24/11/2016 The Papers


24/11/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Rosamund Urwin, columnist at the London Evening

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Standard, and political journalist Sean Dilley.

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Tomorrow's front pages, starting with...

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Years" is the Metro's headline on the Autumn Statement.

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It says inflation will "wipe out wages growth" and quotes analysts

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saying it's the worst wages squeeze since World War II.

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The Guardian says the squeeze will be the longest in 70 years

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and repeats the warning from the Institute for

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Fiscal Studies that the effect of Britain leaving the EU will keep

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wages below 2008 levels for at least five years.

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The Mail's headline is, "Who are they trying to kid?"

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It says top economists are accused of Brexit doom-mongering.

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Paris terror attackers funded by UK benefits

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is the headline in the Telegraph, which reports the trial

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The Times reports that failures by the Metropolitan Police

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have left "young children at risk of abuse".

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A senior policing source tells the paper that "this is the most

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damning review in the history of Her Majesty's Inspectorate

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It has gathered pace of its own, this inquiry of sexual abuse in the

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football. Two more players linked to Newcastle supposed to come out

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tomorrow. The fear is we are only just seen the beginning of it.

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Absolutely. Here we have got another player, not named, who has contacted

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police and making allegations of abuse. It does feel as though we are

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seeing a domino effect where people who have not felt able to speak out

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suddenly feel that they have to come forward. You think the stigma they

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felt they faced for all these years, but at least people are now speaking

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out about it. The thing that surprises me is that in a number of

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these cases, they are talking about two paedophiles who were convicted.

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There was an opportunity for them to come forward and say he abused them.

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They only have the confidence to do it do it because someone else came

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out and told his story. We look at all the hysterical allegations of

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abuse and many institutions have been shown to be fact. We have a

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very macho industry here where you have premiership footballers

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potentially, possibly billions of pounds at stake, they do not want to

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play that aspect of their life out, and it is one of those industries

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where do you cool a business or whatever where things are dealt with

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in the locker room not the front pages of the paper. Does it surprise

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you that we have not had a statement from Crewe Alexandra in particular?

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We have heard from one victim today who was part of the historical case

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involving this coach and he said they have had 18 years and today

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they are saying, we need to consider what we are hearing. It is not a

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great look. I think they need to make a statement. They have had all

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this time. It is not as though they have had two days, they have had all

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these years. But there is a line here is that the number of players

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to contact the union is in double figures. So we are talking about

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something that seems really quite wide-ranging. Potentially bigger

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than Jimmy Savile? It is almost hand on heart is a service. If anybody is

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watching now, footballer or anything else, you should not be afraid to

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speak out because now more than any other time in the past, people will

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listen to you. Unless there is some reason not to, you will be believed

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and it will be investigated properly. This absolutely could be

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bigger than Jimmy Savile because these people had access to

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vulnerable young children who wanted to play the ball. Well, we'll be

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investigated properly? The front story on the times, young children

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at risk of abuse. This is an investigation looking at historical

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cases and saying the Met are not doing a good job. This is utterly

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damning. They say three quarters of child protection abuse cases are

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poorly handled by the Met police. One of the issues it raises here is

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that the force has been more focused on burglary and vehicle theft. Those

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things are important but are they as important as child protection? I

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would argue absolutely not. And they have only taken a sample of cases

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here. We need to hear from the Met whether they think that is fair. But

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38 had to be referred for further investigation because they

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represented a continued risk the child or children. But a couple of

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points need to be made here. Police officers feel it has been

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politicised with regards to Tom Winsor, who went on to do a

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wide-ranging review of police performance. They feel they have

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been openly critical. Last year, H Aussie put out a report saying

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firearms holders were likely to be involved in mass shootings and

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failures. Ultimately, when you have cuts up to 40%, yes, when somebody

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makes these allegations, they need to be investigated, when your house

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get burgled, it needs to be investigated. Frankly, the police is

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not something you save money on. There is one thing in this story as

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well. They picked up two cases and in one of them, officers had wrongly

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close the case of the 13-year-old girl believed to be sexually active

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with an older man, and did not speak to the child. I think there is an

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attitude thing we need to address here. There was a belief that these

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were girls who were certain kind of girl. We really have to address

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that. If we want people to come forward, they have got to know they

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will not be dismissed like that. But you were about resources. No, but

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this is politics. Ultimately, the theory is that politics is separate

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from policing but the reality is different and you can look back to

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when the former Prime Minister David Cameron, for reasons we can

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understand, wanted resources put into the investigation of Madeleine

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McCann. He had told the Met commissioner to investigate. That

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became a massive political issue because theoretically, they are

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supposed to be separate. Ultimately, we do not just want a chiropody once

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we can see things being investigated. They need to be

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properly investigated. Burglaries, car thefts, child protection, all of

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it. Trouble is, when you look at the rest of the front pages, there is

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not much money around. They talk about borrowing going up. Most

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notably, the pay of the lowest paid in the country. The Guardian is not

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cheery reading for anyone struggling. Such an all encompassing

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phrase, jams. Who are the? Lots of people think they are the jams, even

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without... The people who actually applies to, probably a much smaller

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group. It is the ISS to say that actually, every household will be

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?1000 worse off a year. So even if you are not a jam, I don't know, a

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scone or something, people who cannot pay the electricity bill, but

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?1000, how many families and households can afford to lose that?

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One of the things we are likely to see is rising costs. I thought this

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immediately after the EU referendum and I panic bought meat, which

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proved to be rather fruitless! But I suppose people will feel those costs

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on things like food and electricity. They are. The pressure on sterling.

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They will simply see that the bill go up and that is really bad. It

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will happen. I travel around the continent a bit and bizarrely...

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People said they would not like the British because a Brexit but it has

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not been my experience. I was in Romania at the weekend, normally 100

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Romanian lei, it is ?105. As it gets more expensive the people, they will

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side with Tony Blair, who is saying, we must stop Brexit. Will they know

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to attach those two things? I don't know that people think, we will

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associated enough to think that. I personally would but, will they

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listen to Tony Blair? He is arguing, we need to persuade the public

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somehow. Maybe there is some sort of dossier. To persuade the public that

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there has been a vote but if we are negotiating on freedom of movement,

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access to the single market and how much we are maybe the public of

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which we are all members will say, hang on the second, what is the

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point of leaving? Will not some people be frustrated? The Telegraph

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has the same story. He says he could've held a referendum on the

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Lisbon Treaty in 2005 but said he would be likely to lose if he had.

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He said, I might lose so will not give you an option on Europe. It is

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said we live in a Parliamentary democracy. But at some point, as

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David Cameron said, that people needed and wanted a vote on Europe

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and that is what they want. So why is Tony Blair weighing in to try and

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stop it? It was the seventh most important issue in the last

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election. I do not remember is getting a referendum on the top six.

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And then of course, not only that, it was fairly low down people's

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pecking order but why did Cameron do it? To protect his own party. And it

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has worked. We have seen Prime Minister after Prime Minister. It

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was a self-inflicted headache on the EU because he mentioned it very

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early on but that will be the legacy he has got. Top of the times,

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another former Prime Minister weighing in, John Major, who was a

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big voice for Remain. The tyranny of the majority must not set Brexit

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turns. He is agreeing with Parliamentary democracy there. He is

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also saying there is a credible case for a second referendum and

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interesting to see Blair and major in such apparent agreement. They all

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agree on Europe. One could argue they agree because they have a

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deeper insight into this than many of us. His other point here, which

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is a fair one, is, why should the 48% also not have a say? The idea or

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they should have no say at all is rather ridiculous. Imagine how you

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would feel if you were an American voter. 100,000 votes in three states

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split Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, you took all three states.

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They are now having a recount England's quantum. It is on the

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basis they say they could be Russian hackers or whatever. The hackers

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said they would attack various systems. It is a machine voting

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rather than paper voting. That is the basis of the challenge. But of

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course, Mitch and has not declared still and whether we think it is

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fair or unfair, a lot of people think, 2 million votes... 126

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million people voted in the election. Does that not reflect

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everything around the world? How divided we are as a world? And also

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we could quite easily have a different conversation here about

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America's first female President. Funnily enough, the consensus of

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many of the swing voters is, any other candidate potentially, any

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other woman, would have beaten Donald Trump. We are out of time. I

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wish we could go on. Don't forget, all the front pages

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are online on the BBC News website, where you can read a detailed review

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of the papers. It's all there for you seven days

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a week at bbc.co.uk/papers and you can see us there too

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with each night's edition of The Papers being posted

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on the page shortly I want to bring you one line of news

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that is coming in from the Reuters news agency. Police say there is an

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operation

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