08/04/2014 The Papers


08/04/2014

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines. Presented by Clive Myrie.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 08/04/2014. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

We will have both results on the way. And more on Chris Hoy and his

:00:00.:00:00.

attempt to forge a career in motor sports. That comes after the papers.

:00:00.:00:24.

Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing

:00:25.:00:27.

us tomorrow. With me are the Spectator's Assistant editor Isabel

:00:28.:00:29.

Hardman and Owen Jones from The Guardian. Tomorrow's front pages.

:00:30.:00:32.

The Telegraph leads with comments from the culture secretary, Maria

:00:33.:00:35.

Miller ` 'I have let you down' is the paper's headline. But its front

:00:36.:00:41.

page is dominated by Martin McGuinness, the Deputy First

:00:42.:00:44.

Minister of Northern Ireland wearing a white tie as he toasted the health

:00:45.:00:47.

of the Queen at this evening's state banquet at Windsor Castle. Martin

:00:48.:00:51.

McGuinness dressed in his evening finery also features on the front

:00:52.:00:55.

page of the Mail. But alongside is what the paper describes as the

:00:56.:00:58.

'dignified protest' of a father of an Omagh bomb victim, holding a

:00:59.:01:02.

placard. The Irish Times not surprisingly leads with today's

:01:03.:01:04.

historic state visit to the UK by the Irish President Michael D

:01:05.:01:07.

Higgins. But for the Guardian, it's the controversy over the culture

:01:08.:01:10.

secretary Maria Miller, which makes the lead story, and the desperate

:01:11.:01:13.

plea from her parliamentary aide to Tory MPs to back her. The

:01:14.:01:17.

Independent claims some drugs clinics are offering addicts

:01:18.:01:20.

shopping vouchers to quit. And the Times carries an exclusive,

:01:21.:01:23.

reporting that the Ministry of Defence is attempting to block the

:01:24.:01:25.

publication of a book it commissioned one of its own officers

:01:26.:01:28.

to write, which paints a bleak picture of the way military

:01:29.:01:31.

operations were carried out in Afghanistan. But it's the sad death

:01:32.:01:42.

of Peaches Geldof that the Metro chooses to focus on ` it says her

:01:43.:01:45.

father Sir Bob Geldof was a sombre figure as he flew home to Britain

:01:46.:01:49.

from the United States. And Peaches is also pictured with her baby sons

:01:50.:01:52.

on the front page of the Star. The paper claims drugs and suicide have

:01:53.:01:56.

not been ruled out as a cause of her death. So let's begin. We begin with

:01:57.:02:08.

this picture, as the Queen hails Irish friends. Michael D Higgins,

:02:09.:02:13.

the head of state for the Irish Republic. There is an Irish folk

:02:14.:02:23.

ballad called the fields of Rye, talking about the two main

:02:24.:02:27.

oppressors of Ireland being famine and the Crown. And you have this

:02:28.:02:33.

lovely picture of the Queen with Michael D Higgins, and they look

:02:34.:02:41.

like best chums. The other side of this is the anger from those who

:02:42.:02:44.

filled the past is not something they are ready to let go of. They

:02:45.:02:51.

are living in it. One of the themes of this visit for both the Queen and

:02:52.:02:57.

Michael D Higgins have been that the two countries need to deal with

:02:58.:03:00.

their history and look to their future. But there have been protests

:03:01.:03:03.

of relatives of those killed. They say there are still questions from

:03:04.:03:07.

the past which need to be Ansett before the countries can move on.

:03:08.:03:13.

The speeches from both heads of state `` need to be answered. The

:03:14.:03:26.

speeches were about looking and moving forward. For people on the

:03:27.:03:30.

ground, that is difficult. Of course it is. It goes back centuries. The

:03:31.:03:39.

colonial histories, with famine, the Irish famine in the 19th century,

:03:40.:03:43.

the colonial terror which lasted into the 20th century after the

:03:44.:03:47.

First World War, and then you have the legacy of the Irish Troubles,

:03:48.:03:55.

where thousands of civilians were killed by loyalists as well as the

:03:56.:04:01.

British Army, you also have a legacy of discrimination suffered by the

:04:02.:04:05.

Irish community. We see a move before normality. That is a great

:04:06.:04:11.

legacy of the peace process. If you have suffered, as so many have, the

:04:12.:04:17.

bitter memory of a father, a son, a daughter, being killed in horrific

:04:18.:04:21.

circumstances, no one should expect them to just move on and put it

:04:22.:04:26.

behind them. A peace process says that enough people have died, let's

:04:27.:04:30.

move on and have a process to stop it ever happening again. That is

:04:31.:04:42.

what this is a part of. As you said, the Daily Mail leads with a father

:04:43.:04:55.

who cannot for give. This man's son was killed in a bombing, and he says

:04:56.:04:58.

there are still questions which desperately need to be answered.

:04:59.:05:03.

This is the other side to the visit. One of the problems is that the

:05:04.:05:08.

letters sent out in some cases suggested that some suspects might

:05:09.:05:12.

be guaranteed immunity from prosecution, staring all of this up

:05:13.:05:17.

again. Perhaps if the case hadn't arisen in the last few weeks and

:05:18.:05:21.

months, that would not have been such an issue. But things are a lot

:05:22.:05:25.

more broad than they would have been. `` a lot more raw. . Let's not

:05:26.:05:36.

forget the attack there was by dissident republicans, attempting to

:05:37.:05:43.

destabilise the peace process, it was by parties very opposed to Sinn

:05:44.:05:53.

Fein. So it was the last great big atrocity of the Troubles. And one of

:05:54.:05:59.

the worst it in terms of civilian deaths. It gave a renewed sense of

:06:00.:06:06.

determination to the peace process, which others had tried to

:06:07.:06:12.

destabilise. It is proving to be hugely symbolic. The fact that he

:06:13.:06:18.

went to Windsor Castle, toasted the Queen, Stuffer the national anthem,

:06:19.:06:21.

would previously have been unimaginable. Many who remember the

:06:22.:06:28.

past decades could not have imagined it. Sinn Fein did not take up their

:06:29.:06:36.

seat in Parliament, because that would mean respecting the

:06:37.:06:41.

sovereignty of Britain. The fact they ended up in coalition with Ian

:06:42.:06:46.

Paisley shows that this is a remarkable piece of progress. The

:06:47.:06:53.

commitment to the peace process in terms of stability for the peoples

:06:54.:06:57.

of Northern Ireland, written, and Ireland, this is `` Britain, this

:06:58.:07:08.

reminds us how far we have come. Sounds like praise for Tony Blair!

:07:09.:07:17.

You are at the Guardian now, and you have changed. Already. Bowen, where

:07:18.:07:37.

did you go there is back `` Owen. The media accused of a hidden agenda

:07:38.:07:46.

with regard to the Leveson proposals. The vast majority of

:07:47.:07:56.

voters, across the spectrum, UKIP might even be marginally more angry,

:07:57.:08:01.

even though three quarters of the population thinks she should resign.

:08:02.:08:15.

The reason this has caused such a outrage, is that if you are accused

:08:16.:08:25.

of benefit fraud, you get the full force of the law down on you. They

:08:26.:08:29.

don't understand why are MPs are allowed, if accused of wrongdoing,

:08:30.:08:35.

to have their colleagues sit in judgement. They don't understand why

:08:36.:08:41.

MPs, who are paid far more than them, at a time of long falling

:08:42.:08:47.

living standards, are basically regarding expenses as a way to top

:08:48.:08:53.

up salaries. That is why this is causing outrage. Leveson may be

:08:54.:09:02.

fuelling this further, but that is why people are upset. She was

:09:03.:09:09.

pleading with colleagues to support Maria Miller, suggesting a

:09:10.:09:12.

witch`hunt. One of the things exactly that very few colleagues

:09:13.:09:17.

have been prepared to defend her in public. Some have done so because it

:09:18.:09:23.

is their job to do so, but without a great deal of enthusiasm for her as

:09:24.:09:28.

a minister. She seems to have very few allies in Cabinet, even before

:09:29.:09:31.

this blew up. Her non` apology on Thursday, it was very difficult to

:09:32.:09:36.

find a Cabinet minister who thought she would survive the summer

:09:37.:09:40.

reshuffle anyway. She was damaged goods because of Leveson and gay

:09:41.:09:45.

marriage. She wasn't a great performer, as well. I actually

:09:46.:09:51.

disagreed with that. She was hugely respectful over gay marriage. She

:09:52.:09:55.

took questions from all sides. Watching her apology last week, I

:09:56.:10:03.

turned the TV on, and sought her colleagues sitting next to her,

:10:04.:10:07.

Jeremy Hunt. And then I saw the report later that showed him going

:10:08.:10:14.

back up there in order to show physically for the cameras his

:10:15.:10:17.

support. He hasn't come out and said anything, or George Young. He

:10:18.:10:25.

probably wouldn't, because he is the chief. He probably feels the her,

:10:26.:10:31.

because he has been through his own crisis. Most Tory MPs have looked at

:10:32.:10:37.

this and decided it was too toxic. I think the difference is between

:10:38.:10:41.

David Cameron and other prime ministers is that others would have

:10:42.:10:48.

let her go very quickly. You mentioned Jeremy Hunt, he was

:10:49.:10:51.

embroiled in controversy, and ended up being promoted. He would now

:10:52.:10:59.

think that he made a big mistake. Absolutely, people like me have

:11:00.:11:12.

apologised publicly. Folks, you can get this on iPlayer. Owen Jones said

:11:13.:11:21.

he was wrong. There is a difference in approach where David Cameron is

:11:22.:11:27.

loath to let ministers go. He doesn't have many women in Cabinet.

:11:28.:11:33.

He doesn't have to make her resign in order to sack her. What he could

:11:34.:11:38.

have done is insist on some form of public contrition which made her

:11:39.:11:44.

apology in the House of Commons. And possibly not use the words "warm

:11:45.:11:56.

support" . She has managed to fuel this as best she could. She gave a

:11:57.:12:02.

terrible non` apology. And Mary Macleod's intervention has not

:12:03.:12:08.

helped. Especially with all the things going on. The Times doesn't

:12:09.:12:13.

have Maria Miller on the front, actually. At the very bottom. And

:12:14.:12:27.

from them, how surprising! This is fascinating. It is a book from a

:12:28.:12:34.

captain in the Territorial Army about the lessons from Afghanistan.

:12:35.:12:38.

It is about what the government can learn from that conflict. The

:12:39.:12:42.

Ministry of Defence feels, their argument is that could contain

:12:43.:12:45.

intelligence material which shouldn't be in the public domain.

:12:46.:12:50.

But it is surely part of a really important public debate about the

:12:51.:12:53.

lessons from the conflict in Afghanistan. As we start to pull out

:12:54.:12:57.

from that country, you see everyone, left my right, and centre, offering

:12:58.:13:02.

their own opinions, when they may not have even been to Afghanistan.

:13:03.:13:07.

Surely this is an important part of accountability process. I think it

:13:08.:13:12.

is a travesty of their block this book. This is a war which began, and

:13:13.:13:20.

was over very quickly. It was one of these "mission accomplished" , and

:13:21.:13:30.

13 years later with many deaths and no peace and security in

:13:31.:13:35.

Afghanistan, a disastrous conflict in which so many died horrendous

:13:36.:13:44.

deaths. There was that sense, partly, it was because you had had

:13:45.:13:50.

the British quite humiliating rout in Basra in Iraq, and this was in a

:13:51.:13:57.

sense to compensate for that, and I think all people, regardless of

:13:58.:14:00.

their stamps on the conflict, would want lessons to be learnt in order

:14:01.:14:08.

for such an unnecessary loss of life to be avoided. If they block this,

:14:09.:14:12.

it could put people 's lives at risk in future and end Finally, the Daily

:14:13.:14:27.

Telegraph. How not to make cheese on toast. I hope we can bring this

:14:28.:14:34.

picture up now. We really lobbied for this. What happened here? The

:14:35.:14:39.

London Fire Brigade were called out to a house they are being used by a

:14:40.:14:43.

toaster on its side with cheese in it. That is quite clever. If I was

:14:44.:14:53.

the worse for wear I could imagine myself doing this. You are

:14:54.:14:59.

desperately cheese, you don't want the cheese to fall off. It makes

:15:00.:15:07.

perfect sense. Was there a problem here? To the house blowup? There was

:15:08.:15:16.

a house fire. I was going to give it ago but I have decided not to on the

:15:17.:15:22.

basis this story. Import and cooking advice. Bowen and Isabel thank you.

:15:23.:15:38.

Stay with us here on BBC News. We will have more on the first of a

:15:39.:15:42.

state visit to the UK by the president of the Irish Republic. The

:15:43.:15:50.

Queen has welcomed him. Now it is sports day. .

:15:51.:15:57.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS