13/07/2017 Outside Source


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13/07/2017

Ros Atkins with an innovative take on the latest global stories.


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Hello, I'm Ros Atkins, this is Outside Source.

:00:09.:00:14.

Donald Trump is in Paris but the questions about his son's decision

:00:15.:00:20.

to take a meeting with a Russian lawyer have followed the President

:00:21.:00:24.

across the Atlantic. I do think this, I think from a practical stand

:00:25.:00:27.

point, most people would have taken that meeting.

:00:28.:00:31.

That was during a press conference with Emmanuel Macron. You can see

:00:32.:00:35.

them there. Of course they have major disagreements on climate

:00:36.:00:38.

change and the Paris Agreement. If it happens, that will be

:00:39.:00:44.

wonderful, and if it doesn't, that will be OK too.

:00:45.:00:47.

Nobel Prize Winner and Chinese dissident

:00:48.:00:55.

He took part in the Tiananmen Square protests - but had spent most

:00:56.:00:59.

The UK Government has published a bill that aims to convert all EU

:01:00.:01:04.

It's as complicated as it sounds - we'll try to explain it.

:01:05.:01:08.

And if you've got any questions on that or anything else we're

:01:09.:01:11.

President Trump has begun a two-day trip to France.

:01:12.:01:35.

Here are pictures earlier showing President Trump and his wife being

:01:36.:01:39.

greeted by Emmanuel Macron and his wife. From there they went to the

:01:40.:01:48.

Elysee Palace, that I were getting ready for dinner in the Eiffel

:01:49.:01:51.

Tower. The President was taken with what happened. But before he set

:01:52.:01:56.

off, he wanted to make clear to all of us this is not going distract me

:01:57.:01:59.

from what is going on at home. He said I have very little time for

:02:00.:02:13.

watching TV. He is very keen on watching TV, particularly network

:02:14.:02:18.

new, they have held this press conference and inevitably there were

:02:19.:02:21.

questions about Donald Trump Jr's decision to meet a Russian lawyer,

:02:22.:02:27.

in Trump tower last year. As far as my son season concerned.

:02:28.:02:32.

He with a wonderful young man, he took a meeting with a Russian

:02:33.:02:37.

lawyer, not a government lawyer, but a Russian lawyer. It was a short

:02:38.:02:44.

meeting. It was a meeting that went very very quickly, very fast, two

:02:45.:02:48.

other people were in the room. One of them left almost immediately and

:02:49.:02:51.

the other one was not really focussed on the meeting. I do think

:02:52.:02:56.

this, think from a practical stand point, most people would have taken

:02:57.:03:00.

that meeting. It is call opposition research or

:03:01.:03:04.

even research endo your opponent. To be clear from the e-mails we saw

:03:05.:03:10.

from Donald Trump Jr, the e-mails that press conference faced the

:03:11.:03:14.

setting up of that meeting said that damaging information on Hillary

:03:15.:03:18.

Clinton would be provided via a lawyer, but the information was

:03:19.:03:20.

coming from the Russian Government as part of its support for the Trump

:03:21.:03:23.

campaign. That is worth bearing in mind.

:03:24.:03:31.

David Eades is covering the visit to Paris, I wanted to know if the issue

:03:32.:03:35.

of his son was overshadowing the President's visit. I wouldn't say it

:03:36.:03:40.

is overshadowed it really. It has been a melange of issues to address

:03:41.:03:46.

here, that is clearly one which the White House pack is homing in on and

:03:47.:03:54.

will be taken back and in terms of domestic politics, critically

:03:55.:03:57.

important, but you know, there was discussion about Iraq and Syria,

:03:58.:04:02.

very much a message of cooperation between the likes of France and the

:04:03.:04:06.

US, there was discussion even about China, frankly and what they thought

:04:07.:04:11.

of the Chinese leader, about climate change with Donald Trump throwing up

:04:12.:04:14.

vague suggestion that maybe a deal can yet be done, a compromise could

:04:15.:04:18.

be reached which is going to introduce another element of

:04:19.:04:22.

interest to that issue, where we all thought it subsided somewhat. Then

:04:23.:04:27.

perhaps the pithiest question was about Trump's view of France,

:04:28.:04:31.

because in his election campaign, he was talking about Paris isn't Paris

:04:32.:04:36.

any more because of immigration and terror threats. France can't look

:04:37.:04:39.

after itself, and here, he nailed that issue and said you have to a

:04:40.:04:43.

new man in charge, a new President. A great President, a strong

:04:44.:04:46.

President, and he will make things right, and I will come back again.

:04:47.:04:50.

So, I am sure that is what the French will pick up on. More in a

:04:51.:04:53.

moment. Here is a tweet from Donald Trump.

:04:54.:05:03.

The two seem to be getting on very well.

:05:04.:05:05.

The press conference was very convivial -

:05:06.:05:07.

these two have had major differences.

:05:08.:05:08.

Before the French election, Donald Trump appeared to support

:05:09.:05:11.

She was in the second round run off against Emmanuel Macron. Mr Trump

:05:12.:05:18.

said she is the strongest on boarders.

:05:19.:05:23.

Then of course there was the famous muscular handshake between the two

:05:24.:05:26.

in May when they first met. It seemed to go on and on and on. And

:05:27.:05:31.

Mr Macron said there was no no accident. He had deliberately done

:05:32.:05:36.

this so that he could send a message.

:05:37.:05:41.

He said it was a moment of truth. But on more fundamental matters the

:05:42.:05:45.

men have big differences. Emmanuel Macron has been critical of Donald

:05:46.:05:48.

Trump's decision to pull the US out of the Paris Agreement. The issue

:05:49.:05:52.

came up in the press conference, this was Donald Trump and Emmanuel

:05:53.:05:55.

Macron talking, but Mr Trump's response was curious to say the

:05:56.:06:02.

least. I disagree about the reading we have of the Paris Agreement. We

:06:03.:06:07.

have disagreements about this accord. And about the decision made

:06:08.:06:12.

by President Trump. Something could happen with respect to the Paris

:06:13.:06:15.

accord, we will see what happen, but we will talk about that over the

:06:16.:06:21.

coming period of time. And if it happen, that will be wonderful, and

:06:22.:06:27.

if it doesn't, that will be OK too. What do you make of that? Curious,

:06:28.:06:32.

those are the G20 summits, where there was no getting away from the

:06:33.:06:36.

fact that America was completely separate from all of the other

:06:37.:06:39.

members of the G20, on climate change. They didn't even try to

:06:40.:06:45.

dress it up. They had a paragraph saying this is America's situation.

:06:46.:06:50.

The language we heard there was different. So what does David make

:06:51.:06:57.

of that I have spoken to one or two of the Washington insiders, they

:06:58.:07:00.

said we have heard this before, let us wait and see if anything comes on

:07:01.:07:05.

it. Fascinating stuff, does it actually material hides? That is a

:07:06.:07:12.

big question. A final word on the relationship between these two, they

:07:13.:07:16.

are a curious couple. On one level they disagree on a lot. On another

:07:17.:07:20.

there seems to be a certain chemistry. Very different characters

:07:21.:07:25.

in many ways, as you say very different policy views in others but

:07:26.:07:30.

these are two alpha males here, we used to have Francois Hollande and

:07:31.:07:35.

Barack Obama, you couldn't ask for a more different ambience now, they

:07:36.:07:39.

are obviously up in the Eiffel Tower, tucking into a dinner

:07:40.:07:42.

together, building a relationship, and I think, it may be true to say,

:07:43.:07:47.

Donald Trump recognises that Macron is not there to be pushed around. He

:07:48.:07:51.

is here to stay, he is serious, he is strong and that might work well

:07:52.:07:55.

for both men. It could be terrible, could go the other way, the feeling

:07:56.:07:59.

is they are building rapport for the future.

:08:00.:08:03.

Pulled up the live feed we have coming in from, there it was, it

:08:04.:08:08.

disappeared. I was going to show you the live feed, there we go, it is

:08:09.:08:12.

back, the live feed from Paris you can see the spotlight at the top,

:08:13.:08:17.

that is where Emmanuel Macron and Donald Trump and their wives are

:08:18.:08:21.

having dinner at the moment. In the Jules Verne restaurant. It has been

:08:22.:08:25.

cleared out. Six courses apparently and they will not be short of

:08:26.:08:29.

anything to talk about. I presume they won't be using translator, we

:08:30.:08:34.

know Emmanuel Macron speaks excellent French. Speaks excellent

:08:35.:08:35.

French? He speaks English too! Now one of the main stories

:08:36.:08:46.

in the BBC News room. The Chinese dissident,

:08:47.:08:52.

writer and Nobel Peace prize winner, He was being treated

:08:53.:08:58.

for liver cancer. He spent most of the last

:08:59.:09:04.

seven years in prison. And only very recently had he been

:09:05.:09:06.

transferred to hospital. He was in prison for

:09:07.:09:09.

what the Chinese authorities called "subversion" -

:09:10.:09:11.

what he'd actually done is call We asked Celia Hatton

:09:12.:09:13.

to record her thoughts on the story. The hospital said, he is just too

:09:14.:09:25.

sick to go abroad. We can't allow that, but the real story, or an

:09:26.:09:34.

alter mass story seems to come out from his family member, they managed

:09:35.:09:38.

to get messages out into the outside world, saying look, Liu Ziaobo wants

:09:39.:09:42.

to go overseas, people who were close to him told me he was really

:09:43.:09:48.

concerned is about, he was, he knew he was going to die, he was in the

:09:49.:09:52.

late stages of terminal liver cancer. But what he really wanted

:09:53.:09:57.

was for his wife, the love of his life to be able to go overseas with

:09:58.:10:01.

him, and then to be able to live a life in exile. She had been living

:10:02.:10:06.

under house arrest since he had been awarded the Nobel peace prize in

:10:07.:10:10.

2010 and really his last wish was to ensure her freedom.

:10:11.:10:19.

Liu Ziaobo was important because he was able to write a road map for

:10:20.:10:23.

what he thought should happen to China in the future. Many people

:10:24.:10:27.

over the years have called for freedom in China, have called for

:10:28.:10:31.

democracy, but Liu Ziaobo did it in a way that was unrelenting and

:10:32.:10:38.

prolific, he wrote poem, essays all with the same message, calling for a

:10:39.:10:41.

non-violent change of Government in China. An end to Communist party

:10:42.:10:45.

rule and the birth of democracy, but the document that put him away was

:10:46.:10:53.

called charter 08. It outlined in incredibly explicit Frank terms what

:10:54.:10:58.

China needed to do, to become a fully formed democracy. And it

:10:59.:11:00.

lengthy document. And it doesn't lengthy document. And it doesn't

:11:01.:11:06.

mince words. It was Frank enough to terrify the Chinese authorities.

:11:07.:11:12.

For years, western Governments and human rights organisations have been

:11:13.:11:17.

calling for Liu Ziaobo 's freedom. Calling for his wife's freedom and

:11:18.:11:20.

of course there was outrage when he died. But many people are saying

:11:21.:11:25.

this didn't go far enough. Particularly at the G20 meeting

:11:26.:11:29.

which was just held in Germany a few days ago, no western leader, no

:11:30.:11:35.

world leader directly challenged Chinese President to his face, in

:11:36.:11:40.

public, calling for Liu Ziaobo to be allowed to go overseas. Many people

:11:41.:11:43.

are saying that is a failing, that should be a great shame to western

:11:44.:11:48.

Governments, that they didn't go far enough, they didn't go further.

:11:49.:11:52.

Those same people are a killing on those same Governments and

:11:53.:11:56.

organisations to speak up again and to ensure that Liu Ziaobo 's wife is

:11:57.:12:01.

able to go and live a life in exile. Thank you.

:12:02.:12:03.

The UK Government has published a key part of its Brexit Stategy -

:12:04.:12:07.

It will repeal the law from 1972 which took Britain

:12:08.:12:10.

into what was then called the European Economic Community.

:12:11.:12:13.

And it will transpose EU law into British law -

:12:14.:12:15.

so the same rules apply on the day of Brexit as the day before.

:12:16.:12:18.

But the UK Parliament will then have the power to change them.

:12:19.:12:21.

The Brexit Secretary David Davis has called it "one of the most

:12:22.:12:24.

significant pieces of legislation that has ever passed

:12:25.:12:26.

We will not support the bill at second reading unless the Government

:12:27.:12:58.

makes a fund. Aal change to address the concerns expressed by us and

:12:59.:13:01.

other members of Parliament. I tries to do a lot in 19 clauses, I think

:13:02.:13:06.

it will require careful scrutiny, in terms of the powers which it gives

:13:07.:13:12.

Government and how they are to be exercised, Unamended we won't vote

:13:13.:13:17.

for this, we will amend it. It doesn't provide the provision for

:13:18.:13:24.

devolution of powers. Just those clips give you an idea of the

:13:25.:13:27.

pressures coming to bear from all directions. I have been speaking to

:13:28.:13:40.

Leila Natho. This is a numbers game. They are going to struggle to get

:13:41.:13:43.

this bill through. The Government are saying look, this is a

:13:44.:13:47.

technicality, we have to bring these laws back in to UK laws so we can

:13:48.:13:51.

choose which bits which keep and tinker with and which we throw out

:13:52.:13:55.

entirely. Already, as you heard there, we have heard from opposition

:13:56.:13:59.

parties they do not like the bill in its current form. There are disputes

:14:00.:14:05.

over what it means for the devolved administrations, Labour are

:14:06.:14:08.

focussing very much on human rights legislation and they want there to

:14:09.:14:11.

be much more a role for parliamentary scrutiny. And it only

:14:12.:14:16.

takes a few Kvitova rebels for this bill to be derailed so I think we

:14:17.:14:22.

will see start to see certainly over the coming months before this bill

:14:23.:14:26.

is debated, signs of compromises on the Government's parts because, as

:14:27.:14:29.

you say, they do not have the numbers to get this bill through.

:14:30.:14:34.

Help me understand the opposition Labour Party's position? It supports

:14:35.:14:39.

Brexit happening so how it is justifying being this awkward? You

:14:40.:14:43.

are right. So Labour agreed to help the Government to start the Brexit

:14:44.:14:47.

process triggering Article 50, the official way that Britain began its

:14:48.:14:52.

exit from the EU. But what this provides is the first real chance

:14:53.:14:56.

for Labour and the other opposition parties to tinker with the

:14:57.:15:03.

government's vision for Brexit. So it provides a platform really for

:15:04.:15:06.

Labour to say we are going to get our version of Brexit on to the stat

:15:07.:15:12.

toad books. If you take the Charter of Fundamental Rights, the

:15:13.:15:16.

Government saying it is not going to incorporate that charter into EU

:15:17.:15:20.

law, it will protect rights in other ways, Labour are very clear on that,

:15:21.:15:24.

that that is a red line for them, they want that charrer into UK law,

:15:25.:15:31.

incorporated as it is now. And that is just one example, so what this is

:15:32.:15:36.

coming down to is specific, now, we are into the specific policy areas,

:15:37.:15:41.

and the specific visions of Brexit, and that is where the opposition

:15:42.:15:46.

parties think they can play a role. If you have more questions on

:15:47.:15:49.

Brexit, either send them my way or if you go online there is is a vast

:15:50.:15:52.

amount of information explaining all of the elements of Brexit on the BBC

:15:53.:15:55.

News website available do you now. Stay with us on Outside

:15:56.:15:59.

Source - still to come. Boris Nemtsov two years ago.

:16:00.:16:01.

for killing Russian politician, The questions of who ordered them

:16:02.:16:10.

to do, though, remains unanswered. We will have Sarah Rainsford's

:16:11.:16:15.

report. The Department for Transport says

:16:16.:16:29.

the amount would have been higher, but most of the possible problem

:16:30.:16:36.

were down strike action and high levels of staff sickness. Richards

:16:37.:16:39.

we Court was at Victoria Station and told us how the fine was being seen.

:16:40.:16:44.

Most people would agree it is relatively small, if you bear in

:16:45.:16:48.

mind that southern gets about a billion pounds a year to run the

:16:49.:16:52.

whole contract, it has to pay for the train, that is not profit, it

:16:53.:16:58.

says it doesn't make any profit but the Government put in ?300 million

:16:59.:17:02.

into Network Rail, so they could improve the track, and they have

:17:03.:17:06.

given ?20 million for further improvements on the line to

:17:07.:17:10.

Southern. If you look at scale it cost to improve rail service, then

:17:11.:17:12.

?13 million doesn't seem very much. We are live from the BBC News room.

:17:13.:17:35.

Donald Trump has been welcomed by Emmanuel Macron, on his two day

:17:36.:17:38.

visit to France, and President Trump has been defending his son's

:17:39.:17:41.

decision to meet a Russian lawyer last year. He also made some curious

:17:42.:17:46.

comments about the Paris climate change agreement which are almost

:17:47.:17:50.

impossible to decipher, he said perhaps there was some movement on

:17:51.:17:53.

the issue. Some of the main storieser from BBC

:17:54.:17:56.

World Service. This from Brazil. We've had confirmation from Lula da

:17:57.:18:03.

Silva that the former Brazilian president will appeal

:18:04.:18:06.

against his nine-and-a-half year In the meantime he can run

:18:07.:18:07.

in next year's presidential Six Afghan girls who had been

:18:08.:18:22.

refused visas will now be able to attend. The

:18:23.:18:29.

This dashcam footage from southern China is one of the BBC's

:18:30.:18:33.

It shows the moment a landslide struck a road.

:18:34.:18:36.

Eight vehicles were buried - fortunately no-one lost their life.

:18:37.:18:39.

The slide was caused by a long period of rain.

:18:40.:18:50.

Five men convicted of murdering the Russian opposition figure

:18:51.:18:52.

Boris Nemstov have been given long prison sentences.

:18:53.:18:54.

Mr Nemstov was shot dead outside the Kremlin more than two years ago.

:18:55.:18:58.

And still his family maintain whoever ordered the killing

:18:59.:19:00.

back on The convicted killer of one of President Putin's greatest

:19:01.:19:15.

critic. Five men from Chechnya wait to hear their sentence, this man

:19:16.:19:20.

shot Boris Nemtsov in the back. The court was packed full, with press,

:19:21.:19:24.

police, and relatives. All five men looked passive,

:19:25.:19:30.

indifferent, even amused at times. As the sentence came in the gunman

:19:31.:19:33.

wrote the word lie in the steam in front of him.

:19:34.:19:37.

Good will be your judge this man says.

:19:38.:19:41.

All five claim they are innocent. It took half an hour in the end to

:19:42.:19:46.

read the verdict in this case, in the end the judge confirmed what the

:19:47.:19:51.

jury had said, that all five men on trial for murdering Boris Nemtsov

:19:52.:19:54.

are guilty and are going to face a long time in high security jails.

:19:55.:19:59.

Boris Nemtsov was murdered right next to the Kremlin. His killers

:20:00.:20:03.

trailed him for months before they struck. Their victim was once a

:20:04.:20:08.

popular political high flyer. A regional governor and a former

:20:09.:20:13.

Deputy Prime Minister. UnDecember President Putin he became

:20:14.:20:17.

a sharp voice of dissent. Hours before his murder, Boris

:20:18.:20:22.

Nemtsov was on the radio. Calling people to a protest march.

:20:23.:20:30.

It became a march of mourning. Mourning. President Putin denounced

:20:31.:20:34.

the murder as shameful and ordered it solved but the person who ordered

:20:35.:20:39.

the killing is still at large. We want some answers, on the question,

:20:40.:20:47.

who has been just the killer, who has been the perpetrator, but we

:20:48.:20:52.

have no official answers on the question, where are organisers and

:20:53.:20:57.

sponsors of thises a nation so is the main problem of this case. Boris

:20:58.:21:03.

Nemtsov 's family believes the evidence leads to Chechnya where

:21:04.:21:07.

these men are from and security figures close to the Kremlin. The

:21:08.:21:11.

convicted killers are giving no clues.

:21:12.:21:18.

The Chief Executive of Qatar Airways has said the airline still plans

:21:19.:21:20.

to buy a stake in American Airlines - despite the US carrier ending

:21:21.:21:23.

a code-share agreement between the two companies.

:21:24.:21:25.

Michelle Fleury is covering this for us in New York.

:21:26.:21:32.

Hi Michelle. What is a code sharing agreement? This is, I don't know if

:21:33.:21:40.

you have gone online, you have bought a ticket, say with America,

:21:41.:21:42.

with British Airways, but when it comes to catching the flight it is

:21:43.:21:47.

maybe on another carrier, that is a code sharing agreement, in action,

:21:48.:21:52.

it is allowing customers to buy a broader range of flights but through

:21:53.:21:56.

the airline you are going through. Now this is part of a broader fight

:21:57.:22:03.

or spat if you like, amid between American Airlines and adequate tar

:22:04.:22:09.

airlines, Qatar airlines is trying to buy a 10% stake in American

:22:10.:22:13.

Airlines which the board of American is not too thrilled about but there

:22:14.:22:17.

isn't much they can do about it. At the same tie they are accused Qatar

:22:18.:22:21.

of receiving benefits from their Government, which they say is

:22:22.:22:28.

putting them at a disadvantage and is a asking the White House to look

:22:29.:22:34.

at this. Is any of this political? Is this related to that at all? It

:22:35.:22:39.

isn't related and what is interesting you have the CEO of

:22:40.:22:45.

Qatar Airlines saying that ban it faces in the Monfils is having an

:22:46.:22:49.

impact on profits. This code sharing agreement is not likely to have a

:22:50.:22:56.

huge impact on Qatar airlines profit, but it shows the tensions

:22:57.:23:01.

that exist between the carrier, and its American counterpart, and I

:23:02.:23:06.

think it is one to watch, certainly as I mentioned American Airlines has

:23:07.:23:10.

gone to the US Government to ask for help on this. We will talk about

:23:11.:23:13.

Artificial intelligence has been accused of threatening everything

:23:14.:23:16.

But it's ALSO being called the most important technology to come

:23:17.:23:20.

So Microsoft has outlined a code of ethics for

:23:21.:23:23.

One face near top right. Take picture. What if art intelligence

:23:24.:23:30.

could see your world. Microsoft engineer who is blind is showing me

:23:31.:23:35.

a new app called seeing AI. Designed to help visually impaired people. As

:23:36.:23:39.

well as reading text, it can tell him about the people in front of

:23:40.:23:46.

him. As sometimes he gets it wrong. 50-year-old man looking happy. I am

:23:47.:23:51.

getting younger. This is an application close to my heart, but

:23:52.:23:57.

the general AI we show is applicable in so many different ways.

:23:58.:24:03.

From round the world Microsoft scientists came to London to show

:24:04.:24:08.

off their project. Like this live translation system for

:24:09.:24:11.

presentations. Or software which can search through

:24:12.:24:19.

hours of closed circuit TV as well as a leader in technology, the firm

:24:20.:24:23.

has come up with ethical principles for AI Microsoft believes we are

:24:24.:24:32.

create AI to amplify human ingenuity. I want to endow you with

:24:33.:24:38.

super powers. Microsoft is one of a tech giants battling to profit from

:24:39.:24:44.

advanced in artificial intelligence which give continues skills once

:24:45.:24:47.

restricted to humans, so they are learning to see S driverless cars

:24:48.:24:52.

can see exactly where they go for example. They are learning to hear

:24:53.:25:00.

what we say and to respond to it so Alexa or Sirry can respond when we

:25:01.:25:05.

ask them to give us the new or recommend a restaurant. They are

:25:06.:25:09.

even making judgments, on whether a scan shows a malignant or benign

:25:10.:25:15.

Nuer n this battle over the crucial technology, Google and Facebook are

:25:16.:25:20.

spending vast sums on research. But China refuses to be left behind.

:25:21.:25:24.

Investing heavily to build robots that will take over from humans in

:25:25.:25:31.

its vast factories. It looks like it is going to transform economy and

:25:32.:25:36.

industry, make us all happier and the companies who get there first

:25:37.:25:39.

will take the spoil, they will take the rewards, so you have to come out

:25:40.:25:42.

loud and you have to come out strong.

:25:43.:25:47.

Progress in artificial intelligence has been more rapid than predicted

:25:48.:25:51.

and companies like Microsoft know they can't afford to fall behind.

:25:52.:26:00.

Rory ends this half of Outside Source, see you in a couple of

:26:01.:26:01.

minutes. It is that time of day we look at

:26:02.:26:12.

interesting weather events currently happening round the world. First

:26:13.:26:13.