06/01/2016 The Papers


06/01/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - Clive Myrie presents a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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have the result from the game between Manchester and Arsenal. And

:00:00.:00:00.

the latest from the BDO. Darts championship.

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Hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers

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With me are the political commentator Lance

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Price, and Bronwyn Curtis, from the Society of Business Economists.

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The FT, which says the Chancellor George Osborne will warn that unless

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tough economic reforms are stuck to, it could mark "the beginning of the

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He cites the Chinese slowdown and plummeting oil prices

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The i leads on a story about five extremists it says have

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slipped out of the UK to join terror groups, despite having travel bans.

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The Sun says red wine drinkers are being warned to stop thinking it's

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good for them, with its supposed health benefits set to be rubbished

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The Mail says exam timetables for this summer's GCSEs

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and A-Levels have been altered over fears that Muslim children fasting

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during Ramadan will be unable to produce their best work.

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The Express warns Britain's set to freeze when it's battered

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by an Arctic blast next week, bringing with it snow and subzero

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temperatures heralding the start of what it calls proper winter weather.

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The Guardian leads on North Korea's claims it's tested a hydrogen bomb -

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it says the UN Security Council has threatened

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the country with new punitive measures, and there are also doubts

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The Telegraph says Republican Presidential candidate

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Donald Trump has threatened to withdraw nearly ?700 million

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of investment in Britain, as he hits back at attempts to ban

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And the Times claims ministers are now

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considering a tax on sugary drinks, after evidence showed it would

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It has a picture of Prince George who has started his first day

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The reshuffle that does not seem to want to end. The pack is continually

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being shuffled and shuffled. It is still going on. We have had three

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resignations today, so Jeremy Corbyn is to find three people to replace

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those who have left. It is a bit of chaos. It looks very chaotic. I am

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looking from the outside, I am not a political preacher will stop but it

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seems to me one of the things when I was employing people, I always tried

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to employ the best people. They may not always agree with me, they may

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not always agree with each other, but what you hope to do was put

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together the best you can get, and mould them into a team to go forward

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together. That is what leadership is about. This does not look like this.

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It looks like getting rid of those who have spoken out against the

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views of Jeremy Corbyn one of his supporters. Politics is slightly

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different from business in that regard. Some people would argue you

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want the best talent but also need to speak with a united voice, and it

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would save the Labour Party has not been doing that, especially on

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crucial issues like defence and Syria and foreign policy. That is

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trying is trying to do, have a united party. You do want a united

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party, and a coherent voice. But everyone doesn't have to agree with

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each other. One of the strengths of Jeremy Corbyn's new approach to the

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leadership is that he said it is OK to debate. In the past, we have been

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a bit too rigid in a system where everyone in the Cabinet or Shadow

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Cabinet had to agree with everything everyone else said. Everyone knew

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that is not our works. We would sit around and discuss everything and

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not always agree. Is it naive to talk about a new politics? Was that

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just rhetoric? I think it was. A lot of it was just rhetoric, and an

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excuse for allowing Jeremy Corbyn to cover up for the fact he did not

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have the authority. He has the support of about 10% of MPs on the

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Labour benches in the House of Commons. He has to manage a

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situation where he has a large body of support no body can deny amongst

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membership outside, but when it comes to the party in Westminster,

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who are the men and women who have to work with him, there is a really

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difficult relationship. This business around the reshuffle will

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make that relationship far worse. It is not just the three Shadow

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ministers that no one has heard of outside of West Minister resigning

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occurs to other people were sacked. It is that people who have a lot of

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respect because they are hard-working people are not only

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forced out of jobs but also trashed afterwards by some of the People

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around Jeremy Corbyn. That is unprofessional. That is an

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interesting point. Define Hilary Benn claims he has not been muzzled,

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says one paper. Those colleagues of his who have lost their jobs in the

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reshuffle have been described as disloyal and part of a right wing

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clique. Is that the kind of rhetoric that you would expect, especially in

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the political arena, when you want to be seen as capable of running the

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country? It looks very amateurish to me. It looks as though everyone is

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talking about everyone else I know backs, talking to the media. --

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behind their backs. That is not what I want to see. We voted the People

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who got in. They represent asked. I want them to be able to represent

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us. I find this sort of disorganised... I find it

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amateurish. You may be point as a voter, as a member of the public,

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this looks bizarre and amateurish. Are the public taking notice of

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this? One interview suggested it is a bit like the pre-season games for

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football. This is just the warmup, and no one really cares. It is not

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until you get close to a collection that people will care. There is some

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truth to that. Although people to form impressions of any process

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whether it is sport or politics. In contents is something people can

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smell, and it is written all over these stories and what has happened

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over the past few months. If those like months. -- it feels like

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months. It does feel like the reshuffle has gone on for weeks and

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weeks. It has turned out to be, compared to the blood threatened to

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bespoke, something far less serious. Yet it is all over the papers and

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broadcast media for days. That does have an impact. It may not have

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anything to do with their everyday lives, but the most important thing,

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if you are a political leader, every decision you make you should think,

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does this make my party more credible, more electable? All of

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these decisions fail those tests. Let's go to the Financial Times.

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George Osborne will give a speech where he will warn that the country

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is heading for rocky economic times. This is because of external risks. A

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lot of external risks. There are a lot of them. He also makes the point

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that last year, we had the slowest global growth since the crisis. So

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he is looking at these risks. It is China that is been all over the

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media. We have seen the stock market really volatile, crashing, and

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people are worrying about whether China is slowing down too much. The

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slump in the oil price, and a $35. -- under. Saudi Arabia and Iran are

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disagreeing, putting it mildly, and yet you expect the oil price to go

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up. But it went down again because you were not getting any agreement

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in OPEC. There is the fact that the UK economy, the numbers recently are

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much weaker than perhaps they thought they would be. It means the

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deficit might be higher. One thing the Conservatives have over Labour,

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polls would suggest, they are way ahead on economic readability. The

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latest poll suggested the Conservatives were 42% and Labour

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18%, reiterating George Osborne's point that there are not economic

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times ahead. That helped his cause any cause of his party. Those

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figures are woeful. It is a cause of great concern. It does bring it back

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to the arguments of austerity, whether or not it has run its course

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or George Osborne can continue to make because we need to be cutting

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back on spending and perhaps increasing taxes, which is something

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the Tories are normally reluctant to do. The problem for Labour is they

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don't have an alternative narrative. They say they are not happy with

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austerity and think it hurts the wrong people, but there is not a

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coherent alternative. One silver lining for some people, interest

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rates will probably not go up. Any time soon. That is what it looks

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like, because we are looking at growth that is quite soft, and

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coming out of the US Federal Reserve today, they said it was a close call

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on interest-rate hikes. They don't want to do that again soon. They are

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talking about another quarter point hikes, but it pushes interest-rate

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further into the future for everybody. Netflix launches in 130

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countries in an online streaming battle with Amazon. This tells us

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the whole way in which we get our entertainment is changing so fast.

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People are switching on to things like I prime and Netflix, and

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compared to the prices people pay for their sky subscriptions is a

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very cheap way of getting television -- Amazon prime. Some people still

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have to make these programmes. It is like journalism and any other

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business. If people don't want to pay money, they will not get quality

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of product. Have you got Netflix? No, but I have been looking at it,

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and the reason I have been looking at it is because I was checking

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yesterday my television Rundle. -- bundle. I won't say which one it is.

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Because they drag you in with discount, it has almost doubled in

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the last 12 months because discounts go away after three or six months.

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As they do with Amazon and Netflix. But they are very expensive. Just

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with movies and entertainment, and broadband, I am up at ?90 or more.

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That is far too much. I will look at an alternative. That is what they

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are doing in the US. How can they keep it so cheap in comparison to

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other satellite providers? It is called revenue investment. They are

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spending money to discount to get people in, to sign them up, and once

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you are signed up, most people just continue and don't look at it. Is

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that what Netflix will do? I think so. It is Netflix, Amazon, and there

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is too much competition, so there will be some fallout. But the model

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depends on dramatic growth in customers, which is what this story

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is suggesting. Netflix have 74 million already endured in the US,

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and 3.2 billion people have the Internet. The Daily Mail, exams

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being set early to fit in with Ramadan. This to accommodate fasting

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Muslims. They are trying to suggest this is a shock horror scandal and a

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threat to the British way of life, but it strikes me as sensible.

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Ramadan moves each year, but so does Christian festivals. The school

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calendar changes to accommodate whenever it is to happen is to be in

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any particular year. I don't see a problem right similar changes should

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not be made to accommodate Hamadan and the fact some kids are fasting

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and therefore not at that test. -- Ramadan. The suggestion is that all

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kids have to move their exams because of this. That could cause

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problems for Christian kids or whatever? Any kids. Is it fair? I am

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trying to find the opposition to this as well. You want students to

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do their best, because we want the best people to pass exams as well as

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they can because you want them skilled and in the workforce. You do

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not want them to suffer because they have not been eating. It is not a

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big deal. What is your story? On the front page. I think it is trying to

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put the word Muslims in a headline and suggest because sensible changes

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have been put in place, that somehow there is a threat. All right. Excuse

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me. Moving on to the Sun. This is an. A. Red wine is not good for you.

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What is that about? Back in 1995, they told us small amounts of

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alcohol, especially red wine, are good for us. Now they are not. Now

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they have decided actually, really, the health benefits are much more

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from exercise, eating greens and all of that stuff. All of that horrible

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stuff. Really they are saying it is bad for us. The fact is, we are

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drinking less alcohol as they say in this article. But not enough less.

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You have aged extremely well. The good news in the small print is that

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the health benefits are still there for men over 40. Which is probably

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both of us. And another group we won't discuss. And postmenopausal

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women. You said it. Busting myths on the inside page of the Sun, it stop

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you getting fat. It prevents cancer, wrong. It prevents memory loss,

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wrong. It prevents bug bites, wrong. It cuts heart disease et cetera it

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is all nonsense. I dislike it. I like the taste. It is not reached my

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memory so badly. -- damaged. You just have to wait six months and

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there will be a report that says the opposite. Thank you both. Stay with

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us on BBC News. Much more coming up.

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