20/04/2017 The Papers


20/04/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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deliberate a targeted. TRANSLATION: The two officers they

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were wounded and other nearby at officers returned fire, and the

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attacker was killed. Hello and welcome to a look ahead at the

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papers for tomorrow. Some have managed to get the Paris shootings

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on to their front pages. Thank you for stay with us to do a second

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review of the papers the night will stop will be looking at the various

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lies coming in from the news agencies as we are talking. Writers

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are in particular dropping lines every few minutes about the attack

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in Paris. Let's start with Daily Telegraph

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which has the Paris attack quoting the French Interior Ministry

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saying police had been deliberately The paper also reports

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from Brussels, saying that EU that the UK retains European laws

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regarding the rights of EU citizens living here after Brexit,

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as part of any deal. "New Terrorist Attack

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in Paris" is the headline The paper also reports

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on government's plans to abandon the planned rise in probate charges

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payable on the death of a loved one. The Metro reports on a major

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study which suggests artificially sweetened drinks may

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increase the likelihood of developing dementia

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or suffering from stroke. Let me with a couple of the papers

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that are reporting on the Paris shooting tonight. The Daily Mail is

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of them. One policeman dad, too critical, it says, after a

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government goes on a rampage on the Champs-Elysees is just before the

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election. -- Champs-Elysees just before. All too often, we have had

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to report seems like this in Paris in the past two years, haven't we?

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Yes. These freezers will be very familiar to a lot of people. --

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phrases. There is in use in having perspective and saying these are

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small-scale attacks which may not have huge amounts of co-ordination

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and made not ring cities to a halt. This also shows that once again,

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people in the emergency services, police in particular, are out on the

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streets every time they go to work on a potentially putting their lives

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at risk? Yes. That Italy when you have here a police officer killed

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again doing his duty. And you have this iconic landscape in the

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background. You have the Arc de Triomphe, and the Big Ben clock

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tower in London. These big tourist sites are the target of attacks.

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Just a couple of lines from Reuters. The Paris prosecutors are saying

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that they have identified the gunmen, but they are still assessing

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if he had compasses or not. -- gunman. There was a report that an

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arrest warrant was issued because they thought that somebody else

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could be out there to speak to. But they said that police raids are

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ongoing. They are looking at addresses in the follow-up is part

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of their investigation. But the timing of this, of cause, is also

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significant. Just three days before the first round of the French

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presidential election. We have sunny similar in this country. Last July,

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the referendum, the EU referendum, Wenger -- when Jo Cox was murdered.

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I don't get really affected in the end. I think people accepted that

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that was a horrific, murderous attack by a deranged individual. And

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hopefully, the people of France will put this aside and not allow it to

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affect their elections. The Daily Telegraph also has this on their

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front page. A gunman with a Kalashnikov was known to security

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services, they say. This will be the information will be looking for in

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the next few days. Who this person was, and my connection they might

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have with other groups. Somebody who might be on a watchlist. I think is

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important to say that just because somebody was known to security

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services does not mean that there was a failing. People can also be

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known without being suspicious. Yes, a lot more information to come. A

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lot of leaders will say it is depressingly regular. And very

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different tiers and levels of extremism among some of the

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suspects. I guess the security services had to categorise them into

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how dangerous they think they are and how much information they have.

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Manpower is not limitless. They need to decide who is the priority. I was

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reading that there are potentially thousands, if not tens of thousands

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of, people on watch lists, potentially. How can even a well

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resourced security service keep track of all of them? There is also

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the suggestion that either the accomplice or the gunmen had come

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from Belgian, which is Brussels, and that is regarded as somewhat of a

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centre for terrorist activity. If that is the case, we are looking at

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is open border situation in continental Europe, where people can

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move freely from one country to the next, and that brings the downside,

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in terms of moving guns across the continent, which, luckily, we are

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not in the Schengen area and we do have the channel between us and

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France, which makes us a little more guarded from gun crime. Let's move

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on and look at the Times. A story about the EU. Britain told to keep

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EU laws on workers and security, says Brussels.

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Plus the jurisdiction from the European court of justice. This will

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be a surprise to many. You have a deal to protect the rights of EU

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nationals in the UK and British nationals elsewhere in the EU. What

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is now being suggested is that would involve the European court still

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having power over what the British government does to the European

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citizens in the UK. Even if they give them the right, which seems

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easy to do, you can stay here for the rest of your lives, we have to

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accept court rulings with regard to benefits, child benefit with Jo for

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example to those overseas -- child benefit for example. You would need

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a new body to preside over issues like this, a country like us not in

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the EU and a country that will? If I'm being too simple then please

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tell me, but if Britain leaves the European Union, we are out of the

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jurisdiction of the European Union so I can't see how the courts of the

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European Union can affect people who live here, be them Europeans or

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British or EU nationals or not. Surely that is if they retain the

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rights are stowed upon them by being a citizen of the EU because they're

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not a British scissors, they haven't relinquished those rights, there has

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to be a supranational body that can preside -- British citizen. If it's

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affecting the way Britain operates as an independent, sovereign nation,

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then it becomes a bit more complicated. The fact we are having

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this conversation shows how difficult the whole business of

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Brexit is. Untangling ourselves from 40 years of joint regulation and how

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it happens is very conjugated. This is a proposal from Michel Barnier,

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and has the backing of the European Parliament. -- complicated. We were

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told it was only Germany standing in the way of a deal between British

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nationals in the EU and EU nationals here, it seems that they're asked

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him the minds on this. It is square one and a difficult one to move on

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from -- there are demands. If we outside the framework there has to

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be a court that can adjudicate between us and the EU. It is

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plausible you could have European citizens living in Britain who were

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subject to British courts and British interpretations of what it

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means to protect your rights of residence, family life and those

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kind of things. If they are as good as you got when we were part of the

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EU. It doesn't seem like this is... They're saying it's a red line, it

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doesn't seem the only way of going about things. If they're worried

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about their rights to claim benefits after a post-Brexit, we would write

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that into law and it would be agreed and our courts would uphold that.

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There would be no need for the ECJ to make a judgement. This is very

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complicated. I don't remember any of it in the referendum campaign! I

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wonder why. Doesn't make for a snappy headline!

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Let's look at the Guardian, something else we thought couldn't

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be un-pick but perhaps it can be. Not too late to avert Brexit, says

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EU leader. The president of the European Parliament, an Italian, who

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is generously saying Theresa May is wrong, you can turn back if you

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change your mind, we will keep you in. You don't have to leave.

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Exactly. I think a lot of people are actually looking at European law as

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it is written, they would say there is so much ambiguity, enough of a

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grey area that if Britain decides it wants to stay in the EU, it's a

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political will question. The people who believe in the European project

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see this as damaging that Britain has left and of course they would

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want to keep Britain on board in those circumstances. I think he is

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saying something many have thought for a long time. Can we turn the

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clock back to July when we were having the referendum? I remember

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the levers saying, look, if we vote to Leave, it will send a shock to

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the European Union and they will up the offer to stay and then we can

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have a second referendum. They would have thought they were losing at

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that stage and they were going to hold out to those who weren't sure

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that if we hold a referendum we will get a better offer from Europe and

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the Leave campaign said don't be ridiculous, leave means leave. Now

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we have voted to leave, the European Union are saying... It would make it

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easier for them if we did? They aren't saying we are going to get a

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better deal, cutting budget contributions for example, they're

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saying it's not too late to stay together. They aren't offering any

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reform? To be fair we haven't asked for anything in particular...

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Theresa May is so keen to get out. What would be required for this is a

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Lib Dem victory in the general election, it doesn't look likely in

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the next two years Theresa May will turn around and stay -- say let's

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stay in. Article 50 is such a small clause, it has to be open to

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interpretation. I was always told it wasn't reversible. Even when you

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change your mind you are out, that is a vicious thing to say so he has

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said the logical more generous thing. Looking at the Telegraph and

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another EU related story, Theresa May commits to cutting migration to

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the tens of thousands. Some people think it is impossible to get it

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under 100,000. The reason it was impossible and why David Cameron

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promised that in 2010 was because we were in the EU. There's more

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immigration from non-EU countries. They can control that. But they

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haven't. Exactly. What they are saying is when we leave the EU the

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Prime Minister will do more to crack down on immigration and get it into

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the tens of thousands. Let's see if she can do it. She should have wiped

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the slate clean, she wants a new mandate, she could have had a

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different mandate. Lots of people are urging her to do that, why make

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a promise that has been proved to be hard to keep. You could fudge this

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promise, you could take out student numbers, those who contribute to the

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economy, you could give it an impossibly long time frame. There is

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some wiggle room, she said to wants to cut it to sustainable levels but

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it doesn't say to 2019. It is hard to hold her to account on this. She

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can say the line of below 100,000 until the end of the next parliament

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if she wants. It was below 100,000, net migration, in the 1990s. It is

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plausible there are a lot more EU member states at the moment who have

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sent a lot of people here. What's curious about this is having voted

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for Brexit, most people believe immigration will be certainly cut,

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especially from East Europe. There's no great need for her to say this

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but she has. They can't help but make pledges, but they are asked to

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make them! Let's look at the Mail again, Theresa May taxes plan for

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rise in death tax. This will be a sliding scale increase in fees when

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people die, their wills and estates have to be disposed of. Is this a

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casualty of the fact there isn't any parliamentary time between now and

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June the eighth to see bills like this through the house? Yes, the

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government want to introduce higher charges without having to go through

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Parliament. Liz Truss, the Justice Minister, has the power to increase

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your death tax in some cases. A parliamentary committee took a look

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and said actually this isn't really a fee because it bears no relation

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to the cost of dying and having an estate process, so actually it's a

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tax and you can't do that without Parliamentary emission. Business

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ends in Parliament next week before the election so they don't have the

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necessary resources to put this through -- permission. They could

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bring this back in the next session. Will it be in the manifesto one

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asked is? It is the second slight U-turn from the budget -- one asks.

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We had the NICs, swiftly ditched, and now this, a good excuse to do

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it. It takes it off the agenda for the election, unless of course she

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decides to put it in the manifesto. It was going to be quite a good

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earner for the Treasury? ?1.5 billion a year, taxing rich, dead

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people, it doesn't seem like voters are going to punish you. Good

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arguments in favour of this moneymaking scheme. Philip Hammond

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needs the money. Let's finish with the Metro, I think it is the Express

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looking at this, diet cola linked to dementia and strokes. If you drink a

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diet drink every day it more or less triples your risk. A lot of people

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are drinking these thinking they are being healthy. I know friends who

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won't drink the fall flat Coke, the normal Coca-Cola, but they buy Diet

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Coke and it has been the norm recently -- full fat. What you are

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giving up in the sugar you are replacing with chemicals which

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sweeten the drink for you. Artificial sweeteners. This story

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doesn't seem to say, we can only see the front page, it doesn't say where

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but it says drinking diet drinks can increase the links by three times

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for dementia and strokes. It's all about moderation. If you're drinking

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a lot of these everyday then you must be doing yourself some harm, so

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cut down. I'm sticking to the water but I want to see the full study,

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I'm not convinced entirely from the front page. There will be something

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that contradicts it. Go back to alcohol! Let me finish by telling

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you something else I have read from Reuters from the French prosecutor,

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he is saying they know the identity of the attacker involved in the

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shootings this evening in Paris. The identity is known, it has been

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checked, but he said he won't be giving the name until we have

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determined whether any more accomplices are around. These are

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life pictures looking down the Champs Elysee towards the Arc de

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Triomphe. We are still investigating and raids are ongoing, he said.

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Investigators want to know whether or not he had accomplices. The

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wounded police officers' lives are no longer in danger, said the

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Interior Ministry, no word yet about the passerby also injured. That's it

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for the papers tonight. Thank you to Henry and Dave for staying for our

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second review this evening. Thank you very much.

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