24/08/2014 The Papers


24/08/2014

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Johansson pushes her brain to the limit in the thriller Lucy, and the

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rest of this week's top releases, with Anna Smith. Welcome to our

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lookahead at what the papers will be bringing us. With me are Tim Stanley

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from the Telegraph and the journalist Shyama Perera. Tomorrow's

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front pages first, starting with: Death of a screen legend ` the

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Independent pays tribute to Richard Attenborough on its front page. Lord

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Attenborough's death is also on the front page of the Times, the

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newspaper singling out the film Ghandi for praise. The Daily

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Telegraph leads on the British aid worker with the Ebola virus brought

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from Sierra Leone to the UK for treatment. The Foreign Secretary is

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warning about the possibility of an attack by Islamic State in the UK is

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on the front page of the Express. While the Guardian concentrates on

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the forces ranged against Islamic State in Iraq. The Daily Mail has

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more detail on the British aid worker suffering from Ebola. And the

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Sun also leads on the Ebola patient coming home for treatment. So let's

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make a start. And sad news this evening, in The Independent, with

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this wonderful picture of Richard Attenborough who we have learnt in

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the last 1.5 hours has died aged 90. Interesting choice of picture, many

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have the smiling bearded face, but this is the face of the dreadful and

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rather sinister Pinkie from his early career. It is the first thing

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I thought of, in the end of the movie, what you want me to say is I

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love you, but I don't, but the record catches, and it just said I

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love you, I love you. Good timing that we have the First World War

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season, Oh, What a Lovely War actually improves on the stage play.

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His acting could be very subtle and incredibly creepy. His performances

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can be so still, magisterial, cunning, devious, it actually makes

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your skin crawl when he says to his victims how about a nice cup of tea?

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It is very scary. When you look back at his work and think about what

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stands out, it is those very quiet performances like Pinkie that held

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your attention even though they didn't demand it. What is so

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fascinating is that contrast to the many saw in real life. And people so

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fond of him because of that great smile and that open attitude and

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compassion he showed in other areas of his life. absolutely, and unlike

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him I am not so familiar with his body of work. I just know him from

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Gandhi, as the old bloke in Jurassic Park, thespians refer to him, and

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you always saw him turning up doing appeals, and he was just larger than

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life. And of course, he spawned a brilliant director in his son

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Michael Attenborough. This just draws your attention, every now and

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then there is the dynasties. It suddenly starts to disappear. I

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think part of my reaction to this is that sense of loss, of history. A

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piece of history is going, and it just reminds you that there are

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sometimes families that make a difference. In particular way, and

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that is the family led by Richard Attenborough. The politics and the

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art art inseparable. Gandhi is a great film, the entire apartheid

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films are excellent `` and the apartheid. He is a voice for

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compassionate liberal progressivism `` Anti`apartheid. He was respected

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in the developing world and the West, and it is a really sad loss.

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We will miss him. And some lovely photos for people to look at in the

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front pages. On the Times, that much more familiar face, really. A much

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more recent picture, the glasses and that wonderful beard, and such an

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open face. So remembering Richard Attenborough. As we look at the

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Times, let's change turned slightly, and turn our attention to

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their main story on the left`hand side, referring to the death of the

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American hostage James Foley, and the suggestion that the video was

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very stage`managed. Yes, they seem to be implying that it was filmed

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for a particular kind of western audience. And the execution happened

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at a different time. It is a disturbing thing to have to

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consider. It suggest, if correct, that this was aimed at a western

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audience, and particularly a British one, but they managed it so it would

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have a particular impact on people watching. What is remarkable about

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this outfit is its sense of what propaganda is. I have never

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understood why ISIS or Islamic State or whatever they call it, doesn't

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sell itself as a more illuminating and enlightened force. I don't

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understand why it is trying to reject itself across the world as a

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grotesque, murderous, terrorist movement. And it speaks to the death

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cult like nature of it. You have to put it in the same racquet as the

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Khmer Rouge or the SS. The idea that they are projecting that throughout

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the world is chilling. We don't want to talk too much about the details,

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but the suggestion is that this tradition man might be what they

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call a front man rather than the actual killer used at the beginning

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of the video. `` British man. Somebody very cunningly thought we

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need a British person as the front man of this piece. Two as I

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understand this was commissioned by The Times, a forensic look at the

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video. And somebody is quoted as saying my feeling is that the

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execution may have happened after the camera was stopped, and they

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show, an English guy because he is an English speaking member for an

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English`speaking audience. It sends a powerful message that it doesn't

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matter where you are from, your allegiance is with the Islamic

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State, and one`day Islamic State will encompass the entire world in

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terms of their thinking. It is exactly as we are describing. But

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this is just one reading of how it has been managed. We don't know if

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this is right either. What it does, I think this whole Islamic State

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press campaign is just extraordinary. I think the way they

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have used Twitter, and it reminds you of a kind of horrendous

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Reservoir dogs thing, where they discuss hamburgers and the next

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minute go out and shoot people `` Reservoir Dobbs. It is very spooky

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how they have played this `` how Reservoir Dogs. It is that strange

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mix of savagery but also being both a with Twitter. An odd mix of the

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mediaeval and the post`modern `` aux fait. And picking up on that idea we

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discussed a few weeks ago with other videos, with British people in them,

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fighting overseas for Islamic groups, the idea that they are very

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slick and as recruiting tools they make it look somehow very menacing,

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very appealing to people of a certain mindset, and think that

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could be met, and somehow for the darker minds, it is... Hooters this

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appeal to? Friend of mine to the study at Cambridge of the Columbine

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massacre. He addressed Wade is that so many people who do school

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shootings in the US turn out to be fans of Hitler. His theory was that

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when you feel like an outcast in society and hate everyone else, you

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pick the figure whose society has most consistently rejected and

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loathed. So there isn't really a substantial Nazi ideology behind

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people who do terrible things in the name of Hitler, but they identify

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with what society most Paetz. And I wonder if there is an element of

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that in this. They are trying to appeal to bear people who are very

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lonely, hate everyone else, and latch onto people who everyone

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despises. If you look at the broader series of events in that part of the

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world, what I find shocking is for we went into Iraq, I can remember

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the footage of UN inspectors being shown around the parts where the

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so`called weapons of mass destruction were supposed to be

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hidden, and it was women showing them around. And you just saw women

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in everything. Now you don't see that anywhere, which goes to show,

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to me, that everybody is capable, actually, quite a change in the way

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they think. It is these societies have gone from being secular, from

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being fairly equal, from being quite open, just like that, into being

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tribal, male dominated, that says to me that could happen anywhere, quite

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frankly. All it requires is the right argument at the right trigger.

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And these guys are just, they were closer to the trigger and the rest

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of us. Let's turn our attention to the Daily Telegraph. Like many of

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the newspapers they have picked up on the return of the British Ebola

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victim who has been flown into an RAF base this evening and is being

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treated at the Royal Free Hospital. And he raised an eyebrow. I am not

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worried about the NHS solving the problem when the worker was here,

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what I'm unsure about is how much it cost to transport him here. It is

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either funded by the government by the RAF or by the agency for which

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he works, or it is funded by medical insurance, because if he has fallen

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ill overseas, and I am interested to know how he was brought here, how

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much it cost, and who paid. Because that has quite big implications. And

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if you are asking me whether the government should pay, I think the

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government has to pay very hard. If it is privileging British people

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dying in the rest of the world but not everybody else dying around

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them, and spending hundreds of thousands that might save half of

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those people there, heading that one person out, actually, is that right?

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I'm not sure I think so. And I also wonder if, when we choose to go into

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places where we are putting ourselves at risk, we should expect

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our government to come in and save us, when something goes wrong? Well

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I would. I would certainly hope they would. You would like to think when

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you have gone for a noble purpose, to help and to volunteer... I don't

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think it matters what the paper says, I think you're asking to

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congregate at a question about something which the rest of us think

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is just fantastic we have done. I just think it is great that we have

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gone in, got this guy out, will treat him, and that will be

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fantastic. I am focused on that. The British government is there to look

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after British subjects. So if one of our people is overseas, they are our

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priority. And this is a unique circumstance. Because of the

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particular nature of this disease, and maybe we have some self interest

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in making sure that it doesn't spread, because our British person

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staggers home and end up spreading it that way. I don't know what the

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reasoning is. As I was saying earlier, I like to think of this as

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NHS SAS style operation, nurses swooping in on parachutes and

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getting this guy out. I think it is fantastic and a price worth paying.

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We are starting to get a little bit more information. 29 years old they

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are naming him as William. It has captured the public imagination.

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What is slightly worrying, as you are saying earlier, the lack of

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resources when this guy does get home. The report I was reading about

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the particular hospital he was going to, it only has two beds of the

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riding needed to deal with this kind of disease. And is the only one in

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the UK, possibly in Europe. And the beds cost money ?5,000 each. Serious

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stuff. Let's look at the Guardian. They

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have got the Independent debate between Alistair Darling and Alex

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Salmond. They are talking about the NHS. I just want to know what the

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answer is. What will they do in Scotland that is different to what

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we do here for the NHS? I want to know how they will be in charge of

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it and how it will be a much bigger fish that they have two Fry. I don't

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see how he can get past the issue of the currency. It doesn't matter what

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subjects he brings up tomorrow. It's that argument that if you vote for

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independence, you will get a socialist utopia. They will get the

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debt that is 86% of the GDP. If they formed a government, he would have

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to be more conservative fiscally than the current government in

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London. What is upsetting is that he is setting the union against itself.

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He is saying that Scots will always do vote for a Liberal government. It

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implies that all English people vote Tory in fact there is something

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wrong with voting Tory. If that is what the United Kingdom has voted

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for, and that government is at liberty to do it. If you don't agree

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with that, vote for a different party, but do virtually. `` but

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don't vote to leave. Are you going to watch the debate? Not a lot of

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enthusiasm. Stay with us here on BBC News. At midnight, we look back at

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the life of Richard Attenborough, one of the country's greatest

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actors, who has died aged 90. Coming up next, it's time for the Film

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Review which was recorded before the death of Lord Attenborough was

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announced. Hello and welcome to the Film Review

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on BBC News. To take us through this week's cinema releases is Anna

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Smith. Welcome. What do we have this week? A lot of action, a little

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