20/02/2016 The Papers


20/02/2016

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 20/02/2016. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

along with Woody Harrelson and a cast of bank robbers in 999.

:00:00.:00:14.

Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers

:00:15.:00:17.

With me are the author and journalist,

:00:18.:00:20.

Rachel Shabi and Tim Stanley, columnist for the Telegraph.

:00:21.:00:25.

The European referendum dominates the Sunday papers.

:00:26.:00:26.

The Observer leads with a quote from David Cameron:

:00:27.:00:33.

He says he believes Britain will be safer and stronger in the EU.

:00:34.:00:42.

The Independent on Sunday says Mr Cameron is playing

:00:43.:00:44.

on voters' fears by putting safety at the centre of the battle.

:00:45.:00:47.

The Sunday Express says the EU is stuck in the past,

:00:48.:00:50.

and that Michael Gove's withering attack on Brussels has got the Out

:00:51.:00:53.

The Mail on Sunday says Michael Gove and Boris Johnson are engaged

:00:54.:00:57.

in a secret plot, reporting on a meeting between the

:00:58.:01:01.

pair before Mr Gove announced his intention to vote to leave the EU.

:01:02.:01:09.

The Sunday Times says the Prime Minister has declared war on the

:01:10.:01:12.

ministers who want to leave the EU, accusing them of making misleading

:01:13.:01:15.

claims that Britain's borders can be sealed by exiting the bloc.

:01:16.:01:20.

The Sunday Telegraph also reports on what it calls "a cabinet divided".

:01:21.:01:32.

Let's begin with how safety frames the EU vote battle. What you of

:01:33.:01:49.

this? Well, this is basically presenting the two sides, Michael

:01:50.:01:53.

Gove who is now freshly liberated to say what he thinks, has said exactly

:01:54.:01:59.

what he thinks. The justice secretary and best buds with David

:02:00.:02:09.

Cameron, perhaps not any more. Politically and personally painful

:02:10.:02:11.

for David Cameron. It is interesting the way he frames this, with the EU

:02:12.:02:29.

being a security crisis. It is very understanding and sympathetic that

:02:30.:02:33.

he has framed the migrant crisis in the way of razor wires and something

:02:34.:02:38.

we should be scared off, but it is fundamentally what the EU campaign

:02:39.:02:44.

is about which is massive fear of migration, as opposed to all these

:02:45.:02:50.

things they are claiming. You have managed to read into this that it is

:02:51.:02:53.

believe people who are running on fear, when it is the remaining

:02:54.:02:57.

people of David Cameron who are saying that leaving is a threat to

:02:58.:03:03.

economic and national security. I am not in either of those camps as you

:03:04.:03:07.

know, I do not take my cue from Cameron, but what I am saying to you

:03:08.:03:11.

is that the Conservative Party have framed this referendum debate very

:03:12.:03:18.

much in terms of a migration crisis. We can agree on that. I say this is

:03:19.:03:27.

a Eurosceptic, but I think this will probably be framed largely around

:03:28.:03:30.

the issue of immigration. Her country has a right to control its

:03:31.:03:34.

borders, that deal has not given us that right, but just a four-year

:03:35.:03:40.

break of people being able to gain access to in work benefits. Having

:03:41.:03:44.

said all of that, I would rather we debated free-trade or sovereignty,

:03:45.:03:50.

and our role in the world. What is it you are scared of? Is it that 500

:03:51.:03:55.

million Europeans will swamp written because we can't control our own

:03:56.:04:00.

borders? What is this session? For me it is not a question of fear, it

:04:01.:04:05.

comes down to the question of pressure. You think that is an

:04:06.:04:12.

issue? Because? For pragmatic reasons. There is pressure being

:04:13.:04:22.

placed on social security and jobs. You can only tax-and-spend for so

:04:23.:04:29.

long before you wreck your economy. But they bring in more than a tack.

:04:30.:04:38.

They are net gain. At what point is it become that our services, housing

:04:39.:04:42.

and schools, cannot take this number of people? Again, I do not want to

:04:43.:04:50.

talk about migration to much. It is philosophical as well as practical.

:04:51.:04:54.

A country is not an independent nation unless it controls its

:04:55.:04:57.

borders. Is that in the end what swung it for Michael Gove?

:04:58.:05:01.

Definitely, the intellectual question. For him, as he said in his

:05:02.:05:09.

piece that most of the papers are carrying, it comes down to Britain

:05:10.:05:13.

not controlling enough of the stuff, which a democratic country with a

:05:14.:05:16.

sovereign parliament should be controlling. Should Britain be

:05:17.:05:19.

surprised by that? I was talking to Margaret Beckett, who back 40 years

:05:20.:05:26.

ago when she was Margaret Jackson, I think, she was a junior minister in

:05:27.:05:32.

the Wilson government and she campaigned to get out of the EU,

:05:33.:05:36.

which we had only been in for two years. I said, what about people who

:05:37.:05:41.

say we have lost all our sovereignty, and having lost control

:05:42.:05:46.

over things. She said, we had that argument in 1985. People say it was

:05:47.:05:51.

all done surreptitious li, but I can remember talking endlessly about

:05:52.:05:54.

sovereignty, and saying that we have to preserve it. People knew the deal

:05:55.:05:59.

and they bought it and voted to stay in. I have accepted now that that is

:06:00.:06:05.

how it is. I think the way you explain how the left have changed

:06:06.:06:09.

their views on Europe is because the left, and I don't mean this is a

:06:10.:06:13.

criticism, they tend to be instrumentalist. They don't really

:06:14.:06:23.

mind what the process is for making social change, as long as they get.

:06:24.:06:30.

In the 1980s, the left calculated that if we infiltrate Europe we can

:06:31.:06:33.

turn it into a more social democratic thing, a social market

:06:34.:06:38.

thing. So now they think, we can't get socialism through the ballot box

:06:39.:06:41.

in this country, so instead we will use the EU to impose it on Britain

:06:42.:06:47.

instead. I love all those logical leaps you have made in that

:06:48.:06:52.

sentence. No wonder Michael Gove is keen to get us out and it is implied

:06:53.:06:58.

by the Mail on Sunday that perhaps Horace Johnson is as well. What do

:06:59.:07:05.

you make of this front-page -- Boris Johnson. This has added the tension

:07:06.:07:14.

and drama that was absent in this very dry debate. Yes, Boris and

:07:15.:07:20.

Michael Gove have had this epic dinner where they have been

:07:21.:07:25.

discussing what to do. So epic they had to send out for fresh shirts. I

:07:26.:07:42.

don't know how that is an indication of a thickness, that you have to

:07:43.:07:52.

change your shirt, but I think Boris might be trying to figure out what

:07:53.:07:56.

is politically advantageous for him. I don't know that it is coming

:07:57.:08:05.

from... How close do you think he is to telling us what he is going to

:08:06.:08:10.

do? Robert Peston, the scruffiest man in journalism, has said on

:08:11.:08:13.

Twitter that he believes Boris is very close to backing the leave

:08:14.:08:19.

campaign. I hope he does do that, because if you think about it, the

:08:20.:08:24.

problem the leave campaign will have is that it is dominated by

:08:25.:08:31.

also-rans. In terms of personality right now, it is Nigel Farage, those

:08:32.:08:40.

are the people who will get attention, and I don't mean

:08:41.:08:43.

intellectually but in terms of public awareness and perception. It

:08:44.:08:48.

will be seen as the fringes. Boris Johnson gives it the backing of a

:08:49.:08:54.

former Merit London he gives it legitimacy. Is the issue that it

:08:55.:09:03.

will potentially be seen through the soap opera of Conservative politics?

:09:04.:09:08.

We have a photograph of the six ministers who have said they will

:09:09.:09:14.

defy David Cameron and vote to leave. Is it a problem for this

:09:15.:09:22.

campaign that that is the prison in which it is being presented?

:09:23.:09:30.

Definitely a problem. I don't blame the front pages in the papers to

:09:31.:09:32.

doing this, because obviously that is where the drama and tension is.

:09:33.:09:36.

You can understand why they would hone in on that. But it is a

:09:37.:09:42.

problem, because it is not about the Conservatives, but it has become a

:09:43.:09:51.

very Conservative debate. We are not actually hearing a progressive

:09:52.:09:55.

argument for staying, or even one for leaving. All of that is

:09:56.:10:00.

completely absent. We are at a 10% right-wing spectrum of the debate,

:10:01.:10:03.

and that is very frustrating. And also very boring. I believe that is

:10:04.:10:11.

a fair criticism, and from it is about sovereignty and trade with

:10:12.:10:15.

Africa, about trade barriers that Europe throws up against developing

:10:16.:10:17.

nations, making it difficult for them to grow. Some people are on the

:10:18.:10:25.

right of the Labour Party but have also joined the campaign. The big

:10:26.:10:31.

difference between now and 75 is it will be on one side largely

:10:32.:10:34.

right-wing personalities for leave, and on the other side it will be

:10:35.:10:41.

dominated by labour. Until we get a senior Labour figure it will look

:10:42.:10:47.

like that. Let's talk about the most senior figure, the PM. The Observer

:10:48.:10:52.

has a very impassioned photograph of David Cameron. Not someone it is

:10:53.:10:58.

often very sympathetic towards. But they have taken the line that

:10:59.:11:02.

Downing Street say. A very prime ministerial photograph of David

:11:03.:11:08.

Cameron, very determined and in mid- flow, not looking exhausted as he

:11:09.:11:11.

did on some of the papers. He has said the choices in your hand, cans.

:11:12.:11:21.

How do you think he is coming out of this? The perception was that he was

:11:22.:11:25.

reluctantly pushed into this. He said he did not want a referendum

:11:26.:11:28.

for a long time but then he ended up having to negotiate this. He didn't

:11:29.:11:33.

get what he initially wanted, he has to sell this package, he knows his

:11:34.:11:37.

leadership may be on the line. Do you feel sympathy for him? I think

:11:38.:11:43.

he is handling it very well. I think this will be the legacy that he

:11:44.:11:49.

will... He wants to be able to say when it comes to write his

:11:50.:11:55.

autobiography, I settled Scotland, and I settled Europe. David Cameron

:11:56.:12:00.

is a Europhile. He has been uncomfortable in the last few years

:12:01.:12:04.

because he has been forced by his backbenchers to pretend to be a

:12:05.:12:08.

Eurosceptic. But what he always wanted to do was to make this case

:12:09.:12:11.

for Europe, pretending he had reformed it and Britain's

:12:12.:12:16.

relationship with it, and win and put it aside. To be the great

:12:17.:12:20.

unifying PM he was wanted to be. From this point on in this campaign

:12:21.:12:25.

we will now see him into comfort zone. We haven't got a huge amount

:12:26.:12:29.

of time left let's move on to the Sunday express. -- Express. Another

:12:30.:12:41.

photo story here on the front page, a very different time to what we

:12:42.:12:51.

have been talking about. Paul Daniels. Yes, he has an incurable

:12:52.:12:56.

brain tumour, so obviously devastating for him and everyone who

:12:57.:13:03.

has enjoyed him over the years. Very brave to come out and go public with

:13:04.:13:08.

this. I think it must be a very difficult decision for anyone, but

:13:09.:13:15.

in particular when you are in the public eye and there is so much more

:13:16.:13:18.

significance and impact. Quite a bold decision. I remember seeing an

:13:19.:13:26.

interview with Timothy west talking about his wife with Alzheimer's. He

:13:27.:13:30.

was asked why he decided to talk about it, and he said it would

:13:31.:13:34.

almost seem fraudulent not to talk about it. He said people will feel

:13:35.:13:38.

hurt if we don't talk to them about it, so I imagine that might be why

:13:39.:13:43.

they have made this decision. I suspect we will hear more from them

:13:44.:13:51.

because he was a love -- loved figure. I'm sure we will see you

:13:52.:13:56.

more through the course of this campaign. That is it from me this

:13:57.:14:00.

evening. Up next, The Film Review.

:14:01.:14:02.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS