16/01/2016 The Papers


16/01/2016

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers

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With me are Tim Shipman, political editor of the Sunday

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Times, and Oliver Wright, political editor of the Independent.

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The Observer leads with figures from the World Health Organisation

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The health body declares it a global public health emergency, warning

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that poor air quality will overwhelm health services across the globe.

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The Sunday Express writes that millions of families can expect

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higher council tax bills and bigger cuts to public services

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because of Conservatives plans to reduce county council budgets.

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The Mail on Sunday headlines a poll which suggests

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the campaign for Britain to leave the EU is now six points ahead.

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It blames the Paris massacre, Cologne sex attacks and the Syrian

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The Telegraph unveils a new alliance of Conservative MPs

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that plans to push for Britain to stay within the EU.

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They warn against Britain leaping into the void.

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The Independent on Sunday has an exclusive interview with the head

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of Interpol, who says criminal gangs made ?4 billion last year

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And the Sunday Times leads with the terrorist attack in Burkina Faso

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We can begin with the Sunday Telegraph. Tim, earlier you were

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saying that you were saying that they were finding it hard to write

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about other than Europe. There are only three things Westminster is

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talking about. The Tories are talking about Europe and the future

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leadership of your party. And the Labour Party MPs are talking about

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the current leadership of their party. That is basically it. Europe

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is on the front of three national newspapers. This is a bit like the

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PeopleSoft of Judy and the Judaean 's people front. -- the people's

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front of Judaea. Splitters! The significance of this story is that

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David Cameron has finally found some allies and a new group that is

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imaginatively called conservatives for the reform of Europe, which does

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what it says on the tin, they want to stay in the EU. The former

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Policing Minister, he will run the script. He is a eurosceptic. But now

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he says we should stay in. It is a big deal for Cameron to land this

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by. -- land this. Where is the Conservative Party on Europe at the

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moment? All over the place? What David Cameron will try to do if he

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gets this successful negotiation, which many of us doubt he will be

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able to achieve in the next month or so... He will try and run quite a

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eurosceptic campaign to keep Britain within the EU. They will not

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suddenly start saying the EU is the best thing. He will be saying that

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he has a deal to give us some less Europe and so on balance, it is

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better to stay in. It is interesting to think how you get that message

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across. It would be a spin, a turnaround, that could put him in

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the Olympic figure skating! EU shock. The outer vote is 6% ahead.

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-- outvote. This is a significant shift. If you look back to before

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Christmas, there were some opinion polls that had them two or three

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points ahead. This is the largest survey that has suggested such a

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lead. I think that the polls will fluctuate quite a lot. This these

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talks about the coming sex attacks, the Syrian migrant crisis, the Paris

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terror attacks. -- the Cologne sex attacks. It does show that the

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referendum is at the mercy of events that David Cameron, control in this

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campaign. One reason why he wants to get a deal quickly in February

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rather than halfway through the year is that they are worried about the

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migrant crisis dominating the news agenda during the summer. There is a

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degree of bloody mindedness about this as well. There is a fear in

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Downing Street that if you get everybody telling people that we

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need to stay in, the main parties, the big businesses, part of the

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British public will push back against that. And some on the left

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are pretty anti-European, although for different reasons. They see it

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as a pro-business union. They hate the TT IP. That is the transatlantic

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trade partnership. Both agree a trade deal with the US. As it's

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David Cameron were not stressed enough about this, Boris Johnson has

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emerged. He is looming over everything. The poll says that if

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Boris supported the outcome thing, his lead would go -- the campaign's

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lead would go from 6.2 eight points. Both sides are desperate to get him.

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-- six points to eight point. In terms of the general public, the

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only person who is likely to be able to move a significant amount of

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votes is Boris Johnson. Nobody I have spoken to around Boris thinks

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that is what he is likely to do but there is an attempt to involve him.

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There is always a Boris angle. And he causes quite a lot of these Boris

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angle is. -- angles. He has written a lot about this himself. He is

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trying to extract as much political capital out of this decision as

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possible. He wants to be positioned where he can succeed David Cameron

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when he steps down. If he thinks is best chance is to lead the no

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campaign, that is probably what he will do. If he thinks his best

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chance is to lead the yes campaign, he will probably do that. A variety

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of rabbits from the hat. They want to rebrand our membership as a slow

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lane in the 2-tier Europe. This idea of an emergency brake to stop

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migrants coming in if public services are getting overwhelmed.

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And just to connect to what we are saying, what David Cameron really

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wants to do after the negotiation is make a grand announcement about

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changing domestic law to say that British law and British courts have

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supremacy over what happens in Europe. This was an idea that Boris

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himself has been advancing and the trick is that Michael Gove has been

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asked by Cameron to go and make this happen. The people they really want

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to lock into the Cameron camp, they get one of them to deliver the

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other's idea and then everyone lives happily ever after. The other major

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story in the Sunday Times is this latest attack, this time in Burkina

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Faso. This is a very interesting picture of French special forces who

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were rapidly deployed. This is interesting beyond the obvious point

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that this is yet another terrorist attack. The fact that French special

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forces were on the scene they quickly suggest to me that there was

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some kind of deal, some kind of organisation that should this happen

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and how they would organise the logistics of those kinds of

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situation. It shows a degree of international cooperation where the

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West is actively participating and helping some of the more vulnerable

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countries in terms of the security apparatus there. Having people who

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can deal with these sorts of attack close by, ready and able. This

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sounds like an insensitive thing to say but 29 people dead... 150

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hostages... It suggests to a certain extent that the operation was

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reasonably successful. There is always that question. Is this what

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groups like Al-Qaeda won't? Western newspapers reported on a story that

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happened in a country a long way away? It is a country as long way

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away. It is interesting, politically. A national newspaper

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putting on its front page something that happened a long way away. But

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we have a Prime Minister who thinks this is the existential battle about

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times. And one of his predecessors, Tony Blair, would say exactly the

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same thing. There is international cooperation and the view that things

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are happening long way away are part of the same struggle that

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politicians here think they are engaged in and it does not matter

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that is happening in West Africa, you have to tackle this wherever it

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is happening. Tax rate on middle-class. What is this about? It

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is complicated but it affects all of us, so it is important. The

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government is completely changing the way they provide funding to

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local councils. They are trying to encourage local councils to be more

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limited in the way they raise money. They will be allowed to keep

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all of the business rates. As part of that, somehow you have got to

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rearrange the funding so that the poorer parts of the country do not

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massively lose out. This story says that the government's plans will

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take money from some of the county councils. What we know about those?

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They tend to rural and conservative. This story is

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basically saying that a group of Tory backbenchers are kicking off

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about this, saying how dare you do this and that they will lose

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services. They say they will fight the government when some of these

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girls go through the House of Commons. Many people will say that

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this is what affects people on the ground much more than what they

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might consider quite incidental debate about the EU. Yes. This is a

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good story. It is about how much people pay in council tax and how

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much they get back out of it. The problem you have with this contrast

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between the rural and the open, yes, you have a lot of rich people living

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in the countryside and doing quite well, but you also have a lot of

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poverty in rural areas and housing problems. Children who have grown up

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there cannot afford to live there. Elderly people without bus

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services... This kind of thing. It is not as simple as perhaps this

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government formula is making it out to be. On many of the front pages,

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there is an image of Stuart Broad, celebrating after England's

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victory. Here it is. We might as well enjoy this for a bit. That was

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an extraordinary performance. I don't know about you but I grew up

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watching some pretty miserable cricket in my days. Some of it was

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enlivened by watching Stuart Broad's father who did well very

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briefly for England 20 odd years ago. Not that briefly! You make it

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sound like he had a good afternoon. He had one very good series. But

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Stuart Broad is turning into one of the greatest fast bowlers England

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has ever had. He has taken six or seven wickets, a ludicrous amount of

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wickets, against the Australians. We have 2 of the greatest of -- bowling

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performances by an impish bowler in my adult lifetime. -- English

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bowler. When there is good news on the front pages, it is nice to have

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some sporting success. -- grim news. It is stop and I suppose what we do

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need is some consistency. When they are good, they are brilliant. But

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then one year or so later, they do something unexpected. We will see.

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Coming up next, it's the Film Review.

:13:46.:13:48.

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