20/05/2016 The Papers


20/05/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 20/05/2016. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

:00:14.:00:17.

With me are The Times columnist, Matthew Syed,

:00:18.:00:19.

and The Daily Telegraph's political correspondent, Ben Riley-Smith.

:00:20.:00:30.

The only one that matters tonight, don't tell Christopher Hope.

:00:31.:00:34.

Tomorrow's front pages, starting with...

:00:35.:00:36.

The Times reports on the financial deficit facing the NHS,

:00:37.:00:38.

claiming up to 50 hospitals face losing A departments as a result.

:00:39.:00:42.

The i focusses on the anguish of the families affected

:00:43.:00:45.

The Telegraph says the BBC could avoid disclosing the salaries

:00:46.:00:49.

of some of its higher paid actors, because of a loophole

:00:50.:00:51.

regarding the terms of their employment.

:00:52.:00:54.

Hidden charges that can claim more than a third of people's pension

:00:55.:00:57.

The Mirror leads on the security alert at Buckingham Palace.

:00:58.:01:03.

And the Express focuses on the same story.

:01:04.:01:09.

Asking how a convicted murderer was able to get into Palace Grounds? The

:01:10.:01:16.

Sun also leading on that story. Let's begin with the i. And that

:01:17.:01:36.

Egypt-Air crash, family sold to inspect the survivors because of the

:01:37.:01:40.

age of the wreckage, also finding human remains. A very moving account

:01:41.:01:47.

by Chris Green in the i. Gives you an idea of the scale of the tragedy.

:01:48.:01:54.

Passengers and debris strewn across the Mediterranean. We're still no

:01:55.:02:00.

closer to working out what happened. Could have been on terror incident.

:02:01.:02:04.

None of the passengers whereon the terror list. Committing 25,000 feet

:02:05.:02:11.

into the sea, wildly swerving from side to site, really horrific.

:02:12.:02:17.

Brings out the emotional side of the story. The thinking is, I was

:02:18.:02:23.

reading, because the crew did not contact the ground, the control, it

:02:24.:02:29.

must've happened really fast. That is probably something that, in

:02:30.:02:34.

difficult circumstances, will be of comfort to the families. One can

:02:35.:02:39.

only imagine how horrible that is being on a plane knowing death is

:02:40.:02:45.

imminent, having time to contemplated. Aviation is still the

:02:46.:02:53.

safest form of transport. The method that they use from learning about

:02:54.:02:58.

near misses, planes almost hitting in midair. Both pilots submitting

:02:59.:03:04.

reports. The totality is analysed to figure out the weaknesses are what

:03:05.:03:10.

we can reform. When an accident happens, these are very infrequent.

:03:11.:03:14.

Two indestructible black boxes, often recovered, that can tell the

:03:15.:03:20.

air accident investigation Branch, they build up the data, telling them

:03:21.:03:24.

exactly what went wrong, so reforms can be made so the same mistake

:03:25.:03:31.

cannot happen again. 2014, one crash for every 8.3 million take-offs.

:03:32.:03:38.

Impressive safety record. It surprises me the speed in which some

:03:39.:03:41.

authorities in certain countries are prepared to say what the cause was,

:03:42.:03:50.

or what was more likely. More likely terrorism than a technical failure,

:03:51.:03:54.

when it was so early on. People waking up on Thursday morning to

:03:55.:03:58.

this news, surprising how quickly people were reaching that idea, a

:03:59.:04:03.

sad reflection on how frequent these things were becoming. This was a

:04:04.:04:08.

flight from Paris. We have no idea what the causes were, but Paris has

:04:09.:04:14.

seen terrible terrorist attacks. The Charlie Hebdo shootings, Bataclan,

:04:15.:04:22.

the Stade de France. This is becoming increasingly common. We

:04:23.:04:29.

have no idea. Funny, as you say, plane crashes happen so rarely, yet

:04:30.:04:34.

it does feel like we have had some extremely big stories around planes

:04:35.:04:39.

coming down for one reason or another, disappearing, explosions.

:04:40.:04:46.

For a very long time, the problems with most formal trance fought, not

:04:47.:04:49.

sabotage, technical problems, human error. A luck to do with humans

:04:50.:04:54.

deliberately bringing the planes down. The two big incidents in 2015,

:04:55.:05:03.

an act of sabotage by the pilots, the Russian flight out of Egypt,

:05:04.:05:08.

almost certainly an Isis bomb. Aviation has major issues trying to

:05:09.:05:12.

address. That is why they have a good record. Now it is deliberate

:05:13.:05:16.

sabotage. Not the problem that has been familiar over so many decades

:05:17.:05:20.

up until recently. Completely different phenomenon, most easily

:05:21.:05:25.

mitigated through additional security, which we have to admit is

:05:26.:05:30.

massively costly, in terms of wasted time for passengers across the

:05:31.:05:36.

world. One of the ways that the terrorists, although we will not let

:05:37.:05:39.

them win, they are making small gains in our daily lives, through

:05:40.:05:43.

the security apparatus we have to endure. After September the 11th,

:05:44.:05:51.

they put the additional security in the cockpit, as I remember part of

:05:52.:05:58.

the German Wings, people were hammering on the door once they

:05:59.:06:01.

realise it was the person on the other side, and there was nothing

:06:02.:06:04.

they could do. Interesting, when accidents happen, there is a

:06:05.:06:09.

plausible interpretation of why, before they wrote it out across the

:06:10.:06:13.

industry, they try to work out whether the relevant reforms will do

:06:14.:06:18.

what they want by trialling it in simulators. There is a good

:06:19.:06:24.

systematic way of trying to avert that kind of mistake. The Times,

:06:25.:06:30.

record NHS deficit putting emergency care at risk. Accident and emergency

:06:31.:06:37.

phase closures. You wonder whether you can afford to lose that many

:06:38.:06:42.

centres, when a unique are on the front line. -- accident

:06:43.:06:56.

and emergencies are on the front line. We're not offering any

:06:57.:07:05.

additional resources, that will make this problem go away. You either say

:07:06.:07:11.

we are going to give up a higher proportion of GDP to the National

:07:12.:07:15.

Health Service, higher taxes, people will not vote for that. How do you

:07:16.:07:21.

get the resources you have to go further. There is a culture in the

:07:22.:07:27.

NHS, there are massive variations in efficiency between all the

:07:28.:07:31.

hospitals. If all the hospitals came up to standard, it would save ?5

:07:32.:07:35.

billion a year. In the way they order supplies, agency staff, the

:07:36.:07:41.

way they learn, what aviation does, learning from near misses, avoidable

:07:42.:07:46.

harm. So they reduce litigation costs, other sorts of things. Not

:07:47.:07:50.

doing that are not. We were talking to a journalist from the health

:07:51.:07:59.

service Journal. He said where hospitals are running up large

:08:00.:08:02.

deficits, the care is generally worse. Not spending it to give you

:08:03.:08:08.

better care. Part of the general malaise within the whole Trust.

:08:09.:08:14.

There are questions about efficiencies, there could be a link

:08:15.:08:18.

that the most inefficient hospitals, the one running up the biggest debts

:08:19.:08:21.

are the ones providing inefficient care. The political angle, reading

:08:22.:08:27.

down into the Times story, so Simon Stephens came up with a plan saying

:08:28.:08:37.

we need 30 billion by 2020 20 make sure we get we need. The politicians

:08:38.:08:43.

needing to come up with 8 billion. The Tories eventually coming up with

:08:44.:08:48.

it. Chris Hanson, the head of NHS providers saying some of these

:08:49.:08:51.

issues are too big. We cannot make these efficiencies so suddenly. The

:08:52.:08:58.

funding crisis, why four fifth of hospitals are in the red. The Tories

:08:59.:09:08.

may have to stump up more cash. Whether official hospitals provide

:09:09.:09:15.

better care, absolutely they do. Preventable medical incidents,

:09:16.:09:19.

killing about a year. People in hospitals say if we have to learn

:09:20.:09:23.

about mistakes, it costs money to reduce avoidable mortality. The

:09:24.:09:27.

hospitals that do have the best balance sheets. They comes from the

:09:28.:09:32.

culture being efficient in all the different dimensional they are

:09:33.:09:35.

involved with. The question of how much of our GDP we give to the NHS,

:09:36.:09:40.

there is the absolute imperative to improve the culture, so they are

:09:41.:09:44.

learning all the time, deploying resources in the most efficient way

:09:45.:09:49.

to protect patients. How do you remember those statistics? I don't

:09:50.:09:57.

know. Good question. It is extraordinary. I am not very good at

:09:58.:10:08.

sincerity. The FT, the Telegraph and the Daily Mail looking at what with

:10:09.:10:16.

Brexit mean for house prices? There is George Osborne bricklaying in his

:10:17.:10:22.

spare time, saying they would be a 10% house price fall. Where has he

:10:23.:10:27.

got this from? Critics would say he has plucked it out of the air.

:10:28.:10:39.

Extraordinary claim. Quite interesting. The message that the

:10:40.:10:45.

government want every voter to have when their pen is wavering over both

:10:46.:10:48.

ballot boxes, is that this is going to hit you economically. Tomorrow

:10:49.:10:56.

George Osborne will say between ten and 18% of the value of your house

:10:57.:11:00.

could go. About 50 grams to the average house. Critics are pointing

:11:01.:11:05.

out, this is not from the Value currently, this is projected growth,

:11:06.:11:09.

value don't have, but you will have by 2030. You could imagine the

:11:10.:11:15.

specifics will be lost in the simple fact people will wake up one month

:11:16.:11:19.

from now and remember what is going to happen with my house. The Daily

:11:20.:11:24.

Telegraph saying it will be worse than that. Once this. 20%. -- one

:11:25.:11:37.

fifth. Is this such a smart thing? If house prices go down, is this not

:11:38.:11:41.

good for first-time buyers. This is one of the thing haunting the

:11:42.:11:47.

British economy. High house prices create inequality between the haves

:11:48.:11:52.

and the have-nots. Except people who were already homeowners. They could

:11:53.:11:57.

backfire. The younger voters in favour of remaining, they may be

:11:58.:12:03.

alienating some of the base. Two points. He tries to get around that

:12:04.:12:08.

saying it is a double whammy, mortgage rates will also rocket,

:12:09.:12:13.

because interest rates will sort, hitting first-time buyers. Secondly,

:12:14.:12:18.

who gets out to votes, the older voters? Britain won't rebalance, it

:12:19.:12:25.

could push people into negative equity. You are able to get 95%,

:12:26.:12:34.

100% mortgages. We are saying he's right. Let's a grip. I am broadly in

:12:35.:12:40.

favour of remaining in the EU. Broadly? You don't have the option

:12:41.:12:48.

in the ballot box. The proviso. Does this make you want to stay in? The

:12:49.:12:56.

level of desperation on both sides, Boris Johnson comparing the EU to

:12:57.:13:00.

Hitler, Osborne saying the economy is going to pot, interest rates

:13:01.:13:05.

going sky-high, alienating me from both arguments. I want to see a more

:13:06.:13:10.

rational debate. Their arguments on both sides, you can leave one way or

:13:11.:13:15.

another. Demonising from each side alienating. The gamble is that fear

:13:16.:13:22.

motivates people to the ballot box. Daily Mail, Osborne saying Brexit

:13:23.:13:32.

will hit the value of your home. There is an extraordinary quote, the

:13:33.:13:38.

perilous state of the euro is the biggest threat. Blue on blue.

:13:39.:13:46.

Honestly. They love to come up with ludicrous, often warlike tags. Long

:13:47.:13:54.

time since Tory attacking Tory. When you unwind the pathway, Cameron

:13:55.:13:58.

calling the referendum trying to call off the Ukip threat. Now he

:13:59.:14:02.

would definitely lose the Premiership if we vote Brexit. I

:14:03.:14:08.

think he's vulnerable even if we stay in, he has alienating so much

:14:09.:14:12.

of the party. Given he has said he will resign before the next

:14:13.:14:15.

election, there could be a critical mass. A slight irony, he did it to

:14:16.:14:22.

head off Ukip. In Scotland they voted no, a surge of Scottish

:14:23.:14:30.

nationalism. If we vote yes, there could be a surge in English

:14:31.:14:35.

nationalism. We will see. The Telegraph. Pay of BBC's top actors

:14:36.:14:48.

to stay secret. Earning ?450,000, they would have to devise the

:14:49.:14:51.

earnings. My question is, what are you earning? I would gladly tell you

:14:52.:14:59.

if I were. What is the loophole? If it is an actor, appearing on the

:15:00.:15:05.

BBC, hired by an independent production company, not a member of

:15:06.:15:09.

staff, they will not have to die vaults. For me, if there is a

:15:10.:15:17.

genuine talent, worth to the BBC paying a lot of money, I don't have

:15:18.:15:22.

a problem with that. I don't. I know people are scared. These things are

:15:23.:15:29.

licence fee funded, should anyone be earning that kind of money from a

:15:30.:15:34.

publicly funded organisation like the BBC? Which is having to make

:15:35.:15:39.

savings? The people who do not want to reveal it by the unnamed

:15:40.:15:43.

household presenters, kicking open the Telegraph. One calling it a

:15:44.:15:50.

cheap hit. A mystery why these actors are getting away with it,

:15:51.:15:54.

while they stump up. A third kicking off, saying the small thing. When

:15:55.:15:59.

you look at the small details. Clearly some people wound up by the

:16:00.:16:04.

new change. Fairly annoyed. I don't know what taxpayers think. Licence

:16:05.:16:11.

fee payers. Not a tax. Licence fee payers, my gut feeling... Straight

:16:12.:16:20.

off-the-cuff. What is the difference between tax payers licence payers?

:16:21.:16:24.

Doesn't go to the Treasury, comes to us. People who pay the licence fee

:16:25.:16:29.

don't necessarily pay tax. I don't want to get bogged down. I want to

:16:30.:16:35.

talk about the cartoon. Muirfield toilets. Two doors, caddie, men on

:16:36.:16:50.

one door, men in kilts on the other. He nails it every time. Brilliant.

:16:51.:16:56.

Mind-boggling. This club which hosts one of the great golfing

:16:57.:17:05.

competitions, the Open Championship for jeopardising the hosting of this

:17:06.:17:08.

to prevent women joining the club. Why would they be so anti-women?

:17:09.:17:13.

Brilliant golfers, wonderful company, what is going on? They

:17:14.:17:18.

needed two thirds, they almost got it. Not quite. Over 50%. Almost two

:17:19.:17:28.

thirds. It seems in 2016, having a debate about whether women can

:17:29.:17:31.

engage in certain parts of Scotland, partaking in a game 150 years old.

:17:32.:17:39.

It seems bizarre. Golf is struggling in participation. Going down, a lot

:17:40.:17:47.

of debate about why. Stop it. Often perceived as trustee.

:17:48.:17:58.

This is going to play into that, in my opinion. Goal. Or as a

:17:59.:18:05.

consequence. They need to revolutionise the image. I quite

:18:06.:18:11.

like the plus fours. Lovely to see you.

:18:12.:18:26.

That is it from us. We will have a look at the weather,

:18:27.:18:27.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS