15/05/2016 The Papers


15/05/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Rail enthusiasts have welcomed the return of the Flying Scotsman

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Hundreds of people gathered to catch a glimpse of the restored steam

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engine as it travelled to the Borders, Midlothian and Fife.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers

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With me are the Iraqi-British journalist, Mina,

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and the Political Columnist for The Independent, Steve Richards.

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The Mirror describes the incident at Old Trafford as a blunder,

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after the discovery of a training device led to Manchester

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A similar headline in the Metro predicts red faces

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A disappointed pair of United fans is the image

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on the Guardian, which also reports on fears of a

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The Telegraph also focusses on the bomb scare

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in Manchester and also has a picture of the Queen

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The Queen is also on the front of the Times,

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which also reports on millions of pounds being invested in Google

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by the Church despite the web-giant's record on tax.

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The backlash facing Boris Johnson for his comments

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about Hitler and EU is the Eye's top headline.

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Let's begin with the Daily Mail's coverage at Old Trafford -- Daily

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Mirror's. Big match called off after suspect device left after training

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exercise. The papers haven't held back in their criticism? And it was

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because there was a dummy device, a lot can be said about the decision

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to cancel the game, the first Premier League game that's cancelled

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because of security fears, but no one can doubt the fact you need to

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make a difficult decision and say we have a device, let's do this. The

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blunder is the fact you have a private firm responsible for this

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device being left in the rest room at the stadium. The words we are

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seeing in the papers, blunder, fiasco, dummy and so forth are

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playing on the word dummy bomb and quite rightly so. People have

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travelled to the game, it's so important, people want to see what

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happens and it will actually take place tomorrow but the fear and

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panic you have that 75,000 people had to be evacuated safely. There is

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anger but there is more anger about the fact the device was left in the

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bathroom and not being cleared out after a training exercise last

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week. The mayor of Greater Manchester and the Police

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Commissioner criticising whoever did this. Reading the headlines, blunder

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is now coming up a lot. It's not, though, this was a terribly confused

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event, they are saying blunder, you quoted the mayor of Manchester as

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well saying that. The blunder is not in the decision to call this huge

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match off, it was in leaving this device from a security exercise last

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week, that is the blunder. This will turn into quite a big story and

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these premiership matches are worth a fortune, the stakes were quite

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high, Manchester United were playing for a place in the Champions League

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and it was called off because of the consensus emerging in what has been

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a complicated and confused and fast moving story towards the sense now

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that a terrible error has occurred. An hour ago we were talking about

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security implications and all the rest of it, but now it's looking

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like the focus on who and how was this device left from a security

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exercise a week ago. In some ways maybe they should be praising the

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reaction a bit more in the papers. For all they knew it was a bomb. 20

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minutes before kick-off, absolutely. A brave decision. Moving

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on to the Times, lots of stories to pick from the front page of the

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Times. But we are going to focus on the headline about security firm

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fake bomb triggering evacuation. A more held back headline, more about

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the facts rather than who is at fault. Each paper is trying to work

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out exactly what happened, who took the decisions, what was the context

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in which this device was found, the private security company and the

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implications of that. It will be a massive operation to get the match

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going again. The stakes will be high for Manchester United. It works as a

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news story on so many levels. As we mentioned earlier, there are massive

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security implications now for big football live events, these huge

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stadiums. At the same time there's huge sums of money involved in every

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game and a decision to call one off is a massive, massive decision! The

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blunder headlines that are coming out and the statements from people

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in Manchester are more about the origins of this device than the

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decision to call it off. And the fact it remained there before a

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match, there will be head scratching because of that tonight. The Daily

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Telegraph says football bomb scare sparks Euro 2016 fears. Even this

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was a blunder that somebody left behind, there will still be

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questions about how it was able to remain for as long as it did. The

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good part of the story is we are asking questions without an attack

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happening. All too often you get an attack and people are asking about

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the security protocols, I'm sure there are protocols but the fact

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there was a device in a restroom that had been there several days

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before the match raises questions. Perhaps this pushes more scrutiny

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about the plans before Euro 2016 and other things in the summer, and it

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is on Tuesday, you're right, but this is the problem with reading

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tomorrow's papers tonight. Thank you for that. This is me quoting a

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paper... We are in Monday morning territory now. Apologies to the

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viewers. That has really confused the viewers watching it on iPlayer.

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We have totally lost them. The Guardian sticks with the theme of

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terrorism. This is interesting, isn't it, Steve? A bold statement at

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the beginning of the year that there would be thousands more police

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officers on the streets, this seems to be down to shortages and people

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not wanting to step forward. It's a classic example. Often prime

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ministers and home secretaries make statements and there's an assumption

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that things will change overnight and they hardly ever do for all

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kinds of reasons. This reason it appears is that there's a reluctance

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from police officers to go ahead with this because culpable at it

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used is a bit confused in British law. It seems as if there will not

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be the numbers police regard as necessary in the near future --

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culpability. It seems they are looking for about 3000 volunteers to

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come forward to fill 1500 extra needed volunteers of police officers

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that our armed. It's difficult because of culpability and also we

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have a culture in the UK of people not carrying arms. You said earlier,

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what happens is when you have police officers carrying arms you have

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terrorists and criminals and others carrying arms as well. It changes

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society and that should be taken seriously. It's interesting, the

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whole of the front page of the Guardian, I don't know if we can see

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it on the screen, it's really interesting because you have the

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photo of two people who were looking forward to seeing the match, and you

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have the story about the Manchester United bomb, then you have the story

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about the shortage of armed officers. What's interesting is the

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whole of the front page virtually is in the context of the threat posed

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by terrorists. There hasn't been an attack... I know people are always

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warning that one is likely, that's the phrase I think, but there hasn't

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been. But just the possibility could command with two entirely different

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story is the whole of the front page of a paper. Terrorism is a

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nightmare, you have the disappointed child in the arms of his father on

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the front page at Old Trafford, but some of those tears will be shocked

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and dismayed, I presume it is his father giving him a coach, he will

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be glad he's OK, and you have to balance that with keeping him safe

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with armed officers -- a hug. Our shopping centres will be disrupted

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and so will our travel to work, it's a balance between freedom and also

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making sure we can do things safely. British people tend to get

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on with it when you look back over the decades. It's not the first time

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we've seen this kind of threat. The balance between the two, it was and

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remains an issue to some extent with Northern Ireland, both within

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Northern Ireland and on the mainland. And that threat is

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reimagining. Indeed. The whole threat of carrying on as normal

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while being protected is massively complicated and will produce endless

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front pages in the weeks and months to come even if, touch wood, we

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don't get this attack. Boris Johnson doesn't escape some of the front

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pages, this is the i, we can see the headline. I know this is something

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you feel strongly about, Steve? This referendum is producing wacky front

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pages. The Daily Mirror on its front page has Cameron writes for the

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Mirror... Yes, really. Even they are joking about it, it must be one of

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the first time is a Tory Prime Minister has written for the Daily

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Mirror putting the case for the In campaign. Then you have Boris

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Johnson being put under intense media scrutiny and political

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scrutiny... Although he's one of the most famous politicians in the

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UK... For the first time in his career. The comparison he made, he

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was making the point that Hitler wanted a superstate, and he was

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arguing the EU is basically going to become a superstate and Britain

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should get out of it. But by using Hitler... You saw what happened to

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Ken Livingstone the other day, you generate a kind of feverish

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response. But the question is whether it gets the response he

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wants. I don't think it will be the kind of thing that will convince

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undecideds that he will become this great authoritative figure to

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follow. It certainly gets headlines and he's on the front pages again,

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he's on the front pages a lot, but that doesn't necessarily mean votes

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for the Out campaign. I think he's having quite an erratic campaign so

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far. Not that surprising. It's his first big national campaign. Cameron

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and Osborne have fought general election is. Labour politicians have

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fought general election is. This is his first big exposure. -- general

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elections. As mayor of London, even though it's only London, it is the

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capital and he's been on the international stage for a long

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time. He knows exactly what he's doing and he is saying surely this

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is an experienced campaigner. He is banking on getting emotions going

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and he also wants to grab headlines and be in the news for as long as

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possible and he's planning his next move is. I'm not sure it's a wise

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way of doing it but he thinks this bombastic character...

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Internationally we are seeing people getting attention because of

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statements we find ridiculous but people are saying, he is speaking

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off-the-cuff and that is attractive --. It will be interesting to find

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out if he has made a thoughtful calculation. Politics is.

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TRANSLATION: Pouring in front of our eyes, you have Donald Trump in the

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US and other outsiders in Europe flourishing -- politics is

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transforming. There was a survey a couple of weeks ago that said both

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campaigns were lacking fact, both of them were lacking proper hard facts

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about what this and that meant. A lot of it was presumptions and

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feelings and predictions. I don't blame them for that. At the moment

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we are Bombay bombarded by fax and it becomes impossible to make any

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judgement at all. -- bombarded by facts. Every now and again the BBC

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does fact checks and they find that one assertion doesn't go with the

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facts. This is a battle and of course you are going to use all

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sorts of emotional stuff to win your argument. The biggest

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numbercrunching is people that are undecided and they may not vote,

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that's the biggest problem not for politicians only but also for

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journalists. We have to leave it there but thank you for taking us

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through the papers. I'm sure we would have had plenty more to say.

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Thank you for joining us as well. Stay with us, coming up next is The

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Film Review.

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