27/11/2016 The Papers


27/11/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 27/11/2016. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

after finishing second in the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix.

:00:00.:00:00.

Team-mate Lewis Hamilton won the race.

:00:00.:00:12.

Hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

:00:13.:00:16.

With me are Nigel Nelson, who's political editor at both

:00:17.:00:21.

And the Columinst for the Feminist Times, Jo Phillips.

:00:22.:00:27.

Welcome to you both. Hello. The front pages, then.

:00:28.:00:34.

The Telegraph leads with its own interview

:00:35.:00:36.

with the Polish Prime Minister, who says that the European Union

:00:37.:00:39.

will have to compromise with Britain over Brexit.

:00:40.:00:41.

The Express says the government must come clean over what it calls

:00:42.:00:44.

It says 30 million British people could have to work until they're 70

:00:45.:00:49.

The Financial Times' main story is that eight big Italian banks

:00:50.:00:53.

could fail if the Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi loses

:00:54.:00:56.

the constitutional referendum next week.

:00:57.:00:58.

The Metro says a prisoner commits suicide in a British jail every

:00:59.:01:01.

three days, in what it calls an epidemic fuelled by overcrowding

:01:02.:01:04.

The i newspaper splashes across its front page that Castro

:01:05.:01:07.

It says Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for praising

:01:08.:01:11.

The Guardian has the story of Francois Fillon defeating

:01:12.:01:14.

Alain Juppe to become the conservative candidate

:01:15.:01:16.

It quotes him as saying, "France is more right-wing

:01:17.:01:22.

than it has ever been."

:01:23.:01:24.

And the Mail claims some GP surgeries are assessing patients

:01:25.:01:26.

on the phone before they decide whether they should get

:01:27.:01:29.

We are going to start this time with the Mirror and it has got this

:01:30.:01:42.

football paedophile sexual abuse scandal on the front page along with

:01:43.:01:48.

the men who have very bravely come forward in the last couple of weeks

:01:49.:01:52.

to talk about those allegations. Ten questions the FA must answer, in

:01:53.:01:58.

short, what are they? Some of them what you would expect, the kind of

:01:59.:02:02.

things they want answered is it Crewe tell the FA what was going on?

:02:03.:02:08.

Why was Barry Bennell, the man at the centre, allowed to leave the

:02:09.:02:12.

country? Were similar incidents reported to the FA? That kind of

:02:13.:02:18.

thing. That is exactly what the FA should answer. They are quite right

:02:19.:02:22.

to get this investigation going on speedily. They have appointed a

:02:23.:02:26.

senior barrister to look at this enquiry. There was a suggestion that

:02:27.:02:30.

the FA could have acted sooner. One would have thought so. This man was

:02:31.:02:35.

jailed in the 1990s. We just heard in the clip with Gordon Taylor from

:02:36.:02:40.

the PFA, the professional footballers association, you would

:02:41.:02:43.

have thought there might have been an investigation and I am afraid it

:02:44.:02:47.

sounds weak to say that we asked if there are any more victims and no

:02:48.:02:51.

one came forward. We are not talking 40 years ago. We are talking, you

:02:52.:02:56.

know, within the last 20 years. There are lots of questions for the

:02:57.:03:01.

football association to ask. As you rightly say, Martine, it is

:03:02.:03:05.

incredibly courageous people to come forward and to talk about this and

:03:06.:03:10.

to open this horrible can of worms. And apparently there will be many

:03:11.:03:14.

more, of course, and the suggestion is that it is not just football,

:03:15.:03:19.

there will be other sports. In a sense, it is surprising, given how

:03:20.:03:24.

many sort of areas this has affected, showbiz with Jimmy Savile,

:03:25.:03:28.

politics, it is amazing no one has turned their attention to sport. It

:03:29.:03:33.

almost seems obvious because it is a gateway for paedophiles to get close

:03:34.:03:37.

to young people. The MS PC has a unit to look after this. Yes. --

:03:38.:03:45.

NSPCC. Thatcherite victor has sharp shock for France. Francois Fillon

:03:46.:03:52.

took 70% of the vote. What is the promising? He is basically promising

:03:53.:04:00.

Thatcherism Lite. He is promising to take on Marine Le Pen, leader of the

:04:01.:04:06.

National Front. He is conservative. By his own admission, he is... He

:04:07.:04:12.

has said he admires Thatcher and he wants to scale back the French

:04:13.:04:19.

estate, which would see about 500,000 public sector workers gone,

:04:20.:04:22.

lose their jobs, he wants to cut back on public spending but he is

:04:23.:04:29.

not looking at privatising national services and infrastructure and

:04:30.:04:34.

things like that. So, he beat Alain Juppe very convincingly. He will go

:04:35.:04:39.

on to the election next year. We don't know yet whom the Socialist

:04:40.:04:45.

candidate will be. I think you were saying earlier in the news that it

:04:46.:04:49.

could be Francois Hollande and he would be mad because he is the most

:04:50.:04:52.

unpopular president they have ever had. He will get knocked out early

:04:53.:04:57.

on if he does decide to run. It does look as though Fillon... You know,

:04:58.:05:02.

centre-right. The unions are still quite powerful. They will fight

:05:03.:05:06.

these cuts to the mail. This is why I find some of this little

:05:07.:05:10.

surprising as a selling point at the moment, because it is exactly the

:05:11.:05:15.

kind of policies that people have been rebelling against. So, here

:05:16.:05:19.

with Brexit, America with Donald Trump, however, it may be that we

:05:20.:05:27.

need some kind of right-wing agenda to take on Marine Le Pen. Yes. The

:05:28.:05:33.

Telegraph, EU must compromise on Brexit, this is the Polish Prime

:05:34.:05:40.

Minister talking ahead of a summit between Britain and Poland, Nigel,

:05:41.:05:45.

and this is looking less at the economy as far as Brexit is

:05:46.:05:51.

concerned. Yes, that is right, really, he is here to deal with

:05:52.:05:54.

defence matters and we are sending 150 troops to help them out. It is

:05:55.:05:59.

defence and security that the summit is basically about tomorrow but in

:06:00.:06:03.

the interview with the article she has written for the Telegraph, she

:06:04.:06:07.

is talking about how she thinks there is room for some kind of

:06:08.:06:11.

compromise. In other words, there could be a negotiated deal with the

:06:12.:06:16.

EU. She doesn't seem to go into any details from what we have seen about

:06:17.:06:20.

what that deal might be, whether it is the single market, the customs

:06:21.:06:24.

union, but she says if a compromise, the only compromise I can think of,

:06:25.:06:28.

access to the single market or some of it, and we will take in some

:06:29.:06:33.

migrants and we have to work out the figures, but it is interesting that

:06:34.:06:37.

it is the first European leader to talk about the fact that they might

:06:38.:06:41.

be able to come to an agreement. It is also a different voice for all of

:06:42.:06:45.

the reasons you said, the voice of our security and defence, the other

:06:46.:06:50.

big issue apart from the economy, which is focusing minds, but in

:06:51.:06:53.

light of the conversation we have had about looking to the French

:06:54.:06:57.

elections, actually this is a different voice, this is a different

:06:58.:07:01.

part of Europe, and if Britain, if Theresa May can do some sort of

:07:02.:07:05.

building of a relationship with Poland, you know, that's going to

:07:06.:07:09.

make it a lot easier when you come to deal with the new French

:07:10.:07:12.

government and a new German government potentially. But there

:07:13.:07:16.

are 27 countries, aren't there, who have to be satisfied with this. If

:07:17.:07:20.

it is a site Eastern Europe will say, we want to help Britain get

:07:21.:07:24.

some kind of deal, that is a better start than anyone else has talked

:07:25.:07:28.

about, everyone else has said it is take it or leave it. If you want

:07:29.:07:32.

single market you take freedom of movement. If you want customs union

:07:33.:07:36.

you don't get foreign trade deals. The idea there is room for manoeuvre

:07:37.:07:41.

would suggest that they are -- there will be genuine negotiation. Maybe

:07:42.:07:44.

there will be softening of the rhetoric. Eventually. Yes. The Daily

:07:45.:07:50.

Express, pension shock for millions, the government urged to come clean

:07:51.:07:54.

with the retirement age rising. Not something you hear in the Daily

:07:55.:07:58.

Express, is it, pension shock. Britain to be colder than Iceland

:07:59.:08:02.

and a whirl. It isn't a killer cold snap. Not yet. As many as 30 million

:08:03.:08:08.

could work until they are 70. It is not surprising. We know that the

:08:09.:08:12.

pensions are moving away from us like beach balls in an ebbing tide.

:08:13.:08:15.

LAUGHTER. I like that metaphor! That's what I

:08:16.:08:22.

am here for. You get extra pay for that. Leaving school now, someone

:08:23.:08:31.

will... Sorry, they face a working lifetime of more than half a century

:08:32.:08:34.

before they are eligible for a pension. The paper was produced by

:08:35.:08:39.

the Department for Work and Pensions and it would bring in the pension

:08:40.:08:44.

age of 70. Years ago when people left school at 15 and didn't get a

:08:45.:08:51.

pension until 65, they were 50 years too. People are living longer. The

:08:52.:08:55.

real problem that you are facing is people would spend one third in

:08:56.:09:03.

retirement. A baby born today will live to be 100, one in three, so we

:09:04.:09:08.

are facing a real crisis. What they should have done is thought about

:09:09.:09:12.

this 30 years ago when they knew about it. I should be happy to

:09:13.:09:16.

serve, if called. LAUGHTER. Imagine! The Times... Rip off rail

:09:17.:09:24.

companies forced to display cheapest fares. Yes. Where will they display

:09:25.:09:29.

them? Ticket machines have to be redesigned. According to the Times

:09:30.:09:36.

investigation, passengers were presented with 42 possible fares for

:09:37.:09:41.

a single journey between London and Birmingham and the online facilities

:09:42.:09:48.

are under attack. It is ludicrous, at a time, talking about more and

:09:49.:09:53.

more people doing the gig economy, freelance work, not working regular

:09:54.:10:00.

Alice, in London there is the Oyster card, rail companies, you need a

:10:01.:10:04.

monthly or yearly ticket, or you have to buy expensive peak time

:10:05.:10:10.

things -- regular hours. So there is no flexibility. They are not

:10:11.:10:13.

advertising the cheapest. Some rail companies have these cards which you

:10:14.:10:19.

can buy which are extremely good value but there are no posters

:10:20.:10:23.

advertised. Rail fares are such a complicated business. You get on the

:10:24.:10:27.

wrong train and you have to pay the full fare because it was a different

:10:28.:10:31.

one. This is such an easy thing to do. When you go and buy your ticket,

:10:32.:10:35.

wherever it is, it should be the cheapest fare for where you want to

:10:36.:10:39.

go. Wouldn't that be simple. That is what they are trying to do. These

:10:40.:10:44.

are the basic, you know, just managing the jams. The Daily Mail,

:10:45.:10:49.

prove you need to see their GP on the phone... Yes, the Daily Mail is

:10:50.:10:54.

serious about this, as they tend to be about many things... Everything.

:10:55.:10:58.

I worry about their blood pressure. LAUGHTER.

:10:59.:11:03.

In which case they should phone their GP and ask if they should come

:11:04.:11:07.

in. This is what the story is about. Three minutes on the phone with your

:11:08.:11:11.

GP and the Daily Mail don't like this terribly because the argument

:11:12.:11:15.

is patients need to be seen physically by a doctor. Yet it seems

:11:16.:11:20.

to make a lot of sense if you are feeling rough or you don't want to

:11:21.:11:24.

go to see their GP but you are worried about something, make a

:11:25.:11:28.

phone call, the GP talks to you and decides whether or not... Lots of

:11:29.:11:33.

surgery is already do that. Yes. I have got an elderly aunt and her GP

:11:34.:11:39.

is extremely good at finding. You know, she probably doesn't need a

:11:40.:11:45.

home visit but she just needs reassurance -- phoning. Older people

:11:46.:11:48.

like to know they are talking to their GP. We also do have NHS

:11:49.:11:54.

Direct. There is a quote from a former president of the Royal

:11:55.:11:58.

College of GPs who says doctors cannot see if the patient is pale,

:11:59.:12:02.

jaundice, if they have a tremor or if they are dressing differently,

:12:03.:12:06.

which would suggest the GP knows the patient well and I would suggest

:12:07.:12:11.

most of them don't. Let us finish, though, with something rather

:12:12.:12:16.

different, Ed's out, he has left Strictly.

:12:17.:12:18.

Let's take the chance to remind ourselves of some

:12:19.:12:22.

How can you not love that? That is animated trifle. He has clearly put

:12:23.:13:01.

in a huge amount of work to be able to do that. It is rather typical. He

:13:02.:13:06.

put in work when he was learning the piano, a huge amount when he was

:13:07.:13:09.

running marathons. And in government. LAUGHTER.

:13:10.:13:16.

He put a bit of work into that too. This is the way he comes back into

:13:17.:13:22.

politics. You think so? Yes. He went out when he wasn't terribly popular.

:13:23.:13:28.

Now he is hugely popular from Strictly - back he comes. That was

:13:29.:13:32.

really for Amanda, the resident Strictly afficionados. And Bake Off.

:13:33.:13:39.

She is a polymath, she is. It won't be the same without him. It is

:13:40.:13:45.

great. It is lovely. And I think we like people who have a go. We don't

:13:46.:13:50.

want them to flog a dead horse. No, and other contenders have arguably

:13:51.:13:55.

hung on longer. Dressed in yellow, he reminded me of an Whitaker when

:13:56.:13:59.

she was sort of flung across the floor and spun around. LAUGHTER.

:14:00.:14:03.

He has never been the same since, has he, spending a fortune on

:14:04.:14:08.

physiotherapy, apparently! LAUGHTER. Well, we wish him well, and we

:14:09.:14:12.

wonder what is next for Ed Balls. I think it will be Yvette Cooper comes

:14:13.:14:18.

back. I thought it was peculiar hearing him talk about economics on

:14:19.:14:22.

Radio 4. Don't forget all the front pages

:14:23.:14:24.

are online on the BBC News website where you can read a detailed

:14:25.:14:29.

review of the papers. It's all there for

:14:30.:14:39.

you seven days a week. with each night's edition

:14:40.:14:43.

of The Papers being posted on the page shortly

:14:44.:14:47.

after we've finished. Thank you for spending your Sunday

:14:48.:14:49.

evening with us here.

:14:50.:14:55.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS