20/08/2014 The Papers


20/08/2014

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Sherwood is still in the frame. More goals for Great Britain at the

:00:00.:00:00.

athletics championships in Swansea. We will have all the details in 15

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minutes after the Papers. Hello and welcome to our look ahead

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to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. With me are the

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journalist Lucy Cavendish and Reuters correspondent Tom Bergin.

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Thanks both for joining us this evening. Tomorrow's front pages

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first. The majority of the papers lead with the murder of US

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journalist James Foley by Islamic State militants.

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The Independent says Britain and America can no longer ignore the

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rise of a caliphate in Syria and Iraq.

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America can no longer ignore The Express says the masked man who

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appears in the Islamic State video is now the world's most wanted man.

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The Telegraph says David Cameron has asked for patience in tackling

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British jihadists British Muslims are helping police and security

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services to track down extremists in the UK, according to the Metro.

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The Guardian says experts are racing to identify the militant in the

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video who spoke with a British accent.

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The Mail claims the jihadist in the video has been identified as a

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Londoner known as John. The times says he's now a top target

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for MI5, MI6 and the SAS. Meanwhile, the Financial Times leads

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with the split within the Bank of England over whether there should be

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an interest rate rise. Let's begin. As we have been saving,

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newspapers dominated by the story about James Foley. `` saying. The

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Times has the angle that the hunt is on for the man featured in the video

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who it looks like might well be British. This is the next phase in

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the story from the point of view of the newspapers, certainly, we have

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had the news very well covered today by the news channels and internet

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websites. The focus today is on this individual. Obviously, the fact that

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he is British is shocking. There are questions as to who he is. They use

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voice recognition software. Looking at the accent he has and where he is

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from. Apparently, east London is the area they are focusing on. The

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authorities will have snippets of the recording they could compare

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with other intercepted phone calls. The hope is they might be able to

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identify the individual. It will be a tough task. In the video, he has a

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small amount of face showing. It will be a very tough task. I would

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like to comment on the picture on the front of the times, because it

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is extremely moving. `` the Times. They look absolutely devastated. It

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rings the story home in a human way. Going back to the manhunt `` brings.

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There is some sense that he has form, that he has been out there for

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quite sometime and has risen to some sort of rank. It seems relatively

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unbelievable that no one knows who he is or has any sense of who he is.

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As the Guardian says, they have said he has been involved in hostage

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negotiations. He has come from some work, he hasn't appeared from

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nowhere. You mentioned the Guardian. Looking at the headline, similar but

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different, manhunt for a British murderer with hostages' fate in his

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hands. That refers to the fact that there are other journalists still

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held hostage. There might be 20. The photograph and video images released

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show one of the other individuals currently being held with threats

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made against his life. The threats are that if there are further

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airstrikes, airstrikes. The policy is that there

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wouldn't be any quid pro quo. These people are very much at risk. Syria

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has become one of the most dangerous areas for reporters at the moment.

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The statistics are horrific. Both in terms of deaths and kidnappings.

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This puts a shiver down people's spines. The news from Reuters and

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elsewhere, this was a focus of discussion as well as being the

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story people were working on. Lucy, the way that it was reported to have

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been done in this video, and as the parents say, they feel haunted. It

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makes me feel so, so upset, the thought that you could actually see

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that happening to your own child is absolutely appalling. As I said

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before, the Islamic State have been committing all sorts of atrocities,

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they have been beheading people and children have been holding up

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pictures of head as if it is true the hunting and crucifixions and

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women and children being buried alive. Something has got to happen.

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The world is absolutely shocked by what is going on. It's not just this

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story. There are journalists out there covering this story, trying to

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interest people in what is happening and they are losing their lives. A

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quick look at the Telegraph. Again, same story, different headline, and

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different news of the picture involved, another life in British

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jihadist's hands. Another journalist parading in front of the cameras. No

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doubt, pressure on politicians in America and the UK. Something must

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be done. But, what? Of course, the independent very much focuses on

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that as well. There is a Catch`22 `` the Independent. It isn't an easy

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situation become involved in. We know that from previous involvement

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in Iraq. There are also, occasions because Western governments are keen

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to pressure Baghdad to come up with a conclusive government than was

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previously there under Nouri al`Maliki. The feeling is that if

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the US intervenes too readily, it removes the pressure on the

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government in Iraq and in Baghdad to be more inclusive and again, that

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might recreate the conditions that help foster Islamic State. Might

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inclusive of who? The Sunnis Mac. `` Sunnis. He referred to the front

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page of the Independent. There is a map on the front, which the red

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areas where it says, ISIS residents. `` presence. A lot of the headlines

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are quite, this is happening, that is happening, though where it are

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quite, this is happening, that is happening, though where do we go

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from here? I would be interested to know what is said on it. No wonder

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it `` no one does have the answer. Hopefully, the Independent can give

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us some pointers stalwart no doubt, despite the terrible tragedy, this

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is a situation that would be days or weeks, we suspect it won't he ``

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might be months or weeks. There won't be rapid military involvement.

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Perhaps, a step up for military support for the Kurds. It seems that

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France and Germany are moving closer to that. There isn't evidence that

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this is something that will be... I don't think it can just be up to the

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Kurds, you know, to get rid of this. It is a difficult situation.

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Other stories making the headlines. Let's look at the Financial Times

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because there has been... This got swept away early in the news agenda

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about interest rates. The headline that the Bank of England split

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signals end to era of low rates because two members suggested rates

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should rise. We are at an historic low of 0.5 of 1% and it looks as

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though the pressure is growing and it is likely to come. The pound

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strengthened because of that. This was unexpected. It probably would

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have been the news story of the day is it wasn't for other advents. We

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have had record low interest rates for a long period of time because

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the economy has been in the doldrums. Now, it looks like things

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have been turning. People weren't expecting murders of that bank to be

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voting for hikes. We aren't out of the doldrums yet. Recently, it has

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been weak. I am not sure how many viewers feel comfortable, especially

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with wage disinflation, whether they feel ready for interest`rate right,

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rise. This is really the question. `` interest`rate rise. Those with

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mortgage debt, this is a big story. This is a very bad idea for those

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with debt. Most people don't think the standard of living has gone up

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and most people's wages haven't gone up. I think it will be crippling for

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the average person. The timing could be interesting. If they are looking

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at spring next year it will be close to the general election. I would sit

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on it if I was them. They are independent, I think. They will be

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happy about it. Might be some interesting conversations between

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the Exchequer and... There might be hopes with certain people in the

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Exchequer that that move would be taken. It is on a knife edge and

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there is a political gain here as well, a backdrop, but of course,

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there is the Monetary Policy Committee which are independent. So,

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yes, they shouldn't be taking account of these things. Lastly, we

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return to the Guardian, which this time has a story about GCSE. In

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about ten hours, there will be the opening of envelopes, protecting,

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e`mails, results coming through. You have a look about a mum who has been

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there, done that. I have been there and I have done that. This

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particular story suggests that because of the way that the recent

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changes to exams have been made, which is that they are awaited at

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the end, the results I weighed at the end, rather than taking stages,

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that the seeds and `` is advantages of some schools `` weighed. Yes, and

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I am fed up with this changing idea of what is right and what isn't

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right. On the other hand, we have this thing where people were tested

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over a period of time. Now, suddenly, it is at the end, so that

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people I know who have taken their GCSEs at this year take the entire

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summer sitting the exam. That is very difficult. They need to sort

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out what they are doing. Exam grades are fluctuating massively. There are

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students tomorrow who will wake up expecting to get As and they will

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suddenly get Cs. It is very disappointing and concerning on a

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personal. What it seems that too many must have accrued without hard

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exams at the end, which is what Michael Gove was doing. It is not

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just the ability to perform. But what about those who say that life

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isn't like that? In one sense, if you are coming at it from the point

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of view of employers, you want employees to deliver well all the

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time, not just to be occasionally great. You can make the argument

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both ways. This is a technical issue and it is shifting the balance from

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60`40 back to 40`60. People of the future depend upon it. It is

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difficult to know exactly what the facts of this case are and I suppose

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this is why it ends up being, on the one hand, a risk, but the education

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regulator says there is no risk, no one will be disadvantaged. Lucy, is

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said that girls tend to perform worse than boys in this system,

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anyway. Girls perform better in coursework because, you know, we are

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well`behaved and put our energy and effort into it, whereas the boys

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wait and then cram massively and do a big flurry at the end. I think it

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is sexist, actually. Guilty as charged. It will affect many, many

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people. Thank you very much indeed. That is it for the papers this

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evening. Thanks to our guests. Stay with us here at on BBC News because

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at midnight we have more on the international outrage after the

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murder of James Foley I an Islamist militant. Coming up next, it's time

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for Sportsday.

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