21/04/2017 The Papers


21/04/2017

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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

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With me are Torcuil Crichton, Political Editor at The Daily

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Record, and the barrister and broadcaster Sophia Cannon.

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Thank you for staying for a second review, which is an unusual retreat!

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The Financial Times says there's alarm within Downing Street

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as the Chancellor hints that he wants to scrap the 2015

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Conservative pledge of not raising taxes.

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The Mirror also leads with the Chancellor's comments.

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It suggests Mr Hammond has signalled he could increase VAT or income

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The Times says sources in Washington have told the paper

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President Trump is prioritising a trade deal with the EU over

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The Independent reports on a British judge,

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who warns the Government is displaying "invincible ignorance"

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in thinking they can free the country from

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The Daily Mail warns of a new mortgage price war

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The Sun also warns of tax rises and pension cuts

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if the Conservatives win the election.

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It says there could be an increase in overseas aid spending.

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The Express writes the Prime Minister is to reject

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a fresh call from Brussels to give a life-time guarantee of working

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rights to EU citizens currently in the UK.

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And the Guardian leads with the Presidential elections

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in France, and the heightened security in polling stations

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Starting with some reflections on three days of campaigning we have

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had after the snap election was announced, much to everyone's

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surprise. The Daily Mirror is where we will begin. The Tory bombshell.

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The Chancellor says he will drop a pledge not to hike taxes. This isn't

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comfortable for Philip Hammond, who says he wants to lower the tax

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burden on people, when the economy is doing well. Indeed. Spreadsheet

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fill, as he is nicknamed in the British press -- Phil, as he is

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nicknamed, is that the Tory party is the party that supports the economy

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and is fiscally secure. However, he has a black coal. Two forces are

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undermining this. First of all the demographic changes and also he is

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seen those who voted to leave or remain, the economy will be under

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pressure. When we leave the EU. Indeed. Where is he finding the

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money? Has tried to raise national insurance... That didn't work so he

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did the U-turn. Indeed. This way is a clever way. He is thinking to

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raise VAT, to put a tax on everything that we buy that special

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for people and the issue is VAT is paid by more people, poorer people,

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at a higher rate because it is the way people buy and consume their

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goods. Who would have thought it? The rule of politics, you can't go

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into an election promising to raise taxes because you will lose that

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election. Unless you are a long way ahead in

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the opinion polls. Unless you are confident of getting more than 100

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seat majority, as you can afford lose if you friends on the way.

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Philip Hammond, last month he tried to raise taxes by raising national

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insurance by 2p. He had to drop that in 48 hours. That budget melted in

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his hands like chocolate! So he is saying, I will have to get three of

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these restraints. The 2015 Tory manifesto said there would be no

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rises in national insurance because David Cameron's backroom boys when

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they wrote that, they thought they would get in the Lib Dems anyway.

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Now they are having to stage an election to escape their own

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manifesto. It's now about taxes and it will be the same for tomorrow.

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Should we applaud politicians for admitting taxes? We need more

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funding if we want the NHS to have enough money in the office. It

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depends who is paying the tax. John McDonnell said this is a tax

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bombshell. This is the mother of all tax bombshell is. More importantly,

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this is bullying the poor, bullying people who can't not pay VAT on our

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heating, on our consumables, on things that people need to have in

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their homes. Labour is accusing of hiding this VAT bombshell that was

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brought in after the election. As you said, the poor pay as a

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proportion of their income 10%, which goes on Vatable goods. But he

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might just opt for income tax instead of VAT. That's what happened

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yesterday. When Don McDonald considered the idea of people

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earning more than ?70,000. The day before, yes. Yes. The whole issue

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was if 70,000 pounds, it's a lot of money, are you rich on ?70,000? We

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are having existential questions being asked. Where should the tax

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burden rests? Because Brexit, even though we do want to talk about it,

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is making us look inwards as to where we will get this money from,

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who is going to pay and where the savings will be found. You ask

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people, ask voters, if they are willing to pay more tax for these

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essential services and of course they say yes. Someone should.

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Someone should. But they don't say yes in the ballot box, bedded reward

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politicians who say they will pay taxes. The Sun. It supports the

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government and Theresa May and says no to tax rises, no to an increase

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in the national aid, no to the end of the triple lock for pensioners,

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all of which might happen if the Tories back out. Pay and DisMay.

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They know their readership. The Sun, they appealed to the white 'van man'

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electorate. They would feel this. Obviously a lot of them are

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self-employed and a lot of them use the VAT system. Added on to this,

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OAPs also face an attack on the triple lock. Although we are out of

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Europe, we still would be paying 0.7% on our foreign aid budget and

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they see that as very much a bitter pill. Why should we be paying into a

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foreign aid budget when a should be raised? Soft power and all of those

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things Britain benefits from. They blinked it together to make you feel

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at -- as a Sun leader that these are linked and it's a clever device, but

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as you say it is the wrong one. That amount of aid... Theresa May has

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recommitted it and she has had to, which is quite good because she was

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being bullied earlier in the week. It will be put in black and white

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what each party thinks. Different forces, mostly media forces, have

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been trying to claw back on Britain's commitment to overseas

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aid, which is hugely important in terms of exercising international

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compassion and basically doing the right thing. Capitalism has been a

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major force in the past century to lowering poverty, to increasing life

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expectancy, and to ensure that there is more quality in the world. But at

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the moment capitalism isn't running the way it is supposed to. The

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Times. Angela Merkel lands a Brexit victory for Brussels. Do they prefer

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a block of 27 member states with hundreds of millions of people in

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it? This is a good story. A good Times splash. Before Brexit Obama

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put us at the back of the queue, then Theresa May goes to Washington

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and they hold hands, we are in front of the queue and Boris Johnson says

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we are the front of queue. Hold on, Angela Merkel! She doesn't seem to

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get on that well with Trump. She is pragmatic. She says this

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transatlantic trade partnership will be simpler and easier than you

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think, Donald. Donald Trump likes deals, he likes big deals, and Trump

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on America trade does five times more. And doesn't provide a path in

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for the EU. It depends on what the deal is. Is it a surprise that

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America wants to make a big deal with a big trading bloc and then put

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the smaller company further down the queue? It's not a surprise. It's not

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a golden carrot. This whole idea that Trump is supposed to be coming

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this year to see the Queen and for a state visit... And see some

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relatives in Scotland! We are no longer this idea that we are the

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nation that we used to be. We are looking at the wrong end of the

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telescope. If we leave we ongoing to be very small, a small island

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nation. We have always batted above our weight. Then why don't we

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continue to do so? Because things have changed. Technology isn't what

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it was. It has recently come out that... But all of that innovation

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we are capable of, all of the things people price about Britain, that

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won't change. One would hope it won't change but the whole idea now

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is the way we are trading and have traded in the past 40 years and it

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has been supporting our economy, it supported it, and now we are

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dismantling it in three years. Robotics might take care of that! We

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are more likely to be a nimble offshore economy with low taxation

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rates for big companies. And of course that probably means lower

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wages as well. Finishing with the Guardian and looking ahead to the

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French presidential election, the first round run-off is on Sunday.

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France heads for the polls on high alert. There are some rather

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stringent legal guidelines when you report in the run-up to the French

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election. Anything that's broadcast which could be considered propaganda

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in France risks in infringing these guidelines. That means things like

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material that you might be favouring one candidate over the other, so we

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will have to avoid that and explain it just you wonder why we aren't

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mentioning in the -- the individual candidates. This is an election that

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is probably more important than the one we are about to vote on in six

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weeks. It may have a bigger effect on Brexit than those going to be

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ballot box later. France will be a big player in negotiating with the

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UK. And if they are still in it. That's not the issue. The issue now

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is democracy in the shadow of the gun. There will be 60,000 extra cops

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on the streets. This is a European democracy that we are talking about.

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Troops being stationed on the streets. When you list the attacks

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that have undermined the French sense of security, we had Bataclan,

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Nice, Normandy, and what happened yesterday. I think when you see them

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and you list them the pedestrian nature of them... The horror, I hope

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the terror is slipping away because it has now become so mundane that we

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are just waiting. We have become immune to them. France is becoming

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fatigued. That may or may not play into the hands of any one candidate.

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We have to remember things like our own referendum in Europe was

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overshadowed by that terror attack of Jo Cox, which kind of soft the

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collective breath out of politics and the nation for some time. Did it

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affect the results? It seems not. Will this attack affect the result?

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The difference obviously with the people of France is they've had

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history. There have been occupied and have had this issue where

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they're very democratic foundations have been undermined by the forces

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and many people are undecided. I think it is 20%. But we can't say

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too much about that. We are expecting a high turnout and it is

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the first round run-off. We will be covering the results at 6:30pm on

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Sunday here a BBC News. That's it for The Papers tonight.

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Don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online

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It's all there for you, seven days a week, bbc.co.uk/papers.

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And if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it

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Thank you, Torcuil and Sophia. It's time for Sportsday.

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