02/10/2016 The Papers


02/10/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 02/10/2016. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

:00:14.:00:17.

With me are the political commentator James Millar

:00:18.:00:22.

Tomorrow's front pages: Theresa May's speech dominates

:00:23.:00:29.

The Financial Times says Mrs May has given the clearest indication yet

:00:30.:00:36.

that Britain will break away from the EU single market.

:00:37.:00:39.

The i says the speech was a hard Brexit plan,

:00:40.:00:41.

representing an end to the UK's single market membership.

:00:42.:00:44.

The Metro also leads on Brexit, and Mrs May's promise to push

:00:45.:00:47.

for continuing free trade with the bloc.

:00:48.:00:49.

The Telegraph focuses on Mrs May's pledge to look beyond Europe

:00:50.:00:52.

to China and India, as well as a policy announcement

:00:53.:01:00.

tomorrow to invest ?5 billion to build new homes.

:01:01.:01:06.

And the Guardian notes the pointed response to Mrs May

:01:07.:01:10.

from the European Council, which said it would prepare

:01:11.:01:12.

to safeguard the EU's interests in the negotiations next year.

:01:13.:01:17.

The Daily Mail says Mrs May's speech was a message to remainers that

:01:18.:01:21.

The Mirror says Sam Allardyce could move to a new job in America.

:01:22.:01:29.

And the Times says EU leaders have rejected the Prime Minister's appeal

:01:30.:01:33.

for immediate talks about Britain's new deal, heightening fears

:01:34.:01:35.

OK, so let's begin. Welcome to you both. And that 10:30pm we focused a

:01:36.:02:01.

lot on Brexit and Theresa May's speech and we will turn to the Sun,

:02:02.:02:10.

and it is their march to freedom, as they call it. Obviously different

:02:11.:02:15.

papers are going to receive Theresa May's talk about Brexit differently,

:02:16.:02:24.

and the Sun is seeing it as Theresa May setting March 21 2019 as the

:02:25.:02:30.

date of our independence from the EU, perhaps becoming a national

:02:31.:02:37.

holiday if the Sun has anything to do with it. For a paper that wanted

:02:38.:02:41.

to leave they seem quite happy with the terms of a Brexit which she

:02:42.:02:45.

clearly set out today, which is for a hard Brexit. It seems that she is

:02:46.:02:49.

saying that Britain should exit the single market, and that the freedom

:02:50.:02:59.

that we would gain from that would outweigh the financial difficulties

:03:00.:03:05.

of doing so. Welcoming this hard Brexit, there are different opinions

:03:06.:03:09.

on hard and soft Brexit but they are very keen. I like it because there

:03:10.:03:14.

is a skill in summing up the story in four paragraphs, which is what

:03:15.:03:17.

they have done. One of the quotes says Mrs May says let's show the

:03:18.:03:24.

country we mean business, which alongside Brexit means Brexit, what

:03:25.:03:32.

does that actually mean? Did we not mean business before? She has done a

:03:33.:03:37.

fine line in soundbites so far. This is the first time we have heard her

:03:38.:03:41.

speak on this, and she warned she wasn't going to be pushed into

:03:42.:03:45.

making further comment until she was ready, until she got closer to the

:03:46.:03:50.

day and things firmed up as well. But the EU also responded. What do

:03:51.:03:54.

you think they were saying when they will safeguard their interests is?

:03:55.:04:00.

That is the most telling part of the four paragraphs, the one in which

:04:01.:04:07.

the EU Council chief, Donald Tusk, says they will safeguard their

:04:08.:04:10.

interests. Inevitably they will do what is best for them. That is what

:04:11.:04:13.

happens in negotiating situation. There is no reason to be nice to us,

:04:14.:04:18.

and no reason to expect that they will. They are taking the shine off

:04:19.:04:23.

that idea that the UK will have some sort of special status or magic

:04:24.:04:27.

capacity to get a deal that it wants. For some time now the EU has

:04:28.:04:34.

been saying, well, no, you won't. You can't, we are not going to do

:04:35.:04:40.

that. It seems like today they are really just reiterating. It is not

:04:41.:04:45.

everyone in the Conservative Party who are saying, it is the people who

:04:46.:04:49.

wanted to stay in saying maybe we need to pedal back of it. No, a lot

:04:50.:04:55.

of people who... I think even for the people who want to leave, there

:04:56.:05:01.

are different ways of leaving. What Mrs May has done today is outline a

:05:02.:05:06.

version of leave that is going to upset a lot of people, and not just

:05:07.:05:11.

the people who wanted to remain. It has upset a lot of business

:05:12.:05:15.

sections, it is going to upset people within her own government and

:05:16.:05:20.

what worries me about this style of Brexit is that, actually, a

:05:21.:05:25.

Conservative MP wrote today in the Guardian that it was Brexit

:05:26.:05:28.

fundamentalism. He talked about it being a romanticised vision of

:05:29.:05:32.

Britain, a country of imperialist chauvinism. What worries me about

:05:33.:05:40.

this is that it is almost as though the leavers have become a little bit

:05:41.:05:44.

drunk on free-market fundamentalism which they always wanted. Because

:05:45.:05:48.

actually what they could do is make business even more deregulated that

:05:49.:05:53.

is at the moment, and that is kind of what we always wanted. That is

:05:54.:05:57.

what I am worried about with this kind of hard Brexit, that that is

:05:58.:06:00.

the vision that they want, a much more deregulated version which is

:06:01.:06:03.

going to be worse for small businesses, for... And others have

:06:04.:06:08.

been speaking on this as well. It is a fundamental problem with

:06:09.:06:13.

referendums, there was nothing about immigration or staying in the single

:06:14.:06:16.

market or all these major issues. As you say it is an opportunity for

:06:17.:06:21.

people to start projecting what they think people are voting for on to

:06:22.:06:25.

whatever will happen next spring in the negotiations. The Times's

:06:26.:06:31.

headline is the rejection by EU leaders of the hard Brexit talks.

:06:32.:06:38.

Who exactly are they referring to hear? The Sun has given the positive

:06:39.:06:43.

take, this is a more negative approach. They claimed that Angela

:06:44.:06:47.

Merkel and other EU leaders have offered instant opposition to this

:06:48.:06:57.

hard Brexit idea. Again, it comes back to what Donald Tusk said, which

:06:58.:07:01.

is we will look after our interests, and Angela Merkel is the bigger

:07:02.:07:04.

player there. One of the fascinating things in this is that Mrs May says

:07:05.:07:10.

she wants to give British companies the maximum freedom to trade and

:07:11.:07:13.

operate in the single market. That would involve staying in the EU,

:07:14.:07:17.

that would be the maximum freedom, isn't it? There are not really any

:07:18.:07:22.

clear answers, it is fair to say. The Telegraph also leading with

:07:23.:07:27.

Europe, we must look beyond Europe and looking to China and India. At

:07:28.:07:34.

that is the thing. You know, they are going to have to find some way

:07:35.:07:42.

to reassure British businesses, how far trade is in the European single

:07:43.:07:47.

market -- half our trade is in the European single market and for

:07:48.:07:50.

companies based here they will be worried about how that will be

:07:51.:07:54.

replaced and how it can be replaced quickly enough for them to actually

:07:55.:07:58.

make up the loss that they would presumably in curb by being taken

:07:59.:08:02.

out of the single market. And so far we haven't seen any signs from any

:08:03.:08:06.

other country that we would be given any kind of preferential treatment,

:08:07.:08:10.

or that there would be any sort of fast track negotiation with them.

:08:11.:08:17.

Well, no, hang on. We have already agreed to start scoping discussions

:08:18.:08:20.

with Australia and New Zealand, the mighty power houses that and New

:08:21.:08:26.

Zealand. That is 2% our trade. And the scoping out is really... That is

:08:27.:08:32.

a done deal, isn't it? Makes it so much better. The key headline is we

:08:33.:08:38.

must look beyond Europe, she is talking about trade and also talking

:08:39.:08:42.

to the party, saying we must shut up about Europe. That is why she had to

:08:43.:08:48.

make the speech at the first-ever conference, telling the party to

:08:49.:08:52.

stop speaking about Europe but that is never going to happen because

:08:53.:08:55.

stories like nothing more than assessing about Europe. Another

:08:56.:08:59.

announced that we heard was the ?5 billion, it looks like we are going

:09:00.:09:05.

to get more building, new houses, a possible solution to the housing

:09:06.:09:09.

crisis. I don't think it is a solution to the housing crisis.

:09:10.:09:14.

25,000 homes by 2020. I am no expert in building houses but that is 8000

:09:15.:09:19.

houses a year. I don't know how long it takes to build a house. I like to

:09:20.:09:31.

-- the line that there will be 200,000 houses in the longer term.

:09:32.:09:37.

It is a daft promise. What's interesting about this is it seems

:09:38.:09:40.

very clearly to be following the Labour Party lead on this because

:09:41.:09:44.

Jeremy Corbyn's main platform was housing. They have pledged to build

:09:45.:09:49.

1 million homes in five years and make half of them council houses. I

:09:50.:09:53.

think when it comes to evidence talk about building houses, the first

:09:54.:09:58.

thing you think is are they going to be affordable? The ones we are

:09:59.:10:02.

seeing built at the moment clearly are not, for one, and your

:10:03.:10:06.

definition of affordable is completely out of range for most of

:10:07.:10:11.

the population. Getting on the housing ladder is impossible,

:10:12.:10:15.

whether it is a new house or current stock. Which is why the Labour Party

:10:16.:10:21.

are saying half of our homes will be social housing, which makes more

:10:22.:10:24.

sense in terms of solving the crisis pulls up the communities Secretary,

:10:25.:10:32.

Sajid Javvid, says it is a community concern. He clearly wants to tackle

:10:33.:10:39.

this. -- Sajid Javid. And Donald Trump is looming yet again, the gift

:10:40.:10:47.

that keeps giving. He is apparently a genius, according to his

:10:48.:10:51.

republican backers. Having not paid any tax for a long time, they are

:10:52.:10:55.

not denying this leads to the New York Times that he hasn't paid any

:10:56.:10:59.

tax but he is a genius for avoiding tax. Rudy Giuliani has gone on TV to

:11:00.:11:06.

say he is a genius for not paying his taxes. It is incredible how this

:11:07.:11:10.

plays out. You would think people would be incredibly annoyed with

:11:11.:11:14.

millionaires evading tax or avoiding tax, sorry, not evading. But to be

:11:15.:11:20.

able to spin it as a great thing, you know, our potential future

:11:21.:11:24.

president... He doesn't pay tax, what a genius! They have decided

:11:25.:11:28.

that they will vote for him and nothing is going to change their

:11:29.:11:32.

opinion, supporters of Trump. But we have until November so let's see

:11:33.:11:35.

what transpires between now and then.

:11:36.:11:36.

Thank you, James Millar and Rachel Shabi.

:11:37.:11:40.

Coming up next, it is The Film Review.

:11:41.:11:43.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS