21/12/2016 The Papers


21/12/2016

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Lucy Fisher, senior political correspondent

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for The Times and commentator Henry Bonsu.

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Tomorrow's front pages, starting with:

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The Telegraph leads on events in Berlin.

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The paper says the prime suspect for the massacre was under covert

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surveillance for months as a possible terrorist,

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until police let him slip through their grasp,

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Anis Amri stares from the front of the Metro.

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He's now said to be the most wanted man in Europe.

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The Times says the authorities suspected Amri of "preparing

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a serious crime endangering national safety" but red tape

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The i says the German authorities are under pressure after a series

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of blunders in their hunt for the killer.

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The FT pictures some of the suspect's different identities.

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Its main story is that the world's oldest bank is to be rescued

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The Guardian says Amri was known to multiple German

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And the Sun has a pun on the Queen's cold.

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Headline writers at the Sun have done better than that I'm afraid.

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Most wanted man in Europe, they now have a name and that's the face of

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their prime suspect in the Christmas market truck attack. The terrible

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thing is that he's had such a long head start in escaping after the

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German authorities held the wrong man overnight. Amir Anis. Tunisian

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failed asylum seeker. Turns out he's the master of disguise, already with

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six aliases, posing as a migrant from three different nations. He is

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clearly very... Practised at hiding his identity. Yeah. Yeah. Henry, the

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fact is, as Lucy points out, this man has had 24 hours, more than

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that, now, to evade capture. The German admitted that they got the

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wrong person. Yes. To begin with. And, clearly, there are a hell of a

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lot of questions the German authorities had got to answer in

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relation to this man. Because he was on their radar. And he's now on our

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radar. Because they hell of a lot is known about him. Usually, when we

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have the rest or the killing of a suspect when it came to the Paris

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attacks a year or so ago, we get all this information once the person has

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been killed or captured but we are getting all this while this guy is

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still on the run. We know he was in an Italian jail for four years and

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he managed to get into Germany under Angela Merkel's "Open door policy".

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They had him on their radar and let him slip through their grass, the

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difficulty seem to be the red tape. Then it needed be sure where he was

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from and that Tunisia would accept him. With the surveillance powers,

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the agent undercover in the Tunisian - Germany community or "Islamist"

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part of the Bellerin community or if he's gone across the border into the

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Netherlands in that community -- part of the Berlin community. It

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would appear at the German security services that they may not have the

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capacity to get on top of this. People are making comparisons with

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this country and the way we do things. That is unfair. Difficulties

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they face very difficult different to us on this island which we have

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been doing for many years. This man has had a head start. We know a huge

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amount about him but he is a man of many faces. Many faces. Front page

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of the Daily Telegraph. The Metro has a big headline and a big picture

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of the man but the Telegraph is a lot more detail. You talked about

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that, Henry. Lucy, the Telegraph goes on to say that the authorities

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in Germany couldn't deport him back to Tunisia because he didn't have a

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passport. They asked the Tunisian authorities for a passport and the

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passport arrived yesterday. I know. So many sliding doors scenario.

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Minute margins of time and circumstance. The fact he was under

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covert surveillance by the German authorities for so many months, it

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is awful to think he was on their radar' was involved in a robbery in

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a park and a bar brawl, never arrested. What would he have done to

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merit a four year sentence in Italy? Four sentence in every any European

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country, but to get that, you need to have done something serious. You

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need information share but a lack of it between European countries.

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Europol is meant to share this information.

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Is seems not to have been done. We saw the same thing last year with

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what happened in France. That's true. As you say, the problem is,

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sometimes you that when European authorities tried to deport them but

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if the home country doesn't want to take them back or doesn't accept

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they are of that nationality or origin, that can become difficult.

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Today, there is this detail that the passport had just arrived for him to

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go back. Maybe that affected his timing that he went and perform this

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atrocity before he knew he was about to be kicked out of Germany. If you

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are a host country and there is a possibility that you can deny that

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this man actually is a citizen of this country... Masi you're not

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going to want him. Why would you want this guy back in this country?

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We are assuming most of this is true. Remember, 24 hours ago we

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thought it was a Pakistani person. We still need to put that note of

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caution in. But apparently, he is a supporter of the people behind the

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Sousse terrorist attack which killed over 30 British people 18 months

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ago. Close links to a terror network. You'd think that in the

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interconnected world that we live in that these kinds of barriers might

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have been sorted out. You would think so. But one of the things

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about Germany, it prides itself, post-war, on being very... You know

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Germany. I've been to Germany many times, burning, Munich, Frankfurt.

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Germans pride themselves on being very open, tolerant. Which is why

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the extreme right has never gone beyond a few percentage points. Like

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in France. They don't want the Christmas market and the places

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where they gather in the centre of their squares to be corralled with

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heavy masonry, with gun toting police officers. People are saying

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this is the new normal, we've got to change. I've went to Westminster and

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it was noticeable, the uptake of police present even in London. That

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is the new reality, as you say. Changing the guard as well. Roads

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blocked off on the entrances. It is unthinkable. What is the most crazy,

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weird, unusual, outlandish thing that anyone can think of and you can

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be sure that some crazy person he wants to kill people will think of

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it. Lucy mentioned earlier that this man was a master of disguise.

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Multiple identities. Front page of the Financial Times. Four mugshots

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of him looking very different. In all of them.

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What right, he's got quite a fat chow hall look. Very gaunt and thin

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on the one next to him. Six different aliases. Three

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different nationalities. Tracking this man will be difficult. But what

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we have been talking about, how you have cross-border intelligence and

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security that joins up all the dots. European court rules, indiscriminate

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UK mass surveillance law to be illegal, Lucy. It's very

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interesting, the timing of this judgment given that we have just had

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this terror attack. The ECJ has ruled against this law that would

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allow the Home Office, the government, to keep the internet

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records and phone records of British citizens for 12 months. If you

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suspect someone of being involved in crime or serious crime or terror,

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instead of asking the authorities onwards looking to keep records, you

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can look back at what they've been looking at online or the website,

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not every web page but the general domain names. And the people they've

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been in contact with. This has been ruled illegal because it is so

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indiscriminate. The idea it is not targeted, you should not have these

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net trawls of data that affect every UK citizen when there is no

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suspicion. When you look at some of the departments that would have

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access to this, things like the Food Standards Agency, the gambling

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commission, you do think, as a British citizen, what I want these

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people looking at it? What's going on? It's one thing, an author body

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institution having access to this data but what about the individuals

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in those organisations, are they incorruptible? We have seen cases of

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police officers when they are upset with journalists, a journalist was

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investigating a police department and a police officer used his access

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to go after the generalist. It is the indiscriminate nature of this

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mass surveillance that the ECJ is exercised about? That's right. One

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of the most fascinating details about this case is that it was

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originally brought by David Davis, Tory MP while on the backbenches, he

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was a champion of Civil liberties. But as of Civil Liberties. David

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Davis Spartacus. But he quietly withdrew from the action and kept a

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low profile. Exactly. This is not going to matter when we leave the

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European Union. It might do. Final paragraph says that this decision

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will pose a problem for London as EU rules, bear in mind we have been

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talking about terrorism, do not allow exchange of personal data with

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countries that do not comply with its privacy regime. If we continue

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with this, after 2020, we have left European Union but it might not

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have, we might not be able to get the Europol type thing. Do you know

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something we don't? Have you got a hotline to Theresa May? No. There we

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are. All right, let's go on to the daily. This made all of us, all of

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our ears prick up when we heard this, the health scare for the Queen

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and Prince Philip. It's amazing, really. For me, this idea that she

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had a heavy cold which stopped her going to Sandringham, they do this

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every year. It just shows that given the Queen is 90 and Prince Philip is

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95, it shows how ready they get ill. Public servers, all the travelling

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they do, all the people they have to meet and come across the germs that

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might be transmitted quite resilient. All those little kids

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with posies! Lucy! That's a horrible thing to say! A bit of diversity

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might help the Jean Paul. What's wrong with the Jean Paul? I'm not

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saying that. -- what's wrong with the gene pool? They are both unwell.

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This train from King 's Lynn, they get driven to King's Lynn from

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Buckingham Palace. The armed protection. And then all the way up

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to Sandringham. Yeah. They will make another decision tomorrow, maybe. If

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they've got over it a bit they will go. It could be as late as Christmas

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eve. But it's a big thing. That's when I head off to the West Country

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or the Midlands. I go to Manchester. You go to Manchester. They go to

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Norfolk, the family get together and it is important. Absolutely. To miss

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that would be a shame. A day or two ago, the Queen quietly disengaged.

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Not quietly, because it was reported by Nicholas Witchel quietly. That's

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his job. Thanks, Nick. She's dropped 25 charities that she was patron of.

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She will no longer be a patron. Those patronises will go to some of

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the other members of the family. -- those patronises

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The advisers to Theresa May are almost as much as she does. Fiona

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Mill and Nick Timothy, they are both on ?140,000 per year, we have

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learned today, only 6% less than the Prime Minister herself on round

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about 149. I have been digging around today in all the records. I

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was interested to find that there are 400 civil servants who earn more

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than 150 K per year. I always thought the civil service was a bit

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less well than that. As you reach the top earner. Is that a case of

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our civil servants and special advisers earning too much or the

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Prime Minister earning too little? That's a good question. The Prime

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Minister and too little. David Cameron in an act of mea culpa cut

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down the salary from 160 or so to 145. But the president of the United

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States and about $400,000, post Brexit is about... 300 p! That was a

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joke, not a statement! It was a joke! It's over, it's over! What are

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you trying to say? Maybe the Prime Minister, considering the

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responsibility... Have come a bunch of MPs haven't complained about

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this? Because they want a pay rise. They are about to award themselves a

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pay rise. 10%, isn't it? They are coming onto just under ?75,000. Some

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MPs called me about this case today. MPs are unhappy there are 17

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advisers in number ten who are earning more than them on their

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basic pay. They think that's a bit unfair. Not necessarily the top

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people like the chief of staff but when you go down the grade and

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you've got right people advising London and what haircut to have. It

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is a privilege of doing your job, being a public servant in the most

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direct way. That's what I should have told them. That's exactly what

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you should have said. Thank you both for looking at the papers. You will

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be back in about 50 minutes. Do it all again. Looking at the headlines

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again and some of the other ones will have come in. Many, many thanks

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to you and thanks to you for watching. Stay with us, the

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headlines are coming

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No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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