27/07/2017 The Papers


27/07/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Joel Taylor, Deputy News Editor of the Metro

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and Kate Devlin, deputy political editor of the Sunday Express.

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Tomorrow's front pages, starting with...

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Brexit leads many of the front pages - the FT focuses on the Chancellor's

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apparent plan for a two-phase, transition deal.

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The Telegraph highlights assurances from the Home Secretary

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that EU citizens will still be able to come to the UK.

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Meanwhile, The Times takes a look at UK-Ireland relations,

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saying Theresa May faces a new setback after

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the government there called for a post-Brexit Sea border.

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The Metro reports on the Grenfell Tower investigation,

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as police tell residents there are reasonable grounds to look

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further at possible corporate manslaughter offences.

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The Guardian also headlines that story, and has

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a picture of the new Swan Lake production starring Hull's

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The Mirror has an interview with mother

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of 11-month-old Charlie Gard, after a judge ruled he should be

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The Express leads with research claiming drinking

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alcohol regularly can significantly cut the risk of developing

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The Sun reports on the upcoming sentencing of thieves who stole more

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than ?400,000 from England star John Terry's home.

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First to the Times and one of the Brexit related stories. Irish want

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the border with Uganda Brexit. Dublin pushes for no controls that

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land frontier. Why, Kate? There are a couple of reasons. One of them has

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to be that we are dealing with a new Irish Prime Minister. He was elected

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as leader of his party only a couple of weeks ago. He has installed a new

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Foreign Minister and they are clearly flexing their muscles. But

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they are also talking about a number of possible solutions that have been

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suggested in the past, including technical solutions which they are

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now rolling out. I'm not that surprised. There have been

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suggestions that there would be huge difficulties in trying to patrol

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that length of border with things like video cameras, and would just

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be a return to the hard border of the past. This is also a huge

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because the border, for a long time during the Troubles, was such a

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difficult place to cross. It was the site of many atrocities. It was

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where a lot of people lost their lives, but it was also symbolic of

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lots of things. On the one hand, there will be lots of people in

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Northern Ireland who will not want a return to a hard border and would

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like this kind of solution. On the other side, where we are talking

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about Northern Ireland and talk about the other community, there

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will be people who look at this and say, we are as British as Theresa

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May and this is imperilling our British identity. It is a big

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problem. But you can understand why Dublin might think that a deal with

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this at sea somehow is for some people a possible solution. You can

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certainly see their perspective on getting away from a hard border in

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Northern Ireland. But you can also see how the government has been

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taken aback by this. There is a source from Whitehall here saying,

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we are being as positive as we can, but their attitude has hardened,

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which signifies that they are a bit shocked by this and not sure where

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to take it. In part, this was supposed to be Project Fear. It was

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supposed to be something that was never going to happen. David Cameron

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mentioned it in Prime Minister's Questions about ten days before the

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vote. It was supposed to be one of the last gasps, saying we can't

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possibly do this, it would lead to dreadful things. When he suggested

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that the border could be in the sea, I have relatives from the

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nationalist community who would not particularly be that obsessed with

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their British identity. They were all voting to stay in the EU, and

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they were so annoyed that David Cameron would even suggest this and

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would treat them differently than people in his Oxfordshire

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constituency that they thought about voting no just to spite him. Freedom

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of movement to continue after Brexit so EU citizens will still have the

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right to work in Britain? Yes, this is a curious one because earlier

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today the Immigration Minister was saying freedom of movement was going

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to end in 2019, and now it is not. There is a lovely line here that

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there will be a transitional period, which we had expected, because even

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Michael Gove suggested that that would happen. But this source says

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the transitional period may look like a similar arrangement to free

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movement. So the Government has not quite made up its mind here. It

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knows that it can't just stop free movement with a cliff edge, but they

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haven't worked out how to frame the arrangement after Brexit. Kate, this

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is to try to reassure businesses which rely on seasonal workers and

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workers from outside Britain. But at the same time, it risks annoying

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Tory Brexiteer MPs, one of whom is quoted here as saying we can't just

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have the same thing, called something different. He says people

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voted to take control and this would not be taken control. Staying with

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the Daily Telegraph, Britain left reliant on allies to track Russian

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buy crap. Why can't we do it ourselves? In part because we got

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rid of a lot of maritime aircraft -- Britain left reliant on allies to

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track Russian spy craft. It is mainly because the Russians are

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buzzing us quite a lot. That is the phrase for them. They are bringing

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over their spy planes and trying to destabilise us by hanging around the

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area. Let's move onto your paper, the Metro. Grenfell - the net closes

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in. This is the Met updating survivors. Yes, they have been

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leading victims and families know they have reasonable grounds to

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suspect both the Kensington and Chelsea Council and it and

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organisation which deals with the council flats. They have reasonable

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grounds to suspect them of corporate manslaughter, so they are going to

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interview both. They will formally question representatives from both

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and we could see charges following on from that. I don't think there is

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much optimism yet that people are actually going to be brought to

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account over this. David Lammy has been making the point that this is

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punishable by a fine, but it is the start of something. It is not

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individuals, though, it is clearly about the organisation rather than a

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person. It is, and David Lammy has called for them to investigate a

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different type of manslaughter which would not be punishable by a fine,

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but could be punishable by a prison term. A long way to go. Let's look

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at the #, page two - jails are an all-out scandal.

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71 likes Lego by mistake. 20 guards beaten every day. The sheer number

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of violent and self-harm is also going up. When you speak to the

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Prison Officers Association, they say they are not surprised, because

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they don't have enough staff. That has been a consistent line from them

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for a long time now. Francis Cook from the Howard league for penal

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reform is talking about chronic overcrowding in these jails, and the

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new Justice Secretary David Lidington has admitted that prisons

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are not yet safe or secure. The prisoners to be allowed to slip into

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such a state is quite something. -- for prisoners to have been allowed

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to slip into such a state. The government has promised that there

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will be more as an officers, but it is whether you can attract people

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into a career that is inherently dangerous? Yes, and pay seems to be

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an issue as well. The government are looking at that. The figures are

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astonishing. There were 15 prison escapes last year, bar and 73 people

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were let out by accident, which seems to suggest that rather than

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planning an elaborate escape, you should perhaps hope that they put

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down nine months instead of nine years, as happened in one case,

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which allowed a man to go free. Yes, the number of people being by

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mistake is at an all-time high. Let's go back to the Times. Jeff

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Bezos, the founder of Amazon, is briefly the world's richest man. Why

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only briefly? Because Amazon shares were not quite as good as expected.

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They went up in the day and then came back down. He had just gone

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ahead of Bill Gates for about six hours. But now he has slumped to

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$89.8 billion. I wouldn't have even noticed. You could ask what more

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vindication this man needs than $90 billion in the bank, but he did

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spend an awfully long time building his business. From his garage. For

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years, people said, when is Amazon going to make any money? When is

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this company finally going to turn it around? And he just kept holding

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his nerve. It is a real story of one man's singular ability to continue

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holding his nerve. Fair play to him. His has certainly done that, and he

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might still head to head. The FT said he is tussling with Bill Gates

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for the richest title. They could arm wrestle. Well, they both live in

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Seattle. A sort of white collar boxing. Now, the FT Datawatch

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column. This shows us the share of women who have been mansplained to

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buy men at different times. This is where men patronisingly explain a

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subject to women. Does this happen to you, Kate? Does it? I love this

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story. We have all been there. But they break it down into when it

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happens. People who have followed this phrase and where it came from

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know that it came from a social event, so it is perhaps not

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surprising that that is top of the list as to where it happens. But

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second most often is from your husband and partner. I am sure you

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never do that, Joel. I get into trouble if I attempt it. I wonder

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why(!), but if you do accidentally slip into mansplaining, what is the

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come # Normally being told off by my mum or my wife.

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How do you deal with it, Kate? I deal with it the way the original

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innovator of the phrase does, which is badly. I sit there and say things

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like, yes, I know that. I am a political journalist. Or, I think

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you will find I read that story. The problem is that quite often, people

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can just be oblivious and they just continue because they don't want to

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listen. Not life's listeners. Find a raised eyebrow is all you need.

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Practise it. Quickly, moderate drinking reduces danger of diabetes.

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How moderate is moderate, though? It is a rather subjective term. Men who

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drink 14 units a week were found to have a lower risk of diabetes, and

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women who had nine units a week had a 58% lower risk. So pretty

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moderate. But before you raise a glass, you might get alcoholic

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hepatitis, so it is not all good news. And if you believe, like

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Graham Norton does, that he doesn't understand how people don't finish a

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bottle of wine because how do they know when it is time to go to bed,

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this is not the story for you. No. There are so many other reasons not

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to drink, but that is one of the good reasons to do so.

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Thank you, Joel Taylor and Kate Devlin.

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There's something wrong with the weather at the moment.

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Today was a mixture of sunshine and heavy April showers

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and we have more showers this evening and overnight.

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The heavy ones in the south-east should ease away, but we'll keep

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them going in the west and particularly further north

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