05/09/2017 Outside Source


05/09/2017

Ros Atkins with an innovative take on the latest global stories.


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Hello, this is Outside Source. The lead story, the Trump administration

:00:14.:00:21.

told it was good to scrap the scheme to protect young undocumented

:00:22.:00:23.

immigrant in the US from deportation. An open-ended

:00:24.:00:29.

circumvention of immigration law that was an unconstitutional

:00:30.:00:33.

exercise of authority by the executive branch. Vladimir Putin is

:00:34.:00:37.

warning the world that a military stand-off with North Korea

:00:38.:00:41.

threatened a global catastrophe. The Australian High Court is hearing a

:00:42.:00:45.

legal challenge to a proposed postal vote on the legalisation of same-sex

:00:46.:00:49.

marriage. A report coming up. As Russia continues to battle the

:00:50.:00:54.

Islamic State group in Syria, we will have the extraordinary story of

:00:55.:00:59.

the mountainous province of Dagestan which has become a key recruiting

:01:00.:01:05.

ground for I!. And in the sport we will have the latest on the World

:01:06.:01:10.

Cup qualifiers. -- recruiting ground for Isis. And we have the story of

:01:11.:01:15.

two kite surfers who are trying to set a world record by travelling

:01:16.:01:17.

1500 kilometres nonstop. President Trump cut straight to it

:01:18.:01:37.

on Twitter this morning, telling Congress to get ready to do its job.

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He wrote Daca, a reference to the deferred action for childhood

:01:46.:01:49.

arrivals which he wants to scrap. It could affect hundreds of thousands

:01:50.:01:54.

of immigrants. It was a system which President Obama introduced which

:01:55.:01:57.

allowed people who were brought to the US illegally as children do have

:01:58.:02:01.

a temporary right to live, study and work legally in the US. President

:02:02.:02:06.

Trump wants it gone and his Attorney General explained why. I am here to

:02:07.:02:17.

announce that the programme known as Daca is being rescinded. Do have a

:02:18.:02:23.

lawful system of immigration that serves the national interest we

:02:24.:02:26.

cannot admit everyone who would like to come here. It is just that

:02:27.:02:31.

simple. That would be an open borders policy and the American

:02:32.:02:36.

people have rightly rejected that. Therefore the nation must set and

:02:37.:02:39.

enforce a limit on how many immigrants we admit each year and

:02:40.:02:45.

that means all cannot be accepted. This does not mean they are bad

:02:46.:02:50.

people ought that our nation this respect or demeaned them in any way

:02:51.:02:54.

also it means we are properly enforcing our laws as Congress has

:02:55.:03:01.

passed them. Let's look at the practicalities. We have been live to

:03:02.:03:04.

New York and Washington but now to Miami. Luiz, does this mean

:03:05.:03:14.

thousands of people in Florida will need to leave? The details are not

:03:15.:03:20.

completely clear right now. There are about 800,000 so-called

:03:21.:03:27.

dreamers, a lot in California and Texas and also in Florida. The

:03:28.:03:30.

government says there will be a six-month period the people

:03:31.:03:37.

currently in the system and they could find a more permanent solution

:03:38.:03:42.

and legislation which is what the Trump administration says is needed

:03:43.:03:46.

if this programme is to continue. They say they will not accept any

:03:47.:03:51.

more Daca applications into the system but this creates a very large

:03:52.:03:57.

degree of uncertainty for the 800,000 people, mostly Mexican

:03:58.:04:04.

Americans. There are 600,000 people of Mexican origin who are part of

:04:05.:04:06.

this programme and they are not sure what will happen in six months if

:04:07.:04:11.

Congress does not act to create a more stable legislative framework.

:04:12.:04:16.

Explain to viewers who have not heard about the scheme, getting a

:04:17.:04:21.

Daca permit can be a transformative moment for these young people?

:04:22.:04:27.

Definitely. There are many stories that have been covered in the media

:04:28.:04:33.

here about how these people in many cases overcame very substantial odds

:04:34.:04:39.

to arrive to university, perhaps the first in their family to do that.

:04:40.:04:43.

Some of them served in the Armed Forces, but they were not part of

:04:44.:04:47.

the legal system in the US and Daca created an expectation of a regular

:04:48.:04:53.

means of staying in the country. It also incorporated them into

:04:54.:05:00.

legality, into the formal labour market in the US soap all kinds of

:05:01.:05:03.

benefits. The other thing that a lot of them say is important for them

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they have lived in many cases many years, spending their entire lives

:05:11.:05:14.

here, and they faced the prospect of deportation to a country they barely

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know having left when they were two or three years old in some cases.

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For many practical purposes they have grown up as Americans and they

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do not see themselves as anything other than that and that is what it

:05:28.:05:32.

has created so much uncertainty and distress in particular in the

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Hispanic community but in many others as well. Thank you very much.

:05:35.:05:43.

BBC News is not just producing stories in English, we are working

:05:44.:05:51.

in well over 25 languages. Switching from Miami to Australia and a postal

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vote on same-sex marriage is planned there but it could be stopped.

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Campaigners have taken the issue to the High Court with the argument

:06:00.:06:05.

that the cost of the vote, $100 million, was not allocated through

:06:06.:06:08.

the correct processes. They want the matter to be dealt with by

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Parliament and not in a national vote. Here is our Sydney

:06:13.:06:14.

correspondent. It's a battle which

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Australia's politicians have Now it is up to the courts to decide

:06:21.:06:21.

if a vote on same-sex Opinion polls suggest most

:06:22.:06:26.

Australians support marriage equality but at the moment only gay

:06:27.:06:28.

couples with a British passport Some fear the eight-week-long

:06:29.:06:31.

national postal vote will stoke We have already seen an intense

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amount of hatred and vitriol come out through that campaigns

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as well as ludicrous accusations like, you know,

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children of gay parents have all these problems in school,

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and that's very problematic for us. The two-day court hearing has

:06:44.:06:52.

drawn intense scrutiny, becoming a test of the government's

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authority is and its determination Given the undoubted powers under

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the Constitution and given the relevant legislation,

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the government is confident we have the constitutional and legal

:07:11.:07:14.

authority to conduct the Australian marital postal survey

:07:15.:07:17.

in the form as proposed. Those challenging the vote say

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the $100 million survey We hope finally our federal

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parliament will stop delaying, stop dragging this out and finally

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deliver on the settled will of the Australian people

:07:32.:07:33.

to allow all Australians to be able to marry the person they love

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in the country that they love. With ballot papers due

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to be sent out in a week, the court's decision is expected

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to be swift. But it is unlikely to bring an end

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to one of the most divisive Now the sport and we begin with the

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World Cup qualifiers and a number of teams are certain to go to Russia

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for the tournament next year but they are all being overshadowed by

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these guys, the Syrian team. They are not quite there but still very

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much in it thanks to quite a match. We can go to be BBC sport Centre.

:08:17.:08:19.

Stories don't get much better than this? This is a terrific story,

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Syria keep the dream alive and they are playing Australia over tee legs

:08:26.:08:29.

with the winners playing someone from North and Central America and

:08:30.:08:33.

that could still be the United States -- over tee legs. The biggest

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story in the last hour is Saudi Arabia going through to the World

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Cup. They are the first Arabic nation at the showpiece event since

:08:44.:08:50.

2006 and they will join Iran, Japan, South Korea, Brazil, Mexico, Belgium

:08:51.:08:55.

and hosts Russia in the 32 team tournament. A second-half winner

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helped them beat Japan 1-0. It takes them to their fifth World Cup and

:09:04.:09:08.

sends Australia to the play-offs. Australia needed a big win over

:09:09.:09:11.

Thailand in order to confirm their place. Tomi Juric put them ahead but

:09:12.:09:21.

with eight minutes to go Thailand equalised. Poor defence but a pretty

:09:22.:09:29.

good goal. Mathew Leckie of Hertha Berlin got the winner for the

:09:30.:09:34.

Socceroos but Saudi Arabia's superior goal difference meant

:09:35.:09:38.

Australia were pushed into third place and they will face Syria in

:09:39.:09:43.

the play-offs. If we had got one a bit earlier, and open them up a bit,

:09:44.:09:52.

but... Like I said, it is heartbreaking for the players. I

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thought they did not get their rewards tonight for a brilliant

:09:56.:10:04.

performance. That was Ange Postecoglou, the Australian coach.

:10:05.:10:09.

Syria drew 2-2 to finish third in the group. They broke through the

:10:10.:10:14.

Iranian defence for the first in the 13th minute with a close range

:10:15.:10:22.

header. And Iran then went ahead 2-1 but Syria pushed for an equaliser

:10:23.:10:26.

and it came three minutes into stoppage time. This secured the

:10:27.:10:34.

fairy tale comeback and a play-off for them. You and everyone else in

:10:35.:10:42.

Australia were rooting for your team and everybody else for the other's?!

:10:43.:10:48.

I don't know! I am being impartial for the BBC! But the 31 qualifiers

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taking place across the globe on Tuesday, there is a full list on the

:10:57.:11:02.

website. A lot is happening across Europe as you can appreciate. We

:11:03.:11:05.

don't have time to go through them all but if your country is playing

:11:06.:11:09.

you can get it on the BBC sport website and the app. One more quick

:11:10.:11:15.

line, online ticket sales for the Winter Olympics next year open in

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South Korea on Tuesday and organisers admit far fewer places

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have been sold up the growing concerns over North Korea's nuclear

:11:24.:11:30.

plans. The games take place in the country arguably with a limited

:11:31.:11:35.

Winter sports tradition, far from the core markets of Europe and North

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America so local attendance is crucial to ensure those grandstands

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are full. Thank you. Good to speak to you as always. One more thing,

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check these guys out, two kite servers are attempting a world

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record, trying to travel further than any team has done in one go.

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They are attempting to travel 1500 kilometres nonstop, which would

:12:03.:12:07.

break their own record. It is expected to take five days and in

:12:08.:12:11.

that time there will not be any land in sight but they will have support.

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The motivation to overcome such a long distance

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a goal that sometimes can look impossible but then with good

:12:20.:12:22.

preparation, a good team and training you can reach it.

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The biggest danger during this challenge

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will be hitting a container during the night or even during the

:12:30.:12:32.

Nowadays, big ships, when there is a storm they can

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easily lose those containers and if we get one,

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either me or the support boat, it will cause severe damage to us.

:12:43.:12:45.

Nervous, for sure, but in a very good way.

:12:46.:12:47.

It's nice to actually have a team partner at this time, were

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you know someone is in the exact same mindset and you just want to

:12:53.:12:55.

If you just trust your strengths, you kind of, how do we

:12:56.:12:59.

say in yoga, breathe over the pain and continue to go.

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Take note of that, everything will be fine! This was a story from last

:13:08.:13:16.

year, a lot of Wales in northern Europe were beaching -- a lot of

:13:17.:13:23.

whales. Scientists think it is to do with how they navigate and the

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Northern lights are also involved. Four serving members of the Army

:13:32.:13:34.

have been arrested under anti-terror laws on suspicion of being a member

:13:35.:13:41.

of a band neo-Nazi group. A fifth person, a civilian, has also been

:13:42.:13:45.

arrested on the same charge. The BBC understands one of the soldiers was

:13:46.:13:49.

detained in Cyprus, the army confirmed the arrests and said it

:13:50.:13:53.

supported the operation. Four the men are being held at a West

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Midlands Police station. Police say there were a 22-year-old from

:13:58.:14:01.

Birmingham, a 32-year-old from Powers, a 24-year-old from Ipswich

:14:02.:14:05.

and a 24-year-old from Northampton. Tom Symons has more.

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The BBC's been told three of the men are members

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of the Royal Anglian Regiment, which recruits in Norfolk, Suffolk,

:14:16.:14:17.

Four were arrested in the UK, one in Cyprus.

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That group is National Action, which described itself last year

:14:21.:14:39.

in the language of Hitler's fascism, as a national socialist

:14:40.:14:41.

The focus was as much on spreading neo-Nazi ideas online.

:14:42.:14:54.

But experts say the far right is not well supported.

:14:55.:15:00.

I think extreme right groups in Britain and others

:15:01.:15:02.

like Britain First are very good these days at creating a sense

:15:03.:15:05.

of greater scale using social media than is actually the case.

:15:06.:15:08.

Probably with National Action, we're looking at people in the tens

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to perhaps the low hundreds at very best.

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But when the Labour MP Jo Cox was murdered by a loner influenced

:15:15.:15:19.

by similar far right propaganda, the Government acted, proscribing

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Despite their name, National Action seeks to divide

:15:22.:15:29.

They are entirely contrary to the interests of our nation.

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Proscribing this neo-Nazi group will prevent its membership growing,

:15:38.:15:39.

prevent them spreading propaganda which allows a culture of hatred

:15:40.:15:41.

Legally, the group should not now exist but police in Birmingham

:15:42.:15:46.

are questioning five suspected members under counterterrorism

:15:47.:15:47.

laws, while searches of properties are carried out.

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This is Outside Source, our lead story is from Washington where the

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Trump and demonstration has announced plans to scrap a scheme

:16:15.:16:18.

which protect young, undocumented immigrant in the US from

:16:19.:16:25.

deportation. Next on the programme, we want to talk about Dagestan. This

:16:26.:16:30.

is a Russian republic in the volatile North Caucasus region. If

:16:31.:16:36.

you ask Vladimir Putin how many Russian citizens fight for Islamic

:16:37.:16:39.

State in Syria, the last time he talked about it he estimated it to

:16:40.:16:43.

be 4000. Many of those come from Dagestan. The BBC's Steve Rosenberg

:16:44.:16:50.

has been there and this was his report.

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They used to believe that this was where the gods

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In Dagestan today, the battle cry is jihad.

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For people have been leaving these mountains for a holy war.

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Artur says his wife was drawn to radical Islam.

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One day, without telling him, she took their two daughters

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and left for Syria to join so-called Islamic State.

:17:13.:17:18.

Desperate to rescue his children, Artur smuggled himself into a Isis

:17:19.:17:22.

To escape from the caliphate, they headed for the Turkish border.

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TRANSLATION: I picked up my little girl and told my

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My youngest started crying and I tripped, I fell three times.

:17:37.:17:44.

The Turkish border guards were just 50 metres away

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We dived into an irrigation ditch and hid there with

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Then we escaped through some long grass and I saw

:17:51.:17:55.

My youngest daughter asked me later, "how come everyone else has

:17:56.:18:11.

But I know the girls are still in touch with their

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It is not only from this house, this village, that people

:18:17.:18:26.

Dagestan has become a key recruiting ground for Islamic State.

:18:27.:18:39.

The authorities here say 1200 Dagestanis have

:18:40.:18:40.

That means that relative to its population, this part

:18:41.:18:44.

of Russia has produced ten times more jihadists than Belgium,

:18:45.:18:47.

which is Europe's top source of fighters for the caliphate.

:18:48.:18:49.

What has been drawing Dagestanis to Syria?

:18:50.:18:54.

Marat says he was brainwashed by radical preachers online also

:18:55.:19:03.

He had abandoned his pregnant wife in Dagestan for jihad in Syria.

:19:04.:19:06.

TRANSLATION: I felt my sole duty was to wage holy

:19:07.:19:12.

It was not a holy war at all, it was just

:19:13.:19:19.

Some claim the authorities have made the situation worse.

:19:20.:19:27.

In this town I am shown the mosque of a fundamentalist branch of Islam.

:19:28.:19:30.

He admits that up to six members of the congregation have left

:19:31.:19:40.

for Syria but closing the mosque, he says, is no solution.

:19:41.:19:46.

When the young people are here with us, he says,

:19:47.:19:48.

But shut the mosque and the young people leave.

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Who knows where they go and what they are doing?

:19:54.:19:59.

Islam is part of the fabric of life in these mountains.

:20:00.:20:04.

But the kind of Islam the authorities want people

:20:05.:20:07.

here to embrace is an Islam that preaches tolerance and

:20:08.:20:09.

So that Dagestanis will not feel the need to go and fight a holy war.

:20:10.:20:17.

If you are a regular viewer you know we have an hour of international

:20:18.:20:32.

news and we have had reports from Dagestan, Portugal, Bangladesh, the

:20:33.:20:36.

US and the UK and next we turn to Brazil because police have been

:20:37.:20:40.

searching the country's Olympic Association headquarters and also it

:20:41.:20:47.

chief and his home, Carlos Nuzman, who headed the successful bid for

:20:48.:20:51.

Rio to host the 2016 Olympics. The police are saying they have strong

:20:52.:20:58.

evidence of vote buying. Earlier I spoke to Camilla Costa in Sao Paulo

:20:59.:20:59.

for the latest. What happens at this point

:21:00.:21:03.

is that the police had been investigating this massive

:21:04.:21:06.

corruption scheme in Now, in collaboration with

:21:07.:21:07.

the French authorities and American authorities, they have reached

:21:08.:21:11.

a new layer that might involve the bidding of Rio to be

:21:12.:21:13.

the Olympic Games host What they have found out,

:21:14.:21:16.

what they say is that one of Rio's top executives had been

:21:17.:21:26.

in a sort of cash for top executives had been in a sort

:21:27.:21:38.

of cash for votes scheme involving And this executive had paid African

:21:39.:21:41.

members of the International Olympic committee for their votes

:21:42.:21:45.

in the bidding for Rio. Presumably those being

:21:46.:21:48.

investigated deny doing Yes, obviously they do deny

:21:49.:21:49.

and actually the president of the Brazilian Olympic Committee

:21:50.:21:55.

has been taken in for questioning and his lawyer denies any kind

:21:56.:21:58.

of allegations and says that Rio's election happened without any kind

:21:59.:22:01.

of corruption scheme and the executive in question,

:22:02.:22:05.

Arthur Suarez, actually has not been They did look for him

:22:06.:22:07.

today but he is considered to be running

:22:08.:22:14.

away from them and they say is probably

:22:15.:22:16.

in the Let's go back to early 2016. 29

:22:17.:22:30.

pilot whales washed up on different beaches in northern Europe. In the

:22:31.:22:35.

UK and France and the Netherlands and also in Germany and scientists

:22:36.:22:39.

were puzzled. They did autopsies but they found they were well fed, young

:22:40.:22:44.

and disease free but they have come up with a theory. They believe this

:22:45.:22:49.

could have been connected to solar storms and how they disrupted the

:22:50.:22:53.

way the animals navigated. Mat McBriar explains more. -- Matt

:22:54.:22:56.

McGrath. Crowds gathered at Hunstanton,

:22:57.:22:58.

on the coast of Norfolk, in February 2016, to see this ocean

:22:59.:23:01.

giant washed up on a All around the North Sea,

:23:02.:23:04.

more than two dozen other sperm whales were found stranded

:23:05.:23:07.

in the first two Scientists were extremely puzzled -

:23:08.:23:09.

the creatures were young, Now it's thought the Northern

:23:10.:23:15.

Lights may have played The Aurora are the visible evidence

:23:16.:23:18.

of large solar storms, which distort This can cause species

:23:19.:23:24.

that rely on that field for navigation, like sperm whales,

:23:25.:23:29.

to lose their way. After big solar storms in December

:23:30.:23:34.

2015, scientists say the confused creatures swam into the shallow

:23:35.:23:37.

North Sea and beached themselves, Researchers at London Zoo autopsied

:23:38.:23:39.

a number of the whales We know that sperm whales

:23:40.:23:44.

are stranded around the North Sea for many, many years historically

:23:45.:23:52.

and it's certainly a possible factor in this instance that we have these

:23:53.:23:55.

whales that got into the North Sea for an unknown reason and then

:23:56.:23:58.

once they are in there, they cannot find their way out

:23:59.:24:01.

and they become so disorientated, So that's what happened

:24:02.:24:04.

in last year's events. Why did they end up

:24:05.:24:06.

there in the first place? To be honest, I think

:24:07.:24:09.

we will never know. There is too much uncertainty

:24:10.:24:11.

around the events in this instance in terms

:24:12.:24:13.

of where they were, where they came from,

:24:14.:24:15.

and so on. And so I think we will really

:24:16.:24:17.

never know what really Proving the impact of geomagnetic

:24:18.:24:19.

storms on the strandings of sperm whales may well be impossible,

:24:20.:24:23.

however researchers here at London Zoo and a team at Nasa

:24:24.:24:25.

are actively investigating the impact of solar

:24:26.:24:28.

activities on the strandings The results in that study are due

:24:29.:24:29.

in the next month or so. That might shed some

:24:30.:24:36.

definitive light on the role Tomorrow I am travelling to Germany

:24:37.:24:54.

and on Thursday I will be live with you from Cologne as we bring you the

:24:55.:24:56.

latest on the German election campaign. I will see you then and we

:24:57.:25:02.

will be back with Outside Source tomorrow. Good night.

:25:03.:25:12.

Hello. The weather headlines for the next few days are likely to be

:25:13.:25:16.

dominated by

:25:17.:25:18.