08/04/2014 The Papers


08/04/2014

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines. Presented by Clive Myrie.


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the time. And more on Sir Chris Hoy's bid to forge a career in motor

:00:00.:00:00.

sport. Hello. Welcome to our look ahead to

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all the papser. Isabel Hardman and Owen Jones of the Guardiola. We'll

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look at some of the front pages now. We'll start with The Telegraph. It

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is leading with comments from the Culture Secretary, "I have let you

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down." But the front page is dominated by Martin McGuinness, the

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Deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland, wearing a white tie, as he

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toasted the health of the Queen, as this evening's State banquet at

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Windsor Castle. Martin McGuinness dressed in his evening finer

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features on the front page of the Mail, but alongside is the dignified

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protest of the father of an Omagh bomb victim holding a placard. The

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Guardian leads with the Culture Secretary as well and the desperate

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plea from her Parliamentary aide for people to back her. The Metro talks

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about the death of Peaches Geldof. They say her father was a sombre

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figure as he flew in from the United States. She is also on the front

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page of the Star. The paper claims that drugs and suicide have not been

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ruled out as a cause of her death. We are going to start, Owen, with

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the Irish Times. Ireland and Britain walking to a brighter future, the

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Queen tells the President. The word historic has been used about 17,557

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times today and that's on the BBC alone. The fact is, it is historic

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and amazing? Of course, there's history involved. Ireland and

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Britain have a very full history and for our generation that's often

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quite difficult to imagine. The first colony? Absolutely. It was a

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colony which suffered brutally at the hands of British rule and that

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seems abtract often to some people on this side of the Irish Sea. We

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have a legacy which is quite bitter for many people in Ireland of famine

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and of colonial rule and repression. There's also a legacy here in

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Britain of a huge Irish community aRG usually the `` arguably the

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biggest in Britain, and for a long time in post war Britain faced

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discrim neighs. Infamous, "Dogs, no blacks, no Irish." They were seen in

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shop windows in postwar Britain and here there is also that sense of

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some of bitterness with the IRA campaigns. I think this is a

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milestone in the sense of the Troubles that are long behind people

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and the days of terrorism and colonialism and a new era of

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normality. Sure. Isabel, so it all seems fine as far as the two nations

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are concerned and the two leaders are concerned? And the governments,

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but if you go up to Northern Ireland, there's a coalition there,

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but it's so uneasy and in fact, it's fracturing. It is, but I think my

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generation are more aware of the desire to move on from the past and

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that is something that is emphasised in the Irish Times. One of the

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bullet points says, "We shall no longer allow the past to ensnare our

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future." When there are problems in Northern Ireland there is a sense

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among the younger generations that they don't want these Troubles any

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more and actually not every blade of grass in Northern Ireland is marked

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by your religious background and your position on the union. I think

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there is this desire to move on, which is what this visit is about.

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It's about two duns talk `` countries talking about their

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friendship. I know we are not looking at the Daily Mail, but you

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referred to it there. We have to remember there are people alive who

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have real raw suffering. People who love their lives and in the

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campaigns and had family members or loved ones who died at the hands of

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loyalist paramilitaries and also died at the hands of the British

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army, for example, Bloody Sunday. A peace process like this is

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difficult, particularly for relatives. When I have been to

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Northern Ireland and speaking to taxi drivers who lost loved ones in

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situations we can barely imagine here in Britain, but this is what

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peace process is always like. There's a sense of you have to make

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the sacrifice and the death toll is over 35,000 people, but that is the

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end and we can move on as communities. There's a huge amount

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of optimism. When I was a housing journalist I covered Northern

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Ireland and I used to talk to social landlords in Northern Ireland and

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one of the things they do is actually to organise shared space,

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where Protestant and Catholic communities live together and that

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would have been unimaginable, in the same way that these pictures of

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Martin McGuinness having dinner. There is The Telegraph, in white tie

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toasting the Queen. Did he stand for the National Anthem? It says he did.

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He said he `` it says he toasted the health and happiness of the Queen.

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The Sinn Fein MPs refused to take their seat in Parliament because

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they don't represent the legitimacy of the Parliament and accept the

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reign of the monarchy. You were talking about your time reporting in

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Northern Ireland. I think that the idea of different communities living

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together as opposed to every patch of land being either Protestant or

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Catholic is an unimaginable, or was, a few years ago as Martin McGuinness

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toasting the Queen and standing for the National Anthem. So many of your

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correspondents reported on Northern Ireland in the tough times still

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feel quite flabbergasted by what has happened today and how symbolic and

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historic it is. It's not just the last burst, but what they've seen

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happening. You couldn't imagine that happening when it was really bitter.

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Owen, the fact is, Martin McGuinness, his presence, while it

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is look ing to the future and the fact that some have suggested that

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he's a terrorist and he was a leader of the IRA in Belfast. He is now

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making that switch to peace maker, but the papers have picked up on the

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fact that there were demonstrations, small, it has to be said, but he's a

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symbol of that past. And it's difficult to get away from that. If

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you lose a loved ones in violent circumstances `` ones in violent

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circumstances, you are never, ever going to be able to move away. I

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would expect nobody would expect that to happen. A peace process like

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this and this is the thing, the idea rather than bombs going off across

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Britain and Northern Ireland, you have a Sinn Fein lead here appearing

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in a State banquet in Britain and also even more strikingly, the idea

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of the democratic unionist party sharing power with Sinn Fein. 20

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years ago it was completely unimaginable. For people on all

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sides have had to make huge sacrifices. There's a long way to

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go. Particularly the younger people, some bridges have been built, but

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you have peace walls across Northern Ireland and it's still very, very

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segregated. You have have a new era of relative economic prosperity and

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people investing in formed the way they didn't. I think very few people

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with ever want to go back to the past, certainly. But that legacy of

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bitterness among all sides, loyalist, Republican and we'll never

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get over. They'll be there for quite a while. Isabel, I know you love

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this story and I know you don't think it's gone on too long. Miller

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as mitts, "I have let you `` admits, "I have let you down she has spoken

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for written something `` "I have let you down." . She has spoken or

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written something. This is now 46 seconds if you read it out. This is

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a lack of wisdom at the centre of the Tory Party. If she had been

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contrite and apologised for what had happened, there would be some sense

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of an understanding that most peBs of the public ?5,800 which she had

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to pay back on overclaimed expenses is a lot of money. You don't think

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that The Telegraph and the Times and the sort of right`of`centre papers

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would be going with her with all the stuff with Leveson and so on? I

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think the link about Leveson was made by her own adviser. It wasn't

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made by the newspapers. It was her adviser, so I want to flag that up.

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They had it recorded. It gave them a reason to continue to push. No, but

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I don't think the row would have been as acrimonious and fierce and I

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don't think it would have upset as many Conservative MPs. If you look

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at those who have broken cover in the past few days, Esther McEvoy and

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Mark Field, everything they focussed on is the way she apologised or

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didn't. I think that's what really worries voters, maybe she didn't get

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why this looks so terrible. The 1922 Committee meeting tomorrow and that

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could be where the big decision comes. I can't remember how days

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Alastair Campbell said after a certain amount of days on the front

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page of a newspaper you're dead. I think he said it's a ten`day rule.

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Alistair's law, ten days. We are approaching that. David Cameron is

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quite different from Tony Blair, where I think they would have been

:10:02.:10:05.

ruthless and dispatched a minister. You could say that is pro`David

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Cameron, he has loyalty to the ministers and is loath to see any of

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them go. I can't remember how long Andrew Mitchell stayed in power. He

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lost it `` over a stone in weight and went through stress in battling

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that. The reason this is resonating is quite straightforward.

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You have MPs when they're accused of wrongdoing get their colleagues,

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some cases accused of similar wrongdoings to judge them and that

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sense if you are someone who is accused of benefit fraud and you

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can't simply say I didn't know the rules, I didn't know the system, the

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state will come down on you like a ton of bricks. The Guardian, Miller

:10:53.:11:08.

begins fightback. Basically she did apologise, accepted the findings of

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the inquiry. As David Cameron said a few days ago, that should be the end

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of the matter. This is the private Secretary to Maria miller who sent a

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message to her colleagues suggesting this was a witch`hunt over Leveson

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and Maria needed their support. Jeremy Hunt when he was having a

:11:32.:11:36.

struggle in the Commons his PPS did similar things to try to drum up

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support amongst colleagues. Unfortunately... He survived. He got

:11:41.:11:45.

promoted, became Secretary of State for Health. Which shows that was an

:11:46.:11:50.

effective campaign. The problem is that Mary Macleod didn't operate in

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the same subtle way as Hunt's PPS and the suggestion there is a

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witch`hunt when the individualser to Maria Miller `` advisor to Maria

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Miller flagged the link. She volunteered that link. And made that

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as a threat. That's why people are making this link because she did

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that. As far as the 1922 committee, meeting tomorrow, they're going to

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make the point, some one would have thought, it's those marginal seats,

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it's our jobs on the line because the public are angry about this. I

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don't think this is going to be the decisive meeting some people think

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it will. The executives meet with the Prime Minister before the

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meeting and will raise concerns raised to them. They'll go into the

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full meeting with backbenchers and doubtless MPs will want to raise it

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with him. He may be able to say to them let's sit on this and wait for

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recess which I think is the worst idea because they'll go back to

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their constituencies and talk to angry voters for two weeks. Their

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hope is this will just fuel a general sense of this is what the

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entire political elite are like, it will bring back memories of expenses

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scandal which implicated all parties. Obviously the danger for

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the Conservatives is this will boost UKIP who to a degree are a kind of

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none of the above box on the voting ballot. They'll be rubbing their

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hands at this. It's a way of sticking your fingers up at the

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political elite. The reason it resonates, a fall in living

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standards, and MPs nr the top % of earners. `` ` MPs are in the top

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percent of earners. They don't regard themselves as much of a

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service as they once did. They compare themselves to other

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professions paid more than them and saw expenses as a way of topping up

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pay to compete with others. I will repeat that an investigation did

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take place and they said she should pay back ?6,000 and she apologised

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and that would be her side. There you go. You guys are going to be

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back in an hour's time. Many thanks for that. Stay with us here on BBC

:14:14.:14:18.

news, at the top of the hour the first ever state visit to the UK by

:14:19.:14:21.

a President of the Irish Republic. The Queen welcomes Michael D

:14:22.:14:26.

Higgins. I am not sure if they're still eating at the banquet. Anyway,

:14:27.:14:28.

it's time for Sportsday. Hello and welcome to Sportsday. I am

:14:29.:14:49.

John Watson. Coming up: A dramatic night at Stamford Bridge as Demba Ba

:14:50.:14:53.

sends Chelsea into the last four of the Champions

:14:54.:14:55.

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