15/09/2016 The Papers


15/09/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Kate McCann, Senior Political Correspondent

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at the Telegraph and Martha Gill, Political Reporter at

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The Times has news that a state-run Chinese company is the largest

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provider of CCTV equipment to UK clients.

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The Financial times leads with the decision to go ahead

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with the new nuclear power plant at Hinkley Point in Somerset.

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The Metro devotes its front page to a shooting in London,

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where the victim was the mother of nine children.

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that UKIP members want Nigel Farage to return and lead the Party -

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he stepped down after the vote to leave the European Union

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The Telegraph leads with the news that Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson

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has re-affirmed his long-standing opposition to building a third

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The Daily Mirror reports that police looking for the missing

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child Ben Needham have made a breakthrough.

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The toddler disappeared in 1991 on the Greek island of Kos.

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And the guardian says that UK companies paid out a record

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?44 billion in bonuses last year So let's begin...

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Let's start with the story dominating today which is China

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getting a green light to power Britain. It may not be the headline

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all the papers would have chosen, but what do you make of this deal,

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Martha? This is the deal to put a power station at Hinkley Point. It

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was put on a pause by Theresa May for a few months and was originally

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put in place by George Osborne as part of its programme of

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strengthening relations with China. It would have been a disaster for

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our relationship with China if it had not gone ahead, but people today

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said it is an economic disaster. It will cost us ?30 million estimated

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over the lifetime of this plant and other energy sources are expected to

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be a lot cheaper. Value for money, Kate? And the political point of

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view? Is difficult to say if it is value for money, because we are

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trying to predict how much energy we will need in the future, what type

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and also what the cost of it will be energy sources are already becoming

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more difficult, so the prices are higher. This is predict is open in

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2025 and that may not happen. It's also the first big decision of

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Theresa May's Premiership. It is a difficult one and is opposed by many

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people for different reasons. It was always going to be hard for her. It

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would be almost impossible for her to reverse it at the point it has

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got to now, so it's a case of wait and see, though there are concerns

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that the technology will be out of date by the time it finally comes

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online, so it's very difficult to call whether it is good value for

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money at this point. I don't think we will know. But as with big

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infrastructure projects, they always go over Budget and take longer than

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expected. Interesting. Let us move on to the Financial Times. Their

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headline, further interest rain -- rate cuts remain despite the Bank of

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England and their bright outlook. Mark Carney has had to row back a

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bit from the gloom he predicted in the wake of Brexit, hasn't he? Well,

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he started the row back as soon as the Brexit vote was announced,

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trying to do it in a calming voice. What's happened now is despite the

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Bank of England having said that things are working, that the

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situation might not be quite as gloomy as we think, they say a

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further interest rate cut is still on the cards, which suggests that

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some people in the industry have been saying, that once they trigger

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article 50, a recession is on the way and this doesn't completely rule

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that out. Be done about business investment in the long term, but

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consumer spending has held up. I don't know if that's to do with a

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sunny weather. Possibly, but nobody knows. I think that's what the bank

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are all so saying, they can cut interest rates, but not saying

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they're going to do either. Consumer spending is better than expected,

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but people were told over and over that Brexit would trigger world War

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three and that hasn't happened of course, but we haven't left the EU

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yet. The crunch point will come in two years when we will really see

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the impact. Business investment as it says is expected to slow more

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sharply than consumer spending and that is a worry, because businesses

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employ a lot of people in the UK, so what does that mean for jobs? If you

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think about it in the round, if you're going to cut rates

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again, that's good for people spending, then offer people saving.

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If you have a situation where people are not getting much money back on

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their savings or able to invest, you could possibly end up with a

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situation where if people lose their jobs, it impacts upon them twice and

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the Bank of England are saying we could be in a brighter position, but

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it could worsen. So it is unpredictable. Good news according

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to the Financial Times for the Scottish whiskey industry.

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Presumably because the weaker pound is good for exports? Yes, we can all

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be proud of that. You criticising our choice of refreshment this

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evening? Yes. Although there is a slight warning point to note in this

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small article here, because it says although the value... No, that's

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wrong. Although the value of exports have risen, the value has dipped. We

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are exporting more, but getting less money back, so that's not ideal.

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Let's move on to the Daily Express. And this somewhat bizarre headline

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says amazing bid to keep Nigel Farage. Could it happen? They want

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to keep him as the leader of Ukip. The new leader is supposed to be

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announced tomorrow. It sounds like something out of a Roald Dahl book.

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The article points out there are some Ukip voters spoiling their

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ballot paper and writing, please Nigel, come back. He didn't rule it

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out when he quit a few months ago saying he wanted to spend more time

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with his family do personal things. He did say if it looks like the

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Government are making a mess of Brexit I will come back in 2020 and

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five for the best deal possible. So I would not be surprised if he came

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back, but I would be surprised if it happened this weekend. Ukip are

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about to elect a new leader. It won't be Douglas Carswell, he is the

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party's only MP and Nigel has said tonight he can't understand why he

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is in the party, you doesn't agree with anything we say, so he almost

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seems uncomfortable about being a Ukip MP. So it feels like a

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last-ditch, I'm going to have my final say before I bow completely.

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Can you see him doing that? Well, you certainly been able to

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reincarnate himself from certain disasters, but what is true is he

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will remain a shadowy presence in Ukip, particularly if Diana James

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who is currently the favourite, winners the plays. She is very much

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a Nigel Farage fan. Indeed in her announcement she said she didn't

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even want to be leader. The next four said let's keep everything the

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same as it was under Nigel. So we can expect to see something of him

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in the party. We will await the announcement tomorrow afternoon. On

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to the Telegraph. EU exploits are reinforced -- forced rethink on

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Brexit. This suggests senior figures in the EU are playing hardball with

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Britain in order to force them to rethink Brexit. The likelihood of

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that is uncertain, Theresa May certainly means business about that,

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we don't need to repeat her phrase. But the mood has been soured by

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Nigel Farage, who I think all of one of the senior delegates seated. I

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can't see them coming to an agreement any time soon. I think

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Theresa May's plan to say very little about Brexit is that when you

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say something very little about something everyone is talking about,

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it allows the other side to fill the gap and the vacuum, so we have seen

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it happen to Theresa May on her own backbenchers wet Tory MPs started to

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define the terms of Brexit might mean and Theresa May has been clear

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that Brexit means Brexit, buzzwords tell us any more. But the EU is now

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talking about what I could look like and if you don't trigger article 50

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quickly, then we are going to define the terms. All the other 27

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countries are meeting without us for the first time, that will be a big

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occasion, we will be in the room and won't know what will happen. David

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Cameron warned us about that before we left. So unless Theresa May is

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able to set out the terms, we will see more of these stories and we may

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see the rhetoric and conversation about Brexit slinking towards a

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hard-line EU position of we won't compromise, despite the fact Theresa

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May keep same Brexit will be good for the UK, we will make a go of it.

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Let us move on to the Guardian, a picture of Hillary Clinton, back on

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the Trail. It led me to wonder, there's been so much focus in this

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presidential campaign on the health of Hillary Clinton and on Donald

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Trump. Can you see a time when our politicians are going to have to

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reveal all about the medical history? Is certainly seemed very

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uncomfortable, is not something we've seen before, but there's been

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a lot of focus on and speculation on politicians and their health. Nigel

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Farage, he was certainly under a lot of scrutiny during the elections.

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He's complained of bad health. And I suppose with the new desire for

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transparency that we see -- have seen in the last few weeks, this is

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a possibility in the future. I wouldn't rule out anything anymore.

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My favourite part of the article was right at the bottom when it says

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Donald Trump exercises because his speeches are so hot they are like a

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sauna. So that's a form of exercise for him. Maybe that is the answer to

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the obesity crisis. Now the Daily Mail and pictures of Ringo Starr and

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Paul McCartney because there is a new documentary about the Beatles.

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You can see what they have done with the headline. I hate to say it, but

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-- but it is nice to see men are being criticised for their parents

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on the front page. I know it won't do much for equality, but these are

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two men who are still well celebrate, but we are focusing on

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their hair colour, which is what happens to women almost every day of

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the week. So I think it is a bit of a high five moment. Thank you. All

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the front pages are on a line on the BBC News website where can you --

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you can read a detailed review. You can see as their with each night's

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edition published shortly after we have finished. Thank you to my

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guests. Goodbye.

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