17/10/2016 The Papers


17/10/2016

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Rosamund Urwin, Columnist at The London Evening

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Standard and Jim Waterson, Political Editor of Buzzfeed.

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Before we hear what they have got to say, let's have a look through some

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of the main stories. The Daily Telegraph.

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on the front of the Telegraph - fresh from meeting MPs to explain

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why he believes those accused of sexual crimes

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The Metro leads on South Yorkshire Police's belief that missing toddler

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Ben Needham died in an accident on Kos on the day he

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Olympic boxing champion Nicola Adams is the Guardian's picture lead -

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The Iraqi Army's offensive to recapture Mosul from so-called

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The Times focus on claims that hundreds of millions of taxpayers

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money is being wasted by the Government on a failed scheme to

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help troubled families. First The Guardian and one of the lead

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stories, a big story that has emerged in the last few days, Ukip's

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front runner, Steven Woolfe, quitting the party. The disaster

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after the referendum for Ukip continues. There is a question of

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why does the party exist now? They would say they are needed to make

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sure Theresa May delivers the referendum result. She seems

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determined for Brexit to mean Brexit whatever that might mean. Well, she

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keeps saying it. We had Diane James leader for 18 days. And then

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obviously resign. And he is saying here that the party is ungovernable

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and it does haven't the referendum to unite it or have Nigel Farage at

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its head. And Nigel Farage is now back in his third stint as leader.

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But he is as far as I can on his way to the United States for another

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presidential debate. Or at least that was the plan a week ago. He was

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supposed to be in the Trump Tower. And the man who can just about hold

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the party together is in the United States. It was interesting here on

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BBC News, we had the chairman of Ukip saying it was a good day for

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Ukip with great things going on, a new dawn and another contender

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saying, Ukip's in a mess and we have a long way to go and Nigel Farage

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should have stuck around. He was keeping the party together. Even

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interviewing Ukip members you hear different points of view. There is

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the old golf club and Essex Kent original sort of base, that former

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Conservative voter and you have the former Labour voters who have come,

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particularly in the north of England. The idea was Steven Woolfe

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could take over from Nigel Farage who was better in the south and he

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was somebody who grew up in Mosside and win voters in former Labour

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seats. He after one leadership election he was kept out on a

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technicality and another ended up with him in hospital for various

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reasons, which are disputed, and he has decided I'm getting out. I think

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a lot of the other candidates, anyone of any quality in the party

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will go, do I want to be in charge of what is left of Ukip? If you

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voted for Brexit you are in an abyss, there is no real voice,

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Theresa May is talking about it, saying Brexit means Brexit. There is

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no opposition. Labour are also trying to sort themselves out. There

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has been no opposition or critical voice or scrutiny of what the

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Government's doing. It feels more like that if you voted remain, there

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is a feeling that 48% of people and Theresa May's speech offered nothing

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for us. But there is a question of who takes over. There are names

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being touted and Suzanne Evans is at the head. And Paul Nuttal. I am not

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sure Paul Nuttal wants to do it. He had a chance to do it and decided

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against it and it was partly he didn't fancy it. Neither did she as

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it turned out. No. So Suzanne Evans, who is good on TV and has done a lot

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of media work, but hasn't been mofr than a councillor. And has not been

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treated well... She is hated by the main donor. And the only candidate

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is from a niche web-site. No one was thinking about politics today if

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they were in Manchester. Everybody was thinking about Olympic gold and

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silvers and bronzes in the rain. It did rather rain on the parade.

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Nicola Adams looking very happy and wonderful. A lovely picture on The

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Guardian. Nicola Adams who did a big wander with selfies, disappeared, to

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make the most of the moment. As did Jessica Ennis-Hill. Also the main

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photograph on The Times, taking a selfie of the crowds. Their faces

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sum it up. It must be great and there must be that sort of strange

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hangover after the fun has gone and with Jessica Ennis-Hill, who is

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retiring and what do you do next and having to train and now you have

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nothing to do. I like they had a parade in Manchester rather than in

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London. I think they're coming here tomorrow. They're in Trafalgar

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square. And the two Manchester lad s who got on the bus with a fake medal

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and a fake jacket. Cameron back in the headlines, David Cameron wasted

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a billion on troubled families, the Government exaggerated the success

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of the project. I think David Cameron said 98% of families had

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been helped. That is quite an exaggeration. Yes, the David Cameron

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legacy getting another kicking. This scheme was to help what they

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determined, what they termed sorry, troubled families and the idea was

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to get adults off unemployment and top truancy and to stop people

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getting cautioned or committing offences. This was, it came off the

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2011 riots. Although there was a lot of people just kind of jumping on

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the bandwagon, there was clear anger and divisions in society and David

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Cameron said we are going to sort this out. But the idea you can

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change problems by chucking a billion quid which in the scale of

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things given the scale of the issues in terms of employment and some

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people not having jobs that could be suitable for people, the idea you

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can chuck money at it and within five years see any change is, it is

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one of the depressing things when you realise there is a limit to what

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politicians can do. They like to think with a billion they can change

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lives. But when it comes to deep structuralal things, none of us like

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to admit our limited abilities. It with auz tackling a -- it was

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tackling a wide range of issues. It was a team of independent analysts.

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I think local authorities identified the families and you had a key

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worker assigned, a social worker I assume, it was their duty to address

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the issues. Trying to reduce truancy is not perhaps helped by getting

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them to check in with someone. It is down to deep-roofted problems. 45%

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of families who went through the programme still claiming. The Daily

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Telegraph a picture of Sir Cliff Richard in a car with the BBC

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broadcaster Paul Gambaccini. Both of them and a lot of people wanting to

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see anonymity for those accused of sexual offences. You can understand

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why they're arguing for that. Both have endured a drawn out, painful

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process. That seemed very unfair and they have been trited poorly. --

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treated poorly. But I'm utterly opposed as are every women group who

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act to combat violence against women is opposed to anonymity for

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defendants. Part of system is transparency and police seeking

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corroborating evidence... But the police deny naming them. It is

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always leaked. The argument it helps with their inquiries, it is often

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dismissed, the police denied naming them. I do think we need openness in

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our, because for one thing it keeps the public having confidence in the

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legal system. I admit that is not a great system where it is picked up

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by the papers, rather than the police naming a suspect. But I think

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we forget the reason that accusers are granted anonymity is because

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they're a witness and often in cased this is, they're witness to the

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worst thing that will happen and the reason they were granted anonymity,

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was because so few women could come forward, because if they had to face

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this. But isn't the real issue false accusations, people that not only

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ruin the lives of people like Sir Cliff, but real victims who might

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not be believed. I cannot think of anything worse than having a false

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accusation. But on the basic level in every profile written about them

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it will always be mentioned. It might be a case where it is an

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unfortunate effect of a system where if you want to get prosecutions and

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get a culture where people come forwarder and I don't think having a

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cover up to keep prominent names out of the press is what would increase

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trust in the system that a lot of people don't trust. Part of the

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issue is when these things happen, it does get sensationalised and that

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creates a thing where it BPs even -- becomes and feels even more harmful

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to their reputation. The other thing is that not drag out so much. They

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point out a 22-monthings investigation into Sir Cliff

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Richard. That seemed to be excessive. Now a lighter story, the

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Daily Telegraph, get the winter weather, is this true? A year ahead

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from the Met Office? You're asking a political correspondent to predict

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anything a week ahead. Careful, there is still a lot of them in. I

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is a that myself. -- I say that myself. I don't want to know the

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weather a year in advance. I'm happy enough just walking out and working

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out what it is on the day. Apparently the Met Office can now

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using past weather patterns work out what it was in the past and what it

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will be in a year. It is great, you can plan your holidays. You would be

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so disappointed if you booked that one week... I missed some horrendous

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storm in 2013. You could plan your wedding and your Olympic parade. At

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the moment you take a punt and you're disappointed if it is not

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nice. If you thought that was the one or two day gap you would be

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distract. The producer's whispering, maybe it is only for Saudi Arabia.

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We will see. I have never known it to be possible to predict. The only

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man I have known is a guy called Pierce Corbyn, the brother of the

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Labour leader. I am not sure I believe him. And the Express. They

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always get it right! Thank you both very much. Thank you for joining us.

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All the front-pages are online on the BBC news web-site and you can

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read a detailed review of the papers.

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After a mild couple of days, the weather's on the change. We will see

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lower faechlts -- temperatures. That cold front is heading down from

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Scotland and Northern Ireland with some sharp busts of rain and a gusty

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No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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