16/01/2016 The Papers


16/01/2016

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow.

:00:13.:00:16.

With me are Tim Shipman, political editor of the Sunday Times,

:00:17.:00:20.

and Oliver Wright, political editor of the Independent.

:00:21.:00:27.

We can have a look at the front pages.

:00:28.:00:30.

The Observer leads with figures from the World Health Organisation

:00:31.:00:34.

The health body declares it a global public-health emergency,

:00:35.:00:38.

will overwhelm health services across the globe.

:00:39.:00:43.

The Sunday Express writes that millions of families can expect

:00:44.:00:47.

higher council-tax bills and bigger cuts to public services

:00:48.:00:50.

because of Conservatives' plans to reduce county council budgets.

:00:51.:00:55.

The Mail on Sunday headlines a poll which suggests

:00:56.:01:00.

the campaign for Britain to leave the EU is now six points ahead.

:01:01.:01:03.

It blames the Paris massacre, Cologne sex attacks

:01:04.:01:05.

and the Syrian crisis for the shift in opinion.

:01:06.:01:10.

The Telegraph unveils a new alliance of Conservative MPs

:01:11.:01:13.

that plans to push for Britain to stay within the EU.

:01:14.:01:17.

They warn against Britain leaping into the void.

:01:18.:01:22.

The Independent on Sunday has an exclusive interview

:01:23.:01:25.

with the head of Interpol who says criminal gangs

:01:26.:01:29.

made ?4 billion last year by smuggling refugees into Europe.

:01:30.:01:32.

And rhe Sunday Times leads with the terrorist attack

:01:33.:01:34.

in Burkina Faso in which 29 people were killed.

:01:35.:01:43.

Lots of other bits and pieces within those pages, let's kick off with the

:01:44.:01:51.

Sunday Telegraph, I think, lots of stuff about the European Union

:01:52.:01:56.

across the Sunday papers. Europe is everywhere we look! I have spent all

:01:57.:02:01.

week on the phone to Conservative MPs desperately trying to get them

:02:02.:02:05.

to talk about anything else, but no, it is Europe everywhere. This story

:02:06.:02:10.

that Nick Herbert, the former Police Minister, is leading a new group of

:02:11.:02:14.

Tories who wants to stay in the European Union. This makes a change,

:02:15.:02:19.

about eight groups want to leave, but David Cameron has a bit of a

:02:20.:02:24.

coup, Nick Herbert was an arch Eurosceptic who led a group that was

:02:25.:02:27.

the campaign group which kept Britain outside the euro. He worked

:02:28.:02:33.

alongside Dominic Cummings, the guy who was trying to get us out of the

:02:34.:02:37.

EU now, and he is taking the opposite view, setting up this

:02:38.:02:41.

group. A bit of good news for a change on Europe for the Prime

:02:42.:02:46.

Minister. New Tory alliance fights to stay in European Union, which

:02:47.:02:49.

emphasised we do not even know when the referendum is going to be. The

:02:50.:02:53.

funny thing about this if there is a difficulty with negotiating with 27

:02:54.:02:58.

other European countries is rather easier than negotiating with all the

:02:59.:03:03.

factions within his own Cabinet! I mean, Herbert is interesting, he was

:03:04.:03:08.

a minister at the start of the coalition government, he then rather

:03:09.:03:12.

fell out of favour, he was policing minister, he has been on the

:03:13.:03:16.

backbenches, and you wonder if this is a deal, after a successful

:03:17.:03:20.

renegotiation, he would come back as a minister. I am only speculating.

:03:21.:03:25.

No, it is really tricky for Cameron, how do units together bits of the

:03:26.:03:31.

party so that the splits do not appear too bitter, too personal, and

:03:32.:03:35.

come out of the referendum, whichever way it goes, without an

:03:36.:03:40.

utterly divided party? Lots of papers talking about this, do you

:03:41.:03:45.

think the nation as a whole is as interested in this as journalists

:03:46.:03:49.

and politicians? Journalists are not even that interested, we just have

:03:50.:03:53.

to find something to talk about! The short answer is no, I had a long

:03:54.:03:58.

lunch, as it were, with a member of the in campaign, and they have been

:03:59.:04:01.

doing a lot of focus groups, and he says nobody is paying any attention.

:04:02.:04:10.

A lot of people are vaguely aware that David Cameron promised a

:04:11.:04:12.

referendum, but not that he is undergoing the renegotiation, that

:04:13.:04:15.

it is due to come to a head in four weeks' time, and the idea that we

:04:16.:04:18.

might be deciding in June or July is passing by the vast majority of

:04:19.:04:23.

people in this country. People know it is terribly important but they do

:04:24.:04:29.

not care. Scotland utterly electrified everyone, and I do not

:04:30.:04:33.

think it is going to change, I may be completely wrong, but even when

:04:34.:04:37.

we get closer, I think there will be a fair amount of apathy. As oppose

:04:38.:04:41.

we need a date. We should know Brother Tedd Lee Seung Hoon,

:04:42.:04:45.

Jean-Claude Juncker was saying he's pretty confident about the deal in

:04:46.:04:52.

February. -- we should know a date pretty soon. So that is the

:04:53.:05:02.

shadow-boxing going on in the Cabinet, but the Mail on Sunday

:05:03.:05:05.

leads with a really interesting poll, EU shock, out of vote storms,

:05:06.:05:16.

and they have put this in a box, 6% air two, to emphasise just how

:05:17.:05:24.

important they think that is. -- 6% ahead. Two things, remember the

:05:25.:05:29.

election and the polls. It is a long way out and people are not thinking

:05:30.:05:33.

about it. There is probably some truth that things like the Cologne

:05:34.:05:37.

sex attacks, the more that comes into the migration crisis, the

:05:38.:05:41.

morbid plays into it. The history of all this is quite interesting. If

:05:42.:05:46.

you go back to 1973, look at the polls then, they showed the people

:05:47.:05:54.

who were anti-European were leading in the polls but the result went the

:05:55.:05:57.

other way. I think there will be quite a big change as time goes on,

:05:58.:06:02.

when people think, what would really happen if we leave? The figure that

:06:03.:06:07.

is missing is how many people do not know, are not of polls are showing a

:06:08.:06:12.

large number of them, and both people think it is the underside and

:06:13.:06:16.

are the key to this. There is about a third who are resolute to stay, a

:06:17.:06:21.

third that our resolute to leave, and the game is about winning the

:06:22.:06:25.

moderate people who do not much like the EU but are a bit frightened

:06:26.:06:31.

about leaving. One of the interesting things, both campaigns,

:06:32.:06:35.

the in campaign wants to play up Nigel Farage, because they think he

:06:36.:06:39.

is good for the underside ands, that they are more likely to be

:06:40.:06:42.

pro-European the more they see of him. The league campaign also think

:06:43.:06:47.

that, so they are trying to show this positive future outside the

:06:48.:06:51.

European Union union and not mention Farage too much, he is somehow the

:06:52.:06:57.

toxic element, even though he has significant support, it is the

:06:58.:07:01.

people who do not like which need to be persuaded. Let's have a look at

:07:02.:07:08.

the Sunday Times, eight Tim Shipman story, PM's secret EU master plan,

:07:09.:07:14.

you can tell us about it. It links the two, this says that if Boris

:07:15.:07:17.

Johnson were involved in the out campaign, the gap would be 8%, not

:07:18.:07:22.

six. He is seen as a pivotal figure, and part of what we are appealing

:07:23.:07:26.

today is the plan to get Boris to stick with Cameron and vote in. One

:07:27.:07:31.

of the rabbits from the hat that the Prime Minister plans to pull is to

:07:32.:07:42.

bring in some kind of change in domestic law, outside the

:07:43.:07:44.

renegotiation with the other countries, he wants to bring in some

:07:45.:07:47.

kind of domestic law that will say that Britain and Parliament has

:07:48.:07:49.

supremacy over European law, an idea that Boris floated a few months ago.

:07:50.:07:52.

It was widely dismissed at the time, but it is back on the table, and the

:07:53.:07:55.

cunning wheeze that the PM has come up with, Michael Gove is the other

:07:56.:08:00.

guy that he wants on site, and he has got Michael Gove, the Justice

:08:01.:08:04.

Secretary, to find out the best way of implementing what Boris wants. By

:08:05.:08:08.

doing that, you bring the two of them in, they will vote with

:08:09.:08:15.

Cameron, and the members of the Cabinet to vote to leave will be

:08:16.:08:17.

more marginal figures, like Chris Grayling and Iain Duncan Smith.

:08:18.:08:20.

Everybody knows they have taken that Eurosceptic position, but the

:08:21.:08:24.

waverers are being brought in with this plan. Two other elements just

:08:25.:08:30.

to bore you completely! Do not bore anyone, it is Saturday night! We are

:08:31.:08:35.

trying to enthrall people! The emergency brake that they were

:08:36.:08:40.

talking about on migrants is back in, Downing Street have been

:08:41.:08:43.

pretending it is not happening, but I am told by ministers that it is.

:08:44.:08:47.

They want to get everybody to sign up and say membership will be called

:08:48.:08:57.

something slightly different, associate membership or something

:08:58.:08:59.

like that. It looks like windowdressing, but they think it

:09:00.:09:01.

might persuade people. That is another Europe for one thing! Let's

:09:02.:09:08.

go to the front of the Sunday Times, Oliver, this is grim, Westerners

:09:09.:09:13.

targeted in hotel carnage, Burkina Faso, another horrible week. A

:09:14.:09:18.

really grim attack, there is possibly a danger in linking to many

:09:19.:09:21.

of these attacks and suggesting there is one over Raajih control to

:09:22.:09:28.

all of this. -- overarching. These are local groups often with local

:09:29.:09:33.

grievances beyond Islamic fundamentalism, but it shows the

:09:34.:09:40.

vulnerability of places, not just places one might think of as being

:09:41.:09:45.

insecure, but Paris, now across West Africa. Anyone who says we are safe

:09:46.:09:52.

in London, well, think about 7/7, it just shows the global vulnerability

:09:53.:09:56.

we have got when people are prepared to lose their own lives in an

:09:57.:10:00.

attack. One of the interesting things is that this attack is being

:10:01.:10:05.

seen as Al-Qaeda inspired, that group of Islamists. In recent times,

:10:06.:10:10.

we have been concentrating on what Isis have been doing, but there is

:10:11.:10:13.

this tension, the international bogeyman for years and years have

:10:14.:10:16.

been eclipsed by this other group in Syria and Iraq, and it is part of

:10:17.:10:21.

the internal tension. Even the war between Islamist groups for

:10:22.:10:25.

attention, to kill the most Western tourists, that sort of thing. And

:10:26.:10:30.

the other thing, this is a terrorist attack in central Africa where no

:10:31.:10:33.

British people have been hurt, and it is on the front page of a

:10:34.:10:38.

national newspaper. When I was growing up, Ouagadougou was a good

:10:39.:10:42.

quiz answer, what is the capital of the Lord, as it was then? This is

:10:43.:10:48.

something happening a long way away, but we feel it impacts on our world.

:10:49.:10:56.

-- Upper Volta. The other interesting thing is the French

:10:57.:11:00.

special forces coming in so quickly, that is not a spur of the moment

:11:01.:11:05.

thing, the fact that they got involved is very interesting. I want

:11:06.:11:09.

to talk about the Independent, Jeremy Corbyn is on the front,

:11:10.:11:14.

record profits for people smugglers, and then a very long and in-depth

:11:15.:11:21.

interview about Jeremy Corbyn in the Independent. There is a lot of very

:11:22.:11:25.

serious stuff in here, but I want to mention the fact that he has a cat

:11:26.:11:29.

which he has never named. It pains me to say it as someone who is

:11:30.:11:34.

interviewed Jeremy Corbyn, but this is the best interview with him that

:11:35.:11:38.

I have ever seen by some distance. There is one good Newsline, the

:11:39.:11:42.

Labour Party is tearing itself apart on Trident, he is integrating there

:11:43.:11:46.

will be a free vote in the Labour Party. That is good news. He is

:11:47.:11:54.

ruling out giving political Honours, that is a pretty good line. For

:11:55.:11:57.

serving politicians. But what everybody is going to focus on, and

:11:58.:12:00.

one can imagine the tabloids having fun with this tomorrow, he admits he

:12:01.:12:05.

has a black and white cat that he has never named, and he addresses it

:12:06.:12:14.

as El Gato, Spanish for cat. One can only imagine what his political

:12:15.:12:18.

opponents will do. I think that is fine! Being slightly suggestively

:12:19.:12:32.

foreign, including the mild racism of its critics, this is a bloke who

:12:33.:12:36.

addresses the cat he has never named in Spanish. El Gato, it sounds grand

:12:37.:12:43.

and majestic, it is fine, it is a name. It is a magnificent piece of

:12:44.:12:47.

journalism. We don't want to trivialise this, he talks about

:12:48.:12:51.

Trident, but when he calls the cat in, he does not call its name, but

:12:52.:12:57.

he whistles Tie A Yellow Ribbon Around The Old Oak Tree. And he

:12:58.:13:02.

whistles it because he cannot sing, he tells us! It makes the point that

:13:03.:13:10.

cuts recognise voices, not names. Lest we be accused of trivialising

:13:11.:13:15.

the Labour leader, it is a serious interview. Yes, Tim makes the point

:13:16.:13:21.

about honours, that is interesting, and he says that he will allow a

:13:22.:13:25.

free vote on Trident when it comes up in the Commons in the next few

:13:26.:13:32.

months ahead of the party having an official position. Particularly

:13:33.:13:35.

interesting, he suggests they may not go down a fully unilateral

:13:36.:13:40.

approach, ie we will get rid of existing submarines, we will not

:13:41.:13:43.

replace any of them. He suggests there might be a compromise of a

:13:44.:13:48.

small fleet or maybe just having the possibility of developing nuclear

:13:49.:13:51.

weapons in a shorter space of time if we needed to in the future. In

:13:52.:13:56.

most of his public statements, he has sounded quite reasonable, has

:13:57.:14:00.

wanted to be conciliatory, and the problem that Labour is having is

:14:01.:14:03.

that a lot of the people around him are the one with the hard-line views

:14:04.:14:07.

who are trying to force him into these positions. Again, an

:14:08.:14:12.

interesting retreat, we will see what Ken Livingstone says tomorrow,

:14:13.:14:17.

what John McDonnell says. Will they back a non-unilateralist policy on

:14:18.:14:22.

nuclear weapons? We will see. John McDonnell has been a force of

:14:23.:14:27.

moderation. The good news is that you can discuss that later, that is

:14:28.:14:32.

it for the moment, we will get you copies and you continue in another

:14:33.:14:38.

room. -- coffees. Tim and Oliver will be back at 11:34 another look

:14:39.:14:46.

through the papers. Coming up next, it is Reporters.

:14:47.:14:49.

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