21/05/2017 The Papers


21/05/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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be talking about a novel, Peculiar Ground, said in a country house that

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becomes a stage for a gripping drama stretching across three centuries.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers

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Finally, I get to do some work tonight!

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With me are the parliamentary journalist Tony Grew

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entertainment editor at Huffington Post UK.

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Nice to have you both here, coordinated outfits all-round! Do

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not read anything into it! We will start with the Financial Times.

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Claims that Theresa May failed to consult

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some of her most senior colleagues on manifesto plans

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The Times also goes for social care, saying that the planned changes

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could be wrecked by poorly performing local authorities.

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The Metro also leads with the general election,

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reporting that the Tories are now looking to attack Jeremy Corbyn

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after polls showed their lead over labour being cut in half.

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The Telegraph reports that Jeremy Corbyn is at the centre

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of a growing row after they say he repeatedly refused to condemn

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the actions of republican terrorists in Ireland.

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that Britain is set to enjoy a blast of summer with ten days of sunshine.

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Do we believe it?! Let's make a start with the Financial Times,

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senior Tories were kept in the dark over May's dementia tax, it says,

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Prime Minister failed to consult colleagues. She has at times been

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accused of being very presidential, keeping everything tightly wrapped.

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She has a coterie, which I am reliably informed amounts to about

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three in the inner sanctum, but obviously both Boris Johnson, the

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king of love, and Damian Green today sort of hesitated when they pressed

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on weather they had been consulted, and Damian Green is actually

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entirely responsible for this art works and pensions, but they refused

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to say weather they had been informed. I interviewed Iain Duncan

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Smith about this ahead of the manifesto launch, and he said, don't

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ask me for detail, I haven't got a clue! And in the pasty had been very

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much involved. Years a backbench MP, so I wouldn't speak to them about

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these issues, despite his expertise, but this is an interesting move from

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Theresa May. We haven't seen an election pitch like this, she is

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basically saying, we will probably have the raise your taxes and make

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you pay for social care if you are a property owner. You could call and

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brave, or you could see it as a different way of approaching things.

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The interesting detail here, two things, first, that the Prime

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Minister's chief of staff, one of the two brains that she's incredibly

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reliant on and trust implicitly, put this in the manifesto, against the

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advice of other senior people. Apparently it was put in at the last

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minute by the head of staff. So that leads to this issue of a Tory

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candidate saying it is playing badly with voters because people are

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concerned, they do not know if it affects them. That is a serious

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problem in a general election campaign, candidate on the doorstep

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or cannot explain it or do not fully understand of themselves. That is a

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significant mistake that gives Labour a chance to present

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themselves, ironically, as the party of pensioners. Now, I would say, for

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a lot of people who cannot even afford a house, this is like an

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interesting conversation, you have a massive asset but you are not

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required to cash in the asset when you're costing thousands of pounds

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in care. I think what surprised and aggravated quite a lot of people we

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have spoken to since the manifesto was launched was this idea that

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there would be a cap on ?76,000, nobody would pay more than that, and

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that seems to have been accepted, but now all bets are off, you have a

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new election campaign trying to get a new mandate for something

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different. Completely turning the sons upside down, making this a

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ceiling. It is interesting that the two people asked about this, Damian

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Green saying this is locked down, Boris Johnson saying it may yet be

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tweaked. It is a complete U-turn on previous policies, but Damian Green

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saying that is because there is a way of improving it, and the

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emphasis is on making it seem there are two younger generation. Even if

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they were to be elected, they would still have to get it through, and

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some of their own backbenchers might rebel against it? Oblak it depends

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on the size of the majority, every MP standing on this manifesto, you

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can't come back afterwards and say, I don't like that part of it. It

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depends on the size of the mandate, but I don't think she's going to

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back down on this. Boris is being Boris. The major U-turn was over

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national insurance contributions, but all bets are off now, this is

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Theresa May's manifesto. The Daily Telegraph as a couple of stories,

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Corbyn engulfed in IRA furore, Labour leader refuses to condemn the

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group. And it has links to a hard left magazine as well, where is this

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all from? The stuff about the magazine which celebrated the

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Brighton bombing and advocated IRA victory has been talked about

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before, but this was raised during Corbyn's leadership. This is a man

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who repeatedly gave positive publicity to senior figures in Sinn

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Fein IRA. He was not meeting loyalist terrorist Connie was

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basically a cheerleader for republicanism,, and not just

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republicanism but violent republicanism. He is trying to spin

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it as if he was involved in the peace process, which is disingenuous

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at best. People like Mo Mowlam argued with murderers without

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bodyguards. Now that party is led by a man who evades answers when asked

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directly to criticise terrorism and terrorists. These were people who,

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when he was supporting them, they were murdering people live in the

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streets of the city he represented. And for you, there's nothing in the

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fact that it be standing on a platform with them, he is trying to

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engage with them? Absolutely not, he believed in IRA victory, he believes

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they can impose a military solution, drive the Brits out, drive the Brits

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out of Northern Ireland. You wonder for how many people this... Although

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we all lived through it, and it is difficult for young people who do

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not member living through the Troubles, as we always call them,

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how divisive, of course, it was. But it is, thankfully, quite some time

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ago, things have moved on. I'm sure people will say it is not perfect,

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maybe never will be, but how much of an election issue will this be? It

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is difficult to tell. Everybody has their pressure points, and as you

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say, perhaps because there is relief all round, in the past, in terms of

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the Troubles, and Tony has much more intimate knowledge of this, but

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Theresa May this week talked about fox hunting. I know people who were

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up in arms about this, it is a deal-breaker. Everybody has their

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turn, either their Achilles' heel or something they feel most

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passionately about. Corbyn has so many things coming at him, I don't

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know if this is going to prove to be the defined in point in the

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campaign, in the election, but he will certainly spend the next

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24-hour news cycle having to somehow dodge more of these questions, I

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imagine. It is probably something he could do without. As you say, it has

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come up time and time again at various points, this is not the

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first time. And it is not the last time, wait until the last week of

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the campaign, the Tories will be hitting this hard, he is

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unpatriotic, he does not support our Armed Forces, the nuclear deterrent,

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and he supported the IRA against British troops. He has said he would

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take military action as a last resort. He may as well promise a

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unicorn, he is never going to get into Downing Street. The polls have

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changed quite significantly. There has been a narrowing. About ten

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points ahead at the moment. The Conservatives, approximately. Second

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story, Facebook won't censor abuse and violence, something else that

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keeps coming up, this refusal to take down images which many people

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find to be completely unacceptable. I mean, the headline is that they

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have officially announced off what has happened is that the Guardian

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has uncovered a bunch of internal ethical guidelines that Facebook

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shares amongst its staff, and there are not that many people, for me the

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lede is that only 4005 and the people are moderating more than 2

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billion accounts across the world, a staggeringly small amount of people

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charged with this huge responsibility. They must be

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overwhelmed every time they get to work. And they have said it is

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because they don't wish to censor their users. This is all very noble,

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putting freedom of speech so high, but once again, we have touched on

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this before, Facebook and others identify themselves as platform

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providers, but there are increasingly influential publishers,

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they are the biggest machines of this in the world, and when you hear

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that some of the things include videos of abortions, as long as

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there is no nudity, this is unspeakable. I feel like the line

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has been crossed, they don't seem to think it as yet. I don't know what

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it would take. The rules about what broadcasters can show is different,

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we show much less than some parts of the world, but this is beyond what

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we would ever imagine being able to put out. As usual, I am frustrated

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by the Government's querulous approach, we are going to ask

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Facebook to explain this. You are a platform provider, let's set up a

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newsagent called a platform provider and start selling pornography to

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children, the police would be around quickly. You need to establish that

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they have extreme material that they are posting, you arrest senior

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executives under the same laws that you would arrest anyone else. But

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can you do that given that it is an international operation? They

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operate under UK law, of course they can do it. In this piece, it does

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say that Theresa May is promising that one of her next things, her big

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projects, is to impose legislation on these people. We already know

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there is an office of instruments talking about personal data, this

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comes on the back of Mark Zuckerberg sort of tacitly acknowledging that

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he is in some way responsible for fake news, and he is now sharing

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tips for spotting fake news. That is as far as he has got. I feel like

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walls are being broken down with this. Facebook like many and they

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don't like being controlled by governments, and that some point

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those two are going to collide. Church of England Barnes heavenly

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17% returns put it among the top performance. -- funds. How are they

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doing so well? Apparently, they are going against all trends, they have

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very active financial managers who are looking seriously at headlines,

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running in the opposite direction. Apps we should all take a leaf out

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of their book. I love reading the Financial Times, a sentence here, an

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investor remains a support of active management at a time of massive

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inflows into passive index tracking funds, I don't understand it at all!

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Foreign-language! Cyclical, play the long game, that is what it means. If

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you are taking positions counter to industry trends, you might have to

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play the long game, but we will both have to rush tomorrow to see what is

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in their portfolio. I suppose you need someone who understands that

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sort of talk! It is a difficult one, though, isn't it? If you are in

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pursuit of wealth. It is a ?7.9 billion investment fund that

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contribute about 15% of their overall ministry costs, so things

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like looking after cathedrals and things like that. So less than I

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thought, I thought they were making more money from the stock market,

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but most of the revenue comes from people putting money in the

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collection plate. No matter the size of the congregation, they are doing

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all right. Let's look at the Times, air pollution can deprive you of a

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good night's sleep, barely a day goes by where pollution is not an

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issue for one reason or another. We look at it as a background issue,

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but 40,000 deaths a year, you know, and I think about how this country

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dealt with jinked driving, for example, which was another massacre

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on the roads. The Government intervened, culture change occurred,

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and road deaths are down significantly. I think this is a

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hidden killer that we just accept as the price of living in polluted

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cities. I am not surprised at this, what surprised me is that the

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average age of the people involved was 63. So it has not been spread

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across an age range, it is focusing slightly older. But of course the

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people who actually suffer the most from air pollution are children.

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Yes. Their little lungs are the ones that really suffer. And there are so

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many initiatives that could be on the way, these cars scrappage,

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having to pay congestion charge. Yes, and we know that these targets

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are continuously failing to be met. Elution is one of the big villains,

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it is up there with every week, we have a new villain in town, sugar is

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the latest. But pollution has always been around. I went to a

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nutritionist who told me, forget your diet, you are fighting a losing

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battle when you live in the Thames Estuary, because it taps into your

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immune system, allergies, your ability to process even good food.

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You need to get out of towns and get into clean air. On a bicycle! We are

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going to finish with the i, because Carolinas here, she can tell us all

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about it. In the culture section, Twin Peaks is back, what is it all

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about? It first came to the screens 27 years ago, I was out of the

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country and I missed it, but I know it was a big deal. What is

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interesting is that there is a whole generation who have forgotten all

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who will never know what Twin Peaks was about, and they are saying, what

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is it all about? But it did Harold this golden age of television that

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we continue to celebrate over and over again. -- Herald. For every

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auto creating these programmes, these long, corrugated narrative arc

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series, they'll credit David Lynch and Twin Peaks for pioneering what

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was possible. It was a bit weird, wasn't it? It didn't make any sense!

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It was great television, wasn't it, Caroline, like nothing we have seen

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before? Obviously I was only a young child when it first came out! But I

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saw it later, it was baffling, I somebody in biology class join a

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diagram, who was doing what, because it was incredibly confusing. But it

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was television like we have never seen before, I am really looking

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forward to seeing what they do. It is a revival, and what David Lynch

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probably uniquely has managed to do is recruit a very impressive number

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of the original cast members, so unfortunately the log Lady is no

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longer with us, but she did film her scenes before she died, in 2015, so

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she will be back on screen, along with some other strange folk. It

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really said some careers allied, didn't it? Kyle McLachlan is back as

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Agent Cooper, he will probably be ordering some damn fine coffee. Some

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famous faces, a lot of people are writing articles, where are they

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now? The wackiest characters countdown, they are going to keep us

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imprint for a few weeks yet. You have to watch the first one first,

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or I will be even more confused! That is it... Where are we?! That is

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it for the Papers, but Tony and Caroline will be back at 11:30pm.

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Don't forget, all the front pages are on the BBC News website, you can

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read a review, that is seven days a week on the BBC website. You can see

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us there, posted shortly after we have finished. And now it is time

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for Meet The Author. A great house

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with a great wall around it. We are in mid-17th century England

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at a time of religious strife when many lives are touched

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by danger and intrigue. Then we are in the same house three

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centuries later in the grip

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