17/04/2016 The Papers


17/04/2016

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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impeach their President, Dilma Rousseff.

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She's been accused of fiscal impropriety in concealing the scale

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are the former Sunday Express editor,

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Eve Pollard, and columnist for The Telegraph, Tim Stanley.

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The Daily Telegraph headlines a warning from the Chancellor that

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public services including the NHS would suffer if there

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The FT says there's evidence of a slowdown in hiring

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and investment because of uncertainty over whether the UK

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The Metro reports on the 14-year-olds charged with a double

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The Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt is to take a U-turn in the dispute

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with junior doctors, says the Guardian.

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The i leads with a fierce condemnation of Europe's

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policy towards Syrian refugees in a recent report.

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The Daily Express headlines a survey on migration into the UK.

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71% of those asked thought migration has been too high.

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The news that a drone hit a plane on its approach to Heathrow

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And it's back to the EU referendum on the front of the Times,

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with the Chancellor saying households will be over ?4,000 worse

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So, plenty to talk about. Things being dominated by Brexit but let's

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start with the Guardian, claims that Jeremy Hunt is in a U-turn over his

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threat to junior doctors. Two different words, talk of an

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imposition of a contract but now talk of an introduction of a

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contract. Extraordinary because we've been hearing Jeremy Hunt

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saying that he will impose the contract on doctors and now it seems

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that the government lawyers, what have they been doing for the last

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three months? They have said that legally he can't do that. He can

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introduce the idea of a contract, he can't impose it. The whole point of

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them going on strike was that he said he could impose it and the

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government lawyers, it has gone to some kind of court, there is a

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letter from government lawyers seen by the Guardian, confirmed by the

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department, saying he can only introduce it. Strange way of running

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things. There isn't long because the fifth strike will be on the 25th of

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April. Yes, most people will be wondering why the strike is going

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ahead, not just why are the doctors doing it, different issue, but why

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the government is pursuing this line, if it didn't have the

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authority to impose the contract. From what position is the government

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arguing and negotiating? It isn't clear. If he can't impose it, what

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authority does the government have? It has given into most of the

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demands by the doctors, it has met most of the demands they've made. By

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the time the strike comes around, if it goes ahead, it will affect all

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services including maternity, accident, services affecting

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children and the public are going to be wondering why the doctors are

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doing it and why the government has allowed things to go this far. If

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that's the case, as the Guardian says, it may mean that he has misled

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Parliament. He might have misled all of us because he said that he's not

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going to discuss it, he's going to impose it, if they can't agree, he

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will impose the rules. Now he's going to introduce them. You wonder

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why nobody spoke to the government lawyers at the beginning of this.

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We'll wait and see what the response is. Quite scary if you have somebody

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about to have an operation. We are going to go into the Brexit

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argument, starting with the Times, the long-awaited report from the

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Treasury about how much leaving the European Union is calculated, it is

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alleged, to cost Britain and according to the Times, 4300 pounds

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a household. Based on the idea that the economy would shrink because

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things like trade and investment with the EU would be affected.

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George Osborne is claiming that by 2030 the economy would shrink by 6%,

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the equivalent of each household losing up to ?4300. Of course that

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is a projection, the worse case scenario. It may be the thing that

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this entire argument may be what wins the referendum for the

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remaining campaign because economic risks and fear is their strongest

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card but many people are going to be asking themselves why is it that the

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government has pushed for renegotiation, why has it used such

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Eurosceptic language if, having called the referendum, it is

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throwing everything, the Treasury, the civil service, against leaving?

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So you are sceptical? The other thing I would like to ask, if Mr

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Osborne was here, why is it that the Prime Minister before he entered

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negotiations told the public that he thought Britain could flourish

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outside the EU and after the negotiation and he has decided he's

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against leaving, he says it will sink? Do you buy this? I think that

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4300 does not seem a lot. I've come back from America and for ages,...

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At the moment, you get $1 for ?1 40. You don't feel rich in the States,

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it used to be a much better deal and I think the same is true for the

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Euros, you get far fewer euros to the pound and the Financial Times

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has a story that hiring and investment have dropped a lot.

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Seamlessly going the next headline. The Financial Times head page that

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FrontPage, another Brexit story. Says there is a 20% fall in hiring

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in financial services. Why would be the -- why would we be the centre of

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finance if we are not in the EU? The City would vanish. 20% of European

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groups say they are not investing in Britain at the moment, they are

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waiting to see what happens. It's quite interesting. In London, which

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is different from the rest of the country, houses are not selling,

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everyone is waiting to see what happens. One of the Sunday papers

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today in the business section says that two large companies are looking

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to float in London next year and they don't give a hoot about

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uncertainty. It seems to depend on what you read. And what business you

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are in. Why is there any surprise that there is uncertainty? There is

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always risk involved in any kind of political decision, there is risk

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when there is an election, there is an effect on the currency markets

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when there is a threat of the Labour Party winning the election. What are

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we supposed to do, not have a referendum? Our decision-making

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should be entirely decided by this kind of calculation? I think that

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families are right to decide, I mean, a lot of us don't approve of

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the way the EU is run, thinking it is too large, overly bureaucratic,

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we spend too much money on it, it isn't what we signed up to, but on

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the other hand, the idea that the next ten years, perhaps, are going

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to see us poorer, I think that the EU will be very angry with us if we

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pull out. It will be very hard to negotiate deals. If they wanted to

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enter that kind of game, if they are going to threaten us, we can

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threaten them back. The idea that Europe wouldn't want to trade with

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us, that they would stop investment if we left, it is nonsense because

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we could respond and not invest in them. Staying with Brexit in the

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Telegraph, George Osborne saying that because the country would

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supposedly be worse off, it would lead to NHS cuts. The NHS has become

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the eternal political football. You had those in favour of leaving

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saying that we should take the money we give to Europe and put it in the

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NHS, but they weren't entirely accurate about how much money we

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give to Europe and how much money we get back. Lovely idea but I think we

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have to stop dealing with the NHS as a political football. Would you

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agree? Not the first headline linking the NHS to it. The EU

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referendum may turn into a debate about something else, about the NHS

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and priorities, which case the government is on a sticky wicket

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because if it is going to argue that the NHS is imperilled, many people

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why ask -- might ask why. Why is the NHS in a bad position, they might

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ask? The Daily Mail talks about the drone that has been in the headlines

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that was hit by a plane. They cost as little as ?25 and we are still

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looking at legislation. Quite scary, isn't it? I bought a little one for

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my grandson at Christmas, I didn't think it would get very far and

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high. The idea that they can, bigger ones, more expensive ones than the

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one I bought, could actually damage a plane, means we should legislate

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pretty quickly. I think that they are an awful thing, I would ban them

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all together, I don't like the idea of drones. I think in America they

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will make you register them so that they know where it came from if it

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crashes. The idea that it may fall into the hands of extremists, very

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scary. Back to the Telegraph, Boaty McBoatface, this is what happens

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when you asked the public what they want and they have said Boaty

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McBoatface. Isn't it interesting, you ask the public and they don't

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give you a ratio Nelson or whatever you thought you might have got --

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Horatio Nelson. Obviously losing a sense of humour in this case because

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this person says they are going to be looking at it, reviewing it. What

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does that mean? It probably won't be called Boaty McBoatface. I wouldn't

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have asked the public in the first place, it shows how immature they

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have become. The idea of reducing every government decision to a kind

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of version of the X factor, as if the public would only care if you

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let them vote on it. This isn't democratic, it is the opposite, it

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is a display of snobbishness to assume the only way you can in gauge

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with people is to introduce an element of a talent show contest --

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engage with people. I think it would have been a good idea to ask

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children at school because they are the ones you want to interest in

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science. They are doing the science lessons. Perhaps they might have got

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a different response. You don't think it will be called Boaty

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McBoatface? I don't think so. I think there is a horse with a

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similar name in Australia. I know that Tim is very interested to talk

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about the last story which is in the the i. Leicester City, what an

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amazing story if they win the premiership and a late penalty saves

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them a point, getting a draw. I don't care much about football but

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this is a Hollywood story, isn't it, and I gather they have had interest

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from Hollywood. Have they? It is little left of -- Leicester City

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battling through and you can see it becoming one of those movies that

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people will go and see. There are none of those six pointer fixtures

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left. I wouldn't go and see the movie, I'm afraid. I can't pretend

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to care or know anything about football so I warn people, it is the

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equivalent of saying I don't do nude, I have a blank thing in my

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head, when it comes up, I switch off. As an editor of two Sunday

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papers Island more about football than I ever wanted to. It sells.

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Thank you for joining us. We will be back at 11:30pm. Shortly we will be

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having Meet The Author.

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