13/02/2018 Outside Source


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13/02/2018

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Hello.

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This is Outside Source.

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America's top intelligence agencies

have been laying out

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the threats to the US -

we'll look at the list

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and focus on the top

threat they've all named -

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Russia.

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There should be no doubt

that Russia perceived

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that its past efforts

as

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successful, and views the 2018

mid-term elections as a potential

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target for Russian

influence operations.

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Jacob Zuma's own party, the ANC,

tells the South African president

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to step down urgently.

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We're expecting to hear from him

early tomorrow morning.

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A Malaysian newspaper

publishes their checklist

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on how to spot gay people.

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Activists are angry and say lives

are being put at risk.

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If you want to get in touch with us,

the hashtag is #BBCOS.

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The top six officials in America's

intelligence services have been

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sitting before Senators -

delivering a sobering

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assessment of the threats

they say the US faces.

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Here's the list:

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North Korea's nuclear programme

poses what the US Director

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of National Intelligence calls

an "existential threat"

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to the United States.

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They said China is trying to access

sensitive US technologies

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and intellectual property.

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But it was Russia that

they all agreed on -

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they were unanimous in saying that

Russian attempts to meddle in US

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politics were continuing.

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Here's Dan Coats on that threat.

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Frankly, the United States is under

attack, under attack by entities

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that are using cyber to penetrate

virtually

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that are using cyber to penetrate

virtually every major action that

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takes place in the United States,

persistent and disruptive cyber

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operations will continue against the

United States and our European

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allies, using elections as

opportunities to undermine

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democracy, sowed discord, and

undermine our values.

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My colleague Katty Kay was following

this briefing in Washington -

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here's how she viewed this briefing.

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So there you had it, three hours

long, repeated questions about

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Russia, and at one point all of

these six directors, these six white

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guys, sitting up there,

they were asked, do you think this

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is an ongoing problem?

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And each one said, yes,

this is an ongoing problem.

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They were also asked

about the President's attitude

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to this, and why doesn't

the President come out and say

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this is an ongoing problem?

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I've just interviewed

Leon Panetta, who was

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director of the CIA

under President Obama.

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He said that President Trump should

listen to those intelligence

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chiefs, that this is a real threat

to American democracy, and that's

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chiefs, that this is a real threat

to American democracy, and that

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not enough is being

done to address it.

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Katty, let's just listen

in to a bit of that interview

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you did with the former CIA

director, Leon Panetta, saying how

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the president does need to listen.

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The president of the United States

needs to listen to his

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intelligence chiefs.

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They are the ones who testified

today, and they made very

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clear that the Russians

are going to attack our election

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institutions in this country.

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That is a serious issue

that the president of

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the United States needs to address.

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Katty, how worried are they about

the forthcoming mid-term elections?

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Yeah, well, there are already

reports that the Russians are

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already meddling.

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I've spoken to a couple

of politicians, actually both

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from the Republican

and the Democratic side,

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who are telling people

who are

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running for office, listen, just

because you think you are in a small

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state-wide election, nobody has ever

heard of your district,

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don't think that makes

you are immune from

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Russian meddling or interference.

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It's extraordinary to think that it

could go down to that really local

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level, but everybody seems to be

convinced that the Russians are

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continuing to get involved

in American democratic processes,

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perhaps even in the machinery that

does the election processes and the

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voting, and the intelligence

agencies so far aren't managing to

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do enough and that the social media

companies are not so far regulated

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in a way that can prevent this.

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Katty, we heard that list

of threats from these six.

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I mean, hasn't the US always faced

multiple threats, or

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are we really into

different times now?

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Of course, this kind

of briefing happens under all

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administrations.

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This is their chance to see these

are the things we are facing. One

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thing that struck me about this

hearing, it lasted for three hours,

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and nearly the entire focus was on

North Korea, Russia, as you heard,

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and there was quite a lot of talk

about China. There was very little

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talk actually about so-called

Islamic State and the threat of

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global terrorism. In the United

States at least that is being

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perceived as of a lesser threat now

and we know that because the

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department of defence put out their

new policies and that is to focus on

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the emerging threats of Russia and

China and less so on Islamic

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terrorism.

Thank you, Katty Kay.

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Israeli police are recommending

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's

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indictment for bribery,

fraud and breach of public trust

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following long-running

investigations into two cases

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of alleged corruption.

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James Reynolds took us

through the charges.

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They related to two separate

cases that the police

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have been investigating.

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The first, the police have been

checking whether or not Mr Netanyahu

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received lavish gifts in exchange

for offering wealthy

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friends special treatment.

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And the second involves allegations

that Mr Netanyahu tried to do a deal

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with the publisher of a major

Israeli newspaper for favourable

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coverage, and in exchange

would curtail the circulation

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of a rival paper.

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Those are the two separate cases.

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There appear to be similar

recommendations from the police.

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They say that Mr Netanyahu,

they recommend he faces

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charges in both cases.

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Fraud, breach of trust, bribery,

and the most important

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thing to say is this.

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The most important

step is yet to come.

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The files now get handed

to Israel's Attorney General,

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and it is up to the Attorney General

to decide whether or not to indict

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or whether or not to do nothing,

and that decision is expected

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to take at least several months.

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James, how long has

Benjamin Netanyahu's legal

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wars been going on for?

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Several years in this case.

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The police have interviewed more

than 100 witnesses and the have even

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interviewed witnesses from abroad

as well to build up a picture

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of his activities in the last

couple of years as relates

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these particular cases.

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He has known that this

investigation has been going on.

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Israelis have known as well,

and sore throated you see a running

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commentary by Mr Netanyahu

essentially saying what he has said

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tonight, that the charges,

the recommended charges,

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the accusations against him,

are baseless, and he will continue

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to lead the country.

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The recommendation of charges

against a weakened Prime Minister,

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a weak Prime Minister,

would be a bit of a death blow,

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but Mr Netanyahu still

dominates Israeli politics.

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James Reynolds.

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Well, the world's been watching

South Africa very closely lately,

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but Jacob Zuma is still president -

even though he's officially been

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asked to resign for the sake

of the country.

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Earlier, in Pretoria -

the governing party,

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the ANC announced that its executive

had told Zuma to go

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as soon as possible.

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The party is clear

about what it wants -

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this was said in

the news conference.

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The collective of the ANC believe

that indeed President Cyril

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Ramaphosa must take over the

presidency. You can't then have

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another president who is still

president of the ANC.

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Jacob Zuma is expected to respond

to that by Wednesday -

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and we're hearing he'll hold a news

conference at 8 GMT tomorrow -

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that's 10am local South African

time, but remember -

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he's under no legal

obligation to step down

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as President - yet, and so far,

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says he'll resign in 3 to 6 months -

which isn't what his party wants.

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This is the man waiting

in the wings, ready to take

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the job of president -

the party's leader, Cyril Ramaphosa.

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Our Africa editor Fergal Keane

is following the developments

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from Johannesburg.

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Well, we're going to

know tomorrow morning.

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It's been disclosed here that he

will meet the top six leaders

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of the African National Congress,

including the man who would be his

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political nemesis, Cyril Ramaphosa,

the organisation's president,

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and at that point he

will give his response.

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What we do know up until now

is he is saying he will not resign.

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If the ANC wants to force him

from office they are

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going to have to do that.

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He can fight if he wishes,

but this is only going one way.

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The question is, does

his clinging on split

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the African National Congress?

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After car's oldest liberation

movements

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After car's oldest liberation

movements. He still has a

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substantial degree of support in the

party. The question is over the last

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month since Cyril Ramaphosa have

taken over enough people have seen

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the way the wind is blowing and will

now why not behind Cyril Ramaphosa,

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and critically if it gets to a

motion of no-confidence in the

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parliament, will they decide they

can vote along with opposition MPs

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to remove Jacob Zuma office?

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to remove Jacob Zuma from office?

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The foreign minister

of the Netherlands, Halbe Zijlstra

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has resigned after admitting

to lying about meeting

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Russian President Vladimir Putin

at his dacha in 2006.

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He claimed that he overheard

the Russian president talking

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about expansionist ambitions

whereby Putin defined

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"Greater Russia" as "Russia,

Belarus, Ukraine and the Baltic

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states", which are Estonia,

Lithuania and Latvia.

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But doubts emerged about the story

and he later admitted to lying

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about meeting Putin,

in order to protect his source.

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He said, "The manner in

which I wanted to protect my source

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and underscore my message

about Russia was not sensible,

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that is crystal clear."

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And today, in an emotional speech

to Parliament, he resigned.

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TRANSLATION:

So as not to burden the

position of the Minister of foreign

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affairs I see no other option now

than to offer my resignation today

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to His Majesty, the King.

I do this with regret in my heart.

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But in the full conviction that the

Netherlands deserves a minister of

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foreign affairs who is above any

form of doubt.

Hugging the Dutch

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Prime Minister there.

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Anna Holligan has more

on the reaction to these events.

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An extraordinary story indeed. On

Monday we heard from the Dutch

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Foreign Minister, admitting he had

lied about this meeting with

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President Putin back in 2006, in

which he had claimed the Russian

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president had outlined his plans for

a greater Russia, which were said to

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include the Baltic states, Ukraine,

bezel -- Belarus and Kazakhstan.

0:11:330:11:42

Today Halbe Zijlstra apologised and

he said the Netherlands describes a

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Foreign Minister who was beyond

reproach, and it had been the

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biggest mistake of his political

career. Initially the Dutch Prime

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Minister Mark Rutte had stuck by his

man, saying that although he

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shouldn't have claimed to have been

somewhere he was the crux of his

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comments were true. And then a

former Shell executive e-mailed a

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Dutch newspaper to say he had been

at the meeting, which Halbe Zijlstra

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had not attended, and that actually

these comments were made in an

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historical context. Halbe Zijlstra

was supposed to be travelling to

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Moscow this week to meet his Russian

counterpart, Sergey Lavrov, to

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discuss amongst other things the

downing of flight MH17 which left

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298 people dead, but his position

despite his attempts to hang on by

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the political skin of his teeth

clearly has become untenable and

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that is why we have now see them

stand down as the Netherlands

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Foreign Minister.

Thank you.

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Stay with us on Outside Source -

still to come...

0:12:560:13:00

Waging a war on waste -

we'll take a look at how companies

0:13:000:13:03

are helping clean up the oceans

by cutting down on plastics.

0:13:030:13:07

In Liverpool today the former

football coach Barry Bennell was

0:13:070:13:10

found guilty of sex offences against

young boys in the 1980s. The

0:13:100:13:15

64-year-old denied 40 charges of

abusing boys in his care while

0:13:150:13:19

coaching at major football clubs.

Ben Ando was in court.

This

0:13:190:13:28

afternoon the jury started returning

verdicts. Of the 48 counts they were

0:13:280:13:31

asked to consider they found him

guilty of 36 charges, involving ten

0:13:310:13:35

different victims, boys aged 8-14 at

the time of the abuse that took

0:13:350:13:42

place in the 1980s.

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There are legal restrictions on what

we can report today.

0:14:110:14:23

You're watching Outside Source. The

0:14:250:14:32

s... -- the headlines.

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America's intelligence agencies have

said that Russia has never stopped

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trying to meddle in US politics,

and is a threat to November's

0:14:400:14:43

mid-term elections.

0:14:430:14:44

A 17-year-old Palestinian girl

who was charged with assault

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after a video went viral

showing her hitting two Israeli

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soldiers has gone on trial

in a military court.

0:14:480:14:50

Ahed Tamimi arrived for her hearing

with her hands and feet shackled.

0:14:500:14:53

Proceedings got under way

behind closed doors,

0:14:530:14:55

as she is being tried as a minor.

0:14:550:14:57

Yesterday we told you about cyclone

Gita heading for Tonga.

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Well, now rescue teams

in the Pacific island

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state are assessing

the extent of the damage after it

0:15:010:15:04

hit the capital, Nuku'alofa.

0:15:040:15:05

Many buildings were destroyed,

including a Catholic church

0:15:050:15:06

and the main parliament building.

0:15:070:15:08

Thousands of Tongans

are in evacuation centres.

0:15:080:15:10

And a lot of people have been

reading about a man smuggling

0:15:100:15:13

cocaine in fake buttocks.

0:15:130:15:15

He was detained in Lisbon's

International Airport after landing

0:15:150:15:17

with on a flight from Brazil.

0:15:170:15:20

He is accused of carrying 1 kilo

of drugs - enough to make 5,000

0:15:200:15:23

individual doses of cocaine.

0:15:230:15:32

Yesterday we told you about

the a refugee crisis in Uganda.

0:15:320:15:34

It's caused by ethnic clashes

in the Democratic Republic of Congo

0:15:340:15:37

that have forced thousands

to flee the country.

0:15:370:15:46

People have been crossing

Lake Albert which sits

0:15:460:15:48

here on the border with Uganda

after attacks intensified

0:15:480:15:57

here in Ituri over the past week.

0:15:570:15:59

There are fears of a return

to massacres witnessed in the area

0:15:590:16:02

almost 20 years ago,

when tens of thousands were killed

0:16:020:16:04

in ethnic clashes in DR Congo.

0:16:040:16:06

Anne Soy is at Lake Albert.

0:16:060:16:07

The scale of the emergency is clear.

There are more than 16,000 people

0:16:070:16:11

who have been waiting here for

registration. Some have been

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standing the whole day. It is a slow

process. The humanitarian

0:16:140:16:19

organisations say they were not

prepared to handle the kind of

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numbers coming, and more people are

still crossing over from the

0:16:220:16:26

Democratic Republic of Congo, some

using canoes and boats across Lake

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Albert to the Ugandan side. The

eastern side, where they come from

0:16:320:16:40

particularly, is deeply troubled and

has been for many years, with

0:16:400:16:43

different conflicts happening across

the region. The region is mineral

0:16:430:16:48

rich and therefore is important not

only for the Democratic Republic of

0:16:480:16:51

Congo, but also this region, the

Eastern African region, and the

0:16:510:16:59

interests there, so it is a complex

situation and these people have

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found themselves in the midst of

something they say they don't

0:17:020:17:07

understand. We ask why they are

here, and they say they have been

0:17:070:17:11

attacked but they do not know why

and they do not understand what the

0:17:110:17:15

trigger of those attacks was.

Anne

Soy reporting from Uganda.

0:17:150:17:20

The United States is set to become

the world's leading oil producer

0:17:200:17:23

at some point next year.

0:17:230:17:26

That's according to

the International Energy Agency

0:17:260:17:27

which says the fracking boom

could lead to the world's

0:17:270:17:30

biggest economy overtaking

Saudi Arabia and Russia.

0:17:300:17:32

Joe Miller joins us

now from New York.

0:17:320:17:39

Hello, Joe. What is fuelling

America's rise as an energy giant?

0:17:390:17:44

Put simply, it is economics. Just a

few years ago when oil prices

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started to slump because global

demand weakened, it looked like the

0:17:500:17:55

American fracking industry, based

mainly in Texas and New Mexico, it

0:17:550:17:58

looked to be on its last legs

because it could no longer be

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profitable. What has happened since

is they have just got more

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efficient, a lot of cost-cutting

measures and a lot of fracking sites

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have come back online, and this has

led to a huge increase in supply, so

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quite good news I suppose for

America, and we saw a shipment of

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oil from the US to the UAE, the

Middle East, topsy-turvy energy

0:18:180:18:24

market these days, but what is not

so good is the supply is higher than

0:18:240:18:28

the demands of their is still quite

a lot of pressure on energy prices,

0:18:280:18:32

oil prices.

I wonder if Donald

Trump's attitude to fossil fuels

0:18:320:18:36

which we have heard so much about

over recent months is having an

0:18:360:18:39

impact on this?

Well, he certainly

hasn't hindered it. He has relaxed

0:18:390:18:44

some of the regulations are planned

to relax some of the regulations

0:18:440:18:47

around fracking but what happened

here is really an economic story,

0:18:470:18:56

about cost-cutting, and it was

happening before Donald Trump came

0:18:560:18:58

into office and it has continued

after he has done so. I doubt that

0:18:580:19:00

will perhaps stop him and other

members of his administration is

0:19:000:19:03

taking credit, that remains to be

seen, but really what is happening

0:19:030:19:06

here is a story in Texas and New

Mexico with new hydraulic techniques

0:19:060:19:10

for fracking that brings down the

cost a lot. -- brings the cost down

0:19:100:19:15

dramatically.

What impact could this

have on the cost of oil around the

0:19:150:19:19

globe?

It is not good for the cost

around the globe because, put

0:19:190:19:23

simply, the more oil there is, the

more downward pressure on the price,

0:19:230:19:28

and it also means that the oil

cartel Opec and basically most of

0:19:280:19:33

the oil producing countries outside

of the USA, they have been trying to

0:19:330:19:37

boost the price by pushing down

supply, restricting supply, and

0:19:370:19:41

because there is all of this shale

oil out of the US, their efforts are

0:19:410:19:45

essentially not working, so it

really means the mechanisms to

0:19:450:19:49

control prices other countries have,

they are failing, and the US really

0:19:490:19:53

is in the driving seat now, so it

could have quite an effect, quite a

0:19:530:19:57

pressurising effect on oil prices.

It remains to be seen of course and

0:19:570:20:06

it is all down to how quickly the

world economy grows.

Joe, thank you

0:20:060:20:09

very much, from New York.

0:20:090:20:10

Plastic is one of the world's

favourite packaging materials.

0:20:100:20:12

It's cheap and efficient

for transporting goods.

0:20:120:20:14

But only a fraction

of it is recycled.

0:20:140:20:15

Vivienne Nunis reports

now on the demand for

0:20:150:20:17

greener alternatives.

0:20:170:20:25

At least 8 million tonnes of plastic

ends up in the ocean each year. One

0:20:250:20:29

of the biggest culprits is the

consumer goods industry. The plastic

0:20:290:20:34

packaging is often used just once

before being thrown away.

A tenth of

0:20:340:20:39

the plastics in the world is

actually recycled so that leaves 90%

0:20:390:20:44

either buried, burned or lost into

the environment.

Now, and number of

0:20:440:20:49

companies are trying to stem the

tide.

0:20:490:20:56

British firm Recycling Technologies

thinks this machine can be a game

0:20:560:21:00

changer. It takes difficult items

like food wrappers, toothpaste

0:21:000:21:04

tubes, coffee cups and bin liners,

at very high temperatures, and

0:21:040:21:08

breaks down the plastic to its raw

material. And at the end of the

0:21:080:21:12

process you get something like this,

and oil that can be sold back to

0:21:120:21:17

petrochemical companies to be made

back into plastic once again. Many

0:21:170:21:22

plastics and currently only be

recycled ones. This company, which

0:21:220:21:27

makes household cleaning products,

once its bottles to be recycled

0:21:270:21:30

again and again.

The more

sustainable system we can have on

0:21:300:21:35

plastic usage, so everyone use

transparent bottles, because then

0:21:350:21:38

all bottles could be recycled back

and any bottle could be used to be

0:21:380:21:42

recycled into any other bottle.

As

more companies look for ways to

0:21:420:21:46

tackle the problem of plastic waste,

costs will come down. Vivienne

0:21:460:21:53

Nunis, BBC News.

0:21:530:21:56

A Malaysian newspaper has a check

list on how to spot gay people.

0:21:560:21:59

Remember, homosexuality

is illegal in Malaysia.

0:21:590:22:00

The article's in Malay

in the Sinar Harian daily newspaper,

0:22:000:22:07

but we've translated a bit of it.

0:22:080:22:09

It says gay men like to wear tight

clothes to show off their six packs,

0:22:090:22:13

have adoptive brothers and adore

beards, moustaches

0:22:130:22:14

and branded clothes.

0:22:150:22:18

It goes on to say lesbians hate men

and enjoy belittilng them,

0:22:180:22:20

love to spend time alone,

and enjoy hugging and holding hands.

0:22:200:22:24

It's prompted a backlash

from LGBT groups.

0:22:240:22:29

Arwind Kumar is an activist and one

of Malaysia's biggest

0:22:290:22:31

social media stars -

he posted this video on YouTube.

0:22:310:22:40

There are much more important issues

in this country to be addressed in

0:22:400:22:43

this is not one of them. Explain to

them up or molester, a kidnapper, a

0:22:430:22:48

murderer, those people who are in of

another. How the hell does a gay

0:22:480:22:52

person endanger your life? If you

really want to help this society...

0:22:520:22:58

Probably with this article that

could have saved many lives, but

0:22:580:23:02

this article will only take away

lives, and if that is what you are

0:23:020:23:05

happy doing because you want less

gay people in this country, good job

0:23:050:23:08

for you!

0:23:080:23:10

I spoke with Boris Dittrich,

Director of the LGBT programme

0:23:100:23:12

with the Human Rights Watch,

Berlin - here's his

0:23:120:23:15

reaction to the article.

0:23:150:23:16

The words that come to mind are

stupidity, ignorance, prejudice, and

0:23:160:23:24

possibly dangerous. Because as you

said in the introduction Malaysia is

0:23:240:23:27

a country where homosexual conduct

is criminalised and were for

0:23:270:23:33

instance cross-dressing is illegal,

many transgender where men are

0:23:330:23:40

arrested, for instance, and there is

public hostility towards LGBT

0:23:400:23:45

people, so when a newspaper runs a

story like this, so stupid, it could

0:23:450:23:49

also maybe incite people to become

aggressive and, you know, try to

0:23:490:23:56

target LGBT people.

As well as

offensive, this article is

0:23:560:24:01

potentially dangerous?

Yes, because there is so much

0:24:010:24:06

ignorance in Malaysia about what it

means to be homosexual, and that is

0:24:060:24:12

because, for instance, the media,

and the mainstream newspapers, they

0:24:120:24:16

are government controlled. They

never write anything balanced about

0:24:160:24:23

homosexuality. They don't provide

honest information. Usually when

0:24:230:24:27

there is something about LGBT

people, it is quite scandalous, and

0:24:270:24:31

so the general public doesn't know a

lot of facts about LGBT people and

0:24:310:24:37

so when such an article is being

published many people might believe

0:24:370:24:43

it, so what I think, and what Human

Rights Watch thinks is imported,

0:24:430:24:52

sexual education should be taught in

schools so young people will learn

0:24:520:24:56

about sexuality, including

homosexuality.

One brief final

0:24:560:25:00

question. Do you think this article

and the furore that has accompanied

0:25:000:25:04

it, at least outside of Malaysia,

has done anything to open up the

0:25:040:25:08

question about homosexuality in

Malaysia?

Well, because the media

0:25:080:25:13

are government controlled there will

be some smaller news outlets, yes,

0:25:130:25:17

that will pay attention to this, but

I'm afraid that the general public

0:25:170:25:21

that reads the Sinar Harian in the

Malay language will not be included

0:25:210:25:28

in this public discussion, but

that's why Human Rights Watch

0:25:280:25:34

publishes reports about

discrimination of LGBT people, and

0:25:340:25:37

hopefully those reports will lead to

a public discussion.

That was Boris

0:25:370:25:46

Dittrich of Human Rights Watch. Lets

tell you what is coming up.

0:25:460:25:54

The top spy chiefs all lined up

talking to the Senate committee, and

0:25:540:25:57

we will be talking about the threat

that they see as opposed to the

0:25:570:26:01

United States by North Korea. Stay

with us. We will be back in a few

0:26:010:26:05

minutes.

0:26:050:26:08

with us. We will be back in a few

minutes. Hello. A relatively quiet

0:26:080:26:13

weather story at the moment, but

that said there are two storms to

0:26:130:26:16

point out. One is moving away from

the southern Philippines, and this

0:26:160:26:21

is starting to weaken as it moves

across cool waters. Further south

0:26:210:26:26

and east, this was tropical cyclone

Gita, quite a significant storm

0:26:260:26:36

particularly for the island of

Tonga, the biggest they had seen in

0:26:360:26:40

70 years. Power lines down, it

completely demolish the parliament

0:26:400:26:44

building with significant disruption

across the capital of the island. We

0:26:440:26:49

saw sustained winds of 160 mph

gusts, well in excess of that, then

0:26:490:26:54

it moved across the islands of Fiji,

but it continues to track in a

0:26:540:26:59

westerly direction and continues to

weaken all the time so we are not

0:26:590:27:02

concerned about that. It looks like

it will continue to decay. Across to

0:27:020:27:06

Australia we will need to keep a

close eye on the Northern

0:27:060:27:09

Territories, cluster of showers may

develop into a storm. We are seeing

0:27:090:27:21

her frontal system moving away from

Tasmania towards New Zealand.

0:27:210:27:23

Elsewhere, heat building but a

relatively quiet story. We can see

0:27:230:27:25

this in the five day forecast.

Herath will see some beautiful

0:27:250:27:27

weather with temperatures perhaps

into the low 30s. Moving away from

0:27:270:27:31

Australia, we have been looking

quite a lot at parts of Korea, all

0:27:310:27:35

due to the winter Olympics, and the

winds have been a feature, but I

0:27:350:27:38

suspect over the next days the winds

will start to ease slightly and it

0:27:380:27:41

will stay dry. Dry weather across

much of China. It looks like this

0:27:410:27:46

continues to track and a westerly

direction and may well interact with

0:27:460:27:50

Vietnam over the next few days, but

by then not a storm, just bringing

0:27:500:27:55

some enhanced rainfall. A good deal

of dry weather in the five-day city

0:27:550:27:59

forecasts. It looks like Bangkok

will see some beautiful blue sky and

0:27:590:28:02

sunshine through the middle part of

the week. North America stays quite

0:28:020:28:05

quiet as well, a southerly breeze

starting to introduce something a

0:28:050:28:10

little less cold and some sharp

showers moving out of Texas towards

0:28:100:28:20

Tennessee. A weather front end from

the Pacific north-west, snow on the

0:28:200:28:22

leading edge of a few scattered

showers perhaps likely in the

0:28:220:28:25

southern half of California. That

front in British Columbia may well

0:28:250:28:27

bring greater Seattle in the next

few days, and elsewhere it is quite

0:28:270:28:29

a quite unsettled story to come. But

certainly not across Europe at the

0:28:290:28:35

moment. One storm moving through the

Black Sea and another bringing heavy

0:28:350:28:38

rain, strong winds and some rain

across central and southern Italy.

0:28:380:28:44

Strong to gale force gusts of wind

and snow with the leading edge of

0:28:440:28:48

Scotland moving through France and

over into the Pyrenees. Here it will

0:28:480:28:52

stay pretty unsettled but it is a

south-westerly wind so it is

0:28:520:28:55

introducing something a little less

cold. Take care.

0:28:550:29:03

Hello, I'm Karin Giannone,

this is Outside Source,

0:30:090:30:11

and these are the main stories

here in the BBC Newsroom.

0:30:110:30:17

America's top intelligence agencies

have been laying out

0:30:170:30:19

the threats to the US.

0:30:190:30:20

We'll look at the list

and focus on the top

0:30:200:30:23

threat they've all named,

Russia.

0:30:230:30:28

There should be no doubt Russia

perceives that its past efforts were

0:30:280:30:35

successful and will use the 2008 in

US mid-term elections as a potential

0:30:350:30:39

target for Russian influence

operations.

0:30:390:30:42

Jacob Zuma's own party, the ANC,

0:30:420:30:43

tells the South African president

to step down urgently.

0:30:430:30:46

We're expecting to hear from him

early tomorrow morning.

0:30:460:30:48

Every day, Outside Source features

BBC journalists working

0:30:480:30:51

in over 30 languages.

0:30:510:30:52

Your questions are always welcome.

0:30:520:30:57

#BBCOS is the hashtag.

0:30:570:31:00

We started this hour covering

the heads of the US intelligence

0:31:120:31:14

services and their concerns

about Russian meddling.

0:31:140:31:17

Now I want to turn to

what they said about North Korea.

0:31:170:31:21

The CIA Director Mike Pompeo says

North Korea poses a nuclear threat

0:31:210:31:25

to the United States.

0:31:250:31:25

Here's what he had to say.

0:31:250:31:32

Our analysts remain concerned

that Kim Jong-Un is not

0:31:320:31:34

hearing the full story,

that is, that those around him

0:31:340:31:37

aren't providing nuance,

aren't suggesting to him the tenuous

0:31:370:31:40

nature of his position, both

internationally and domestically.

0:31:400:31:47

I can bring in Barbara Plett Usher,

our State Department correspondent.

0:31:470:31:49

Barbara, we've been focusing a lot

lately on the thawing relations

0:31:490:31:52

between North and South Korea

on the sidelines of

0:31:520:31:54

the Winter Olympics.

0:31:540:31:58

At these intelligence chiefs still

see North Korea as a very real

0:31:580:32:01

threat? -- but these.

Yes, they do,

for several reasons, first, North

0:32:010:32:08

Korea's determination to be able to

carry out a nuclear attack on the US

0:32:080:32:11

and the other is its ability to do

so and those increasingly

0:32:110:32:15

sophisticated missile tests we saw

last year showed it was getting

0:32:150:32:18

closer and closer to that

capability, to be measured in

0:32:180:32:23

months, not years, probably. Also,

the intelligence agencies assessed

0:32:230:32:26

that Kim Jong-un is not about to

negotiate away his nuclear weapons

0:32:260:32:30

which is what the US is demanding

because he sees it as crucial to the

0:32:300:32:42

survival of the regime. You have

defrosting on the Korean peninsula,

0:32:420:32:44

diplomacy between North and South

Korea and in the face of the success

0:32:440:32:47

of that so far, the US has endorsed

a deeper in gauge went after the

0:32:470:32:50

Olympics with the possibility of

talks with the US perhaps come that

0:32:500:32:52

is what we had Rex Tillerson and

Mike Pence talking about. But I

0:32:520:32:55

think the intelligence agencies are

focusing much more on the chance of

0:32:550:32:59

another missile test rather than the

chance of a diplomatic breakthrough.

0:32:590:33:03

On the role of the US in this, where

does the thaw, however temporary or

0:33:030:33:08

permanent, between North and South

Korea, leave the US?

It is

0:33:080:33:14

interesting, isn't it? The US

position has been one of maximum

0:33:140:33:17

pressure which means to sanction

North Korea and isolate it, to try

0:33:170:33:21

to get it to the negotiating table,

ready to talk about

0:33:210:33:25

denuclearisation, whereas instead of

being isolated, it has great

0:33:250:33:29

publicity from coming out to the

Olympics with Kim Jong-un's sister,

0:33:290:33:33

with the cheerleaders and the

athletes and it has painted a

0:33:330:33:36

picture that is hard to go against

in public relations terms. Where it

0:33:360:33:41

leaves the US if they have had a

chat with South Korea who have

0:33:410:33:45

convinced them that even if they are

talking to North Korea, they won't

0:33:450:33:48

give them anything. They won't ease

sanctions or give investment or aid

0:33:480:33:53

unless North Korea comes up with

some goods on denuclearisation and

0:33:530:33:56

on the basis of that, the US says,

OK, those talks should be able to go

0:33:560:34:01

ahead and maybe we will even talk

although we are going to keep

0:34:010:34:04

sanctions on as tightly as ever

until we see some results from it.

0:34:040:34:11

It has put the US on the back foot a

bit.

0:34:110:34:14

Now, I want to follow up on a story

we brought you yesterday,

0:34:140:34:17

the Iraq reconstruction

meetings in Kuwait.

0:34:170:34:22

The US Secretary of State Rex

Tillerson is there - have a listen.

0:34:220:34:26

The enduring defeat of Isis in Iraq

and Syria means all members

0:34:260:34:28

of the coalition must support

and sustain the post-Isis

0:34:280:34:31

stabilisation efforts.

0:34:310:34:32

This means continuing to provide

essential aid and services

0:34:320:34:34

to communities which are only now

starting to rebuild.

0:34:340:34:42

What is the US actually committing

in order to assist Iraq moving

0:34:420:34:45

forward?

Not reconstruction, we have

heard again and again that the

0:34:450:34:52

administration does not do

nation-building. It is trying to

0:34:520:34:56

encourage Iraq's neighbours,

especially Arab countries in the

0:34:560:34:59

Gulf, to come forward with

reconstruction assistance and

0:34:590:35:02

especially the private sector. It

has some US companies participating

0:35:020:35:06

in this conference, the US

import-export bank has just signed a

0:35:060:35:10

$3 billion memo with the finance

ministry saying they will provide

0:35:100:35:13

financing to facilitate such

projects. Still quite a big ask for

0:35:130:35:17

the private sector to invest in this

kind of climate with security risks

0:35:170:35:21

and corruption risks but the US

government says it is focusing its

0:35:210:35:25

money on humanitarian aid and also

on what it calls stabilisation, the

0:35:250:35:29

areas where Isis has been defeated,

preparing them for people to return

0:35:290:35:33

back, like basic services and that

kind of thing. Rex Tillerson said

0:35:330:35:37

the US would supply some $200

million extra to Syria for the

0:35:370:35:41

stabilisation process.

Thank you for

joining us. Barbara Plett Usher in

0:35:410:35:44

Washington.

0:35:440:35:47

Well, let's look at North Korea

from their neighbours' perspetive.

0:35:470:35:49

That relationship is improving.

0:35:490:35:50

North Korea's state media said that

leader Kim Jong-un is delighted

0:35:500:35:53

with the outcome of his country's

attendance at the Games.

0:35:530:35:56

Accompanying the report was this

unusually relaxed picture of Mr Kim

0:35:560:36:02

with his delegation that had just

spent three days in South Korea.

0:36:020:36:05

You can see here his sister

Kim Yo-jong and to the left

0:36:050:36:08

the North's ceremonial head

of state, Kim Yong-nam.

0:36:080:36:12

Both are linking arms

with him and Kim Yong-nam

0:36:120:36:15

is practically holding his hand.

0:36:150:36:18

The report also says Mr Kim thanks

the South for "specially

0:36:180:36:22

prioritising" the North's attendance

at the Games and gave instructions

0:36:220:36:26

on how to "liven up the warm climate

of reconciliation and dialogue."

0:36:260:36:30

The question is whether this charm

offensive is working

0:36:300:36:32

beyond the two Koreas.

0:36:320:36:34

Today the South Korean President

President Moon Jae-in said the US

0:36:340:36:36

is open to talking with the North.

0:36:370:36:41

Laura Bicker is at the Winter

Olympics in Pyeongchang.

0:36:410:36:47

Over two months ago,

Kim Jong-un fired his last missile,

0:36:470:36:51

and here we are as the two sides

exchanged warm words.

0:36:510:36:55

The state media reported

that the North Korean

0:36:550:37:00

leader described the way

that the South Korean government

0:37:000:37:02

treated his sister and other

North Korean delegates as very

0:37:020:37:05

impressive, as sincere.

0:37:050:37:08

He also went on to say

that they provided a warm climate

0:37:080:37:11

for further dialogue

and further unification.

0:37:110:37:16

Now when it comes to that wish,

he has already invited

0:37:160:37:18

the South Korean president,

Moon Jae-in, to visit Pyongyang.

0:37:180:37:22

That is something that he will have

to mull over and will have to decide

0:37:220:37:26

what kind of conditions he will put

on that visit.

0:37:260:37:30

Meanwhile, President Moon Jae-in has

confirmed that the US is open

0:37:300:37:33

to talks with North Korea.

0:37:330:37:37

That is a significant

development and a significant

0:37:370:37:40

diplomatic breakthrough

for President Moon Jae-in,

0:37:400:37:44

because there had been this wedge

between the US and South Korea.

0:37:440:37:48

South Korea wants to pursue a twin

approach to North Korea.

0:37:480:37:53

It wants to pursue this approach

of maximum pressure and sanctions

0:37:530:37:56

but it also wants to engage

with the North, to talk to them.

0:37:560:38:00

At the start of Mike Pence's visit

here during the Winter Olympics,

0:38:000:38:03

it seemed that was not something

the US was willing to do.

0:38:030:38:07

It now seems that they are at least

willing to talk about talks.

0:38:070:38:11

There's a huge hurdle in the way,

though, and that is North Korea's

0:38:110:38:14

nuclear programme.

0:38:140:38:16

So far, the North has refused to put

that on the table and that will be

0:38:160:38:20

something that is difficult

for the international community

0:38:200:38:23

to come to terms with.

0:38:230:38:27

However, if you look at critics,

people who believe, some people

0:38:270:38:31

believe that President Moon Jae-in

is on the wrong track,

0:38:310:38:35

that he has given Pyongyang

a propaganda platform at these

0:38:350:38:37

Olympics.

0:38:370:38:39

The Japanese Foreign Minister

has even described his

0:38:390:38:41

approach as naive.

0:38:410:38:43

Others, however, believe that he may

be on the brink of something,

0:38:430:38:47

including enabling talks

between the US and North Korea,

0:38:470:38:51

and that is something that he has

been looking for since he came

0:38:510:38:54

to power eight months ago.

0:38:540:38:57

Let's get back to this picture

released by the North

0:38:570:38:59

Korea's state media.

0:38:590:39:00

There have been previous photos

showing affection between members

0:39:000:39:02

of the Kim family and even senior

North Korean officials.

0:39:020:39:06

This latest photograph

is reminiscent of this old photo

0:39:060:39:10

from the 1970s showing Mr Kim's

aunt, Kim Kyong-hui,

0:39:100:39:17

with her arm around Kim Il-Sung.

0:39:170:39:19

That's Kim Jong-Il on the right.

0:39:190:39:21

In this picture, a girl is shown

overwhelmed with emotion

0:39:210:39:26

as she holds the arm

of the then-leader Kim Jong-Il.

0:39:260:39:28

Kim Jong-un has also held the arms

or hands of elder senior officials

0:39:280:39:32

and even civilians before.

0:39:320:39:37

These fruit farmers are seen locking

their arms with Kim Jong-un's.

0:39:370:39:39

And last year Mr Kim was even

pictured giving an official

0:39:390:39:42

a piggyback to celebrate what state

media said was the successful

0:39:420:39:44

test of a rocket engine.

0:39:440:39:52

Don't forget you can get much

more detail on our top

0:39:520:39:55

stories on our website.

0:39:550:40:04

It's no secret that jihadi groups

use the internet to recruit.

0:40:040:40:09

Their successes in cyberspace have

sucked in many young fighters.

0:40:090:40:13

Many of them have left their homes,

even here in Britain,

0:40:130:40:16

for bloody wars in Syria and Iraq.

0:40:160:40:18

Some are drawn by the grim

videos posted by this

0:40:180:40:20

group, the Islamic State.

0:40:200:40:28

They're the sort of propaganda

videos that governments are trying

0:40:280:40:30

to catch before they enter

the online world.

0:40:300:40:32

Well today, the UK unveiled a tool

which it says can do just that -

0:40:320:40:36

detect this type of content

and remove it instantly.

0:40:360:40:38

It's been tested on thousands

of hours of videos posted

0:40:380:40:40

by the Islamic State -

successfully detecting up

0:40:400:40:42

to 94% of videos posted,

with almost total accuracy.

0:40:420:40:44

It works in the upload process,

so the video is stopped before

0:40:440:40:47

reaching the internet.

0:40:470:40:50

Research suggests Islamic State used

up to 400 different websites

0:40:500:40:53

for propaganda last year.

0:40:530:40:59

The challenge now is

predicting which areas

0:40:590:41:00

of the internet terror

groups could use next.

0:41:000:41:02

Amal Rajan reports.

0:41:020:41:04

Militaristic, cinematic and often

shot with high-level production

0:41:040:41:08

values, these propaganda videos

for the so-called Islamic State

0:41:080:41:10

espouse terror and hatred.

0:41:100:41:17

They're also easy to find

on the internet right now.

0:41:170:41:19

What we have here are two videos,

one of which is extremist content,

0:41:190:41:22

the other which is perfectly

legitimate news coverage.

0:41:220:41:25

Now an artificial intelligence firm

in London has used Home Office money

0:41:250:41:27

to target such extremist content.

0:41:270:41:31

The creators claim the technology,

which is obviously secret,

0:41:310:41:34

can spot 94% of IS content online

with an accuracy of 99.995%.

0:41:340:41:39

The technology distinguishes

between news and extremism and flags

0:41:390:41:49

up examples such as the one

on the right, with a high

0:41:490:41:52

probability of being extremist

content, to be vetted by a human.

0:41:520:41:54

What we are looking to do is to try

and remove this content

0:41:540:41:58

from the public web.

0:41:580:41:59

If it requires somebody to have ten

passwords and an incredibly

0:41:590:42:01

complicated Tor browser before

they can get access to content,

0:42:010:42:04

we see that as a win.

0:42:040:42:07

It means that it can't just be

shared between friends on, like,

0:42:070:42:10

their mobile phones.

0:42:100:42:11

While attention is focused

on big firms like Twitter,

0:42:110:42:14

Google and Facebook,

crucially, this technology

0:42:140:42:16

will benefit smaller platforms,

who will have free use of it.

0:42:160:42:21

Islamic State supporters used over

400 unique platforms last year,

0:42:210:42:23

145 of them for the first time.

0:42:230:42:29

Like other forms of modern media,

terrorist propaganda

0:42:290:42:31

has now shifted online.

0:42:310:42:33

What's so striking about this

new tool is both that it's funded

0:42:330:42:36

by Government rather than technology

firms, and that it's powered

0:42:360:42:38

by artificial intelligence.

0:42:380:42:41

In other words, it's an admission

that machines rather than manpower

0:42:410:42:45

will be most effective at finding

and removing extremist

0:42:450:42:47

material online.

0:42:470:42:49

One former jihadist who now works

in counter-radicalisation argues

0:42:490:42:53

that terrorists will always

adapt their methods to find

0:42:530:42:56

new audiences, and the platforms

need to be willing to take action.

0:42:560:42:59

The big players in this area

are taking a lot of action,

0:42:590:43:02

but we've found that it's

the smaller companies who aren't

0:43:020:43:05

necessarily prepared to play

ball with Government,

0:43:050:43:10

sometimes because they're

suspicious of government,

0:43:100:43:12

sometimes because they simply don't

regard it as being part

0:43:120:43:14

of their business model.

0:43:140:43:16

It's not yet clear how widely

the technology will be taken up,

0:43:160:43:18

but the Government says its instinct

is to collaborate with industry.

0:43:180:43:21

We're not going to rule out

taking legislative action

0:43:210:43:23

if we need to do it,

but I remain convinced that the best

0:43:230:43:28

way to take real action

to have the best outcomes

0:43:280:43:31

is to have an industry-led form

like the one we've got.

0:43:310:43:34

Your algorithms are doing that

grooming and that radicalisation.

0:43:340:43:37

It's a war of attrition,

but the chair of the Home Affairs

0:43:370:43:40

Select Committee says the onus

is still on the biggest

0:43:400:43:42

digital companies.

0:43:420:43:44

I think it's imperative on the tech

giants, on all of these companies

0:43:440:43:48

to do more to operate swiftly

to remove illegal material.

0:43:480:43:51

If they don't, there has to be

some form of penalty

0:43:510:43:56

on them for not doing this,

because in the end, this

0:43:560:43:58

is about illegal material.

0:43:580:44:00

It's important to be

realistic about the costs

0:44:000:44:02

and consequences of the open web.

0:44:020:44:05

While technology and Government

pressure can reduce harm,

0:44:050:44:08

the fight against digital extremism

is a war without end.

0:44:080:44:10

Amol Rajan, BBC News.

0:44:100:44:13

Nakita Malik is the Director

of the Centre for the Response

0:44:130:44:16

to Radicalisation and Terrorism.

0:44:160:44:19

Let's hear her views

on this new tool.

0:44:190:44:24

I don't think it is a game changer

but I do think it is a step in the

0:44:240:44:28

right direction. We have to remember

that nothing beats human

0:44:280:44:32

intelligence so although the

software is very good in spotting

0:44:320:44:36

trends, what we have already begun

to see when we analyse Islamists and

0:44:360:44:42

far right propaganda, which we do on

a regular basis at my organisation,

0:44:420:44:48

is the Islamists and the jihadists

and extremists are always one step

0:44:480:44:51

ahead of the technology already,

they know how to skirt policy

0:44:510:44:55

guidelines, to make sure that they

are using certain language or

0:44:550:44:59

symbolism that only the insiders of

their group can understand. The

0:44:590:45:02

software is good at removing perhaps

the bulk of the material but the

0:45:020:45:06

real nuance and the trends and how

this will change remains to be seen

0:45:060:45:10

and we also have to remember that

the Islamic State is just one group

0:45:100:45:16

which was found through a foundation

of Islamist ideology, starting with

0:45:160:45:21

Al-Qaeda, with the Taliban and now

what we see with Islamic State. We

0:45:210:45:27

really have to look at the bigger

picture, although it is a step in

0:45:270:45:30

the right direction. I don't know

the details of the software but from

0:45:300:45:34

what I can understand, it is quite

similar to the way that, say, child

0:45:340:45:38

pornography details are seen on the

Internet, how visuals and videos can

0:45:380:45:44

be removed in that way so yes, it is

useful and in the past we have seen

0:45:440:45:49

unsuspecting smaller websites like

Etsy hosting Islamist material

0:45:490:45:55

completely by accident and not

knowing what to do about it so it is

0:45:550:45:59

good having said that, however, the

search engines still posed a lots of

0:45:590:46:04

handbooks, they host poison manuals,

they housed a lot of disturbing

0:46:040:46:07

material which we interact with and

flag up to be social media providers

0:46:070:46:12

on a daily basis. So I'd really like

to see changes in that and also in

0:46:120:46:17

legislation. We have yet to see what

exactly the government means by

0:46:170:46:21

extremism.

0:46:210:46:24

The threat of terrorism has hit

the tourist industy in a number

0:46:240:46:27

of countries on the continent.

0:46:270:46:28

Not least Tunisia, where in 2015,

38 people were shot

0:46:280:46:30

dead at a beach resort.

0:46:300:46:33

And today, for the first time

since that incident,

0:46:330:46:42

a British tour company,

Thomas Cook, is taking tourists

0:46:420:46:44

back to the country.

0:46:440:46:45

Frank Gardner reports

on the measures that Tunisia has

0:46:450:46:47

taken to ensure security.

0:46:470:46:48

Tunis by night, and a National Guard

unit prepares to raid

0:46:480:46:51

a suspected terrorist hideout.

0:46:510:47:01

Since two devastating attacks

in 2015, this country has vowed

0:47:060:47:08

to stamp out terrorism and make

Tunisia safe for tourists.

0:47:080:47:10

Well, they've just gone

into a house here.

0:47:100:47:12

We can hear some shouts.

0:47:120:47:15

We're in a tiny little backstreet,

and they're looking for members

0:47:150:47:19

of an Isis cell that has been

in Libya, they suspect, so the whole

0:47:190:47:23

street is flooded with these armed

National Guard soldiers.

0:47:230:47:27

Three years ago, on this beach

near Sousse, an Isis gunman

0:47:270:47:30

shot dead 38 people,

30 of them British.

0:47:300:47:35

Now, Tunisia is getting training

from Royal Navy instructors

0:47:350:47:38

in maritime security,

while Met Police detectives have

0:47:380:47:41

been training up hotel staff.

0:47:410:47:43

At four key airports,

British aviation experts have

0:47:430:47:46

installed new screening equipment.

0:47:460:47:50

In this resort town, where Thomas

Cook is taking the first returning

0:47:560:47:59

British tourists, I asked the hotel

manager what precautions he is

0:47:590:48:02

taking.

0:48:020:48:04

We have around 60 cameras

all around the hotel.

0:48:040:48:06

The exterior cameras

are all monitored 24 hours

0:48:060:48:11

by persons behind the screens.

0:48:110:48:14

But Tunisia sits in

a dangerous neighbourhood.

0:48:140:48:17

Across this border, Libya

is in chaos, and Isis has bases.

0:48:170:48:22

The Manchester bomber trained in

Libya, and so did the Sousse gunman.

0:48:220:48:29

Back in the capital Tunis,

the night raid yields results.

0:48:290:48:35

Suspects are arrested

and will now face trial.

0:48:350:48:40

Tunisia has made huge

progress against terrorism,

0:48:400:48:42

but if its tourist industry

is to recover fully,

0:48:420:48:45

it will need to stay vigilant.

0:48:450:48:47

Frank Gardner, BBC News, Tunisia.

0:48:470:48:50

The funeral of prominent

Pakistani human rights

0:48:510:48:55

activist and lawyer,

Asma Jahangir, has

0:48:550:48:57

been held in Lahore.

0:48:570:48:58

Senior government officials

and members of the legal

0:48:580:49:00

profession were among

the mourners who attended.

0:49:000:49:03

Ms Jahangir - who died on Sunday -

campaigned for women's rights

0:49:030:49:06

throughout her career.

0:49:060:49:07

BBC Urdu's Henna Saeed

was there and sent us this report.

0:49:070:49:12

Hundreds of people came out

here at the Gaddafi Stadium

0:49:120:49:15

in Lahore today to pay tribute

to the prominent human rights

0:49:150:49:19

activist and lawyer Asma Jahangir.

0:49:190:49:21

Asma had a great fan

following in Pakistan,

0:49:210:49:24

especially with women,

because she was a voice for women

0:49:240:49:27

who were suppressed here.

0:49:270:49:29

She fought for the rights of women,

and got them justice.

0:49:290:49:33

A large number of such women,

her friends, family, co-workers,

0:49:330:49:40

they all came to her house today

to see her for the very last time,

0:49:400:49:45

then they formed groups

and came here as they walked

0:49:450:49:48

to the stadium in Lahore

where they offered

0:49:480:49:50

the final funeral prayers.

0:49:500:49:52

For the first time in Pakistan,

men and women stood side by side

0:49:520:49:57

in the funeral prayers.

0:49:570:49:59

Never has this country seen

this scenario, and this

0:49:590:50:01

is what Asma Jahangir wanted

in her life, to see men

0:50:010:50:04

and women stand by together.

0:50:040:50:08

Asma's last wish has been granted,

although there were voices

0:50:080:50:10

from across Pakistan that she should

be given a state funeral,

0:50:100:50:14

but nothing was finalised in that,

and now she has been laid to rest

0:50:140:50:18

in Bedian graveyard.

0:50:180:50:21

Henna Saeed, BBC News, Pakistan.

0:50:210:50:23

Let's bring you a story

from Australia now, which is marking

0:50:230:50:26

ten years since it said sorry

to its indigenous people

0:50:260:50:28

for the wrongs of the past.

0:50:290:50:31

This is what the former

Prime Minister Kevin Rudd said

0:50:310:50:32

to parliament back in 2008.

0:50:320:50:34

The pain, suffering and hurt of

these stolen generations, their

0:50:340:50:43

descendants and for their families

left behind, we say sorry.

APPLAUSE

0:50:430:50:48

It was a defining moment

in Australia's history.

0:50:480:50:51

This was the scene in

the capital Canberra that day.

0:50:510:50:53

Thousands watched.

0:50:530:50:54

Many of them described it

as a watershed moment.

0:50:540:50:58

Up until the 1970s,

aboriginal children -

0:50:580:51:00

thousands of them -

were taken from their families.

0:51:000:51:02

They became known as

the stolen generations.

0:51:020:51:07

So ten years on, the question

is are indigenous Australians

0:51:070:51:09

still being disadvantaged?

0:51:090:51:10

Here's a tweet from an indigenous

rights campaigner,

0:51:100:51:12

Roxy Moore who says:.

0:51:120:51:14

On Monday the government released

this report, Closing the Gap,

0:51:240:51:26

which found that although it's made

some progress in reducing

0:51:260:51:32

inequality, it still has a long way

to go in several areas.

0:51:320:51:39

One of them is closing

the life-expectancy gap.

0:51:390:51:40

More now from our reporter

Hywell Griffiths who is in Canberra.

0:51:400:51:45

The apology ten years ago was a

cathartic moment for Australia. It

0:51:460:51:51

is hard to overestimate its

significance at the time. I have

0:51:510:51:55

been speaking to survivors of the

stolen generations, people who were

0:51:550:51:58

taken from their families and they

told me how they cried for hours on

0:51:580:52:02

that day ten years ago. A lot of the

focus today has been on progress or

0:52:020:52:06

the lack of it. Sadly, we know that

things like life expectancy for

0:52:060:52:12

indigenous Australians is far lower

than nonindigenous. When it comes to

0:52:120:52:17

employment rates, for example, the

gap has widened in the last decade.

0:52:170:52:20

The employment rate for indigenous

Australians is 25% lower. There is

0:52:200:52:26

some progress being made but one of

the other concerns we have heard

0:52:260:52:30

about is talk of a new stolen

generation, the high number of

0:52:300:52:35

children from indigenous families

taken into out of home care. They

0:52:350:52:39

account for about 35% of the

children in care although

0:52:390:52:42

proportionally, they are only about

5% of all children in Australia so

0:52:420:52:46

you can see there are difficult

issues that people are still

0:52:460:52:50

grappling with. In terms of

aboriginal community leaders, they

0:52:500:52:53

are asking for more

self-determination, for them to come

0:52:530:53:00

up with the answers rather than be

dictated to by the government. But

0:53:000:53:03

it is a difficult balance for the

Australian Federal government. They

0:53:030:53:05

want inclusiveness, to be the

government for all Australians.

0:53:050:53:08

We spoke to Warren Mundine,

an aboriginal leader

0:53:080:53:10

in northern Queensland,

who told us about what kind

0:53:100:53:12

of progress has been

made in his community.

0:53:120:53:14

Well, it's a bit of a mixed bag,

to be quite honest, but first of all

0:53:140:53:18

I've got to congratulate the former

Prime Minister Kevin Rudd.

0:53:180:53:20

It was a major step.

0:53:210:53:22

I was in the parliament that day

and I actually cried when

0:53:220:53:25

he made that apology.

0:53:250:53:26

So it was a major step forward.

0:53:260:53:27

There are many things that

are improving but there

0:53:270:53:31

are also many things that

are not moving forward.

0:53:310:53:33

I have just...

0:53:330:53:34

I'm up in Cairns because

I have just come from

0:53:340:53:38

a tour of free remote aboriginal

communities, looking at the

0:53:380:53:41

challenges that we need

to face to move ahead,

0:53:410:53:45

but I'm very pleased there is more

of a sensible approach

0:53:450:53:49

in regard to if we are

going to lift people out

0:53:490:53:53

of poverty and bring them in

0:53:530:53:55

the mainstream economy

and the global economy,

0:53:550:53:58

and we have to be able to deal

with issues of

0:53:580:54:01

education, health and housing.

0:54:010:54:02

There needs to be

economic development and

0:54:020:54:04

that is what the major focus is now.

0:54:040:54:11

Before we go - I want to introduce

you to some robots that are getting

0:54:110:54:14

everyone's attention.

0:54:150:54:18

You may have already seen this and

had a reaction to it.

0:54:180:54:21

This is the Spot-Mini Robot.

0:54:210:54:22

It was designed by Boston Dynamics -

and it has an extendable

0:54:220:54:25

arm that opens doors.

0:54:250:54:31

But a lot of people are saying

it's downright creepy.

0:54:310:54:33

This clip has been picked up

and shared widely on social media.

0:54:330:54:40

The news editor of BuzzFeed says,

"This is one of the most terrifying

0:54:400:54:43

things I've seen in all my life".

0:54:430:54:45

Comedian and Daily Show host

Trevor Noah @trevornoah

0:54:450:54:47

replied to that saying,

"All I see is a robot

0:54:470:54:49

being a gentleman."

0:54:490:54:54

Thank you very much for watching.

Five. -- goodbye.

0:54:540:55:01