10/11/2015 The Papers


10/11/2015

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 10/11/2015. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

to keep the week it in the opening one-day international against

:00:00.:00:00.

Pakistan tomorrow. We will have the rest of the day's

:00:00.:00:00.

sport in Sportsday, in around 15 minutes, after the papers.

:00:00.:00:10.

Hello and welcome to our look ahead

:00:11.:00:19.

to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow.

:00:20.:00:21.

With me are the Evening Standard columnist Rosamund Urwin

:00:22.:00:23.

and political commentator Lance Price.

:00:24.:00:27.

The Financial Times leads with David Cameron's plans

:00:28.:00:32.

for changing Britain's relationship with the EU.

:00:33.:00:36.

The inquest into the death of singer Nick Cave's son Arthur

:00:37.:00:39.

The Telegraph leads with a speech by Sir John Major

:00:40.:00:43.

in which he describes the level of inequality in modern Britain

:00:44.:00:46.

The Express says there were 1.2 million illegal entries into the EU

:00:47.:00:54.

and the paper says that's why Britain should leave the EU.

:00:55.:00:59.

The Guardian says the Chancellor has been dealt

:01:00.:01:01.

a blow by a Conservative-controlled committee of MPs

:01:02.:01:03.

who are condemning plans to cut working tax credits.

:01:04.:01:06.

David Cameron's is pictured inside a jelly on the Sun,

:01:07.:01:08.

which claims his stance on migrant benefits is wobbling.

:01:09.:01:12.

The Independent also goes with the Prime Minister's bid to

:01:13.:01:18.

renegotiate the terms of Britain's EU membership.

:01:19.:01:28.

There are more allegations from the Mail

:01:29.:01:29.

The paper also shows the Duchess of Cornwall jokingly brandishing

:01:30.:01:33.

a knife, during a visit to a winery in Australia.

:01:34.:01:41.

At least we hope she is joking. We begin them. We kick off than with

:01:42.:01:52.

the Independent. But here are the Eurosceptics. They really were, some

:01:53.:01:56.

of them, angry in the chamber of the house. One of them saying, " Is that

:01:57.:02:08.

it?! " he called it a single rule. He is obviously a campaigner for

:02:09.:02:14.

out. There is a feeling that David Cameron gave rather vague proposals

:02:15.:02:20.

and then watered down the ones that seem like a red line only six months

:02:21.:02:24.

ago. There has been a quick change of heart on this. The Europe

:02:25.:02:29.

Minister went even further and said," Let's see what other people

:02:30.:02:34.

suggest we do instead. " Obviously, he is willing to find some ground to

:02:35.:02:40.

move on this. It has not exactly pleased the Eurosceptics. Some

:02:41.:02:44.

people are suggesting that he has stitched up a deal already with

:02:45.:02:48.

Angela Merkel along time ago, and the other EU leaders, to get all

:02:49.:02:53.

this through. What is your reading? Will he have a battle on his hands?

:02:54.:02:58.

There is a battle on his hands. It is not all about Angela Merkel. The

:02:59.:03:04.

other EU leaders have to agree on treaty changes. That is a tall

:03:05.:03:11.

order. Some have pointed out that this may be unachievable and we

:03:12.:03:14.

should be out altogether. There is no doubt that Chancellor Merkel

:03:15.:03:20.

wants the UK to stay in Europe. I think that David Cameron does as

:03:21.:03:23.

well. She keeps saying that anything is possible. That is the way that

:03:24.:03:31.

renegotiations work. It does not make it or attractive necessarily to

:03:32.:03:35.

the people who have to decide in the referendum, all of us, because it

:03:36.:03:39.

tends to be deals. It is difficult to pin down who said what to whom

:03:40.:03:43.

because it is done behind closed doors. David Cameron has a difficult

:03:44.:03:48.

task on his hands to persuade a very sceptical Conservative Party and a

:03:49.:03:53.

public and Bill about Europe as well and they are in bill at about

:03:54.:03:58.

Europe. This was his date is set out his stall. The headlines he will get

:03:59.:04:01.

tomorrow at the last things he wanted. A different style from

:04:02.:04:07.

Margaret Thatcher's negotiations. It is not exactly no, no, no, is it

:04:08.:04:12.

that is what the Eurosceptics wanted to hear. They want another Thatcher.

:04:13.:04:18.

That is what the Sun have focused on. They had David Cameron in a

:04:19.:04:24.

jelly, say that he or balls on a plate. He will not like that. He

:04:25.:04:31.

will not like that at all. -- wobbles on a plate. David Cameron is

:04:32.:04:36.

in a difficult position here. It does not want this to be the

:04:37.:04:41.

defining moment of his premiership. Is this all goes wrong and we vote

:04:42.:04:48.

to leave, he is done for. He has fixed his term. How does he stay in

:04:49.:04:54.

office after that? It would be game over. It is a policy that he

:04:55.:04:58.

created, isn't it? To deal with the far right of his party and to deal

:04:59.:05:05.

with UKIP. It was affixed to keep Tory party quiet. He now has to keep

:05:06.:05:12.

the price that decision -- pay the price for that decision to do that.

:05:13.:05:18.

It was a short-term fix and now he faces a difficult decision to get

:05:19.:05:22.

through this. I'm very pro- European and I think that we will vote yes. I

:05:23.:05:27.

have to wish him well even though we do not necessarily think it was the

:05:28.:05:30.

right decision. Will the referendum settle this whole debate that has

:05:31.:05:34.

been so dominating politics. Long? If he loses, he will have to go. --

:05:35.:05:43.

dominating politics for so long? It is a once and for all decision. As

:05:44.:05:48.

we have seen in Scotland, once in a generation. A new Conservative

:05:49.:05:53.

Party, new Prime Minister, they could say we will look at it again.

:05:54.:05:59.

Moving on from Europe, the Guardian has a fresh blow for George Osborne

:06:00.:06:06.

on tax credits. What is that about? The Work and Pensions Select

:06:07.:06:11.

Committee which is controlled by the Tories, has said that they would

:06:12.:06:17.

want tax credit changes, cuts, to be brought in slower. This is what

:06:18.:06:23.

Frank Field had put before the House of Commons. This is not quite the

:06:24.:06:29.

same way as doing it. In order to cut spending, George Osborne wants

:06:30.:06:33.

to save ?4.4 billion by cutting tax credits. The problem is that this

:06:34.:06:39.

will hit the so-called striders, hard-working people, not the

:06:40.:06:43.

scroungers but this government sees as the mortal enemy of everything.

:06:44.:06:49.

People in work and people with children, and people trying to make

:06:50.:06:52.

a better life. This is incredibly difficult for them to push, this

:06:53.:06:57.

time. What the government is doing is putting up the minimum wage for

:06:58.:07:05.

those over 25 at least. That is supposed to offset that. If you

:07:06.:07:08.

bring in more slowly, the idea is that it will have the fact that

:07:09.:07:12.

people will not be badly punished. They have been forced to go back on

:07:13.:07:17.

the tax credits by the House of Lords? It is obvious that he will

:07:18.:07:23.

have to budge on this. The biggest concern comes from the conservatives

:07:24.:07:27.

who had serious doubts about it. Some of them are saying that this

:07:28.:07:31.

could be the administration's poll tax, it could lead to that much of a

:07:32.:07:34.

reaction in the public. It is interesting. When I was working for

:07:35.:07:41.

the Labour government when the tax credits were introduced, it was

:07:42.:07:45.

fiendishly complicated. It was Gordon Brown's baby and he

:07:46.:07:49.

understood it and few others did. You understood it, didn't you? I did

:07:50.:07:54.

my best. There was not much gratitude in the country when it was

:07:55.:07:58.

delivered. We wondered why people want more grateful but as soon as

:07:59.:08:01.

the threat comes up to take it away, it becomes... Does it have the

:08:02.:08:06.

same resonance as the poll tax? It is not quite as simple as the poll

:08:07.:08:12.

tax. Not as easy to grasp. We will not see writing in the streets and

:08:13.:08:15.

all of those dreadful scenes again. One of the reasons we won't you that

:08:16.:08:20.

as well as Thatcher refusing to budge on the poll tax, George

:08:21.:08:25.

Osborne will budge on tax credits. Speaking of issues are so could --

:08:26.:08:31.

social equality which the TAT credits -- tax credits are supposed

:08:32.:08:36.

to address, interesting comments from the former Conservative Prime

:08:37.:08:38.

Minister John Major, saying that the lack of equality in Britain is

:08:39.:08:49.

"shocking". Major is a boy from Braxton who grew up in a council

:08:50.:08:54.

house and went on to become Prime Minister. He has experienced here.

:08:55.:08:57.

Not many politicians have that kind of experience. This is a personal

:08:58.:09:04.

intervention. He is admitting that he failed when he was empowered to

:09:05.:09:11.

do much about inequality, as it was not a big issue when he was in

:09:12.:09:15.

power. There is now this massive gap that has opened up between the rich

:09:16.:09:23.

and poor. It is something that he is finding desperately unfair, that a

:09:24.:09:29.

child may start with worst prospects than some others. It was across the

:09:30.:09:32.

idea that you have no security and no peace of mind if you grow up in

:09:33.:09:37.

those circumstances. He would deny it of course, but this is another

:09:38.:09:40.

attack on the tax credit policy. There is a nod in there to the

:09:41.:09:44.

increase in the living wage as you are saying. And improving government

:09:45.:09:49.

finances being a prerequisite for ending poverty. He says that he

:09:50.:09:53.

failed to do it in his having years as PM. It raises the question of

:09:54.:09:57.

whether equality will be reduced or increased under the next... The only

:09:58.:10:02.

Conservative Prime Minister we have had since John Major, David Cameron.

:10:03.:10:07.

It is an easy one for the Labour Party and opposition to say, if you

:10:08.:10:11.

will cut tax credits and also cut taxes on the rich, you will make it

:10:12.:10:15.

worse. Former Prime Minister John Major, in

:10:16.:10:17.

the Daily Mirror, former prime minister Gordon Brown saying that

:10:18.:10:25.

the Tories are betraying Britain with the tax credit cuts. Quite rare

:10:26.:10:30.

interventions from Gordon Brown. We have had a few in the last year or

:10:31.:10:36.

so. It is not speak up very often. I think that he is very right in the

:10:37.:10:39.

arguments that he is making. This is the least of their problems. You

:10:40.:10:45.

would expect Gordon Brown, the architect of tax credits, to be a

:10:46.:10:49.

very vocal supporter of them. He does that, pointing out exactly have

:10:50.:10:53.

we had been discussing earlier, the people hardest hit are those who

:10:54.:10:57.

want to work. They are not people on benefits of our people with kids and

:10:58.:11:03.

all the rest of it. There is an older and ageing politics that

:11:04.:11:09.

is... The opposition are in front of you, your enemies are behind you and

:11:10.:11:12.

the the George Osborne has to worry about other Conservative benches,

:11:13.:11:18.

not Gordon Brown. We can talk now about the Times's

:11:19.:11:24.

report on Sunday trading. This is an interesting kind of coalition of

:11:25.:11:31.

rebels who, as the Times say, brought down the shutters on longer

:11:32.:11:36.

Sunday trading hours, including the SNP, the Scottish National party,

:11:37.:11:40.

even though this is something that applies to England and Wales. They

:11:41.:11:44.

are claiming this as a victory even though they could not have won it

:11:45.:11:48.

alone. We will not have longer trading hours on a Sunday. I'm

:11:49.:11:53.

puzzled about this being an issue. Most supermarkets get around it by

:11:54.:11:56.

opening up the smaller stores at that stay open till 11pm anyway.

:11:57.:12:00.

They found their peaks anyway in big cities. But not that big... The tiny

:12:01.:12:10.

little... It is confusing for shoppers. Mike small supermarkets

:12:11.:12:13.

stay open longer and the big ones cannot? Well, quite. Is this

:12:14.:12:18.

something that government should be doing? I don't want shops open all

:12:19.:12:21.

the time that this isn't something the government should be doing. The

:12:22.:12:25.

last paragraph of this story is fascinating. It is a different angle

:12:26.:12:31.

on the story. The Queen comments on something political which she rarely

:12:32.:12:36.

does. She was igniting the Liberal Democrat who lost his seat. He said

:12:37.:12:46.

that there were more women than before and she said that there were

:12:47.:12:51.

more Scots. That is bizarre. There are more Scottish Nationalists but

:12:52.:12:55.

many of the MPs who were defeated in Scotland were also Scots. Not sure

:12:56.:13:00.

what she was getting out there. The SNP a saying that this is another

:13:01.:13:06.

example of them acting as the effective opposition at Westminster.

:13:07.:13:11.

But if Labour had done well in the election, they could be almost

:13:12.:13:15.

working hand-in-hand with Labour in government, that was the theory

:13:16.:13:17.

before the last election. Absolutely. The SNP on this one have

:13:18.:13:24.

jumped on the bandwagon, basically. It does not affect them. They

:13:25.:13:29.

already have the right trading laws in Scotland as it stands. It used

:13:30.:13:34.

the Labour's opposition, which is bigger than the SNP in Parliament.

:13:35.:13:39.

The deadly bit in the mix once again is the Tory backbenchers who do not

:13:40.:13:43.

agree with David Cameron. Now, perhaps Camilla has an idea for

:13:44.:13:49.

the way that David Cameron might deal with these backbenchers. I

:13:50.:13:55.

hesitate to suggest... She is looking ferocious there, isn't she?

:13:56.:14:00.

This is the kind of photograph that makes the picture editor's day. It

:14:01.:14:06.

is in several papers. Normally, a royal photo opportunity, they are

:14:07.:14:11.

happy and smiling. This looks like something out of an hour through

:14:12.:14:15.

Hitchcock film, doesn't it? I rather applaud her for not playing along

:14:16.:14:20.

and smiling the entire time and having a bit more personality. I

:14:21.:14:24.

rather like the idea that she was at the same time, warning her husband,

:14:25.:14:30.

Prince Charles, to behave himself. Don't mess with the Duchess! Don't

:14:31.:14:36.

mess with the Duchess! Finally, we have a cartoon from the

:14:37.:14:41.

Daily Telegraph. It is my favourite cartoon on the Russian athletes. It

:14:42.:14:48.

is rather brilliant. We have to bear is in a cave and one is saying to

:14:49.:14:53.

the other, I would never eat a Russian athletes, they are so pumped

:14:54.:14:58.

full of chemicals. That is a rather beautiful summary of the day. It has

:14:59.:15:02.

been the dominant story of the week, the doping scandal. The idea that

:15:03.:15:07.

this was based on its sponsored doping... Back to the Cold War, back

:15:08.:15:12.

to the Soviet days... It is not on the front pages of many papers but

:15:13.:15:16.

it will be a huge story that will develop and it may turn into almost

:15:17.:15:25.

a Cold War test of strength. Blimey Putin and the Russian authorities

:15:26.:15:29.

seem unrepentant. He is accused of using sport as part of his foreign

:15:30.:15:33.

policy. He will get the states dependent on Russia for oil or gas

:15:34.:15:38.

to threaten to boycott the bits as well if Russia were to be under

:15:39.:15:44.

pressure not to compete. -- boycott the Olympics as well.

:15:45.:15:46.

That's it for The Papers this hour. Thank you, Rosamund and Lance.

:15:47.:15:49.

Coming up next, it's time for Sportsday.

:15:50.:15:52.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS