20/11/2015 The Papers


20/11/2015

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - Martine Croxall presents a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers

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With us, James Martin from Huffington Post and Melanie Eusebe

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be from Hult Business School. Apologies for being over

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co-ordinated, like BBC News cabin crew.

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The Independent leads with the Mali hotel siege, with the headline

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"Another Bloody Friday", a week on from the Paris attacks.

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The same story on the FT, showing an injured man being carried away from

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The Times focuses on a draft resolution presented

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at the UN Security Council, calling for countries to take

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"all necessary measures" to fight the Islamic State group.

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The Telegraph says Britain is poised to join air strikes against IS

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in Syria, after senior Labour MPs publicly

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Security chiefs are warning Islamic State could be plotting

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an attack on British ferries, according to the Mirror.

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The splash on the Express is Chancellor George Osborne announcing

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And the Mail reports police are to probe a Tory scandal.

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We will of course begin tonight with the story that has unfolded today in

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Mali, in the capital, Bamako. Here it is on the Independent, another

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bloody Friday, with a body being removed from the Radisson Blu hotel,

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their main picture on the front page, saying that dozens are killed

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as jihadis attack a hotel and the group is linked to Al-Qaeda. They

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have said they are behind this. Whether or not it is connected to

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what happened in Paris we are not sure, but the French certainly feel

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it is an attack on their interests, as well as those of Mali.

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Absolutely, and this group, loosely affiliated with Al-Qaeda, is the

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same group responsible for the Algerian gas plant attack in 2013 in

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which eight Britons died. It almost seems, to put in perspective the

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amount of terror and carnage recently, that if there are less

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than 30 people pulled dead from this hotel, and let's hope the casualties

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are as low as possible, it almost feels like a victory, especially

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when you had up to 170 people held hostage. It is a horrible sign of

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how desperate things have become. 130 dead in Paris, 220 in a Russian

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plane crash. This is, unfortunately, a sign of The Times that there are

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now less and less people who have not been directly affected by

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terrorism in some way. It is extraordinary to think that, but the

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fact that there were French and US forces already in Mali who could

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help to bring the siege to an end so quickly is a reflection of the fact

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that there has been a lot of militant violence to deal with. They

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have had a lot of militant violence. With the Radisson Blu, there was a

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UN conference there a few years ago, it is a big site for Westerners,

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businessmen, businesswomen, aid workers. The Radisson Blu is such a

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Western Front in Mali, in Bamako. It is a victory, however it is still

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very much still a target. It just continues the trend, civilian

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targets, defenceless civilian targets, trains, planes, shopping

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centres. And how do you protect them all? Absolutely, you can't, and that

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is the unfortunate, frustrating and terrifying thing about terrorism, it

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is unpredictable. Moving the Times, looking at how we deal with of eight

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front group. A UN resolution calls leading nations to action. We had

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that from the UN Security Council in the last half hour or so, asking for

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all able states to join the fight against Islamic State. This is not a

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legally binding resolution, but it does allow governments to consider

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how they can contribute. Certainly it allows governments to consider,

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and I think it also lends government some aid. Cameron had to abandon his

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push a few weeks ago, and so undoubtedly this will help internal

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governments come together under the same resolution. Essentially, you

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have have the United Nations being a bystander until now with Isis,

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possibly the greatest terror threat the world has ever seen. It has had

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the constant veto of Russia and China hanging over it. Now you have

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this gruesome statistic this week that every permanent member of the

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Security Council has lost a national to Isis. Two Chinese citizens

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murdered this week, the Russian aeroplane incident as well. You

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almost feel that if they were ever going to act it had to be now if

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they were going to get the support of Russia and China. Bringing it to

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Britain, the Telegraph is looking at ramifications for a vote in the

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British Parliament. Set to strike Isil as Labour MPs defied Jeremy

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Corbyn. He has always said he is opposed to air strikes, because his

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concern is that our intervention in the Middle East has actually created

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more radicalisation, created more problems. Difficult for him to

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backtrack from that, I would imagine. He is being exactly what he

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should be, which is the voice of opposition, saying, let's look at

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the results of air strikes before. Does this work for us? He has

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received quite a lot of slack from Chuka Umunna, other MPs who have

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said he is unqualified if he can't protect the safety of Britain, not

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qualify for office. However, he is doing exactly what he should be

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doing. You are seeing a huge ground shift. This morning we had talk of

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upwards of 20 Labour MPs prepared to rebel. Now the Telegraph is saying

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up to 60 are prepared to vote against Jeremy Corbyn. If you think

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around 20 Tory MPs might be prepared to vote against Cameron, there is no

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doubt the momentum is definitely with David Cameron. Moving on to

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other stories, which have a connection. Boris clashes with

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Osborne over cuts to police funding. We have the spending review this

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week, lots of departments braced for pain. Boris Johnson is saying in the

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light of what has happened in Paris and in Mali, we can't afford to cut

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police numbers in London. Absolutely. You get the feeling that

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Boris and Theresa May are not going to play nice with the spending

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review next week. With every other department signed up to these cuts

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of up to 30%, the Home Office is the standout. The question posed by Andy

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Burnham from Labour and others is, how deep will these cuts be with the

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police force. He sets anything more than 10% would be dangerous, he

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wants less than 5%. Here you have Boris, defying his Chancellor,

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saying he is prepared to back the police on this. Let's move on to the

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Financial Times. Osborne set to meet deficit target. Ahead of the

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spending review, the prediction is that he will miss the target. At the

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same time, under pressure as well not to be so tough in his

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implementation of the cuts to the welfare reforms, to tax credits.

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Exactly, is a big tax decreasing terms of classic income tax,

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National Insurance VAT, corporation tax. He is going to have to figure

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out how to make it up. With working tax credits under attack, he will

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have to try to replenish them. Now they are suggesting that perhaps

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they are looking at your contractors and self-employed and raising tax

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there, so it will be interesting to see what the resolution will be.

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Economists are saying he will need a miracle to hit the target, and he is

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not going to get that. He is good, politically, and it will be a bit

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embarrassing for him, but politically he could probably blow

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the deficit by 100 billion and Labour cannot hurt him on the

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economy at the moment. Where it will hurt is front-line services like

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policing and libraries. The final story, still on the Financial

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Times, Cameron DeLay 's Cabinet reshuffle to deter waverers from

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backing British exit. People will have to wait to see which Cabinet he

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might get, according to this article. In light of what is going

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on, frankly, I would say it is a wise move. Over you could also make

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the point that if it is David Cameron saying it, he will be out

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before the next election, who cares? Maybe Boris or Theresa May

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will run wild. His main issue heading up to the next election

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before stepping down as leader is instilling discipline. Maybe Boris

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will just defy him, even with this politically savvy move from Cameron.

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I suppose he wants to keep people guessing, maybe people keep all in

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the Cabinet who are more on the side, if David Cameron decides to

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campaign for staying in the EU. I'm not sure if that will be a very

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successful tactic, really. We've seen that before with regards to

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Tony Blair and Gordon Brown and I don't think that worked, in terms

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of, let's keep everyone on tenterhooks until the very last

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moment. It will be interesting to see how this plays out, so I will

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reserve my judgment. That is what I'm going to say, I do not have an

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opinion yet. I never have an opinion! I am tipping Boris

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defiance. I have plenty of opinions outside, just ask them at home.

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That's it for now, but stay with us because at 11pm, Islamist attack a

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hotel in the capital of Mali. Coming up next, Sportsday.

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