30/06/2016 The Papers


30/06/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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available on the BBC Sport is app. Coming up, it is The Papers.

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to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow.

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With me is political reporter for the Huffington Post

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Martha Gill, and columnist for The Herald David Torrance.

:00:27.:00:30.

Nice to see you both. Lots to talk about, particularly dominated by

:00:31.:00:40.

Boris Johnson. The FT leads with the Bank

:00:41.:00:42.

of England's reaction to the economic fallout of Brexit,

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outlined in Mark Carney's second speech since the UK's

:00:45.:00:46.

vote to leave the EU. The Independent runs a teary-eyed

:00:47.:00:49.

picture of Boris Johnson and uses the Shakespearean Julius Caesar

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analogy to describe his chances of Tory leadership being

:00:52.:00:54.

quashed by Michael Gove. The Metro likens the dramatic twists

:00:55.:00:56.

and turns of the Tory party's leadership race to the popular

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HBO series Game of Thrones. The Daily Express focuses

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on the shock announcement from Michael Gove that he would

:01:03.:01:04.

throw his hat into the ring to enter Number 10 and

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lead Britain out of the EU. The Telegraph leads with

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the reactions by Boris Johnson's allies to what they described

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as a "calculated plot" by Michael Gove to destroy

:01:13.:01:15.

the former London Mayor's hopes The Sun describes Boris Johnson's

:01:16.:01:17.

political fate as "Brexicution" and says Theresa May is now

:01:18.:01:24.

the favourite to become And The Guardian too features

:01:25.:01:32.

the tussle for the Tory The paper describes

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Micheal Gove's surprise entry Remember those days when you were

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scratching around for a headline. We will start with Metro, the real Game

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of Thrones, after Michael Gove sees off Boris Johnson. Already exciting,

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then this happened. Two big plot twists, the first that Gove would be

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running, thinking that him and Boris Johnson would run as a ticket,

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taking a lot of votes from Tory membership, but Gove said he would

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run and then Boris said he would not. That was the most shocking

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surprise, I think. Let's look at the I. Rather detected looking borders

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there. Didn't look like he had had a proper shave. -- rather dejected

:02:33.:02:41.

looking Boris Johnson. Deftly some bits he has missed thanks to that

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close-up. I'm sure he had quite a lot on his mind this morning. As the

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headline alludes to, it is Shakespearean in nature. Tory

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leadership races have been dramatic. He actually quoted from Julius

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Caesar in his declaration that he was going to run, I think most

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people miss it, he referred to align spoken by someone just before the

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Burchill from Brutus. This was very much on his mind. And we had that

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e-mail that was leaked. -- just before the betrayal.

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And we had Michael Gove's wave scene to get a good deal. Should we have

:03:28.:03:35.

seen this coming? -- Michael Gove's wife had said to get a good deal.

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The result was a degree of some sinless and Susan -- a degree of

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cynicism. Was this planned all along? Was it a last-minute thing we

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he realised his friend and colleague was not up to the job? I don't think

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that latter scenario was credible, there must be more to it, and that

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e-mail appears to suggest a degree of planning behind-the-scenes. And

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the Mirror, justice, it says, with photograph of Johnson, and strange

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to hear him referred to as that, as he is generally Boris. Standing

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behind a pleasant. Lord Heseltine coming out with incredible criticism

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of him today. Yes, yes. I can't quite remember exactly, but he was

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incredibly critical and sort of said he will have to live with the shame

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of what he has done. He has betrayed his country and party and torn it

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completely apart. When people hear that, the then said that borders

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would never come back from this, some speculation this morning, when

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Boris said he was not going to rant, that he was doing something quite

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clever, backing away from what will be a difficult time as Prime

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Minister, then he could perhaps rally some support from disgruntled

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people, of which there will be many, and come back again. -- not going to

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run. Heseltine putting the boot in. One choice quote from the Mirror. He

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leaked the Leeds bleeped the -- it said he bleeped the country.

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Some feelings amongst MPs about the leadership. I asked how many MPs

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supported Boris Johnson and the best guess was around 12. Crucial detail.

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Gove was there for ensuring ... I heard 74 Gove. But the Times had a

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story suggesting a deal was made with Theresa May that she would set

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down be taught -- she would step down before 2020. But some denials

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about that. Act of midnight treachery from the Daily Telegraph.

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The suggestion is Michael Gove was sort of an carriage, shall we say,

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to do this. And how many friends do politicians think they have amongst

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their own ranks? If you are in it for the prior, you will look after

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yourself. The old adage was, it might even have been Alan Clark, who

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said there are no true friends from politics, and the better friends may

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be from the benches opposite, not behind. Her hats this confirms that.

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Friends of the former mayor have said there is a very deep pit

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reserved in hell for Michael Gove. This is the other aspect, that Gove

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successfully pushed Boris aside, but how much damage has he done to his

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own candidacy doing it so brutally? And people in the country less

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worried about this making and breaking of friendships, whether one

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person has betrayed another in the party, whether they are standing by

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principles than doing the right thing for the country, which seems

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to be someone no one seems to be considering. Roger Mosey, former

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head of television news, now head of cell in college, hello! He said

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Michael Gove was a reporter Ron BBC Radio for bringing a reporter Ron

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BBC Radio for bringing askew about a Tory leadership election. --

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bringing the scoop. And The Guardian saying that Boris cannot provide the

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leadership. Then very different tone from Theresa May, saying she just

:07:59.:08:08.

gets on with the job. Betraying herself as a steady hand. Yes, and

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she did that successfully. Even the optics of the speech, in a library,

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not flashy like Boris, and fascinating to see her tax to the

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centre, dropping the previous support of getting rid of the

:08:25.:08:29.

European Convention on Human Rights, showing a general shift, not just

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with Theresa May, but Stephen Crabb and others, pitching to the centre,

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one nation, healing the country and attracting crucially as broad a

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section from the party as possible. And the Daily Mail saying a party in

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and why it must be Theresa May. Significant when a newspaper puts

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their weight behind you, isn't it? Theresa May has played this well,

:08:55.:09:01.

she is in the centre, known to be trucked up on immigration, reaching

:09:02.:09:06.

to the right, then tacking to the left crucially going back on her

:09:07.:09:10.

idea of scrapping the Human Rights Act. So she is very much playing it

:09:11.:09:17.

very well. And both she and Nicola Sturgeon I think, whilst they may be

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playing as many parlour games as the others, they have managed to sort of

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look as if they are not, which I think is our feat in itself. And

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very quickly, the Sun, from Brexit 020. Tory bloodbath. -- from hero to

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zero. The idea of a female head of state, prime ministers, and in

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Northern Ireland, it is quite something. And moving on from Boris

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Johnson. Mark Carney talks about economic post traumatic stress. I

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did tell you it wouldn't be good. He went on to say that there is a very

:10:07.:10:17.

flexible nature to the UK economy, but the Lions on graphs you would

:10:18.:10:20.

like going up will probably go in the other direction. It is reckless

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truth telling, as called by the FT, but he is one of the most impressive

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figures immediately after the vote, and this is more of the same,

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softening people up, getting them prepare for what could be coming

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down the line, and Nigel Farage's typically insightful economic

:10:45.:10:46.

analysis that Mark Carney was once again talking down Britain. But the

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thing is, the talked about Armageddon, the Remain camp, and you

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think it is this sudden thing that happens overnight, or in a moment,

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but of course, although there was that reaction to the pound on the

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markets, things have moved again. The Armageddon people might have

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envisaged, and if you are not an economist out can you, that didn't

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happen in the way that people thought it would, with that

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language. On Friday, I mean. Fine, but the damage has been done and

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will continue with this period of uncertainty, the worst work you can

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hear as an investor. You hear people about investment in science cooling

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off. Crucial art in the sector for Britain. -- crucial research and

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development sector for Britain. Who knows when that will change? That is

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all we have time for. Gerry Peyton has called it WestEnders! Also known

:11:55.:12:05.

as BBC Rahm. We need that dramatic doof-doof! Thank you both for your

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time. Coming up next, the weather. -- it is also known as BBC The

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Papers.

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