24/08/2016 The Papers


24/08/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are journalist and broadcaster Aasmah Mir

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and the New York Times reporter Dan Bilefsky.

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Tomorrow's front pages: The front page of the Metro shows

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the devastation caused by the earthquake in central

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Italy, in which 120 people have been killed.

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The Times leads with the same story too, saying Italy's most historic

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The Guardian looks at a report by a think tank, which suggests

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the NHS would collapse without its 57-thousand workers

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The Telegraph reports on Government plans of permits for low-skilled

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EU migrants to work in the UK after Brexit.

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The FT says the US has warned the European Commission that it

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will consider retaliating if Brussels demands

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billions of dollars in underpaid taxes from Apple.

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The Express leads with a warning that toxic smog is set to sweep

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The Mail splashes with a call for a ban on microbeads in cosmetics

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and toiletries due to the damage they can cause to sea life.

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The Metro, devastation, one of the areas hit by the massive earthquake

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overnight. Two buildings, maybe three still standing in the middle

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of all of that? I think the picture is phenomenal, really. It gives you

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the absolute birds eye view of what has happened here. We are talking

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about entire villages, very remote, most of them on top of hills, some

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with populations of as few as 700 people, being pretty much wiped out

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in terms of buildings. At this point, the death toll stands at 159.

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It may, unfortunately, rise. This gives you an idea of the fact that

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in a small village, a small town like Amatrice, every person and

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every building is affected. You can see the rescue workers, people

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sifting through, in vain, almost, because it is such a picture of

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devastation, as the Metro rightly says. Questions clearly will be

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asked. At some point in the future, now is not the right time, questions

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about how stable some of the buildings were. So many of them seem

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to have just collapsed like a pack of cards. We are talking a very old

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part of the country, in terms of architecture, lots the buildings are

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medieval. They are not going to be constructed in the kind of materials

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that deal with this. I covered the L'Aquila earthquake in 2009, a

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similar area, not far from here. Very fragile, medieval buildings. An

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earthquake, I think you know about this as well, done, it was a shallow

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earthquake? The Mayor of Amatrice said that the town is not there any

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more. Because it was shallow, it was only six miles below the surface.

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They are more devastating than deep earthquakes because of the Dai

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Greene of the vibrations. It just hit massively, because of that.

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That's because of the intensity of the vibrations. 14th century

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buildings, even buildings from 100 or 50 years ago are not earthquake

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proof and they have not been retrofitted since. Especially when

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you consider that it was 6.2 magnitude, last year, Nepal, that

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was 7.8, and 700 people were killed. It was quite lower, but it still

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created such devastation. It's interesting when you say retrofit,

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it is possible to do that? It is, but it is very expensive. Questions

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will be asked, it is an area of incredible seismic activity. It is

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probably one of the worst areas for it in Western Europe, this

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particular part of Italy. The devastation, wiping out whole

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villages, areas. The picture on the front page of the Daily Telegraph

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was of a nun, on her cellphone. The convent she was in was destroyed?

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This photograph has been compared to Dante 's Inferno, a very moving

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tableau of a nun, caked in blood, on her cellphone. Apparently there were

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several nuns from the convent, pulled out of the rubble by a man

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that saved their lives. Had it not been for a matter of minutes, they

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would have perished. There you see her, possibly minutes afterwards,

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trying to talk to somebody, looking absolutely devastated. It is

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incredible what has happened. The rescue operation is still going on.

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As Aasmah was saying, 150 killed, but many are still trapped? With

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this type of tragedy, teams came from all over Italy, a six-man team

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came from the Vatican as well, to try their best to help. We have seen

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this time and time again. It is a horrible story, a horrible aftermath

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that we see played out on TV news screens. There is very little hope

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that people will be found alive, but you do hope that there will be those

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stories, those small stories of hope, where somebody is discovered

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perhaps a couple of days down the line. There will be one, there will

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be two. But not many. No, it is interesting covering the Nepal

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earthquake just over a year ago, you have all of these rescue teams

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getting in and they are trying to save lives. They know they will

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probably only save one or two, but that justifies, in their eyes, and

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drives them. Then they sadly be hundreds of people under the rubble,

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but if they can get one person how to live, and that could well happen

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over the next two or three days... And as we have seen covering

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earthquakes, the social fabric of a country like Italy, where family is

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so strong, it will hopefully help save the depression that can come

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after such an experience. In this case, entire towns have been

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demolished. It will be difficult. Staying with the Telegraph, internet

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giants passing the buck on terror? This is a story in which MPs are

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warning that Facebook, Twitter, Google and other social medias are

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deliberately failing to stop terrorists from using the websites

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to promote their beliefs. This is interesting, having investigated

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terrorism, many law enforcement people will tell you that in today's

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age of Twitter, millennial jihadists use Facebook, Twitter and other

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social media to describe in real time what they are doing, how they

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are becoming radicalised, where they are going to go. It has been a real

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asset for law enforcement to track these people. There are many people

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that would disagree with MPs, allowing them to have Facebook and

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Twitter be transparent, providing footprints which allows police and

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counterterrorism... At the same time, it helps them spread their

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message. It may provide a footprint that authorities can use, but they

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display their message at the same time? They are preaching hate filled

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messages and they are reaching a young and vulnerable audience, you

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could argue. I think what the MPs arguing, and this is the chairman of

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the home affairs select committee, saying that these big companies do

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not seem to be keen to take down or delete messages, profiles, as

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quickly as, for example, during the Olympics, a lot of people were

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saying they did not take down Anjem Choudary's profile on social media,

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but they were very quick, when there were copyright issues of somebody

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putting up a video of anything to do with the Olympics, it would be

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deleted pretty much straightaway. I think that there is a bit of a

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disconnect between the two. Obviously people will see one as

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being much more dangerous than the other. I'm not sure why they would

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not act. MPs are saying that they were damaging their brand. It

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doesn't necessarily make sense to me. It is money, isn't it? If you

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start impairing somebody's right to say something... Where do you draw

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the line? A lot of people would say you should draw the line with

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Islamic State, but that line seems to be in the wrong place for a lot

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of technology companies, compared to the general population, it seems? I

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think within the general population, they would like more control. To

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counter what I was saying earlier, I was amazed when I was investigating

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the terrorists involved in the Brussels and Paris bombing, a lot of

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them had open Facebook profiles, you could see them posing with an AK-47.

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That is worrying, for sure. Brussels, tax demand on Apple, Dan?

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Well, this is a long, ongoing battle between Washington and Brussels

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overregulation. We had the case of Google, Microsoft, they came in the

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cross hairs of the European Commission. Now we have the United

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States, chastising the European Commission for clamping down on

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Apple over tax, alleged tax evasion. This is an ongoing battle we have

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seen, where the Americans feel that European regulators are unfairly

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targeting US companies and applying and their demands. K. Well, what is

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likely to happen if this is done by Brussels? What are the Americans

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threatening to do? They can apply geopolitical pressure and take

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revenge by starting to regulate European companies operating in the

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United States, with greater force. The European model has always been

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more consumer centric, the American model is always, to some extent,

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more business centric. A clash of ideology? It good job we are not in

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it any more, isn't it? That is one way of putting it! This is all

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nonsense, because it is Bake Off! It is back. Tears after the Jaffa

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disaster? Is I didn't say it, I was busy revising for The Papers. They

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tried to recreate Jaffa Cakes, a bit of a divider, a bit like Marmite.

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The thing about this programme, it is on BBC One, who knows how many

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millions of viewers, and everything is so ramped up. To populist? It is,

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it used to be cool on BBC Two. It is so ramped up that you have people in

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the first episode crying, throwing things in the bin. They said the

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cake was moist, everybody was giggling. That is British humour,

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you are not quite used to it. The last British Bake Off final, it had

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huge attention in the United States. Nadia became a dramatic of identity

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politics, Islamic integration, I got hate mail from readers of the New

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York Times that were unhappy that I said that she had won. I spoiled it

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by saying that she won. Well, quite right! I would have been angry! It

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has a global following. So, if this went back onto BBC Two, maybe BBC 4,

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radio 4? Thanks for checking out the papers.

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Don't forget all the front pages are online on the BBC News website

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where you can read a detailed review of the papers - bbc.co.uk/papers -

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and you can see us there too, with each night's edition

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of The Papers being posted on the page shortly

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Thank you Aasmah Mir and Dan Bilefsky.

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The heat and humidity of recent days is triggering some thunderstorms. It

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was a hot one, to say the least, the hottest day of the year so far

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across the south-east. Much more

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