13/02/2016 The Papers


13/02/2016

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers

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With me are the political commentator

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Jo Phillips and the Political Editor of the Sunday People, Nigel Nelson.

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According to the Sunday Times the boss of EasyJet has warned that

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cheap flights are at risk if the UK leaves the European Union.

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Ahead of the EU referendum the Mail on Sunday says a senior aide to

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Angela Merkel claims the UK cannot survive on its own.

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"Public faith in Cameron drops" is the Independent

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on Sunday's headline, with a new poll claiming 6 out of 10

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expect the PM not to secure good deal in Brussels talks this week.

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The Telegraph claims the government could soon fund new onshore wind

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Should we start with the Observer? It is just in. There is a lot of EU,

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and this paper is focusing on Jeremy Corbyn. It is interesting, another

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battle with his own party. Apparently what Jeremy Corbyn is

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going to do is before David Cameron goes off to negotiate in Europe, he

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is going to make a big speech and he is going to say that European

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migration is a good thing, but that is what we should be encouraging,

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that we shouldn't be discriminating against Eastern Europeans. Well...

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It won't cut very much ice with people who are not very keen on

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migration. This is the weakest card of it in campaigners. 50,000 people

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who come from abroad and keep the NHS going, those other positives.

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The question is the timing, whether it is a clever idea to be doing it

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this week, maybe further down the road. Do you agree? It is fine to

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Jeremy Corbyn to be doing it because he wants to make some kind of

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statement, but it is David Cameron's worst nightmare, because

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this will just fuel the people who feel that this whole debate is now

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focusing on migration and borders, and free movement of people and the

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refugee crisis that is going on. This will now paint a picture that

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you have a Labour Party that wants a free for all, because that is how it

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will be portrayed, because it doesn't help it in campaign --be in

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campaign. There have been countless debates, with many people agree with

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Jeremy Corbyn, a lot of people thinking we can't bring any more

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migrants, and people who think we should welcome them. Migration is

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probably the most contentious issue with in this whole thing and I think

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the difficulty comes down to... It is not about racism, it is about

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somebody who either imagines that his job has been taken by an Eastern

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European worker. It is that kind of problem. My argument would be that

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the intervention has to come in at some point, but not quite yet. It is

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not just about the migrant crisis, let's go to the Independent on

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Sunday. They have gone to a poll. This is before a proper debate, and

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its headline... Nearly half the voters say that the UK would have

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more control of borders outside the EU. Quite revealing poll about the

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state of play now in the referendum. As far as the trouble with borders,

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that is quite clear. If we are out of the EU we will be able to control

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our board is much better because EU migrants won't be able to come in as

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a right as they do at the moment. That is sort of stating the obvious.

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People seem to have no faith in David Cameron's ability to

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renegotiate the deal this week, with six out of ten saying he won't come

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back with anything. I'm not sure it all means a great deal. I don't

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think people know what he is going to negotiate anyway. It is one of

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those things were actually it is very hard to ask people what they

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think about something when it is not clear what is being negotiated. That

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won't be the question we will be asked when the referendum happens.

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Interestingly, if 58% of people say David Cameron will get a bad deal,

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but then you are almost evenly split on people saying that the economy is

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better being in the EU or out of it. Clearly there is a muddle and

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confusion, but there is some comfort that the government in this that

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there is still a 14 point lead over Labour. It is just that David

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Cameron's personal rating has fallen considerably. It is an interesting

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poll but it is way ahead of when the argument has been started proper,

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but the argument has of course already started in some ways. Let's

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have a look at the Mail on Sunday. This is an argument between British

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MP Bill Cash, and a German MP, who is saying that if we leave, Europe

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will impose crippling trade tariffs on Britain. Maybe, maybe not. I

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think it is unlikely. I think if Europe would pull in its horns and

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say we want to keep outsiders out... This is just a row between

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two MPs. It is not the position of Germany, is it? I don't think so.

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You would think it looking at that front page. I don't think he is part

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of Germany's diplomatic corps. He has form attacking David Cameron, he

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accused him of trying to black out the EU. He then mocked the

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flip-flopping MP. In 2014 he said he would get a bloody nose if he curbed

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immigration without EU permission. This is a three page story based on

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argument between two people that frankly are not hugely important. We

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haven't even got started yet! There are some other stories knocking

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around. We had to read this one carefully, the Sunday Times. The

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headline, Osborne profits as firm pays no corporation tax. This is an

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interesting story. Only because I think it is again, and we often say

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this on this programme, quite often the headlines they're very little

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resemblance or relationship to the actual story. Nigel and I both know

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that that is the Saabs, not the person writing the story, quite

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often. You can't say that because you have to go to work tomorrow.

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This is a story about the Chancellor George Osborne who has shared in the

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dividend payment in the company that his family owns. The company has not

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paid any UK corporation tax for the last seven years. If you read it all

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the way through, what you will discover is that company records

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show that the Chancellor holds less than 1% shares in this company and

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he got a dividend of about ?1200. The idea that this is some sort of

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walloping great windfall from a company that hasn't paid corporation

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tax because it hasn't registered any profits, I would expect a bit better

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of the Sunday Times. But it is a story that pushes all the right

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buttons. It got you reading the whole lot, didn't it? That headline!

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That is my argument. It is so easy, that every story we look at every

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time we do this, and everytime anyone else does it, you look at the

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headline, you see them on the television, and actually, is that

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actually the story? We are going to stick with the Sunday Times. Another

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interesting story, Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe is to face the widower of

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Lord Britain. There have been long campaigns for him to apologise --

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the widow. Yes, this is about the investigation into her husband. If

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you are going to investigate crimes like this, then you have to do the

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whole thing properly. On the basis of that, if you have evidence that

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you believe in, do you then apologise for collecting that

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evidence after the event? Even if you haven't got evidence, there has

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or has been an argument that it is really important for the them to be

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believed. That is the other danger. How many other victims won't come

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forward because of what has happened? It is very difficult, that

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anybody who is innocent of a crime like this, it is appalling that they

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find themselves in the public eye and in the middle of a police

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investigation. But does that mean that the police shouldn't

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investigate? Could they investigate without the person being named? In

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that case they're going to a different area about whether or not

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we name people before they end up in court, and why then should a sex

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crime be particular? If you were a police officer dishonesty would be

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quite serious. Once you start going through the different grades of

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crime you could argue that no one should be named until the trial.

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Police have agreed that they won't allow MPs to be named if they are

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arrested, unless it is in connection with something they have done in

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office. The other danger with not naming people is that part of the

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justice system is that justice is seen to be done. If you have a trial

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where the defendant is anonymous, it won't be seen to be done. I think in

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this particular case, they are damned if they do and damned if they

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don't, for the reasons you have just said. They paraded this alleged

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victim, called Nick, who had apparently come forward with this

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credible evidence. They didn't have to make that public, actually. They

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could have arrested or investigated... Police always

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maintained that they don't release the names of suspects. We are

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journalists, we can draw our own conclusions. This comes down to the

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fact that Lord Britain was not told that there wouldn't be any charges

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before he died -- Leon Brittan. Do you believe this is a debate that is

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needed? Yes, I do. There is a review... It is very difficult for

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them. It is very difficult for anybody, but the sooner justice

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Cotes Art can get on with the proper enquiry. That is the key to it. What

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seems to have happened is that what we do know is that there were

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paedophile rings, there was an establishment cover-up. What we

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don't know if the extent of it, and quite clearly certain people who

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have been named will have imparted that. We only have a couple of

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minutes left. A couple of interesting stories on the front

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page of the Sunday Telegraph tomorrow. Talk us through this home

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saliva test for cancer. This is not one of the stories you would

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normally see on the front page of the Express. This seems to be quite

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sensible. The University of California have done a lot of

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research saying that tumour DNA is in bodily fluids like saliva, so it

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would in fact give you the ability to have a liquid biopsy, instead of

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going through the often traumatic and painful and uncomfortable

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surgical procedure. This is 100% accurate. If you stop and think

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about it, given that you can get DNA from a tiny bit of saliva, it makes

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sense that you would be able to do this. But this will have a huge

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impact on people. It can be carried out at home, by a dentist, Hugh who

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are hugely good at looking for cancers. You might not want to do

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it, but you might be worried about the spread of it. In alternative to

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a biopsy you would definitely want to do it, and if it means you don't

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have to have a biopsy. In future they are saying it could be for

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multiple tests. I don't know if I would like to do that. But if it

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makes somebody do it rather than... Early diagnosis is so important with

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cancer. We just had time to talk about Chris Grayling and Michael

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Gove. The Valentine couple of the night. This is the present justice

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secretary saying he agrees with the previous justice secretary, Chris

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Grayling, and they have written a joint letter together saying that

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they have kissed and made up. It is tough love. It takes us back to the

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EU a bit, because Chris Grayling has been widely tipped to run the Grexit

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campaign. And we still don't quite know how Michael Gove will go. It

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may well be that this new friendship... At the moment Michael

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Gove seems to be veering towards Brexit as well. Thank you both,

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always a pleasure. More headlines at the top of the hour. Next, film

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review. -- The Film Review.

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