15/01/2017 The Papers


15/01/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Coming up, song, dance and romance in La La Land. Could this be one of

:00:00.:00:00.

the big Oscar winners? We will get Mark Kermode's verdict in the Film

:00:00.:00:00.

Review. Hello and welcome to our look ahead

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to what the papers will be With me are Rowena Mason,

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deputy political editor for the Guardian, and Jim Waterson,

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political editor of BuzzFeed. Tomorrow's front pages:

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The Financial Times focuses on the Government's approach

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to Brexit, ahead of the speech It says ministers are adopting

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an increasingly pragmatic stance. The Daily Express says Mrs May's

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vision will completely free Britain, once and for all,

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from Brussels rule. The Metro highlights

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the Chancellor's suggestion that Britain could become a tax haven

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if it is denied access The Times says US President-elect

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Donald Trump will offer Britain a trade deal within weeks of taking

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office, to help make Brexit The Telegraph has the same story,

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adding that Trump plans to invite Theresa May to the White House

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as soon as he is sworn in. The Guardian reports on the warning

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by the outgoing head of the CIA that Mr Trump must adopt

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a more careful approach The Daily Mirror reports that

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Jeremy Hunt will earn millions of pounds from the sale

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of an education website he co-owns, although he can't take the money

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at the moment as a serving Health And the Daily Mail has the story

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of a Nigerian woman who flew So let us begin. Let's go to this

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story in the Times. Quite an extraordinary story, an

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extraordinary front page it makes. A couple of people doing interviews

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and one familiar name, Michael Gove, who used to work for the Times at

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the leading Brexiteer, and someone called Oliver Wright. It is a

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remarkable interview, and you see Michael Gove quite obviously

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blurring the boundaries between journalists, politicians and

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campaigner. In the top line that the Times has picked out is that Donald

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Trump has said that he wants to do a fair trade deal with the UK almost

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as soon as he takes office, and that will help make Brexit a great thing.

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That is a really, really interesting line for a domestic audience, but

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possibly even more than that globally is this confirmation that

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he will try to seek nuclear weapons reduction deal with Russia's

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President Putin, in return for lifting US sanctions. That is a

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really significant diplomatic development, if he manages to pull

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that off. What we get here is such a spread of things. You mentioned two,

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there are more in this piece. There are so many that you can't put them

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all on the front page of the newspaper. There is the fact that he

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wants his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, to find peace in the Middle East. He

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basically dismisses NATO as a spent force and wonders what its purpose

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is, along with the purpose of the EU. In the space of one hour-long

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conversation with Michael Gove he sets off several diplomatic problems

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which will now take a very long time for people to decode. I do sometimes

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wonder whether he is actually going to follow through on some of things

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that he says. When you see him saying I feel this way, is there in

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any thought behind it, is it calculated, or is it something that

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has just come into his head at this particular moment in time? He is

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pretty rude about Angela Merkel, saying she made a catastrophic

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mistake when she let 1 million migrants into Germany, but he goes

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on talking about her in warmer terms. Yes, slightly contradictory,

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as we have come to expect from Mr Trump. He says that Angela Merkel

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made a catastrophic mistake by leading refugees into Europe and he

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goes on to make some predictions about how this could cause the

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disintegration of the EU, and then he says he is going to start off by

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trusting her, even though that might not last very long. A little sting

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in the tail of that one. The same with Putin. He is saying he wants to

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do this deal with him, and then saying he will trust him for now,

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but potentially not forever. All the newspapers are going to scramble to

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catch up with this, of course. And the Telegraph has to give the Times

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the credit, but they point out the line about making Brexit a great

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thing. A great thing for who is what I want to know. Some of the guys on

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the US side I talked to recently said they are slightly less positive

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about the deal Britain will get from the trade deal with the US. They

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said everything will be on the table, things like pharma and

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agriculture, which were big, big things went Ttip was going through,

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ultimately scuppered by Mr Trump. They say Britain is going to really

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struggle with this one but journalistically what is interesting

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is that the Telegraph recognised that the Times front page is so good

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that they basically have to run it in full. Newspapers hate doing that

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unless they really have to. The other thing about the trade deal is

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that Obama said we would be at the back of the queue, so for reporters

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in newspapers like the Telegraph, this is a vindication of their point

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of view, the point of view from the Leave campaign is that Brexit would

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lead to trade deal and we would not miss out as a country. Very quickly,

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it is such a bizarre situation we're in, 12 months ago Donald Trump was

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not ahead in the polls on the primaries, he was still seen as joke

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candidate, David Cameron was secure as Prime Minister and going around

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Europe getting a renegotiated deal and the EU referendum was a long way

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off. It is absolutely mad. We stick with Brexit, let's go to the Daily

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Express but this is very much a domestic situation. Who starts us

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off? Theresa May due to make a big statement on Tuesday, everybody

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hoping for as I said before flashed on the bones of this thing. What has

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the express got to say? The Daily Express are probably the most pro-

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Brexit newspaper and its headline is thumbs up for Theresa May's Brexit

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plans. That is a signal that Brexiteers are going to be very

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pleased with what she has got to say, which we think is going to be

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that she wants to... She wants a clean Brexit. In order to achieve

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immigration controls she is willing to take us out of the single market,

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and we think also out of the customs union. At the same time we still

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want access to the single market. So we have also seen this weekend

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Philip Hammond, the Chancellor, out there saying well, unless you give

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us some access to the single market we would be prepared to potentially

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change economic model. That is code for cutting taxes, something which

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might frighten the rest of the EU. Encouraging them to come to the UK

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rather than other parts of Europe, absolutely. Interesting. I think the

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thing with the Express which intrigues me at the moment is that

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at the moment Theresa May has all the pro- Brexit newspapers behind

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them, the media on the whole are behind her, and she will keep that

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as long as she can keep proving that she is getting a proper Brexit. The

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moment the editors of the express and the Daily Mail start to see some

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give or some compromise, you could see the tone change. There'll be a

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lot of media influence in terms of what she is willing to compromise on

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and how hard she is going push it. That phrase Brexit means Brexit, do

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you think she will avoid that on Tuesday? I think she will need to

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give us a little bit more, but I think single market membership is

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probably for the chop. The Guardian, and it is your newspaper so you

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should probably tell us about this. This goes back to Donald Trump but a

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domestic thing for the Americans. This is the CIA getting involved.

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What are they say? This is the departing director of the CIA, John

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Brennan, who has issued a message to Donald Trump saying he should be

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more circumspect when tweeting, often in the early hours of the

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morning, his thoughts on anything and everything. Whether Donald Trump

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will listen to this chap remains to be seen. I think it incredibly

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unlikely. Intelligence agents are not exactly his favourite people. Is

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the outgoing? I think he is still in the job at the moment. Donald Trump

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in the Times interview in another section said he loves his Twitter

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account because as soon as he tweets anything all of the TV stations and

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the media rush to cover it. This headline reminds me of those

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careless talk costs lives posters from World War Two. Doesn't cost Mr

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Trump anything from his supporters. They go on loving him just the same.

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No, his team don't necessarily know what he is going to send out, he

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still has a mobile phone which he just stands out tweet, his random

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thoughts, he wakes up and sends out stuff that changes diplomatic

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positions and moves markets, no one in his team even has cited. Your

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organisation, in the modern way of disseminating news, is nice and

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small. A few words, you say it, it is irresistible. As a cynical

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product, it is absolutely brilliant. Everyone wants to hear about it, it

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is funny, rude, it gives you an emotional reaction, his tweets.

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Every is talking about them, whether they are on his side or not --

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everybody is talking about them. You can dominate the news cycle by

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sending out 140 characters when he wakes up. Brennan is stepping down

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so he can say things. He refers to Trump 's tweets about Nazi Germany.

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The insults are pretty nasty, aren't they? Yes, and he was pretty upset

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at the time about this controversial dossier that said various salacious

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things about Donald Trump that were supposedly written by a former

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British intelligence officer. And that caused a huge scandal last

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week. So I think it would have been a very emotional reaction to the

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things which were said about him in that dossier. Let's go on now to

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something which isn't about Donald Trump or Brexit, not directly,

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anyway. The Daily Mail, health tourism which is a subject they go

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for a big way. What is this particular story about? It is all

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about... Through Freedom of Information requests they have

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looked for the costs of maternity care for mothers who have flown into

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Britain or in some way ended up in Britain, despite being foreign

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nationals, and then gone back home having not paid their bills because,

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you know, they are not entitled to NHS care and yet they have left the

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hospitals with bills. The thing that intrigues me with this is that it is

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quite hard to argue on an individual case about the details on it, and it

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is also very hard to know, in isolation it is hard to justify.

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There are often circumstances... This is about one particular case of

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the ?350,000 bill, the person is not named. We don't have a context

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all-white has happened although the Daily Mail is certainly putting a

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context with previous cases where mothers have seemingly flown in to

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take advantage of superior healthcare in some respect. And as

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the paper says inside it, this all comes as... Journalists love to link

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these things up, we do have the story today about cancer operations

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being postponed. So it has managed to be blended in with the state of

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health service, the crisis in the health service. The NHS is under

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what are saying is unprecedented pressure at the moment and it is a

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little bit strange to me that the Mail is highlighting this particular

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problem so much when there are a lot of other things causing greater

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pressure on the NHS. As identified by doctors, cuts to social care, the

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ageing population, to name but two. They do go on inside, it has to be

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said, to go through a lot of the other issues as well. What is quite

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clever, I think, to give the Daily Mail bit of credit, what it could

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pay for, ?350,000. A good example of journalist digging in.

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Journalistically, you can imagine people talking about this down at

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the pub. It is a really good talking story, so there is an element of

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that. It is more influential than talking about billions of pounds in

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cuts to social care. Very quickly, I can't resist this. I don't know if

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either of you are dog lovers, but there is a story on the Daily

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Telegraph, the Queen's new role as a helpful dog walker. I'm not sure

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whether it is a Telegraph scoop or whether they have managed to confirm

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somebody else's world exclusive, but what is saying is that Her Majesty

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has spent last two years quietly acting as a dog walker for her

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former gamekeeper. His late wife was known as the keeper of the corgis,

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and presumably she died and so the Queen has got into the dog walking

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business. Another little nugget in here is that she is considering

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taking on two more dogs, having said that the current ones would be her

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last. What a thing to do when you are 90 years old. In a world of

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chaos, Brexit, Donald Trump, the Queen is walking some dogs. It is

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reassuring. It is, I like it anyway.

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