09/10/2016 The Papers


09/10/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

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With me are Matthew Syed, who is a columnist for the Times,

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and Charlie Wells, who is European features reporter at the Wall Street

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We will try and find some things not to do with Mr Trump, but there is

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rather a lot of it. Once again Donald Trump dominates

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many of tomorrow's front pages. The Mirror says more videos are set

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to come to light to shame In other news, the Financial Times

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says Germany is stepping up attempts to lure banks away from

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London to Frankfurt. And the top story in the Times

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is a warning to Theresa May from business leaders

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on the possible impact The Metro lampoons

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the Home Secretary, calling her Amber Rudderless,

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after she ditches plans to make companies list their

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foreign workers. The Guardian says the UK is planning

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to move immigration controls to the Republic of Ireland,

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to avoid a hard border between north The Daily Telegraph leads

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on comments by the Housing Minister, who suggests grandparents

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should leave their homes to their grandchildren to help

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ease the housing crisis. Gideon Ruckman, the chief foreign

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affairs commentator at the FT, says he is looking forward to tonight's

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edition of the Jerry Springer Show. More bombshells to come as his own

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party disavows him. Apparently there is more damning evidence out there.

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There is this idea in American politics called the October

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surprise, Americans vote on the first Tuesday in November and the

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October surprise is something that comes in that month before and

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fundamentally reshaped the election. This is starting to look like it

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might be that October surprise. Because the controversy is

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snowballing. There was that video which was released on Friday, the

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promise of more videos to come, and of course, Republican politicians

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moving away from Donald Trump. Why leave it until now? Are stuffed with

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WikiLeaks about Will Hillary Clinton, they have only just come

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out and very recent, they have had months to dish the dirt. I don't

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know why it has come out at this moment but what has astonished me as

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that it has taken so long for the Republican establishment to come out

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against Donald Trump. He has comments much worse about -- he has

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made comments much worse about immigrants, about his opponents.

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Anybody who gets in his way he lashes out. So for me the question

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isn't so much whether or not the liberal establishment in America is

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against Trump, it is how this plays amongst people in the base who had

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or already come out and said... I think they had priced this end. And

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if more seats, along the same line, it may bubble up the controversy but

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a lot will hinge on what could become an electrifying debate

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tonight where two candidates are going to go in and I suspect Donald

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Trump is going to be hostile. The Guardian says Trump hits out at

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Republican hypocrites. This is from Missouri where the televised debate

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is taking place tonight, and a different kind of debate, town hall

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style. I think it will be interesting to all kinds of reasons,

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tactically, psychologically. Trump is cornered. I think his team are

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saying that he has to be contrite. He has to say I am sorry, draw the

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line, and as it were trained to insinuate that he is a changed man.

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To what extent he is able to get that across, I don't know. I suspect

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if Hillary Clinton goes after him he will not be able to resist fighting

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back and then it will be a race to the bottom and I suspect Trump could

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be defeated in this debate. He talks about Republican hypocrites,

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suggesting they are abandoning him now because they are seeing that

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their own polling won't do well. That is an issue. And part of the

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reason why it may have taken so long for the Republican leadership the

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sort of back away is because there are a number of Republicans in hotly

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contested seats right now who are nervous. They need to be very

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careful. How much worst is that need to be before he... He is under so

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much pressure that he has got to stand down. I think this is one of

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the most interesting phenomena in modern political discourse, is that

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to all intents and purposes it seems obvious that Trump should never have

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secured the Republican nomination. I mean, that was an impossibility.

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That this man could get the Republican nomination, he completely

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subverted the expectations of the pundits and the experts. The

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forecasters have got it wrong as they did with Brexit, Jeremy Corbyn

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becoming leader of the Labour Party. I think politics is becoming almost

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inherently unpredictable. I hope and pray and think that this could be a

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major problem for Donald Trump I can't say that with any certainty.

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The Daily Telegraph has another picture of him with his daughter

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Ivanka, on the left, and how he made lewd remarks to Howard Stern, the

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shock jock, the DJ, about his own daughter. Donald Trump has been

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struggling with suburban women, they have proven to be a key demographic

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in this election, in places like Pennsylvania, Florida. I don't think

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a father talking in this way about his daughter is going to play

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particularly well with that demographic. Let's move on, shall

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we? The Financial Times has Frankfurt's stepping up a bid to woo

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London banks after Brexit, as Germany consider changing the Labour

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laws. It is about being able to move across borders easily for bankers,

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and we are going to have this passport, which they may not have,

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after we leave the European Union. Whatever that means, whether it is a

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hard Brexit or a soft Brexit. One of the ideas was that upon Brexit

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London could become less attractive to banks as a headquarters and

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launchpad into Europe. But one of the points the article makes that I

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think is fascinating is that low living in London and would favour

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Amsterdam or Paris over Frankfurt. And New York could benefit, how so?

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You can imagine the executive saying I don't care where you want to live,

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if it is tax advantageous, you will go there. They say in this piece

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that German ministers have been going to leaving bankers and talking

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up some of the changes in the Labour laws. One of the key ones as a

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minimum statutory redundancy terms that is twice as generous in Germany

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as in the UK. That is a problem for tanks which often hire and fire at

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quite a fast rate. So they start changing the rules and inducing

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banks to go to Frankfurt, I agree that not all bankers will want to

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live there. It is worth saying loud and clear that this will massively

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hit the British exchequer. Huge amounts of money are paid by people

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who may hate the city but it is a very big cash cow. The times says

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this is a stark message to the Prime Minister from business. This is all

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to do with this immigration clampdown. Carolyn Fairburn, the

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director-general of the CBI, this is quite a stark interview where she

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has reacted with shock to the policy, saying they regard it... She

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is talking about business leaders and CBI members, as an indication

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that is somehow a shameful thing to be attracting the best talent from

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around the world, rather than a source of pride. This fits I think

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in the wider debate about what the conservative government is going to

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be like under Theresa May. She started as all new leaders do under

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a bit of a honeymoon, but the speech last week was a bizarre synthesis

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between Nigel Farage with an anti immigrant rhetoric on the one hand,

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and Ed Miliband with slightly anticapitalist sentiment on the

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other. That I don't think is what people were expecting and there is

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no doubt at all that the business community are concerned. There is a

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tension also between economic than politics, with Brexit negotiations,

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focusing on the economic benefits, or will we go the political rout and

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focus again on immigration? -- political route. The UK seeking to

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move the border into Ireland. The idea that immigration controls in

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the written would happen when you arrive potentially in Ireland. --

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Britain. Because of course the land border between Northern Ireland and

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the Republic of Ireland would be a border into the EU. And if the UK

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and is leaving the single market and a wall is built, the article talks

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about how that could be a breach of the Good Friday Agreement is,

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bringing back those tensions. And Southgate has tweeted from County

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Antrim, and they won't want the border any more than we do with the

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North, because they do most of their trade with the UK. You wonder what

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is in it for Ireland. It is a lot of work. It is a lot of work, but

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relations with the UK government are of great importance and the

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precedent exists for this model, where visitors are subject to a

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system where they apply for a single these are valid for travel both in

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Ireland in the UK. You mentioned Southgate, I think I had about eight

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tweets from her. She is prolific, Lisa is. If only she were here. The

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Metro, Amber Rudderless. The Home Secretary being ridiculed by Labour

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after a U-turn on plans to make all firms with their foreign workers. Is

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it fair to ridicule her if she is just listening to business saying

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that they don't want to declare how many employees they employ publicly.

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Yes, it is fair to ridicule her. It was a ridiculous concept and it is

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not just Labour going after her. One speaker came out today against

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naming and shaming, and Michael Fallon has as well. To play devils

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advocate, it is early on in this government, we are floating ideas to

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see what takes off on what doesn't. That really seems to be what she was

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doing at the conference. Can I change my mind? I think it is OK to

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say something, realise it is not a good idea and change your mind. I

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think we should give politicians more scope to flip-flop. Isn't

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success about adapting? It is a discourse. You have just done the

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very thing that you have criticised the Home Secretary for! It took a

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great deal of subtlety to do that. Backpedalling furiously underneath

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the desk. The argument is that they will still collect the data so that

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they can work out where the skills gap is. Will a Mac yes, and we

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should potentially be identifying our skills gap, to be encouraging

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people to get the jobs that foreigners have. Shall we go to the

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Times? Happiness is the best medicine, grumpy doctors and nurses

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are told. USENET awful being told to cheer up when you are feeling blue?

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They are being told to be more positive at work. Why? That could

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potentially lead to less mistakes -- isn't it awful. And this hormone

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oxytocin can make people a lot happier, get along better, and not

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make so many mistakes. I have some oxytocin right now. Surrounded by

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love? This is something that makes people happy. The Beatles disagree

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on this sentiment. It is easy for them to say. There is an important

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issue, which is protection for whistleblowers who want to speak up

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about bad practice, and often that is quite difficult to do if they

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don't feel empowered within the environment in which they are

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working, and so there are a number of important policies to make it

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easier for doctors to admit to adverse events. Once you admit and

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are open about errors, medication errors, surgical errors, you can

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change the procedures and protocols to make them less likely to happen

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again. I agree that joy and happiness and finding meaning in

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your work is an important part of performance, but I think there are

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some important institutional mechanisms surrounding the

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whistleblowing, that will make a difference. And this is coming from

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the new whistleblowing chief, who is Doctor Henrietta Hughes, a GP. She

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says it is her job to create a really positive culture in the NHS.

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The question of culture is a really interesting thing, Google and other

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companies talking about creating these new cultures and happy places

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to work and it tends to be trickling into other sectors that you don't

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necessarily think about. Cultural change is some of the hardest to

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bring about. But it is very rigorous. Some of the changes at

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Google, Amazon and others, success and innovation comes from quite

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specific internal dynamics and if you can get that right, growth

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mindset, resilient cultures, openness and there are metrics that

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can track how that changes over time and interventions which can make it

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happen. You should write a book about it. I have done already. I

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should have read it. You haven't? Not yet, is on my list.

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Coming up next, it is The Film Review.

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