23/04/2017 The Papers


23/04/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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There's a Royal send off for tens of thousands of runners in this

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With us are Rosamund Urwin, columnist at the London Evening

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Standard, and France 24's UK Correspondent Benedicte Paviot.

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Welcome to you both. The front pages, starting with the Financial

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Times: It leads with the French elections -

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and former banker, Emmanuel Macron going head-to-head

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against the far-right leader Marine Le Pen in the race to become

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France's next president. The Guardian says Macron

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is now favourite to win the result redraws

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the French political divide. The Times says voters

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in France have humiliated the country's two established

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political parties. While the Daily Mail describe it

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as a "new French Revolution". The i features the former

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Labour Leader, Tony Blair, telling voters to put aside party

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loyalty for the sake of the best The Daily Telegraph questions

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Labour's credibility on defence after they say

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Jeremy Corbyn ruled out ever The Daily Express claims a foreign

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aid row broken out over claims taxpayers' cash

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was being given to a government And The Daily Mirror suggests

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Madeleine McCann may have been snatched to order

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by slave traders and sold. Lets's begin with what has been

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happening in France tonight. In the first round of the French

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presidential election. They say here in the Times that the French elite

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have been humiliated. We ought to be used to political upsets by now.

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After what we've seen in the last 12 certainly. Although, as you put it

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this morning, this was the most likely result on polling. -- 12

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months. Given that there were four potential candidates to get through

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to the second round, and there now just the two candidates. There was a

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possibility a debt result. You have Marine Le Pen looking victorious

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here. Although she did actually come second. Or was interesting about her

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speech was that it sounded like a victory speech. Now, of course, we

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will have two weeks of the two of them campaigning and going head to

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head. In what I think is interesting is that immediately we have Fillon,

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we have him immediately coming behind Emmanuel Macron. The current

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Promina stop also coming behind a Man U Micron. You'll be interesting

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to see where the vote goes. But one assumes that the Emmanuel Macron

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really does look like the favourite. -- behind Emmanuel Macron. What is

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very interesting is that this portrays a deep division within

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France. There are a lot of unhappy and dissatisfied people. Much as

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there are in the United Kingdom, who feel forgotten, not listened to,

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left by the wayside. And all 11 candidates, presidential candidates,

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were offering solutions. The two that are going to face off in the

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second round mean that the centre-right and centre-left parties

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have been rejected. Just to confirm that headline fare, it is

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extraordinary. Is the first time in six decades, that the centre-right,

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represented by the former Prime Minister of Nicholas Sarkozy, a

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-- Nicholas Sarkozy, Fillon. This didn't work out for those parties.

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It is monumental. A novice, who created a movement just months ago,

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Emmanuel Macron, and then the Front National, in that second round. I

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know he took full responsibility for it, but wasn't the Socialist

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candidate, Hamon, because people had had enough of Hollande, being

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punished? Yes. This was an accident waiting to happen. When President

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Hollande said before the last election, he said Jeffrey on what

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happens, and then failed to deliver, except for a little at the end of

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his mandate, that is why he was forced in December to save, which is

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extraordinarily rare for an outgoing president, I will not set again. --

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he said, Judge me on what happens. Look at the parliamentary elections

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that will be held in June. Because you have this nervous, who is not

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for the right or left. -- novice. Can either of these two get elected?

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Whoever of the two is elected, a parliamentary majority. Because

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otherwise, if you are just a president, and you cannot command a

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majority in the Parliament, you are to do much. The Guardian says it is

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Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen. There are wider ramifications in

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terms of what that means for the rest of Europe. Where framesets. As

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a one to remain in the EU? Andrew Laughlin said the message on Twitter

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saying, how would each of these candidates affect the Brexit

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negotiations? What kind of lumber they take to Britain? Absolutely.

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And Marine Le Pen is the anti-EU candidate. And Emmanuel Macron loves

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Europe. -- what kind of attitude will they take to Britain. This is

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why we saw the euro go up on the anticipation that this was looking

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good billion in two weeks time. And also we saw people across that. --

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was looking good for him in two weeks' time. What about the talk of

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a Frexit? Is that take up much time for people in France? I think the EU

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is in the DNA of the French people in a way that it is not, in a way,

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in the continent, it is in the DNA. In Britain, not so much. I think

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there has always been that doubt. Given a four to be part of it when

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you want to, and not when you don't. Dennis Lillee schizophrenic -- there

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has been a schizophrenic attitude to Europe. Again, what I think is

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interesting for politicians around the world watching us, and looking

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at the wider phenomenon on, you have the Brexit, OK not called right by

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the polls, but that was a rejection of the EU, but a rejection of

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globalisation and immigration. You then had Donald Trump. So it is

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interesting to have seen the result that happened in the Netherlands,

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and we are now seeing tonight in France, and if indeed Emmanuel

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Macron goes on to win, politicians are getting a real kicking. And I

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think to the pollsters for a second, but I think there is a real

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antiestablishment mood, and in anger, economic anger, political

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anger, a cynicism of populations. But voter turnout was high. It is

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consistently high in France. People take that responsibility in the

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boat. I went to London today and it was extraordinary to see people with

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babies and in wheelchairs... All queueing up for about an hour and a

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half to go and vote. Good to see people using their democratic vote.

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Lets's look at the Daily Telegraph, then. Labour's nuclear implosion. It

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is that Labour's credibility is in tatters. So-called went on Andrew

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Marr and said that he ruled out ever using Britain's nuclear deterrent. A

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little while afterwards, the Labour Party had to say, actually, of

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course we still support the Trident nuclear deterrent. Every body knew

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the Jeremy Corbyn does not support nuclear weapons. We are in a weird

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situation. But think when Theresa May's said, was asked, said she

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would not hesitate. -- Theresa May it was asked, she said. This has

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been a difficult issue. Parties have always been divided, since 1945

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there is or has been division. I think you had to pretend that you

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would use nuclear weapons. That is the most effective strategy. We are

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in a system where people say, of Corso would, and that works as a

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deterrent itself. But of course, what is the point in hitting a

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button, when you are just critical more innocent people? Are we all

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exist in this sort of lie that they would. -- of course I would. You

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should never threatens the not prepared to carry out. You just hope

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you never had to use it. That is why it is called dissuasion. Some very

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top commanders, former commanders, the former first Sea Lord, he said

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this really rests alienating the armed forces. Lets's very quickly

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look at the i. Forget party leadership, says Tony Burke, saying

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vote tactically. Purview Kennedy as you can vote for, irrespective of

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their party, if a conservative, or whatever, they go to deliver the

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best Brexit deal, that is so you should vote for. -- vote for who

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ever you want to vote for, irrespective of their party. He said

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he felt so passionate about Brexit that he was almost motivated to

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re-enter British politics himself. The thing is, Tony, you can want to

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re-enter, but then knew how to find the right entry. And what role. It

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is what extraordinary to see him say that. I don't know this is something

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that he is sort of testing the waters in terms of where he would

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fit in... A new centrist party? You don't think they would have learnt?

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I think Labour has learnt from the split in the 1980s. It is

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interesting, because Tony Blair, a lot of people would like to have

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seen them go away and not return. But this is now am aware it is less

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unappetising to people, because of Brexit, and because we have an

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extreme option at the general election. I feel as though there are

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many people who previously disagree with Tony Blair ever saying anything

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ever again, but feel that political lines have been so redrawn by

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Brexit, they have hit refresh on everything, and it is not the most

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unwelcome intervention, weirdly. I will move us onto our last paper,

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the Daily Telegraph has a picture of Bryony Gordon, one of their

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columnists. She has raised a huge amount of money to be the London

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Marathon. Oh sure that was very difficult. How you do it, I don't

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know. She will write about it in her column tomorrow. They will be

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fantastic to read. She has done a great job. She has really raise the

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profile of mental health issue s. And she got the royal family

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involved. She got Prince Harry to talk about what happened after her

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mother's death. We know about the stiff upper lip stereotype of the

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Royal family. They do tend to shy away from controversial issues, even

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ones that should not be controversial. Citing what she has

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done to get all of that coverage for it, and then to go and run the

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marathon, and to raise all that money, and the matter charity, the

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official charity, there does well. -- so I think what she has done to

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get. And all those runners, amateurs, raising huge amounts of

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money. Think all that money for such worthy causes. About the mental

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health, I think it is extraordinary. As the Daily Telegraph rightly

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points out, unprecedented attention to an overlooked cause. We cannot

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say that enough. Then as you have physical injuries that are more

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visible. Of those injuries are just as real, and that needs... And it is

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commendable that Prince Harry, Prince William, and the Duchess of

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Cambridge have got this worldwide publicity for this.

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That is it for the papers tonight. Very nice to have

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