15/09/2013 Sunday Politics East Midlands


15/09/2013

Andrew Neil and Marie Ashby with the latest political news. With Shadow Business Secretary Chuka Umunna and former Lib Dem leader Paddy Ashdown.


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brightest hopes, Sarah Teather is now heading for the exit. We will

:00:25.:01:45.

hear from Nick Clegg on what it signifies.

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hear from Nick Clegg on what it And freshly showered from the Great

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North Run and looking as fresh as daisies, the best and brightest

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Janan Ganesh, Helen Lewis and Iain Now, their leader is our Deputy

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Prime Minister. They are the junior government. They like the colour

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yellow and they have not won a general election since dinosaurs

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walked the earth. Now they are behind UKIP in the polls, so as

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walked the earth. Now they are party gathers for its annual bash

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this year in Glasgow, what is on their mind? Who are the people

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gathering at the Clyde this weekend? their mind? Who are the people

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Before they started drinking, we councillors in England and Wales,

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comrade. The first question we asked was, if the next election results in

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a hung parliament, which team would you rather go into coalition with,

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the Reds or the blues? Lib Dem councillors said Labour, two to

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the Reds or the blues? Lib Dem Tories or Labour? It is not for

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the Reds or the blues? Lib Dem to say. It is for the voters to

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say. We will decide depending on councillors favoured a coalition

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is on the table. Who would you rather play table football against?

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because I am winning. So in the winning 's which ones are heading

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popular policy was a mansion tax on house is worth more than £2 million,

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popular policy was a mansion tax on councillors. The next most popular

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policy was scrapping the Trident nuclear deterrent, supported by

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policy was scrapping the Trident of councillors. Then there was the

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reinstatement of the 50p top rate of income tax. 70% of councillors like

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the look of that. When it came to the idea of banning the burka in

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public places like schools and airports, 45% of councillors were in

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favour. Finally, a ban on topless Page three model is won the support

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of 33% of councillors. Why is it so popular, the idea of a mansion tax?

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It is a much fairer tax. We know there are people out there with

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It is a much fairer tax. We know expensive houses. Which of these is

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most important to you? Banning Trident. The cold war ended in

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1989. Another one was the idea of banning the burka in public places.

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whatever they like. If they want to banning the burka in public places.

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wear the birth or a kilt or if they anything. We are the party of jobs.

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Thank you. Last night, a fully clothed Nick Clegg rallied his

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troops, but if he was not around, who would Lib Dem councillors want

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instead? Business Secretary Vince Cable was most popular, with a third

:05:28.:05:33.

of the votes. In second place, the party's president, Tim Farron, with

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27%. 10% went to Danny Alexander, while the business minister Joe

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Swinson received 7%. The Energy Secretary Ed Davey scooped 6%, and

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in last place, Steve Webb, the pensions minister, who got 5%. If

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any of these councillors want to talk to me about it, I would be

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delighted to hear from them. Is talk to me about it, I would be

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certainly isn't. What do you think contenders. But our survey is not

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the only one that has got tongues wagging in Glasgow, because the

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the only one that has got tongues Dem leadership have commissioned

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their own poll which showed that 75% Dem leadership have commissioned

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of the country will never vote Dem leadership have commissioned

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the party, no matter what they do. Also meeting here this weekend,

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the party, no matter what they do. Democrats like to think they have

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got just as much va-va-voom, even if a big chunk of the country doesn't.

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Add, back in his hometown. So, a big chunk of the country doesn't.

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Much of their party thinks they a big chunk of the country doesn't.

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moving in the wrong direction. Earlier, I spoke to former party

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moving in the wrong direction. leader Paddy Ashdown. He has been

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put in charge of heading up the leader Paddy Ashdown. He has been

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election campaign. I asked him if the mood in Glasgow was grim. No. In

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many ways, as you know, Tory old commentator that you are just as I

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am a hoary old member at the other end of the camera, we have been

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midterm of a government, especially when you are in government and the

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country is going for in a deep economic crisis, has almost no

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relevance to where you might be economic crisis, has almost no

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the nipple come to consider how economic crisis, has almost no

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will vote in 600 days time -- when the people come to consider how

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will vote in 600 days time -- when will vote. We do not dismiss polls,

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but they are a snapshot of what will vote. We do not dismiss polls,

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indication of where we will be. will vote. We do not dismiss polls,

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guess is, for what it is worth, will vote. We do not dismiss polls,

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as we come to the election, the public will be in a very serious,

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probably frightened mood. Their public will be in a very serious,

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thoughts will be, who maintains public will be in a very serious,

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job, makes sure I don't have to public will be in a very serious,

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to higher mortgage? The coalition has delivered not only the required

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policies to make Britain's economy prosperous, but also its society

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fair. That is what people will want to see. I think coalition politics

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are here to stay and we have a role to play in it. But you are in a

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are here to stay and we have a role mood this morning. You tweeted that

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you were not happy with how the Observer newspaper handled your

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there anything we can do to help? There is probably something they

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arguments with the interview. The headline they chose to put on it

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late last night was outrageous, misrepresentative and in one case in

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Something about Ashdown wants a coalition with the Tories, or at

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Something about Ashdown wants a least they gave that in for us

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Something about Ashdown wants a inference. Let me make this point.

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campaign. Any journalist who in election. I am in charge of the

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campaign. Any journalist who in these next two years says that any

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Liberal Democrat prefers anything else in terms of the outcome of

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Liberal Democrat prefers anything coalition but the result of the

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ballot box dictating that outcome, that any prefer one side to another

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coalition determined by the electors that any prefer one side to another

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in the votes, will get a bloody that any prefer one side to another

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time from me, no matter who they are. We take the warning. A survey

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of Lib Dem councillors shows that in coalition with the Tories. That

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of Lib Dem councillors shows that in clear sign that your activists want

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a change of direction. I don't think it is news that as a left-wing

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party, we find it more congenial with those on the left wing, but

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that is not the issue. You saw it election. We are servants of the

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ballot box. We do watch the British people require us to do to provide a

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of our country. I am sure you have stable government in the interests

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of our country. I am sure you have got the point by now. I have fought

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the Tories all my life. But when responsibility to amend the economic

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crisis, was this right for the determine who are going to be in any

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coalition, should there be one, determine who are going to be in any

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voters and nobody else. It is not about what we like. I understand

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that. But your own internal polls leadership are not taking the party

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with them on that. I don't think that is true. Nick Clegg has done

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what no other party leader has done. He took the coalition agreement

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what no other party leader has done. the party, and they voted for it. So

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it is not true to say that members different direction. I think we

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it is not true to say that members extraordinarily united. I did not

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expect them to be so under these pressures, but they have surprised

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me and made me joyful at the same time. The party has done what it

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done in local government for a long time. We may have our private likes

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and dislikes, but the thing that time. We may have our private likes

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coalition is the ballot box. You have said that three times. I can

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say it again if you like. Please don't! What if your party votes

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say it again if you like. Please reinstate tuition fees as party

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policy afternoon? We will have to listen to that and act accordingly.

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You must listen to the voice of listen to that and act accordingly.

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party and take it into account in what you do. I am always quite

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answering hypothetical questions. I don't think it is likely to happen,

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but if it did, we would have to don't think it is likely to happen,

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distinguished Lib Dems was that don't think it is likely to happen,

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your party conference voted for something, it was in the manifesto.

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The manifesto is taken in its final form before the party for decision.

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The party will express views at form before the party for decision.

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stage in all sorts of ways. It did in my leadership, too. The manifesto

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is democratically agreed by the party at the time of the election,

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not before. The Tory conference party at the time of the election,

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be about how they think they have been vindicated, that austerity

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be about how they think they have worked, the economy is turning a

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corner. But Nick Clegg's conference announcements will be about plastic

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bags. Have you got the hang of this coalition think? Andrew, you can

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always be guaranteed to put things in the most discreditable form!

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always be guaranteed to put things is part of your charm. That was

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about to be a minor announcement in the middle of his speech. But it was

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discovered beforehand. It has not the middle of his speech. But it was

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discovered beforehand. It has not been very popular in terms of how it

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has been received, but that is not the central message. That leads

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has been received, but that is not to what I think is the biggest

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election. Isn't the biggest danger that the Tories, not you, if there

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is an economic recovery, they will get the credit for it? I don't think

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think the electorate does gratitude. The only time people cast a thank

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Thatcher over the sale of council houses. We could have a different

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discussion over whether that was a good idea. But what you have done is

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the underpinning for the promise of government, we have stayed firm

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the underpinning for the promise of very tough economic policy. But

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the underpinning for the promise of you get the credit? What we have

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done by ourselves, which the Tories would never have done, is make sure

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that when the pain is felt, it is not the poor who feel it. We have

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seen the biggest shift of taxation, lifting the poorest in the country

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out of taxation, that has ever happened, including in the previous

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Labour government. You are presiding over the biggest squeeze on living

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standards in modern times. Because it is the biggest recession in

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modern times. When you speak to it is the biggest recession in

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2.5 million people who have been lifted out of taxation altogether

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because of the Liberal Democrats, tax cut. You may be able to make the

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because of the Liberal Democrats, connection, Andrew, you are a sharp

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economic crisis and difficulty for everybody. But it is clear that

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economic crisis and difficulty for the Tories had been by themselves,

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none of that would have happened. We have sought to shift the burden

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none of that would have happened. We from the poorest in this country. I

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am part of that. So when we go into the next election, the message will

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am part of that. So when we go into be that if you want to continue

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am part of that. So when we go into have a prosperous economy and a

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society, only the Liberal Democrats will deliver that. Tim Farron says

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want to diss him. Can you confirm he likes Ed Miliband and he does not

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want to diss him. Can you confirm that there will be no dissing of Ed

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Miliband? It is not much my style. I've never much liked comments about

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the other leaders. I do not intend to make it so in the future. Can I'd

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finish up on Syria? You said after the Syria vote that Britain was

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finish up on Syria? You said after hugely diminished country. Given it

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both sides on a course which could now see Syria give up chemical

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weapons without records to military action, would you like to withdraw

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these remarks and admit that you action, would you like to withdraw

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these remarks and admit that you Britain has done? No. You and I

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these remarks and admit that you know, because we are old observers,

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that that would never have happened underpinning of a threat to use

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resigned from that. We have no part to play in the fact that Assad and

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Putin have moved towards peace for to play in the fact that Assad and

:17:06.:17:09.

fear of military action. We decided exactly the opposite. Why would

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fear of military action. We decided liked to have seen our country join

:17:14.:17:16.

in with those who are serious about upholding an international law which

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left others to make sure that we talent, but instead we resigned

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left others to make sure that we moved towards peace. -- even the

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Maxis and Stalin. But if it had moved towards peace. -- even the

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would not have had the time to allow this to happen. It has avoided war.

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Job done, British Parliament. That would be true if it was accurate but

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it is not. The resolution proposed a delay, that we should wait until the

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inspectors came back. That time frame was absolutely nothing to

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inspectors came back. That time with the parliamentary vote. The

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vote was going to incorporate that. I do not think you can claim what

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vote was going to incorporate that. remember that diplomacy, which was

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not reinforced by the threat of military action, does not work.

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not reinforced by the threat of is when diplomacy runs with a grain

:18:21.:18:25.

of military action that it works. illustration of that, look at what

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is happening over the last two weeks. By regret to say that our

:18:30.:18:35.

country, which has always been in disengagement, had no part to play

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And you we would get to the Balkans eventually, and we did. His biggest

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challenge is if the economy is get some credit for the Lib Dems,

:18:56.:19:03.

when the Tories will want to halt it all. But his position is not to

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when the Tories will want to halt it the necessary axeman. That is George

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Osborne's role. Their role is to be Osborne's role. Their role is to be

:19:08.:19:12.

the chaser party, taking the edge off. They will because of me going

:19:12.:19:16.

on about the pupil premium and That is what you will hear from

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of the cuts. Will that work? They them, how they have taken the edge

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of the cuts. Will that work? They are in a pretty good position. Even

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if they have lost two thirds of are in a pretty good position. Even

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popular support, according to the polls, I do not know anyone in

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Westminster methinks that will be matched in their parliamentary

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representation. If they have 56 matched in their parliamentary

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now, they might lose a dozen but Strategically, they are in a better

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position than the reading of the polls would tell you. I think Nick

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Clegg's survival has been one of the stories of this Parliament. He is

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looking good at the comfort -- at the conference. When he was at his

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lowest after the AV referendum, people were saying he would survive

:20:04.:20:09.

I thought that was fanciful. Believe and lead us into 2015 and beyond and

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I thought that was fanciful. Believe it or not... Paddy Ashdown was

:20:13.:20:15.

wrong, you were wrong and... I wasn't. I'm underestimated how bad

:20:15.:20:21.

his rivals are. If you are Lib Dem member, however aggrieved you are

:20:21.:20:27.

with Nick Clegg, you do not think, wouldn't it be great if Christian

:20:27.:20:31.

was in charge? Nick Clegg is the best they have. -- Chris Huhne was

:20:31.:20:34.

in charge. Of course, the people do in charge. Of course, the people do

:20:34.:20:40.

government and it is a consequence of the way they vote, a different

:20:40.:20:44.

matter. If Janan Ganesh is right, and they lose 15 seats in the next

:20:44.:20:51.

pivotal in the next government. It Possibly the most amusing outcome

:20:51.:20:57.

would be a Labour or Tory overall majority, which would be hilarious

:20:57.:21:00.

for the look on Paddy Ashdown's face. The danger is they get trapped

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constantly in talking about the politics of coalition and of a hung

:21:06.:21:09.

parliament. And they are very puffed politics of coalition and of a hung

:21:09.:21:16.

parliament. And they are very puffed up and they enjoy Parliament and

:21:17.:21:20.

there is a possibility they will not be. While they are talking about the

:21:20.:21:23.

Polish and themselves, they are be. While they are talking about the

:21:23.:21:25.

talking about the issues facing be. While they are talking about the

:21:25.:21:31.

coalition. It was interesting that he said that we are a left-wing

:21:31.:21:37.

party, not a centre-left party or a centre party, but a left-wing party.

:21:37.:21:44.

I'm going to put myself in the firing line and say that there is a

:21:44.:21:46.

big split between the Tim Farron firing line and say that there is a

:21:46.:21:50.

line who say they like Ed Miliband, and another one, Jeremy Browne in

:21:50.:21:54.

the Home Office saying that Labour are intellectually lazy. The risk

:21:54.:21:57.

clearly a clique around Nick Clegg who wants to be a synthetic party,

:21:57.:22:05.

but that is not where the membership who wants to be a synthetic party,

:22:05.:22:12.

activists are clearly of the left, not just the centre-left. They are

:22:12.:22:17.

very pro-immigration and they want strategy has to be to take the party

:22:17.:22:23.

to the centre. The something not happen at some stage? The poll

:22:23.:22:26.

suggests it is a left-wing party. happen at some stage? The poll

:22:26.:22:30.

Very left-wing. Other think the happen at some stage? The poll

:22:30.:22:33.

would have yielded -- would have yielded the same results before

:22:33.:22:39.

would have yielded -- would have 2010 election. This is reflected by

:22:39.:22:40.

the arithmetic. Whichever party 2010 election. This is reflected by

:22:40.:22:43.

biggest will most likely be the 2010 election. This is reflected by

:22:43.:22:44.

in coalition with the Lib Dems. 2010 election. This is reflected by

:22:44.:22:49.

Clegg's on latitude to choose is exaggerated by us. The choice is no

:22:49.:23:01.

parliamentary arithmetic. But if you remember the structure of the Lib

:23:01.:23:04.

Dems, they can tie themselves up in infighting. -- the choice is not

:23:04.:23:15.

stable. And Nick Clegg has had a good conference last year, and will

:23:15.:23:18.

have another one this year. The economy is better than it was a

:23:18.:23:21.

have another one this year. The ago. It could still go quite well

:23:21.:23:21.

for him. Yes, it is one of the ago. It could still go quite well

:23:21.:23:27.

stories of this Parliament, his survival and the way in which he has

:23:27.:23:31.

prospered. But there are a lot of campaigners, labour activists who

:23:31.:23:37.

have not forgotten what he has done in government and are determined to

:23:37.:23:41.

get him. It will be a tough year and a half. Tougher than he imagined.

:23:41.:23:46.

Now, not so long ago they were writing George Osborne's political

:23:46.:23:49.

obituary. Be on the Omni shambles budget of 2012 and a lacklustre

:23:49.:23:55.

performance of the British economy meant his reputation work -- was in

:23:55.:24:03.

the dirt. -- the omnishambles. But things have changed. The Chancellor

:24:03.:24:06.

is saying he has been vindicated. If runway, it looks as though the

:24:06.:24:15.

British economy has taken off, quarter. Forecasts for the rest

:24:15.:24:20.

British economy has taken off, the year have been revised up words.

:24:20.:24:23.

What's more, the office for National recession never actually happened.

:24:23.:24:31.

Unemployment is down in the three months to July and the number of

:24:31.:24:40.

spasticity rate since 1997. On Monday, George Osborne said his

:24:40.:24:42.

policies were bearing fruit. We Monday, George Osborne said his

:24:42.:24:45.

our nerve when many told us to abandon our plans. As a result,

:24:45.:24:51.

thanks to the efforts and sacrifices of the British people, Britain is

:24:51.:24:59.

turning a corner. The message for his Labour critics was clear. The

:24:59.:25:02.

Chancellor thinks he was right and they were wrong. And Chuka Umunna

:25:02.:25:06.

Good afternoon. Good afternoon.Do you accept that the economy has

:25:06.:25:21.

turned a corner? I think it is good that a stalled recovery appears

:25:21.:25:27.

turned a corner? I think it is good get this in perspective. We have had

:25:27.:25:29.

three wasted years. We have the worst economic recovery in history.

:25:29.:25:34.

Debt is up and we have record youth programme if they feel better or

:25:34.:25:43.

worse off, compared to 2010, the majority will tell you they feel

:25:43.:25:47.

worse because, on average, wages are down by £1500 compared to May of

:25:47.:25:54.

2010. That is the situation. The one of the things we have seen

:25:54.:26:02.

talked about, Vince Cable has been talking about this as well, is what

:26:02.:26:06.

is happening in the housing market. It seems that much of the solution

:26:06.:26:08.

to powering the recovery in the It seems that much of the solution

:26:08.:26:14.

of George Osborne lies in sorting out the housing market but the

:26:14.:26:18.

problem is, we are at risk of being another housing bubble. Because

:26:18.:26:21.

problem is, we are at risk of being research that came out this week, we

:26:21.:26:26.

know that housing in the UK is three times more expensive than in the US.

:26:26.:26:29.

know that housing in the UK is three We know that house prices are rising

:26:29.:26:32.

five times faster than wages, but we also know that the government is

:26:32.:26:38.

five times faster than wages, but we building new housing at a slower

:26:38.:26:40.

complaining about a housing bubble, rate, the slowest rate that we have

:26:40.:26:46.

complaining about a housing bubble, isn't that like Satan complaining

:26:46.:26:52.

about seven? -- seven. We all know that we cannot go back to business

:26:52.:26:56.

as usual. We need to build a new model of growth. But the housing

:26:56.:27:01.

bubble you talk about, it is not a bubble. It might turn into one.

:27:01.:27:06.

bubble you talk about, it is not a said the risk of a bubble. It is

:27:06.:27:08.

nothing like what happened on the I said, in 2009, we had the crash

:27:08.:27:15.

and we knew we needed to reconfigure the way that our economy works.

:27:15.:27:19.

Having an economy based on crisis is rebalance the economy. We saw the

:27:19.:27:26.

unemployment statistics this week, and it is welcomed overall, that

:27:26.:27:32.

unemployment has come down. At half up. And it went down in other parts.

:27:32.:27:42.

We know that we need to rebalance our economy, so that we do not just

:27:42.:27:48.

rely on consumption, but that we grow our productive sectors. And

:27:48.:27:53.

also that we grow our exports as well. We know we have a continuing

:27:53.:28:00.

deficit. We always have a trade deficit. There was never a trade

:28:00.:28:11.

surplus under Labour. Want to come onto what you have mentioned but

:28:11.:28:14.

scheme? We have not said that we would you scrap the help to buy

:28:14.:28:18.

scheme? We have not said that we would do that. Why not if it is

:28:18.:28:21.

causing the bubble? If you let me finish, on one hand what that scheme

:28:21.:28:27.

does at the moment, at the moment it is inhalation to a new scheme but

:28:27.:28:34.

tomorrow -- next year it will be in you do not sort out the supply of

:28:34.:28:38.

housing, then that is a recipe for the problems we have seen. Our

:28:38.:28:43.

argument is build more houses. Help more people to buy them by all means

:28:43.:28:45.

but if you do not have the supply more people to buy them by all means

:28:45.:28:48.

but if you do not have the supply you will end up with rising prices.

:28:48.:28:52.

That is obvious. Labour said that government austerity would prevent

:28:52.:28:54.

the return of growth. Austerity government austerity would prevent

:28:54.:29:00.

were wrong. We never said that growth would never return. What

:29:00.:29:04.

were wrong. We never said that said was that if you went for an

:29:04.:29:05.

were wrong. We never said that overly extreme deficit reduction

:29:05.:29:11.

recovery and you would choke growth. That is what we saw for three years.

:29:11.:29:17.

If you say, look at the US economy, it has grown at three times the

:29:17.:29:24.

If you say, look at the US economy, economy has grown at twice the rate.

:29:24.:29:28.

But the British economy is growing quicker than the American or German

:29:28.:29:31.

economy is now. But over time we have not seen that happen. But it is

:29:31.:29:37.

now. That may be the case. But my point is that those three years

:29:37.:29:42.

now. That may be the case. But my people undergoing huge stress and

:29:42.:29:44.

worry. It is good that we have growth back again but the question

:29:45.:29:48.

is, what kind of growth? What we have said... I'm going to come onto

:29:48.:29:55.

that but your credibility depends on your previous analysis. And there

:29:55.:29:57.

are doubts about it. This is what you said not that long ago. In

:29:57.:30:05.

You and the Labour Party said it had choked off growth. You were wrong.

:30:05.:30:33.

We were not wrong, because we had three years where the economy was

:30:33.:30:38.

not moving. Let's remind ourselves. Claude Osborne was predicting that

:30:38.:30:41.

the economy was going to grow by 6.9% between the start of this

:30:41.:30:46.

Parliament and now. It has grown by 1.8%. We did not say we would never

:30:46.:30:55.

have a return to growth. You never said that austerity would only

:30:55.:30:58.

temporarily delay growth. We have looked through your speeches and Ed

:30:59.:31:03.

Balls'. We can't find any reference to say this is simply delaying the

:31:03.:31:09.

recovery. You said austerity would choke off growth. If that is true,

:31:09.:31:13.

why has it returned now? Did we choke off growth. If that is true,

:31:13.:31:19.

it would choke off growth for ever? choke off growth. If that is true,

:31:19.:31:26.

We did not. You have changed your tune. I think your package at the

:31:26.:31:29.

top of this programme, to frame tune. I think your package at the

:31:29.:31:34.

around George Osborne, this is not a people's lives, and the people who

:31:34.:31:39.

deserve huge credit for the growth we are seeing are our country's

:31:39.:31:46.

businesses, who despite the tough economic times, have succeeded.

:31:46.:31:49.

businesses, who despite the tough are the ones who have powered this

:31:49.:31:52.

growth. It is not for us in Westminster to take credit. But you

:31:52.:31:57.

blame the government for lack of growth. So therefore, when the

:31:57.:32:03.

growth comes, the government has to take some credit. Look at the

:32:03.:32:07.

situation Britain is in now. We know the recovery still has to reach many

:32:07.:32:12.

parts of the country, but this is the OECD annualised growth in the

:32:12.:32:21.

G-7, the world's guest economies. That is looking pretty healthy. That

:32:21.:32:25.

is a recovery. I am not denying that That is looking pretty healthy. That

:32:25.:32:33.

we are seeing a stalled recovery, but who benefits from the growth? On

:32:33.:32:38.

average, your viewers have sustained a £1500 pay cut. That is the second

:32:39.:32:48.

biggest fall in the G20 since May 2010. Because we had the biggest

:32:48.:32:54.

financial services sector and took the biggest crash. Financial

:32:54.:32:58.

services are still in decline. Financial services are about 10% of

:32:58.:33:07.

the economy. They are not the only contributor to the economy. The

:33:07.:33:12.

point is, who benefits? Unemployment is falling, but we don't just want

:33:12.:33:16.

people to have any job, we want them to have decent jobs that pay a

:33:16.:33:21.

weight you can live off and that are more secure. Let me show you the

:33:21.:33:28.

unemployment figures. Your criticism has been that all the new jobs are

:33:28.:33:33.

part-time. They are not now, they are full-time. Full-time

:33:33.:33:37.

unemployment, up -- full-time employment, up 94,000. This is a

:33:37.:33:46.

short time frame. It is since the recovery began. Half the jobs that

:33:46.:33:50.

have been created since May 2010 have been part-time jobs. Roughly

:33:50.:33:56.

107,000 people are working part-time who would like to work full-time.

:33:56.:34:01.

Over the last 20 years, people now feel more insecure at work than

:34:01.:34:03.

ever. The question is about what feel more insecure at work than

:34:03.:34:07.

kind of growth and employment you are getting. The other point is the

:34:07.:34:14.

uneven spread of this across our economy. In places like the

:34:14.:34:21.

north-east and north-west, the Humber, the east of England, they

:34:21.:34:29.

have seen unemployment increase. I agree that there was a regional

:34:29.:34:33.

imbalance, but the service sector is growing, cheering and construction

:34:33.:34:40.

are growing and financial services are in decline, so the rebalance is

:34:40.:34:44.

happening. It is not happening to the degree we need to transform our

:34:45.:34:49.

economy so that we have a long-term, sustainable model of

:34:49.:34:53.

growth. That is why we need a comprehensive industrial strategy

:34:53.:34:55.

that all of government works towards. Your party conference is

:34:55.:35:04.

coming up. I am sure you are looking forward to it. Why do Ed Miliband's

:35:04.:35:09.

approval ratings get worse the more people see of him? I don't accept

:35:09.:35:20.

that. I have given you the figures. Polls go up and down. I have said

:35:20.:35:26.

that on this programme before. But his approval rating has consistently

:35:26.:35:33.

gone down. What actually matters our votes. Under Ed Miliband's

:35:33.:35:35.

leadership, the Labour Party have votes. Under Ed Miliband's

:35:35.:35:39.

put on almost 2000 extra councillors in places like Canada case, even

:35:39.:35:50.

Whitney. What is wrong with Whitney? We have been putting on votes. Let

:35:50.:35:56.

me show you this. This is the net satisfaction rating. Your leader is

:35:56.:36:00.

now more unpopular than Gordon Brown was when he took Labour to the worst

:36:00.:36:07.

defeat in living memory. Gordon Brown did not put on anything like

:36:07.:36:14.

this number of councillors. Votes are what matter, Andrew. Few people

:36:14.:36:21.

think Ed Miliband is a capable leader. Twice as many people think

:36:21.:36:26.

over Spurs who lives on the moon. These are polls. If you are talking

:36:26.:36:32.

to me about over Spurs lit, that puts this into context, Europe

:36:32.:36:39.

session with polls! -- Elvis Presley. Since 2010, we have put on

:36:39.:36:44.

thousands of members. Compare that to the Conservative Party, which has

:36:44.:36:47.

not won a general election since 1992. They will not disclose their

:36:47.:36:58.

membership figures. Why -- why won't you pledge to renationalise Royal

:36:58.:37:02.

Mail? Because that would be like writing a blank cheque. We don't

:37:02.:37:05.

know at the moment how much the government would receive for the

:37:05.:37:09.

sale of Royal Mail? So how can I judge how much it would cost to buy

:37:09.:37:13.

it back? That would be irresponsible. But the government

:37:13.:37:17.

does not need to do this right now. The entire country is against it.

:37:17.:37:23.

Sources in the City and Whitehall tell me that if Labour pledged to

:37:23.:37:26.

renationalise it, it would kill off the flotation. So if you are against

:37:26.:37:34.

it, why don't you do it? For me to pledge to renationalise Royal Mail

:37:34.:37:36.

would be like writing a blank cheque. But if you put it in the

:37:36.:37:43.

prospectus, people in the City, who know more about these things, say it

:37:44.:37:50.

would not happen, so why not do it? Because that would be irresponsible.

:37:50.:37:54.

It would be like writing a cheque for billions to renationalise Royal

:37:54.:37:59.

Mail. You would not have too right at the check if it did not happen. I

:37:59.:38:05.

have to deal with the facts. I am not good deal with the plot somebody

:38:05.:38:09.

might be speculating about in the City. We have to be careful about

:38:09.:38:14.

this. For me to pledge to renationalise it now would be like

:38:14.:38:18.

writing a bank cheque . We are going to be a fiscally responsible

:38:18.:38:22.

government. That is why I am not prepared to do that. Ed Balls will

:38:22.:38:28.

not be talking to you. You are watching the Sunday Politics. Coming

:38:28.:38:29.

up in 20 In the East Midlands: County

:38:29.:38:47.

councils had to cut millions of pounds from their budgets and now

:38:47.:38:53.

they are turning to you for ideas. If they were in an orchestra, they

:38:53.:38:59.

would be on fiddles. That is absolutely untrue. Nick Clegg tells

:39:00.:39:05.

us that he thinks we are warming to the Lib Dems. I get the impression

:39:05.:39:11.

that people in the East Midlands, much as other parts of the country,

:39:11.:39:15.

are developing a begrudging respect. My guests this week are Jessica Lee

:39:15.:39:26.

and Graham Allen. First, thousands of youngsters are heading off to

:39:26.:39:30.

university, but thousands are into. East Midlands has some of the lowest

:39:30.:39:35.

figures are people going to university in the country. Graham's

:39:35.:39:41.

constituency is officially the lowest. Teachers travel to

:39:41.:39:46.

Westminster to meet the educational secretary to voice their concerns.

:39:46.:39:52.

How did it go? It went well. We spent over an hour speaking to the

:39:52.:40:02.

Education Secretary. What they need is small bite—size bits of learning

:40:02.:40:08.

to build their confidence, motivate them and show them they can achieve.

:40:08.:40:14.

I'll be bothered about loosening the modules —— are they bothered? My

:40:14.:40:24.

kids don't like that, there are frightened of it. So why not stick

:40:24.:40:30.

with what we have gotten the moment. It has provided a tremendous

:40:30.:40:38.

improvements. 90% are more —— 90% more people from my constituency are

:40:38.:40:46.

going to university. We have to help young people in the East Midlands to

:40:46.:40:54.

aspire. Not everybody is good at the exams. If there is continuous

:40:54.:40:59.

assessment throughout the year, it helps? It changes the way of

:40:59.:41:08.

helping. It can help them to meet the changes that are suggested. In

:41:08.:41:14.

my constituency, the system that we have had for many years of building

:41:14.:41:19.

people up is actually working. There are no tangible improvements. My

:41:19.:41:23.

worry is that if we change for the sake of it, it will frighten the

:41:23.:41:31.

life out of the youngsters and my constituency, we will arrest that

:41:31.:41:35.

development and kids in my patch won't get that chance that we have

:41:35.:41:40.

all worked so hard to give them. I hope the Secretary of State has

:41:40.:41:45.

listened to us and hope he will come back with some minor changes to help

:41:45.:41:48.

children and my constituency to flourish as in others. We have a

:41:48.:41:54.

good and improving uptake for university and our constituency. It

:41:54.:41:58.

is right that the Education Secretary met with Graham. I think

:41:58.:42:04.

that is good news. I find Michael Gove very approachable and amenable

:42:04.:42:09.

to ideas. We need to follow it up and see what response we get there.

:42:09.:42:15.

We will follow that with interest. What are you most prepared to see

:42:15.:42:19.

dashed libraries closed, care for the elderly cut or other council

:42:19.:42:25.

services? Leicestershire county council says

:42:25.:42:31.

it needs to find £110 million worth of savings in the next five years.

:42:31.:42:35.

In Nottinghamshire the figure is £154 million. And Derbyshire county

:42:35.:42:41.

council says it has took at £157 million. Leaders from Leicestershire

:42:41.:42:46.

have been in Westminster this week to meet Conservative MPs from the

:42:46.:42:50.

county. In Nottinghamshire the county council has launched a public

:42:50.:42:56.

consultation. It wants to hear what services the public are prepared to

:42:56.:43:02.

seek at. We went out with the leader of the council to meet the voters.

:43:02.:43:08.

£154 million has to be cut from Nottinghamshire county council. They

:43:08.:43:13.

are asking you how they can do that. I am here to find out your

:43:13.:43:19.

views. I have the leader of the county council with me. Shall we

:43:19.:43:22.

asked people what they think? Yes. More people on the ground doing the

:43:22.:43:28.

actual work and not too many managers. What do you say to that?

:43:28.:43:37.

It is interesting to hear these views. There will be further job

:43:37.:43:43.

losses. There will be job losses in management as well as elsewhere in

:43:43.:43:48.

the management. You have built a new library building, to me there was

:43:48.:43:52.

nothing wrong with the old library building. You should look to do

:43:52.:43:57.

something in the library for the children, you might save money doing

:43:57.:44:03.

it that way. There is no money for the youth. Where do you think this

:44:04.:44:14.

man can cut the £154 million from their county council's budget? We

:44:14.:44:19.

haven't got a bus station for a start. We are waiting for one of

:44:19.:44:25.

them for quite a long time. It has been delayed again. You will have it

:44:25.:44:32.

by next winter. You can only cut so much. You need the services. Why not

:44:32.:44:43.

ask government as they can cut any of their budget, the Houses of

:44:43.:44:47.

Parliament? They have decided we should be cutting our budgets. You

:44:47.:44:54.

never see anybody saying, we are going to cut the site of our budget.

:44:54.:45:00.

The county council and a waste of time. Why are they a waste of time?

:45:01.:45:06.

If they were in an orchestra, they would be on fiddles. What do you say

:45:06.:45:12.

to that? It is absolutely untrue. I understand why people might have

:45:12.:45:16.

that perception. Fair play to Alan Rhodes to take

:45:16.:45:24.

part in that. You are never going to be sure how people are going to

:45:24.:45:29.

react to you when you're out in the street. The Conservative Council

:45:29.:45:32.

light Leicestershire are having to go cap in hand to Westminster to

:45:32.:45:36.

Conservative MPs to say, do not cut funding any more. We have got to

:45:36.:45:41.

deal with the reality. Most people in my constituency understand that.

:45:41.:45:46.

They are understand that the country has overspent and the appreciate

:45:46.:45:54.

that. They need MPs to make the case to request for funds in a way that

:45:54.:46:00.

they think will best serve their community. I think most people

:46:00.:46:01.

understand that. Nottinghamshire county council have announced they

:46:01.:46:06.

will stop paying their workers are living wage. How can they afford

:46:06.:46:14.

that? —— are going to start peeing. I think he has been courageous going

:46:14.:46:23.

out to the public and speaking to them about this. —— I hope this is

:46:23.:46:30.

opening up a dialogue with people saying, if you want good services

:46:30.:46:34.

local or a good health service, you will have to pay for it. I would

:46:34.:46:40.

like to see local people deciding what they are prepared to pay,

:46:40.:46:44.

politicians of all parties going out to convince them on the arguments

:46:44.:46:49.

and engage with them. If you fit it to people that if we pay a lot —— a

:46:49.:47:00.

little more for our police then we have less crime. If you invest in

:47:00.:47:02.

children, early intervention, that'll pay back in the long term.

:47:02.:47:07.

People are not stupid, they get these arguments. At the moment, all

:47:07.:47:14.

parties say that if we cut the fat out, it will be OK. Where can these

:47:14.:47:21.

cuts come from? I think this is what MPs need to do. To make those

:47:21.:47:25.

representations. Where can these continuing cuts come from?

:47:25.:47:30.

Foreigners start, you heard on the film there, the man was pointing out

:47:30.:47:37.

that there are too many chiefs. —— for a start. There has been a lack

:47:37.:47:42.

of accountability in the public sector for a long time. For

:47:42.:47:46.

example, I was horrified to read that under the last Labour

:47:46.:47:51.

government, they ordered 28 luxury coaches. What about elderly care?

:47:51.:48:08.

Local industry should be benefiting. There are savings that

:48:08.:48:13.

can still be made. I absolutely believe that. Where can these cuts

:48:13.:48:19.

be made? I will give you an example, I think people need to have a longer

:48:19.:48:23.

sighted view as well. For Derbyshire, the new Labour county

:48:23.:48:30.

council at the moment are having a consultation idiot. There are no

:48:30.:48:32.

decisions made. —— consultation period. £157 million they had to

:48:32.:48:43.

save and Derbyshire. That is a lot more than the —— than they were

:48:43.:48:51.

having to save. I think that this process is important. People can

:48:51.:48:57.

find those savings. Focus on keeping the front line services. I think it

:48:57.:49:03.

will pay off in the long term. You think that front line services will

:49:04.:49:07.

be protected? I cannot see what Derbyshire county council will do. I

:49:08.:49:13.

am saying that should be the priority. I would have one, cut

:49:13.:49:19.

central government out of the loop on raising money and let local

:49:19.:49:23.

people, local politicians, argue it out. I have faith in my politics

:49:23.:49:29.

that I can convince people that they should pay an adequate amount of

:49:29.:49:33.

hassle tax. Other taxes should be allowed to be raised if the local

:49:33.:49:39.

electorate agreed to it. —— council tax. Is that Labour Party policy?It

:49:39.:49:46.

is not. I am working hard to win over the Labour Party. Most other

:49:46.:49:52.

weathering —— Western democracies have councils that are independent

:49:52.:49:58.

and that listen to local people. That is the sort of system we need

:49:58.:50:02.

to build in this country, otherwise we will be back here next year

:50:02.:50:06.

having the same discussion. I hope not. The Lib Dems are holding their

:50:06.:50:11.

annual conference. They are looking to see how they can

:50:11.:50:18.

win here in the East Midlands. We have only one MEP N control of one

:50:18.:50:23.

district Council. Nick Clegg told us that he sees that as an improvement.

:50:23.:50:29.

It is a lot better than it used to be. For 70 years we were not

:50:29.:50:34.

represented a Parliamentary level. I am aware that in the last three

:50:34.:50:39.

years while we have been in coalition, we have suffered in the

:50:39.:50:43.

polls and there has been a temporary it to our popularity. I get the

:50:43.:50:48.

impression that people in the East Midlands, much as in other parts of

:50:48.:50:52.

the country, are developing a begrudging respect that we have

:50:52.:50:56.

stuck with it. If we had not, we would not begin to see the start of

:50:56.:51:03.

an economic recovery. Without the unanimity —— unity and resolve of

:51:03.:51:10.

the Lib Dems, we would not see a change like we have. Better state

:51:10.:51:13.

pensions, more apprenticeships, the people —— pupil premium in school,

:51:14.:51:22.

most notably as of next April, no one in the East Midlands will have

:51:22.:51:27.

to pay a penny in income tax from the first £10,000 the peak. All of

:51:27.:51:33.

that are good Liberal Democrat achievements. But I think we need to

:51:33.:51:39.

shout about them more. In two years ago you were here with the Prime

:51:39.:51:43.

Minister announcing a new enterprise scheme. I am frustrated that some of

:51:43.:51:55.

these enterprise zones have got stuck on various details. I would

:51:55.:52:00.

like to see the enterprise zone at the site I did visit myself, move

:52:00.:52:05.

forward as quickly as possible. It is a great way of attracting

:52:05.:52:09.

investment and generating jobs locally. Will your rallying cry be

:52:09.:52:15.

to the Liberal Democrat conference, hang on? Is that the best you can

:52:15.:52:21.

do? It is more uplifting than that. We have done great things in

:52:21.:52:28.

government. We are the only party of the liberal central ground. If you

:52:28.:52:37.

want a party that believes in a stronger economy, doing the

:52:37.:52:41.

difficult job is to do that, and a fairer society, then the Liberal

:52:41.:52:46.

Democrats are the only party able to deliver that in British politics. We

:52:46.:52:50.

will hear from an East Midlands Lib Dem hoping to make a breakthrough.

:52:50.:52:56.

Vince Cable was here to visit the biggest live them success story in

:52:56.:53:03.

the East Midlands. The party is in charge here. He was realistic of the

:53:03.:53:09.

challenges facing the Lib Dem is making more games in the area. We

:53:09.:53:15.

have got a base in several areas. We have been strong in other parts of

:53:15.:53:21.

the area, Leicester for many years. We have had a base in Nottingham,

:53:21.:53:26.

not now, Chesterfield used to be a state we had control of. It has

:53:26.:53:31.

fallen away now and we recognise that reality. Being an government

:53:31.:53:35.

has been a mixed blessing politically. We get criticised for

:53:35.:53:40.

everything that goes wrong, but we are now beginning to get the message

:53:40.:53:45.

across that we have made a positive contribution in government. You can

:53:45.:53:49.

always rely on Vince to be a straight talker.

:53:49.:53:55.

You are part of the largest Lib Dem branch in these midlands. It is the

:53:55.:54:01.

exception not the rule? You have said we have got a good story to

:54:01.:54:06.

tell where we run the council, where we have had this load —— big

:54:06.:54:13.

increase in membership. Things are going really well, we have a lot of

:54:13.:54:20.

support in other areas, Ashfield we had a close result in the county

:54:20.:54:27.

council elections. There are a lot of places in the East Midlands where

:54:27.:54:32.

there is support. Nick Clegg said last year that Lib Dem voters who

:54:32.:54:38.

went to the Labour Party are our lost cost? No. I do not believe

:54:38.:54:49.

that. There are lots of people who are inclined towards the Labour

:54:49.:54:53.

Party whose supporters because they see as campaigning on local issues.

:54:53.:54:59.

There are a lot of people who say the main problem is the man at the

:54:59.:55:05.

top for your party. Nick Clegg read a remarkable performance in the 2010

:55:05.:55:13.

debate. His ratings are very low. You have got to look at the facts,

:55:13.:55:19.

Nick Clegg's ratings are lower than Margaret Thatcher 's where before

:55:19.:55:25.

she left. We are still winning in our constituency where Nick Clegg as

:55:25.:55:29.

leader. We have a huge amount of support in our area. We are

:55:29.:55:34.

campaigning and doing well. We have the enterprise zone that is bringing

:55:34.:55:40.

thousands of jobs. We have a company that is bringing lots of jobs into

:55:40.:55:45.

our area. The Lib Dems are growing in some areas? They are not growing

:55:45.:55:50.

in Nottingham North. We are recruiting a lot of people there. I

:55:50.:55:57.

feel sorry for councillors of all political parties. They suffer from

:55:57.:56:02.

what the people do at the top level. People cannot vote for who the Prime

:56:02.:56:08.

Minister is directly, so they take it out in the local councillors. I

:56:08.:56:14.

think you will find that they will take it out on the Liberal

:56:14.:56:16.

Democrats. Now one trusts the Liberal Democrats because of Nick

:56:16.:56:21.

Clegg and the promises he broke in those very debates. It goes back to

:56:21.:56:26.

that, that's what many people think. We have delivered on the main

:56:26.:56:31.

policies that we have been involved in. I signed a letter to Nick Clegg

:56:31.:56:39.

when the votes came in on tuition fees. What about your party,

:56:39.:56:47.

Jessica? I think we have had is accessible marriage of convenience.

:56:47.:56:52.

I am going for an overall majority, all mean parties will be seeking

:56:52.:56:58.

that for the general election. In the key areas of the can make and

:56:58.:57:03.

welfare reform, where there have been significant improvements in

:57:03.:57:06.

reforms, there has been agreement by the two parties. —— economy. We will

:57:06.:57:12.

see separate campaigning by the leaders in the run—up to the general

:57:12.:57:19.

election. You say you would rather not have another coalition

:57:19.:57:22.

government? If there is another hung parliament, twice as many of them

:57:22.:57:28.

would rather be in a coalition government with the Labour Party and

:57:28.:57:35.

with you lot. I think that it has been, for the national interest, no

:57:35.:57:42.

one got a majority as we know. Two parties came together to form an

:57:42.:57:46.

coalition. There will be a natural separation. When will that happen?

:57:46.:57:52.

We will see natural campaigning, we will hear announcements from the

:57:52.:57:59.

party leaders. We would want to be an government on our own and put our

:57:59.:58:05.

own views across. We will be going for the maximum number of seats and

:58:05.:58:10.

we will fight the election on that. We will campaign for what we believe

:58:10.:58:17.

in. It will all depend on what the public does. The arithmetic last

:58:17.:58:22.

time was we could only go into the coalition with the Conservatives. We

:58:22.:58:28.

may be in agreement with the Conservatives but we have different

:58:28.:58:34.

priorities. We want tax cuts for the millions, we want that. I want to

:58:34.:58:41.

break up the happy coalition couple here. Every week in the House of

:58:41.:58:48.

Commons, I say the Liberal Party and the Conservative party marched

:58:48.:58:51.

through the lobbies to do things on health service, detrimental things

:58:51.:58:55.

to schools, to actually start to undermine our country. Then they

:58:55.:59:00.

come out and say, we are not really friends, we do not really work

:59:00.:59:05.

together. Yes they do. Night after night when they could fate ——

:59:05.:59:10.

thought certain things down, they are supporting this government

:59:10.:59:14.

together and they are both going to take the consequences in the next

:59:14.:59:17.

election. It has been suggested the best way forward as a party is to

:59:18.:59:20.

dozens yourself from the Conservatives. —— is to distance

:59:20.:59:28.

yourself. When do you think it is good to happen? We have different

:59:28.:59:33.

priorities to the Labour Party in Conservative Party. We have common

:59:33.:59:37.

to government with them to clean up the mess they Labour Party left. We

:59:37.:59:43.

believe in low earners and middle income earners into... Thank you

:59:43.:59:55.

very much. Here is a round—up. Millions of pounds worth of

:59:55.:00:00.

government funding is up for grabs for East Midlands's businesses.

:00:00.:00:03.

Companies are being invited to bid for the next round of the regional

:00:04.:00:14.

growth fund. 16% of shops here are empty, 2% above the national

:00:14.:00:19.

average. Be careful what you treat for. Gloria did they found she had

:00:19.:00:26.

as a prize Twitter. She treated this morning that she asked for is the

:00:26.:00:33.

gestures. The first suggestion came back because I follow these things

:00:33.:00:39.

very clearly. How happy are you that the leader of the Labour Party will

:00:39.:00:44.

still be in place come the next election? Why reject that advice and

:00:44.:00:56.

take advice from the Shadow Chancellor, I cannot think.

:00:56.:01:03.

You have got to be sober full. Does David Cameron follow you, Graham? I

:01:03.:01:08.

am sure he is one of my most avid followers. From the last programme I

:01:08.:01:15.

appeared on, and man treated to say I should not wear red Sox. I have

:01:15.:01:25.

tweeted today. Do you treat for yourself? I do about 90%. We will

:01:25.:01:29.

have to leave it there. Thank you deserves a programme all to itself.

:01:29.:01:45.

In a moment, more from our political Good afternoon. Nick Clegg says

:01:45.:01:51.

victory for either the Conservatives Good afternoon. Nick Clegg says

:01:51.:01:55.

or labour at the next election would put at risk the economic recovery

:01:55.:01:59.

is. Speaking in Glasgow at the Liberal Democrat annual conference,

:01:59.:02:00.

he said a coalition would allow Liberal Democrat annual conference,

:02:00.:02:04.

party to balance politics and enable the government to finish the job of

:02:04.:02:09.

repairing the economy fairly. It is my genuine belief that if we go

:02:10.:02:15.

repairing the economy fairly. It is coalition and Islands politics,

:02:15.:02:19.

repairing the economy fairly. It is dominating blood on their own, you

:02:19.:02:22.

will get a recovery which is neither fair nor sustainable. Labour would

:02:22.:02:24.

wreck the recovery, and under the fair nor sustainable. Labour would

:02:24.:02:29.

same commitment to fairness as ours, you would get the wrong kind

:02:29.:02:35.

Two 19-year-old woman arrested after a stabbing on Thursday have been

:02:35.:02:37.

released without charge. Police a stabbing on Thursday have been

:02:37.:02:41.

trying to discover if there is a link between the killing and a fire

:02:41.:02:45.

four hours later in which four Five people are being questioned in

:02:45.:02:51.

connection with that blaze. A Syrian government minister has described

:02:51.:02:54.

the agreement drawn up by America country's chemical weapons as a

:02:54.:03:01.

The minister claims the deals helps the Syrians out of a crisis and

:03:01.:03:06.

others war. The US Secretary of State John Kerry is in Israel to

:03:06.:03:08.

brief the prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, on the proposal. China

:03:08.:03:13.

and France have also welcomed the deal, which says Syria has until

:03:13.:03:17.

Friday to submit a competence of list of its chemical stockpile.

:03:17.:03:22.

Britain's Mo Farah has missed out on winning his first half marathon

:03:22.:03:27.

Britain's Mo Farah has missed out on He was taking part in the Great

:03:27.:03:29.

North Run between Newcastle and South Shields. Farrar, who was the

:03:29.:03:33.

favourite following his two gold Ethiopian's can mean many Serb

:03:33.:03:42.

favourite following his two gold Kenenisa Bekele in a sprint finish.

:03:43.:03:45.

A carnival atmosphere for the start was about the challenge. For others,

:03:46.:03:52.

walking it, so I have no time in simply dressing up for fun. I am

:03:52.:04:00.

walking it, so I have no time in mind. I just want to enjoy it and

:04:00.:04:02.

appreciate the crowds and have a fantastic time. For elite athletes,

:04:02.:04:08.

today's race was about who would be first over the line. Despite the

:04:08.:04:13.

wind and rain, large crowds turned out for the world's most popular

:04:13.:04:17.

half marathon, which attracts some of the finest women runners, two,

:04:17.:04:25.

including the Kenyan. There were high hopes for Britain's double

:04:25.:04:29.

Olympic champion Mo Farah, but after Shields, he was narrowly beaten

:04:29.:04:36.

Ethiopian's Kenenisa Bekele. It Shields, he was narrowly beaten

:04:36.:04:46.

thought I would come back and close the gap slowly. I managed to close

:04:47.:04:50.

it a little bit, but you can't take away what he has. Wheelchair athlete

:04:50.:04:56.

David Weir won his race for a fourth time. More than £200 million has

:04:56.:05:01.

been raised since the Great North That is it for now. There will be

:05:01.:05:16.

more news on BBC One at 6:35pm. So, did anything happen while we

:05:16.:05:19.

were away this summer? I thought heading now? Who better to answer

:05:19.:05:27.

than the best political panel we could cobble together for a tenner?

:05:27.:05:33.

Putting foreign affairs to one side for a moment, it seems that what

:05:33.:05:38.

happened mystically was that it became more apparent that some sort

:05:38.:05:41.

of recovery was underway at last, and that Mr Miliband still has not

:05:41.:05:48.

yet resonated with the British public. These things are a problem

:05:48.:05:54.

for Labour. Ed Miliband's mistake over the summer holiday was to take

:05:54.:05:56.

a summer holiday. And it looked over the summer holiday was to take

:05:56.:06:00.

the rest of the Labour Party had taken one too. They were not finding

:06:00.:06:04.

issues they could make their own. The only person who made an impact

:06:04.:06:09.

was Stella Creasy on online abuse. That is a huge problem, and it is

:06:09.:06:12.

partly down to the fact that there is this intense message discipline.

:06:13.:06:15.

They don't want to say anything is this intense message discipline.

:06:15.:06:18.

of line until they have got all their ducks in a row. It makes the

:06:18.:06:21.

party do at the moment. The terms of party do at the moment. The terms of

:06:21.:06:26.

trade have swung in David Cameron's favour, but the political rhetoric

:06:27.:06:30.

look at this headline from the is still with Mr Miliband. Let's

:06:30.:06:39.

look at this headline from the Sunday Telegraph. That headline

:06:39.:06:44.

might not be right, but the story is significant in that Mr Cameron is

:06:44.:06:46.

still in danger on his right flank significant in that Mr Cameron is

:06:46.:06:51.

doesn't need an enormous share of the vote to get an overall majority?

:06:52.:06:59.

Westminster group think. Of course Ed Miliband is in trouble. The

:07:00.:07:04.

Tories are reserved and. They are better organised, the economy is

:07:04.:07:08.

recovering. That poses difficulties for Labour, but if you look at what

:07:08.:07:15.

is happening on the ground, UKIP still pose a danger to Cameron.

:07:15.:07:18.

is happening on the ground, UKIP don't need to poll 15% in a lot

:07:18.:07:19.

is happening on the ground, UKIP those marginal seats, they just

:07:19.:07:22.

is happening on the ground, UKIP to get five or 6% of the vote, and

:07:22.:07:24.

that could potentially destroy the Tory lead. Lots of commentators

:07:24.:07:34.

that could potentially destroy the to say, this guy will never be prime

:07:34.:07:39.

minister, but it is possible that by default or by accident, in a very

:07:39.:07:45.

Miliband could end up as prime minister. It is still all to play

:07:45.:07:50.

for on both sides. If UKIP remains a threat to the Tory right flank and

:07:50.:07:56.

the Tories themselves are not really a national party any more, I am

:07:56.:07:59.

the Tories themselves are not really they will only target a few seats in

:07:59.:08:02.

Scotland, they don't get any big seats in the big cities of the north

:08:02.:08:05.

any more, they don't get the Ulster vote they used to get, so it is

:08:05.:08:09.

possible that Labour, which is more nationally based and has seats in

:08:09.:08:12.

the Midlands and the north and in Wales, so they could get in. I

:08:12.:08:18.

agree. The advantage of having a bad summer is that Ed Miliband can go to

:08:19.:08:25.

expectations. All he has to do is not dribble on the lectern, and

:08:25.:08:29.

expectations. All he has to do is will be written up as spectacular.

:08:29.:08:31.

expectations. All he has to do is He might not even use a lectin.

:08:31.:08:38.

position. The electoral vagaries of the system work in his favour. He

:08:38.:08:44.

still has a narrow poll lead, he is not out of the game at all. Of the

:08:44.:08:47.

three main party leaders, the only one who can be confident about being

:08:47.:08:54.

three main party leaders, the only in government after 2015 is Nick

:08:54.:09:00.

electorally. But if it is this bad for Labour at the moment, what will

:09:00.:09:06.

it be like if this recovery turns out to be real? It depends how much

:09:06.:09:14.

they succeed. Chuka Umunna was shifting the debate are living

:09:14.:09:16.

standards. They don't want to keep arguing about who called it right.

:09:17.:09:20.

Do people feel richer than they arguing about who called it right.

:09:20.:09:24.

in 2010? The data suggests that people don't feel richer than in

:09:24.:09:28.

2010. Because they are not.That people don't feel richer than in

:09:28.:09:33.

the basis on which Labour will fight the next election. It is clear that

:09:33.:09:38.

Labour are unclear on what to say or do next. They have just got to hope

:09:38.:09:42.

and pray that the economy is not as soundly based as it appears to be

:09:42.:09:45.

and that George Osborne is Tony Barber, who thought he fixed the

:09:45.:09:53.

just before the next crash. There are all sorts of uncertainties

:09:53.:09:57.

just before the next crash. There China, the bond market, the housing

:09:57.:10:00.

bubble might be blown up, and Labour just had to hope something goes

:10:00.:10:01.

wrong for Osborne. Chuka Umunna just had to hope something goes

:10:01.:10:07.

he would not get rid of help to just had to hope something goes

:10:07.:10:11.

There are all these criticisms about just had to hope something goes

:10:11.:10:14.

artificial schemes pumping up house prices, but he would not say that.

:10:14.:10:19.

It is tortuous. You see this again and again. When asked if Labour

:10:19.:10:27.

would repeal the bedroom tax, or the same thing with Royal Mail, it

:10:27.:10:29.

happens again. They will be falling on people who have not had a meal in

:10:29.:10:41.

coming out of the Labour Party. There is a kind and Gillette in

:10:41.:10:45.

coming out of the Labour Party. them to a politician's career. When

:10:45.:10:47.

they are under attack for a long time, the media get bored after

:10:47.:10:51.

they are under attack for a long while and switch the story. It

:10:51.:10:55.

happened to Osborne, who had a horrific 2012 and has recovered

:10:55.:11:00.

bad press as he is getting at the moment, because people find it

:11:00.:11:08.

tedious. Syria has been the big foreign-policy event this summer. It

:11:08.:11:10.

has remarkably led to a Soviet- American initiative to get Syria to

:11:10.:11:19.

give up its chemical weapons. The world will now expect the Assad

:11:19.:11:24.

regime to live up to its public commitments. As I said at the outset

:11:24.:11:27.

anything less than full compliance. John Kerry. Is this too good to

:11:27.:11:44.

anything less than full compliance. true? Even superficially, it is

:11:44.:11:46.

anything less than full compliance. very good. The only people who

:11:46.:11:49.

emerge with any sense of triumph are the Russians, who have had their

:11:49.:11:53.

emerge with any sense of triumph are biggest diplomatic coup. They are

:11:53.:11:56.

back on the stage again. B if you want to know why Putin even has

:11:56.:12:02.

back on the stage again. B if you because of moments like this. They

:12:02.:12:04.

were humiliated after the end of the Cold War, and a Nou Camp is a great

:12:04.:12:09.

power again. Then you have the Obama situation, because he has ended

:12:09.:12:13.

power again. Then you have the Obama where he wanted to end up. He has

:12:13.:12:16.

power again. Then you have the Obama concession from Syria, but the way

:12:16.:12:16.

he got there was so embarrassing. It concession from Syria, but the way

:12:16.:12:21.

made him look weak and erratic as a leader. There were contradictions

:12:21.:12:25.

between himself and his Secretary of State last week, and it has not

:12:25.:12:32.

between himself and his Secretary of him any good. I was in the States,

:12:32.:12:37.

and it was open season on him. I have never understood the idea of

:12:37.:12:41.

chemical weapons as a red line when you can massacre people in their

:12:41.:12:45.

thousands through other means. But chemical weapons are beyond the

:12:46.:12:50.

pale. The rebels are miserable. chemical weapons are beyond the

:12:50.:12:57.

have run out of time. I will have to ask you what you think about Syria

:12:57.:12:59.

next week, which gives you time ask you what you think about Syria

:12:59.:13:05.

prepare. Your book on Fred the shred is going well? It is.I am back

:13:05.:13:11.

tomorrow at noon with the Daily Politics at noon on BBC Two, where

:13:11.:13:14.

we will have more from the Liberal Democrat conference in Glasgow.

:13:14.:13:18.

we will have more from the Liberal is the start of our Daily Politics

:13:18.:13:18.

conference coverage. Next week, is the start of our Daily Politics

:13:18.:13:21.

will be back here at our normal is the start of our Daily Politics

:13:21.:13:24.

of 11am, when we will be joined is the start of our Daily Politics

:13:24.:13:30.

Grant Shapps. Remember, if it is Sunday, it is the Sunday Politics.

:13:30.:13:50.

Andrew Neil and Marie Ashby with the latest political news, interviews and debate including energy and climate change secretary Ed Davey on whether it is time to think again about global warming.


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