26/07/2016 The Papers


26/07/2016

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website, that is all from Sportsday for the moment, coming up, in a

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moment, the Papers. STUDIO: Hello and welcome

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to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow. With me are Claire Cohen,

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Womens Editor at the Telegraph and Charlie Wells, European Features

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reporter at the Wall Street Journal. The FT says the prime minister

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is coming under increasing pressure to pull out of the EU customs union

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in the wake of Brexit before she begins negotiations

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on leaving the EU. The Metro has

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more on today's church attack in Normandy,

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including a picture of one of the suspected killers

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when he was 14 years old. The Express carries

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another warning about a fresh influx of migrants wanting to claim

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permanent residence in the UK is dominated by a picture

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of the French Catholic priest murdered by two terrorists

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apparently linked to Islamic State. Churches in Britain have been put on

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terror attack after the attack, according to the Daily Mail.

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The Guardian also leads on today's attack in France,

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but also has Michelle Obama moving the Democratic Party's convention

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A YouGov poll which puts the Conservatives 12

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and claims two and a half million people who voted Labour at the last

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election prefer Theresa May to Jeremy Corbyn as Prime Minister,

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And the Mirror splashes with the kidnapping

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in Brazil of Formula One boss Bernie Ecclestone's mother-in-law.

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Let's begin, another day, another awful tragedy, and atrocity, in

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France, so we thought we would start tonight with Le Figero. The picture

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of the priest here, here is the headline... Assassinated by

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barbarians, killed by barbarians. Unbearable story. The interesting

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thing to me is underneath all of the details, underneath, Nicholas

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Sarkozy speaking. -- Le Figaro. Talking about calling on the

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government to implement all counterterrorism measures proposed

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by the right. We must be ruthless, this is war, he has said. Frantic

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business. A number of people over the last few days and weeks have

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called 2016 a sum of eight, it increasingly seems that way, this is

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another specific targeted symbolic attack, that has created a sense of

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momentum, it seems like a day does not go by where something like this

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does not happen, and the details are particularly poignant. And Nicholas

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Arcos's comments, particularly interesting, he has used strong

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words, war, terrorism. It is very interesting in contrast to Francois

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Hollande, is language around this, he has been a little weaker. --

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Nicolas Sarkozy. He has called it does to the and an abomination. More

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measured, some might say. Others would ponder what would happen if he

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called an election tomorrow, he campaigned on the security of

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France. It is not really looking like that, it is an increasingly

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divided nation. As we move on, as we look at the Daily Telegraph, which

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has the priest martyred by Isil, that is what is so awful, an elderly

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man, standing in as priest, because most of the priests were away doing

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something else, his throat cut. What is really striking about Le Figaro

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and the Daily Telegraph, these photographs, really screams soft

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target. Concert halls, church, trains... First attack in a church?

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These are soft targets, places where people are not expecting to be

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attacked, not on alert. Indeed, as Claire is saying, the pressure on

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the French government is very intense. That is one of the

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combative did things, there is so much data, there is so much

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information that intelligence experts pass through, and we have

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heard reports tonight about one of the attackers having been locked up

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for a period of time. -- parse through. It is so difficult to keep

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an eye on these threats, so much information out there. The man they

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were talking about, at Alchemy is -- Adel Kermiche. A lot of people will

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be looking to France tonight, less than two weeks since 84 people were

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killed in Nice. There is going to impact how we do politics. Going

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back to the Telegraph stories, interesting quotes from the uncle of

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Adel Kermiche, saying that he has been manipulated by extremists. We

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should remember there is a lot of young, vulnerable people out there

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who can be radicalised very easily and very quickly.

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This attack was filmed, clear propaganda. And actually, I thought

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the use of the word martyr was very interesting, that is the kind of

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language that Islamic State adopt. Absolutely... One of the other

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newspapers, I have noticed, the times have this, it is religious

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wars... Bitter divisions between religions, really accentuated, right

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here in Europe. Without a doubt, in this Telegraph article they call it

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a war with the West. Certainly this was the first attack. In a Christian

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church. That amplifies it and changes the narrative we will be

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having about these attacks. The minute that we are in a church, you

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wonder about the motive, is it religious, is it ideologically? Will

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street journal talking about the difference between the terrorism

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that we have been seeing in the past two months compared to the terrorism

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that was in the 1970s and 1980s, when it was more politicised and

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getting back prisoners, exchanges, now this is a lot more random.

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Moving on, Daily Mail, talking about this British churches on terror

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alert... I remember talking to date to one of the Catholic

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representatives in France, thousands of Catholic churches in France, we

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have loads of judges there, security will be dreadfully difficult but 2.5

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million more is going to be put into it. Soft targets, incredibly,

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located, these places are easy to attack with low technology. This was

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a knife attack! It is hard to trace the knife trade in any country.

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Something that is interesting, the localisation of this story. This

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attack happened in France but now we are talking about ramifications here

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in the UK. Indeed. Moving on, moving on to the Daily Express. It does

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have a picture of the murdered priest on its front page, but the

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main story... New migrants surge on the way. The express always believes

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in having bowled, straightforward headlines, what are they on about

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tonight? Britain could face a flood, EU migrants rushing here to beat

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Brexit. It is a story that seems to be about a couple of issues, whether

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existing citizens are going to get any clarity on whether they will be

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able to stay in Britain, and indeed, British citizens living in the EU,

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what their fate is going to be, but also this and about whether there

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will be a cut-off point of people coming to Britain ahead of article

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50 being enacted. This is something the government have addressed, David

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Davies said last week, than he was going to take a tough line. -- David

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Davies. They talked about a cut-off point, Theresa May talked about that

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before she was Prime Minister. It is whether we are going to stop people

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coming here, and there is going to be a deadline by which migrants can

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enter Britain. -- David Davis. It is all part... We do not know much

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about... The express believes in getting a campaign going and

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sticking to the line, if you don't know about its history. This is a

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poll, by readers of the Daily Express, after showing that readers

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are in favour of a very swift British departure. That is something

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that I found interesting, a division between those who may be in favour

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of Brexit, some want a quick departure, to wait it out,

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interesting negotiating strategy on both sides. It sounds like Theresa

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May is more interested in a slower process. Obviously there want to go

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more quickly, it remains to be seen which one is more powerful in

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negotiating. If you can bend John mine to British politics, the

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times... Story about millions of Labour voters placing Theresa May

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about Jeremy Corbyn, also... What is this about? Essentially, this is a

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poll that was commissioned by the times, using YouGov, and

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essentially, it seems to show that voters who voted Labour in a

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previous election would actually favour Theresa May. It seems to

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suggest there may be something of a bump for Theresa May, stability, may

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be an issue here, in the days following the referendum, the

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transfer of power from David Cameron to Theresa May, perhaps voters

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appreciate that stability. Another issue this calls to mind, division

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in the Labour Party right now. Right now we all know that the Labour

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Party is trying to find a new leader, that process has been

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somewhat acrimonious. There is the mention in the article of the

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potential for Theresa May to call an early election on the back of this

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so-called bump, which is, as we were saying, it could really help

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Labour... Overcome its own divisions, splitting the divisions

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which exist within the Tory party, in terms of remain and leave and

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whether there should be an early election. I also found this

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interesting, pointing out that Theresa May has a bigger lead than

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Gordon Brown achieved after he succeeded Tony Blau. I have a

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feeling this comes from across the Atlantic, I keep reading about

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bounces for Donald Trump etc. Is there a difference between a bounce

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and a bump! I think that a bounce is bigger than a bump. Patrick

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McLoughlin, and seven party chairman, very much playing down the

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whole business of an early election, we have this fixed term Parliament

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act, you have got to get rid of that first. He is playing it down. He

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said it would be very difficult, and the concern that is raised is that

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Labour would then campaign to reverse the referendum result, which

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could cause... We think we are divided now...! Could cause all

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problems -- all sorts of problems. The Guardian, they have the attack

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on terrible things in France, they made John Michelle Balmer moving the

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convention to tears. -- they major on Michelle Obama. We have heard

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cheering and lots of terrible things, but crying? 23 minutes

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clapping for Donald Trump, at the Republican convention. Glitzy and

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glossy and weeping... Not the kind of tub thumping action of Donald

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Trump, far more glossy. Bill Clinton caught mouthing the words "Wow" when

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Michelle Obama was speaking. We can go to the Convention right

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now... Let's have a look at what is going on... There it is... Bernie,

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again, it is obviously going to be Hillary Clinton... Seemed like a

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bone that the DNC was willing to throw the sound of supporters, to

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allow them to voice their support. Huge message at the convention, at

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both conventions, has been this idea of unity, on the Democratic side

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there has been bitter battles to get to the point where they are at now.

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To rally. On this Michelle Obama speech, it seemed like an attempt to

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soften Hillary Clinton, make her come off as a more personable

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leader... And stress this whole business of the first female

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president. Interesting story as well... Yes, the strategy seems to

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be, will the Democratic party try to convince voters to vote for Hillary

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Clinton or convince people to vote against Donald Trump, this speech

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seemed to be telling Democratic voters to vote for Hillary Clinton,

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Donald Trump was not even mentioned by Michelle Obama. Did we know that

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she is a terrific speaker, her delivery seem to be very passionate,

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as a speech it was more careerist than anything we have heard from

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anybody! Does a lot of campaigning, we knew that she was a good speaker,

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I worked in that area, she does a lot of campaigning for girls and

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education, we saw her doing James Corden's show, last week, and being

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very funny, and the controversy over whether Donald Trump's wife had

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borrowed some of her speech. That is a nice way of putting it! We knew

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that she was a good speaker. Before we go, the front pages... Let's look

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at some of them coming in while we have been talking. The sun has more

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on the killing of the priest in Normandy, by so-called Islamic State

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soldiers, referred to as cowards by one expert. All front pages are

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online in the BBC news website. You can read a detailed review.

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You can see as their with each night of the newspapers been posted on the

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page shortly after we have finished. Thank you very much.

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