16/12/2015 The Papers


16/12/2015

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Redbridge in the second round. That is all in 15 minutes after the

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papers. Hello, and welcome to our look

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ahead to what the the papers With me are Liam Halligan,

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who's Economics Commentator for The Telegraph, and the broadcaster

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Penny Smith. Tomorrow's front pages, starting

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with... The Financial Times leads,

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unsurprisingly, with the historic US

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Fed rate rise of a quarter of a percent

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in what it calls a 'landmark step'. Moving on to the Metro,

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which features on its front page the early release from jail of the

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former BBC presenter Stuart Hall. The Independent carries the

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story of the Syria refugees crisis ahead of

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a meeting in Brussels on Thursday. The Daily Express warns of a

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toxic dust cloud that could be sweeping into Britain

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from the Sahara. The Guardian features an

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investigation into illegal goods - including stun guns and pepper

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spray - being sold on Amazon. It's anger on the front page

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of the Times as the newspaper reveals that over a thousand charity

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chiefs are paid six figure salaries. The Taxman gets a beating in

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The Daily Mail, with MPs calling a 38-minute waiting time to get

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through to HMRC 'abysmal'. Finally, daffodils for Christmas -

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the unseasonally warm weather has seen flowers sprouting up all over

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the country and these ones should be in stores in time for the holiday -

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that's in the Daily Telegraph. Let's begin. Penny has broken her

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wrist in a skiing accident. I did. When I went to go have it sorted

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out, the lovely Doctor at the emergency room gave me a list of

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things I should not do, you can't do this or that, and don't eat other

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people. -- hit. I am used to being told not to hit children, but I can

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do the paper review. Let's talk about the Times front page. They are

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talking about the districts on standby as ices extend their control

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into Libya. Possibly 1000 troops and special forces. -- side. An Italian

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mission it to support Libyan security forces. I am confused by

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this sentence, they will not be in a combat role, but members would be

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armed to take on high-value Isis terrorist targets. That is because

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this is a rather anonymously sourced story from Whitehall that the MOD

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has denied tonight, but... The difference is the troops will be

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training Libyan security forces and the SAS will be deployed under this

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surmise to take out specific high-ranking folk from second act.

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How is that not a combat role? The Raby sentence is structured

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carefully is that the troops will not be in a combat role, but SAS

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forces could be. -- the way the sentence. Since the fall of Gaddafi

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they have not had a functioning government, and that is why Isis

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have such a strong hold. This is a response that may be Britain will be

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deploying troops. You mentioned the MOD statement. They say no decisions

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have been made about the future deployment of any British military

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forces to Libya as part of a international coalition force. The

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point is that because of the bombing in Syria, this is why they want to

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go to Libya, because they have the oil reserves. Let's move on to the

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i. I think you want to focus on something that is not the dominant

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headline, the story about fracking which we have been reporting. You

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are worried it is not featuring very heavily in the papers. I think we

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both thought giving their is such a strength of feeling around the UK

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about fracking, especially in rural regions, we were surprised that was

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not more on this Commons vote today to allow fracking in national parks

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and other areas of outstanding natural beauty. When we set not much

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coverage, we mean in the papers. We know it has been covered on the BBC.

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The Commons voted 298-206 to one to allow fracking in national parks

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even though campaigners have said ministers pledged an outright ban on

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fracking in national parks as recently as January. The compromise

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is that the actual rigs will not be allowed in national parks, and the

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fracking will only be allowed 1.92, matters were the ground. But a lot

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of campaigners concerned about this extraction of what we call tight oil

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and gas, is the pumping chemicals and chemical reactions underground

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to get it out. A very emotive subject. Which you stand? Don't we

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all think this is near the water table, so instinctively you think

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this is not a good thing? We are such a polluting... We are already

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polluting so much... But we need energy for the future. Lots of

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people feel right now we should have moved on to find something that was

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not well, and especially not something where you are involved in

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blasting something to get this out. It is so tightly packed. Given more

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oil is in regions of the world that are politically difficult, shall we

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say, there will be more emphasis on this in the UK as they has been in

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the US. Surely we have moved on? We were supposed to have by this time.

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I remember reading things you could make energy from. You are showing

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your age. I think it was 1860. Let's move on to the daily Telegraph.

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Again on the environment, they say nine out of ten cancers are due to

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lifestyle, and that includes environmental factors but also

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smoking, drinking, exposure to the Sun, pollution and so on. It is

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especially cancers of the breast, prostate and one. -- line. They are

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talking about up to 90% caused by extrinsic factors, meaning it is not

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something genetic, lack, but things we have to do. The sad thing is I'm

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sure there are loads of people who say, here we go again. In other

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words, stop having fun. The problem is we do like to go out and drink,

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eat, and instinctively, quite a lot of people find people who are not

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wanting to go out and have fun and spent five hours in the gym. We

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think they are not interesting. This debate ebbs and flows. The Telegraph

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refers to a January study by John Hopkins University, well-respected

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in the states, saying 65% of cancers are inevitable, in other words they

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are due to cell mutations, may be genetic, and nothing to do with how

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you out living a lie. Now we have another study in New York,

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Washington, which has been published in a magazine, that says it is down

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to your lifestyle. Skin cancers are caused in a high percentage by the

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Sun. When you talk about diet, lack of exercise, pollution and stress,

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stress is a difficult one to deal with. It is difficult to get rid of

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that. Thank you. Let's talk about the Guardian, because they are

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focusing on what is the big economic story of the day, the Fed rate rise.

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It was anticipated, but a lot of papers are calling it historic.

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Viewers will remember after the crisis in 2008 across the Western

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world, just rate were slashed. US interest rates have been down at

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0.25%. Now the Fed have raised rates. It was widely anticipated.

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Two or three times they have tried to raise them before, but just

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floating the idea and there were tensions. This response has been

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widely flagged and therefore it has been calm. It is not a very big

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rise. It is a tiny rise. When you take it in inflation, US interest

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rates are now precisely zero. They have gone up to zero, from negative

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interest rates. This means symbolically the Bank of England is

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now more likely to raise sooner than it otherwise would. Our interest

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rates have been down at historic lows since March 2009. Many

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households have borrowed heavily. The Bank of England brought out a

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study saying maybe if they'd of British households could become into

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trouble if rates went up more than 2%. 2% is a lot. Yes, but that would

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make it 2.5% before sub-prime. Why do they say a quarter of a percent?

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I don't know, Penny. From now on, I will say a quarter %. It just seems

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unnecessary to say a quarter of a percent. If you want to sound like a

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smart Alec, you could say 25 basis points. Gizmo -- there is no

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inevitability. It does not mean rates will go up. It is symbolic.

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Psychologically. We will not go in one direction while the Fed those in

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another. But we could stay the same. Yes, for quite a while. Let's look

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at the express. They have the dust cloud from the Sahara that could be

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toxic. We have had them before. Not so close to Christmas. Instead of

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snow we will get tossed? Where we talk about temperatures of seven

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degrees for Christmas... The hottest Christmas for half a century. Now

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they say we have these freakishly warm temperatures. It will be hotter

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then Sydney. They call it a blood rain. The sand falls from the sky.

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Of course there is an issue for people who have breathing

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difficulties. Anything that clogs up the air for anybody already... If

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you are a asthma sufferer. Deathtrap has issued warnings. -- side. I

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wonder what the likelihood of a red Christmas is. Let's look at the

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Telegraph. Bunches of daffodils being collected in a Cornish field

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to take to supermarkets in time for Christmas. Do you want to put

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daffodils are up for Christmas? It is very cherry. I'm wearing a

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cheerful festive scarf, but I should probably wear a canary yellow one.

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Dress up as a spring chicken. Why not? Put your rid of antlers away.

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You can't help but feel sorry for nature. You are thinking about

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hibernating and... Imagine being a bird. You are finding all of these

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birds. Is it alarming to think it is so warm in December and you are out

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in a T-shirt? Is it time a change? The thing is, they probably said

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that in the Ice Age. Do you think it is, change? The dinosaurs as well.

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What you think? And e-mail. Love and cuddles from Fred and Gladys.

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Explain what we are talking about here.

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What a nice photograph! It is a lovely photograph, they both look

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very happy. That is their Christmas card. It is not very Christmassy and

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he is not wearing a jacket, but that is OK. Have either of you had

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Christmas cards from the Royal family? I am always waiting, always

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anticipating. There will always be a moment. Anything from Fred and

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Gladys? No, I am not quite a 100 yet. Is that what you meant? No,

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obviously not. Yours is in the post. I hope your wrist gets better soon.

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Said why. I haven't hit anybody with it yet. I hope it has recovered in

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time for... Well, not Christmas, but New Year. I get out of the washing

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up! Just some news we have had in the past couple of minutes, the US

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and Cuba have agreed to restore commercial airline flights between

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America and Cuba. Coming up next, it is time for Sportsday.

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No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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