04/04/2014 The Papers


04/04/2014

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after a three`month injury lay off. And Andy Murray will have to finish

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his Davis Cup game tomorrow after bad light stopped play today. That's

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after the Papers. Hello and welcome to a look ahead to what the papers

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will be bringing us. Tomorrow's front pages. Beginning with the

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Mirror. will be bringing us. Tomorrow's

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front pages. Beginning with the It leads with Sir Bruce Forsyth bowing

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out of Strictly. The Daily Telegraph also leads with that. The Telegraph

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also has a picture of Sir Bruce, but focuses on the Culture Secretary

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Maria Miller, with the claim that she tried to bully the parliamentary

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watchdog to try to stop an investigation into her expenses. The

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same story about Maria Miller also features on the Guardian's front

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page, as does Bruce Forsyth with the caption "didn't he do well". And

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there are more claims of bullying from the Culture Secretary in the

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Times, which says she used threats to silence the expenses watchdog.

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The Independent has its own investigation into police corruption

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at Scotland Yard with what it says is more evidence of missing

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documents. The Mail claims that Chinese investors are pricing

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homebuyers out of the market. And according to the I the rescue fund

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for the so called bedroom tax has run dry. And back to Bruce, with the

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Sun and their cheeky headline, Chin Chin Brucie. If you heard a bit of

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clicking while I was talking, it was the highlight caps going back on.

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You see, sound effects. Let's begin with Maria Miller, the culture

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Secretary is under fire again in the newspapers. We look at how the Daily

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Telegraph is treating the story. She tried to bully the watchdog.

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Pressure grows. We have the Prime Minister coming to her defence

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again, but the newspapers are not letting this go. Just tell us a

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little bit about this allegation please, then. They are really piling

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on the pressure. The allegation is that she personally put pressure on

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the Parliamentary independent standards Commissioner who was

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investigating her. Telling her that it was perverse to be digging so

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deeply into her affairs. A lot of people see that and think the woman

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was doing her job. This is exactly what we want an independent

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Parliamentary standards Commissioner to be doing. It speaks of an

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arrogance and a lofty disdain for the proper systems of

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accountability. That is the quite shocking allegation. The former

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chairman of the standards committee has been saying that Parliament

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needs to implement tougher disciplinary measures. He thinks

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this reinforces the view strongly held by the public that politicians

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are just out for themselves. Doesn't look like that? Urn I think so.

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Interestingly, the more you read this, the angry at you become. Often

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there are stories running for days and as a reader you just think, for

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goodness sake. Why have they got their teeth into this one? I'm not

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that interested. But this is about morale is he. It will touch on every

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other story we look at during this reviewing session. Because it is

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about the lack of leadership. When you have a Prime Minister who allows

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someone who has, rightly or wrongly, irrespective of their intention, has

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received money she should not have had and done it in a way which

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brought her into disrepute. And then tried to get in the way of the

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investigation, and the Prime Minister says that's fine. She pays

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6% or 8% of the whole, we let her off the hook and she can apologise

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for 30 seconds and that is fine, what message does that send to us

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about leadership, responsibility, decency, and morale are the? I think

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that impacts on the NHS, it impacts on education, there is a whole

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culture in establishments and public service saying they are OK to do

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what they do but it's all right for me to try and get away with breaking

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the rules. `` morale as he. If she is censured within the rules and the

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watchdog does what it can do, why should the Prime Minister not defend

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her? Or is her position untenable? This goes not just to leadership at

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structures. It is astonishing that despite the whole scandal we have

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lived through, MPs are still essentially marking their own

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homework. This was a committee of MPs who decided what level of fines

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she should pay. MPs making decisions about MPs' abuses. That seems wrong.

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One of the starkest FAQ is to come out of this is that the structure is

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still look `` one of the starkest facts to come out is that the

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structure still looks inappropriate. We take our lead from what we see.

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If it's all right for them, we all start being loose around the edges.

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This is very naughty behaviour. She is not following her own code of

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conduct. Has she got to go? Of course she's got to go! What would

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kids think? It's someone else's fault. For goodness sake. Can you

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hold on a minute, you're in charge here. You just feel like it tonight.

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I have heard you had hyper mobility. The Guardian. Medics faced

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absolutely destructive caseload. This is so Richard Thompson, the

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president of the Royal College of physicians. He says hospital doctors

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are running around like a school did cat. They are not hyper mobile

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enough. A serious point that resources are not therefore hospital

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doctors to do their job of caring for patients. David Cameron came in

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and made a very strong pledge to protect the national health service

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funding in real terms, when every other department was taking big

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cuts. What this senior doctor is saying is it is not good enough.

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There needs to be more funding. So many elderly people come through the

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system, and the health of the nation is such that the supplier is not

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meeting the demand. This is a headache that David Cameron wanted

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to avoid. He thought he was going out of his way to give resources to

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the NHS. Senior practitioners rightly or wrongly are saying it is

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not enough. A real headache for him. Every week we seem to see the health

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secretary, Singh to sort this out. Absolutely. And he hasn't, it is a

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failure of management. Some of the medics are managers, and they can't

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manage their behaviour any more than the top of the BBC or indeed our

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Parliament. Managing is quite a difficult thing to do. And doctors

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aren't really taught how to manage, they are taught how to be doctors.

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And the fact is that we've got a breakdown, and I come back to what I

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was saying earlier, of Management, of morale at the comma of basic

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responsibility. In this country. It is a mobile phone culture. Every

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time something goes wrong, it you have someone to ring because you

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can't make the decision yourself. Those structures and processes are

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in place and are creating this trouble. If you listen to Stephen

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Moss, he will say to you exactly what other doctors are saying all

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the time which is that you can have on the same ward a team of Norster

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nurses everyone looks forward to coming on when their shift begins

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because the whole culture of the ward changes. And then a different

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team comes on. It is a tightly detailed as that. And you have to

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work out what it is about the management structures in our

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organisations that causes this to happen. If everybody starts

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admitting fault, irrespective of legal issues, that doesn't change

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how places are run, does it? But it makes it easier to start the

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conversation about how to put it right. If everybody is being

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defensive, no one can take the first step. I think Management does matter

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but is not a panacea. There will be pressures on resources simply

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because more people need care. We need to make a big decision in this

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country about how we are going to fund the national health service

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over the next three decades. There is a problem in that a lot of people

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think they can get away with low levels of taxation and high quality

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services. That will just not fit, effectively. To an extent, this is

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useful. It points that out and highlights that issue coming down

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the line. Aren't we to blame, because we expect too much from the

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NHS. We expect it to fix everything as soon as we ask it to. We turn up

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at A rather than waiting for Monday morning to see a GP. Are we

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being complacent about its use? I think most people would just be glad

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to be spoken to nicely by a GP, have a conversation about how they feel,

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and then just leave. Even in the event of a misdiagnosis, there is a

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more positive response to the interaction. One is far more willing

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to forgive a nice person and a horrible one. I'm sorry to reduce it

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to that, but this is about basic interactions. Most people are not

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complaining about operations. Those are, which is why we read about them

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in the newspapers. The day`to`day complaints are about the

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interactions with GPs, on wards with carers. It's not about a consultant

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who wasn't funded to give you a special drug. But if they don't have

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enough time to spend with you, whether GP... That is a management

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problem. Maybe also a staffing problem, which also comes under

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management. Moving on. A China tycoon buying a house. Earlier we

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looked at another story about investors overseas inflating

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property prices in the country. This now is a tycoon. A Russian

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oligarch, a shake, `` sheikh... And apparently you're a tycoon. They

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have bought a department store which are used to work in. It is a

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nationalistic issue. This was previously owned by Icelandic

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banks. It tried to sell it to French Company 's. The ownership does not

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matter. It is interesting that China has so much surplus cash and is

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willing to spend it abroad. `` companies. Identikit matters because

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these are just business deals. It's not about what it represents, it is

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about `` I don't think it matters. We always get to that, don't be? It

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is the albatross. The house of Fraser joins a list which includes

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the maker of London's famous iconic black taxis, sunseeker

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International, and Weetabix. These are regarded as British brands, but

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they are not that reddish in terms of ownership. I'm not sure it

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matters. It is not as though we are going to get Weetabix with black

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bean sauce, they are not down there on the shop floor. It's interesting

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they have bought a department store. We are constantly told this is the

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great market, Chinese shoppers spending their money on the high

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street. That is definitely true. What is often underreported is the

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reason they do that is there is a huge luxury tax in China. Luxury

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goods over there are much more expensive so it is cheaper to get on

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a plane and come to London or Europe and spend money here. I'm not sure

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that will be there for ever, so maybe it's not such a great

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investment in the medium term. We will have to wait and see. We will

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stay with the Financial Times. Three portraits. Tony Blair, angler

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Merkel, and Vladimir Putin. The artist formerly known as 43rd US

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president George W Bush has unveiled his portraits of world leaders ``

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Angela Merkel. I was quite impressed. I didn't know he could

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even hold a crayon. He reads books upside down. And I am thrilled he

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could put this together. He can't ever get the eyes in a straight

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line, but it may be that these shady characters, in my personal view,

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might personal view is he looked at these and thought it was shady

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characters which he has done all with lopsided eyes. Using a theory

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of facial profiling, that's not a good thing, is it? I wonder when he

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did these, he famously kept quite short hours at the White House. He

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could have been scurrying upstairs to do these. Apparently he told his

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art teacher there was a hidden Rembrandt in his body and it was

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their job to get it out. I'm afraid it is mission not accomplished. They

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are pretty dire. I would not want to have them hanging in my house. You

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would like them to hang in your house, because they will be worth

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money in a few years. A lot of people take up dancing for therapy.

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That's fine. I'm not sure they should be inflicted on the general

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public. Let's move on to the Sun. TV legend quits Strictly. Sir Bruce

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Forsyth bowing out. He has been hosting for ten years, Strictly Come

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Dancing, the hit BBC One show, and he is finding the live shows a bit

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of a strain. If you were standing for hours and hours doing and has

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live rehearsal all day with Tess Daly, come on! By the time you get

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to 7pm live on TV, Woody Ju just be wishing someone would come in and

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carry you out of the studio? You don't know how easy you've got it, I

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feel for Bruce. If I were him, I too would be retiring after all this

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time. One of them had to go. I have to stand on that catwalk from time

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to time, so don't start. He is going to be there, he is not completely

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going. Yes, he says, I'm not retiring, I will still be around.

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There is hope for Brucie fans. I don't watch Strictly Come Dancing,

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but I do remember watching him when I was a kid, and it is phenomenal

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that he has been going for that long. We have something like a

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conveyor belt here, I can turn it like a lazy Susan. That is if the

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papers, thank you both. Well done for surviving your first evening, it

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is not easy.

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