01/07/2016 The Papers


01/07/2016

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

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With me are Lucy Fisher, Senior Political Correspondent

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at The Times and Reuters Correspondent Tom Bergin.

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Welcome. We get on to something other than politics later.

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Theresa May advancing for the top job at Number ten is lead

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The i says top tories are rushing to pledge their support

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May-mentum - is the Daily Mail's headline.

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It says that eight cabinet ministers have come out in support for her.

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And the Telegraph says the Brexit-eer Andrea Leadsom

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currently poses the biggest threat to Theresa May.

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Elsewhere in the Tory leadership battle, the Guardian says

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Michael Gove is losing ground in the race.

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It also shows an image of a soldier taking part in those commemorations

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for the centenary of the Battle of the Somme.

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The Times has a similar front page - it says Michael Gove is struggling

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The Mirror pokes fun at Michael Gove's campaign,

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as well as also celebrating Wales' historic victory over Belgium this

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And the FT reports on George Osborne's decision to abandon plans

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Before we get onto the leadership contest. The front page of the

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Times, the main picture story. Never forgotten is the caption. 100th

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anniversary of the start of the Battle of the Somme. The ceremony in

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northern France. People paying their respects in the military Sema

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-- military Cemetery. A number of events taking place. The sheer

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number of the casualties, mind blowing. 20,000 people killed on

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Monday, impossible to get your head around that. Two-day summit

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haunting, very moving tributes. For me, amazing footage of children

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throwing poppy petals into the crater. Children symbolising hope,

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the future. Recalling the fact that some of these young men were as

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young as 16. Very moving. 100 years, this will be an immensely important

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event. We may never see anything like this kind of commemoration. For

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a certain generation, it may not have the same resonance it does for

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previous generations. My grandfather fought in the First World War, as in

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the previous report, not always remembered in the Republic of

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Ireland. Nice to see the sacrifices are still remembered. One hopes it

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will continue to be the case. As time goes on, other events come to

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the mind of people. Theresa May in the Daily Mail, backed by 88 MPs.

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Some of these figures may not be accurate. Seven Cabinet ministers,

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we have been told it is eight. Michael Gove struggling for support,

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Andrea Leadsom go past him. Everybody seems

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to be going with the same story. With the stories to date, we were

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talking about it. Seems like it is very preoccupied with the soap opera

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of Westminster, the backstabbing. Everybody seems to be shocked people

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backstab each other in politics, I don't know. I am surprised people

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are surprised. Not a lot of conversation about what difference

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it would make if one or the other got elected. Nobody seems to discuss

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what one would do differently in the context of the biggest issue. Which

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is leaving the youth. How they would seek to do that. -- leaving for EU.

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How much of a surprise will it be the Andrea Leadsom has got so much

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backing? Very surprising, before the EU referendum that she could be

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edging in front Michael Gove. He is tainted, the man left holding the

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knife, after assassinating Boris. People do not want to get finding.

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Andrea Leadsom was the break-out star of the Brexit campaign. She did

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well. In those TV debates. She seems confident. The claims made by the

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Leave campaign, many have backtracked. Why would it not affect

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her chances? If it has been damaging for Michael Gove and Boris Johnson.

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Because she was more in the background. Boris spending time on

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the bus where this contentious claim that 350 million pounds a week

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Brussels. Leadsom was not asked those questions, she defended Boris

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she seemed confident in the TV debates. Not as associated in the

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public's mind. Let's look at the marvellous hat Theresa May is

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wearing at the Henley Regatta. Top Tories uniting around the Home

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Secretary. Tell us a little bit about

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the leadership contest. We have five candidates. Stephen Crabb, Liam Fox,

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Andrea Leadsom, Michael Gove and Theresa May. Only Tory MPs can vote.

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The person with the least number of votes goes out. Two further rounds.

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After that the final two candidates go to the Tory party membership,

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about 150,000 people. It is interesting, as Theresa May heads

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for 100 Tory MPs back there, this could almost be a coronation. The

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Conservative Party so preoccupied with power. If people think it is a

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foregone conclusion, nobody will back another candidate on principle

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if they have not come out. She was not very visible, part of the Remain

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campaign. Some people are saying, we're heading out of the EU, we

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should have someone on the Leave side. That is Michael Gove's point,

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only someone campaigning to leave should be the person. If you are

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looking at this from the business community, international markets,

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people are looking for what type of approach will the winner take? The

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view around Michael Gove, he would have pretty strong red lines, happy

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to leave, would not do a deal on the free movement of labour. With

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respect to him, excepting regulation, he would happily walk

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away. People may think Theresa May may take a more pragmatic approach.

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We don't know anything about any of them. They cannot make promises

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about the negotiations until EU use says, we will talk to. -- de EU

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says. We went into the vote, with nobody asked what would happen in

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the next day. Would you trigger article 50, then negotiate? It will

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be interesting to see, what actually happens, in terms of the candidate,

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who will make compromises? The basic decisions, very far apart, will you

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accept regulations? The outcome is somewhat binary. Unless there is a

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massive compromises? I think what he say is right. Of course the Brexit

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negotiations are a key part of the next number of years. Probably about

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a decade or so. Very interested to see Michael Gove's launch speech, he

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cast himself as a radical reformer. Let's build on the green belt,

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reform capitalism, Tarrabt evolution, make a radical proposal.

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-- tear up devolution. Theresa May is the continuity candidate. A

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distinctive choice emerging. Interesting to see what Andrea

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Leadsom does. She has not come out of the woodwork. Difficult to find

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an issue that has more significance than the relationship with the EU. A

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lot of changes in the centre position of government. People seem

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to be in the political periphery getting elected, doing things

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different. You have to make a choice on this issue. Very rare case, where

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it will make a difference. Let's look at George Osborne, what he

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announced today. The 2020 fiscal targets, pretty central target and

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principal of his. We would be back in the black in five, four years'

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time. Michael Gove has said this is fine, although he said they will not

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be an economic impact. Clearly this is one. There has been an economic

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impact. You can look at the markets, take them seriously or not. In one

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sense, not the most important thing, even if you think they are

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important, what is is investment and jobs, how people feel their wages.

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Clearly there is concern. The first move of the Bank of England, saying

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we will make monetary stimulus, injecting cash into the system. The

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government has said we will not take cash out of the system, with fiscal

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stimulus. The government is concerned, all sides are agreeing,

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that would suggest they are all concerned. The idea is to throw as

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much of the economy -- as much at the economy. Surely that just pushes

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the pain further away? We are used to this target being pushed back. In

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2010, the original target was 2015, by 2011, 2017, now shelved

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altogether. Quite interesting counterintuitive commentary coming

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out. The idea that having economic rules, it is for the graveyard,

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anachronistic. You look at Golden brown's golden rule, the EU

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stability pact. John Major's experiment with the exchange rate

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mechanism. They always fall apart. Perhaps abandoning the surplus

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altogether, you tell me? You can only borrow for so long. It is a

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basic principle. The last time we decided the basic principle of

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economics did not apply we have the crash. We cannot borrow forever. If

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you are borrowing and investing, that can create growth. If you are

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taking money out of the country not investing, that can contribute to

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recession. There seems to be a unanimous feeling, not the time for

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austerity. Interest rates may be cut again. Historically low for such a

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long time. What do they do about taxation? Likely to stay the same,

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anybody daring to raise taxes? Unlikely anyone would dare to. A

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very precarious time for the new Conservative leader and Prime

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Minister. Theresa May has a very suggested to assure the markets, and

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the rest of the global community, she's not planning to call a general

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election immediately. Unlikely anyone in the new job in number ten

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will want to rock the boat by hiking taxes. Anymore than it rocking.

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Daily Mirror. Yes! Wales 3-1 Belgium. Extraordinary achievement

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by the Welsh side. Never gone further in a major competition. So

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many people, as the only home nation left, willing them to do well.

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Absolutely, I had a text from my boss, saying seven years growing up

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in Swansea as a boy, part of his Welsh heritage. I am not a great

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sports fan, that he cannot get excited by the story of an underdog,

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smaller nation. Like Leicester, I feel I could get interested in

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football after seeing this. You need to pick a team on the margins, that

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could do well. Many to choose from. A great story. I am not a major

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sports fan, these kind of stories grab my interest. 3-1, decisive

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victory, not stolen. The last goal out of the textbook. Not all down to

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Gareth Bale. They last got to the quarterfinals in 1958, the World Cup

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played in Sweden, knocked out by Brazil, helped by Pele. There you

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go. All that came from Robert Allen, producing. That is it, Lucy and Tom,

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thank you very much. All of the papers I run our website. To run

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through them again, senior Tories rushing to pledge their support to

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Theresa May in the Conservative leadership contest. Telegraaf

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newspaper saying Andrea Leadsom posing a big threat to the Home

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Secretary. The Daily Mirror pokes fun at Michael Gove's campaign as

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well as Wales' historic victory against Belgium this evening. You

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can find the front pages online, there is a recording of this review.

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Seven days a week on the BBC website. Coming up next, time for

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the weather.

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