19/02/2017 The Papers


19/02/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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and their role in the space programme in the early days of NASA.

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Find out what we think of this film in the Film Review. Bats with Mark

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Kermode. -- that's with. Hello and welcome to our look ahead

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to what the papers will be With me are broadcaster

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Natalie Haynes and the Independent's Let's start with the FT leads

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with the news that Kraft Heinz is abandoning its ?115 billion

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takeover offer for Unilever. The i's front cover focuses on this

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week's Brexit debate in the House of Lords,

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where some of the New Labour grandees could resist

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the government's plans urging the Lords not to weaken

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or delay the government's The NHS has cut 15,000

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beds in six years, The Guardian reports that

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EU leaders are telling Theresa May that, what they call,

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blackmail tactics will backfire The Times says No ten

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is on a collision course with small businesses

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over its reforms to business rates. A warning from the

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Defence Secretary makes Sir Michael Fallon says Britain must

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maintain a military presence in Afghanistan to avoid millions

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of Afghans migrating to Europe. Meanwhile, the Mirror

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is leading with the story that

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former boxer Michael Watson has who attacked him as they

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tried to steal his car. Let's start with the Telegraph, and

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this morning from the defence secretary Sir Michael Fallon, UK

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troops to prevent Afghan knock down because Europe faces a new exodus if

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Britain pulls out of a war-torn country, plus echoes of what's

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happened in Syria with hundreds of thousands of people trying to make

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their way to safety in Europe. Yes, the Defence Secretary is using the

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migration argument to make the case for Britain to remain in Afghanistan

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where we still have 500 troops, most people have probably forgotten that

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because clearly it's gone much quieter there since Britain ended

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full combat operations, those troops are just in a training capacity. It

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raises more questions than it answers I suppose because the

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headline states UK troops to prevent Afghan meltdown, you might think

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Britain is about to send more troops to Afghanistan but the Defence

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Secretary isn't saying that, or at least not yet, he seems to be

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talking about the need for our troops to stay there. But is he

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hinting at... Trying to persuade the British public that at some point in

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the future more troops will be required? There's a quote at the end

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of the page that suggests he is, he quotes the Defence Secretary saying

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we're asking the government of Afghanistan and their military to

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deal with the same situation we had ten times as many troops to deal

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with, clearly accepting they need more troops but will they be ours?

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Is the public being softened up? Maybe because I think it's fair to

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say this feels like a respond to an argument that people didn't know was

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going on. Nobody said you couldn't have there smack there used to be

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10,000 British troops there. Now 500 are in a purely training role. It

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does feel very much like an opening salvo if a war metaphor of isn't

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inappropriate in the context. We'll allow it. Thank you. Coming back to

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the Guardian. The Home Office saying... They have agreed to

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review, and my going to the right one? At the bottom of the page, try

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refugees have hopes raised as Home Office reviews Calais cases. It

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emerges people hoping to come to the UK have gone back to the site in

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Calais where everybody used to gather to get across the Channel.

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And where it was such a big story last year that it was finally being

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shut down and bulldozed and children were being may be found somewhere to

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go to in France where they would be safe, or somehow getting lost in the

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whole chaos of it all being shut down. Obviously this story has been

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quite aside from one's opinion on the humanitarian nature of it, it's

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been terrible PR for the government, saying we had room for 3000 children

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under the agreement and now we have a few hundred and we're shutting it

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down. Across-the-board people have stood up to say it's a disgrace. It

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seems like the most enormous own goal really and yet they're not

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actually stepping back from it. They're agreeing to review

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applications, which is almost the exact same thing as not really doing

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anything at all. They're not agreeing to change the policy or put

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a pause in or anything like that, their agreeing to review it, which

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is pretty mild-mannered. A review could mean they could allow a few

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more in without immediately looking like they've changed their minds

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while changing their minds. A few is very few, it says they have their

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hopes raised but the public could have their hopes raised that there

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is a major change coming, which isn't happening. As you said, we're

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talking about a few children forced away from Calais when the Jungle

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close, they found their way back and they could have their circumstances

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looked at again. But the big picture is, the government will still end

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the so-called Dub scheme, meant to bring in 3000 but only brought in

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150. I'm reminded of a favourite limit of a favourite band of mine,

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the Pogues, lend me ?10 and I'll buy you a drink, a very small of. A

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couple of Brexit stories... I wonder which Pogues lyric you were going to

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choose, you had me worried. -- small of. And isn't it right that ?10

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would just about buy you a drink in Islington? With straws. On the

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Independent, Mandelson. The Brexit bill goes to the Lord's this week,

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lots of them are going to have lots to say, will they meant it in any

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significant fashion? Yes they will. Almost certainly the

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bill will be amended in some fashion and it will have to go back to the

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Commons and it will ping-pong as the saying goes. In the end you assume

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the Commons will get its way over the issues of EU nationals and what

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kind of vote takes place on the final deal the Prime Minister Seals.

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Lord Mandelson was on the TiVo this morning, certainly trying to bolster

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a few in the Lord's to stand up against the Brexit bill -- on the

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TV. He certainly believes the British public will change its mind

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when they see what miserable deal they get into years time or next

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year. In our paper tomorrow they go further saying the public should be

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allowed to pass judgement on the deal, raising the prospect of a

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second referendum or a general election if it goes wrong for the

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p.m. . Lex looked at the Guardian's Brexit story, the Brexit scandal. --

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gamble. -- let's look at. This is whether we should have to pay an

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except Bill, Natalie, a very large bill. The whole discussion has a

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faintly godfather like quality in it. Blackmail and division are the

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things we're being accused of. Yet David Davis, he wasn't trying to

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blackmail anybody, he was going to chat to our friends in Estonia,

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Latvia and Lithuania. Really? Everybody could not sound more

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dubious about this conversation! The blackmail line doesn't appear to be

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anywhere else on the front page, but I'm happy to be corrected by some

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ways better than me at reading, but I can't see it. It's within his

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rights to speak to everyone of the 27. There's only going to be one

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person at the negotiating table and not 27, the EU will have a

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negotiator and their employers that going round and talking to some of

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the 27 to pressure the negotiator is not going to work -- they're

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implying that. It's not going to work as a divide and rule tactic. It

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will be very interesting! Very interesting. The Daily Mail, NHS

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cuts... Let me repeat that with the right emphasis. NHS cuts 6000 beds

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in six years, one in Ted, the equivalent of closing 24 hospitals.

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-- 15,000 beds. In real terms funding has gone up year on year and

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it hasn't kept pace with demands. -- one in ten. The BBC ran its own

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series about how much difficulty the NHS is in. It's a stark bigger

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tonight, it says there used to be 150,000... There are now 130,000

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hospital beds, there used to be 135,005 years ago. I think that it

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started to be well intentioned -- 135,000 five years ago. There was an

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idea that you could treat people closer to home in smaller clinics

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rather than big district hospitals, it could have been well-intentioned

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reform, but it happened at the same time as huge cuts to social care so

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the consequence is there aren't enough beds. We have so-called bed

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blocking, operations are delayed and then we have the problems we've seen

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in the NHS. What's wrong is you're talking about funding going up just

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about year-on-year, but on the government's own figures, next year

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funding will fall, it will go down per head next year at a time of an

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ageing population and greater demand. It's a real nightmare for

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the government, this sort of problem, the NHS is going to get

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worse and worse. Health officials say patients recover more quickly if

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there looked after in their own homes, but you have to have doctors,

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nurses, district nurses in particular to visit people.

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Absolutely and you have to have a home safe to be released into. If

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you live alone and you're relatively frail, even if your sprightly the

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rest of the time, when you come out of hospital you're more fragile by

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definition so perhaps a home with lots of stairs or example isn't

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appropriate. You could easily let someone back into a flat or a

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bungalow but not a house and so on and so on. The Daily Mail is at its

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best when it has these consumer or patient lead stories, it's very good

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at these campaigns. I would be quite worried if I was Jeremy Hunt right

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now. And people buy papers because they're always interested in the

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NHS. Bill Clinton said you shouldn't pick fights with people that buy

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their ink by the barrel. Let's look at the Telegraph, plans to save the

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University of Oxford's funding with a Paris branch perhaps. They've been

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in meetings this week apparently, friends of visuals continuing their

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charm offensive. Flipping the glad I at banks. -- French officials.

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Orchestras, as Rob saw last week, and universities. From spending a

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lot of time with academics in the last couple of weeks, by coincidence

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they are all very worried about the Brexit decision, they are all where

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worried about what's happening to their students and their funding. --

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very worried. One of the popular schemes funded by the EU is the

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Erasmus scheme, the exchange, where you can study at a foreign

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university and lots of students wanted to come to Britain but

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they've seen the numbers drop of four applications because they're

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sensing the Brexit effect. -- drop-off for. Universities have been

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one of our great strengths recently and that is what we are concerned

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about when we leave the. It's a red example of a negative story about

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Brexit that makes the Telegraph -- leave the EU -- red example. It's a

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big downside potentially for universities -- rare example. Let's

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finish on something slightly cheery. Who doesn't love a David

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Attenborough series? The Cure Luke Planet, the award-winning series

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about the oceans, is going to return -- the Cure Luke Planet. There's a

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lovely quote about maintaining his works schedule, would you rather

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sail in a balloon over the Alps or sit at home dribbling? Not everyone

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has the choice! Thank goodness you tidied yourself up! Even these

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pictures in the pay per look amazing, don't they, never mind on

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the TV. We'll all be watching, weren't we? -- paper. The Blue

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Planet was his most successful series. I want to read this again.

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There will be the species we've never sing before, behaviours we

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have ever seen before by a dolphin, a task fish and a crap, so named

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because it has a hairy chest and it is like David Hasselhoff. I wonder

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if there is a Pamela Anderson equivalent. -- crab. The cuttlefish

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scene of the mating ritual, where we see what looks suspiciously like

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tentacles of a cuttlefish giving a back rub to another cuttlefish, we

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are all channelling our inner Baywatch memories, I think we are.

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That's it. Before we get into anything more on that! Discussions

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of swimming costumes and that kind of thing! That's it for the papers

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to Mike. Don't forget all of the front pages are online on the

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website where you can read a detailed review of the papers. --

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tonight. We are there as well each night. It is posted shortly after we

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finish and it is on iPlayer. Natalie, Rob, thank you very much.

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Coming up next it's the Film Review.

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