29/07/2017 The Papers


29/07/2017

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to fantasy from writing historical fiction in Meet the Author.

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Hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Nigel Nelson, political editor of the Sunday Mirror,

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and political commentator Jo Phillips.

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Tomorrow's front pages, starting with the Observer,

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which leads with President Trump's decision to sack his chief of staff

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- causing nervousness among Republicans.

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The Telegraph headlines an ally of Boris Johnson attacking

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The Sunday Times has a report on the lives of teenage British

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girls who run away to join so-called Islamic State.

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The Mail says that Princess Diana's brother has called on Channel 4 not

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to broadcast her video diaries, which are due to air next week.

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The Express also focuses on Princess Diana, claiming

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Princess Diana asked the Queen for help about her marriage.

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And that story also makes the Daily Star's front page.

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We will begin with the Observer. Border chaos will hit hard after

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Brexit, say experts. Why? Who are these experts? I thought we had had

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enough of experts. I think as Brexit goes on there will be so many

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experts coming out of the woodwork. These particular ones, it is a

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Europewide consultancy which did an assessment of what it would mean

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once we'd down south of the customs union. -- we bounce out of. They are

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predicting a huge lorry parks in the south-east of England, lots of extra

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border checks and costs. Custom checks would go up from a current

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?55 million to ?200 million, over one year. It means huge delays for

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any goods coming through. What this really shows is the tremendous

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complexity of Brexit. Now, if we are not a member of the customs union,

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we are bouncing out of the single market, we forget how easy life has

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been in the single market. Goods and people can easily go from Yorkshire

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to Lancashire, and is easily from France to Latvia. There were things

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like that we are getting from it. This new system will mean that we

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have border checks at every member state of the European Union, or 37

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countries. It will also mean that's lorries coming from the EU will get

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held up coming into this country as well. So it is in everybody's

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interests to come up with a plan to stop that happening. Absolutely.

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Because that will add on huge costs to consumers, because the delays and

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the price of goods coming in and being delivered. It will also mean,

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environmentally, it is not particularly brilliant. We have seen

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what happens when Operation Stack happens when there is a problem down

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at the Channel Tunnel or at the Channel ports. This will happen

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right across the country and right across Europe and it will encourage

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lots of firms to relocate, quite simply. So what are we going to do?

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Live on chlorinated chicken? These are the kinds of deals that must be

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done. They really have to be sorted out much later than this time next

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year. At the moment, airlines cannot sell advance tickets from October

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next year, because they need to know what deal we have over aviation

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safety, which is policed by the EU. Otherwise our planes grounded. I am

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sure that will not happen. I am sure we will get a deal. But it is the

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kind of thing that needs to be sorted out. And quickly. Yes,

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absolutely right. It might be that our lorries cannot even drive in

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Europe, and in retaliation, European lorries would not be able to drive

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in Britain, so we wouldn't be able to get goods backwards and forwards.

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If there has to be quick throw quirk, -- quid pro quo, they would

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cancel each other out. Or is that too simplistic? It is too sensible.

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This whole deal is being run by people who want Brexit and want it

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now. It is a case of ironing out the creases. We need a very big iron.

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The Mail on Sunday, don't show Diana love tapes on television. This is L

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Spencer, Diana's rather, not wanting these video diaries to be aired on

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Channel 4. Why not? These are video recordings of sessions that Diana

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had with a voice coach, a long time ago when she was in a very unhappy

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place. It was before she did the Panorama interview, and the

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suggestion is that she was having the voice coach sessions in order to

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prepare for that interview. Now, what is rather curious is that these

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were recorded by Peter Southland, a former Coronation Street actor and

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voice coach. As far as we know they belong to him. The tapes, which were

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filmed on a camcorder, then appeared, all were revealed, in Paul

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Burrell's house, that was Diana's former butler. They came to light

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when they were seized by police officers when they raided his house.

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But they were not used in court during his trial. No, because they

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were so incendiary. Mr Southland had a civil suit to try to get them back

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was not Diana's family, the Spencer family, eventually settled it out of

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court. The BBC bought them for ?30,000 or something like that but

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chose never to show them. NBC, bizarrely, showed the tapes in 2004,

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which seems to have passed all of us by. And now it is unclear how they

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have ended up a channel for it to BBC bought them outright. Channel 4,

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helpfully, have given us a statement. They are watching! Yes,

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thank you, Channel 4. The excerpts from the tapes recorded have never

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been shown before on British television and are an important

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historical source. We carefully considered all of the material used

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in the documentary and although the recordings were made in private, the

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subjects covered are a matter of public record and provide a unique

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insight into the preparations Diana undertook to gain a public voice and

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tell her own personal story, which culminated in her late interview

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with Panorama. This unique portrait of Diana gives her a voice in places

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at front and centre at a time when the nation will be reflect in on her

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life and death. Difficult, though, for her sums to watch, no doubt.

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Yes, very. I understand absolutely white girl Spencer -- why Earl

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Spencer does not want to see these go out. I understand that Prince

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Harry and Prince William do not want them transmitted. At I do think

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there is a public interest here. There is not. The idea that Diana

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speaking in her own words, telling it like it is, or at least how she

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saw it, I think it is important. But she was doing this in preparation to

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do her own voice in the Panorama interview. I appreciate that. Now

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that these tapes have come to light it does seem to me that both for the

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public interest and the historical record, it is quite important to

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have these things out there. But she chose to do an interview which was

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recorded, the Panorama interview which some of us remember, this was

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preparation for that. These are private sessions. They are not

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public property. Obviously we cannot know what Diana's wishes might have

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been. Given that she has been dead for 20 years and we cannot ask her,

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now that they have come to light and now that they are available, I

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think... But they have been available for a long time. 20 years

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after her death is probably the right time to have these broadcasts.

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I do not think it is in the public interest. They are private sessions.

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We are not going to agree. No. That's fine. Indeed. I am grateful.

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No gavel required. The Sunday Times, a couple of stories about Isis.

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Firstly, revealed, the life of teenage brides in Isis' "A little

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Britain". And ministers strip 150 jihadist is of UK passports. --

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jihadists. People being stripped of part of their dual nationality to

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stop them coming back to the UK from Barack or Syria. I think this is a

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subject for rejoicing. If you have people who want to come back and

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bomb us I am quite happy to keep them away. The way this works, it is

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if they only had reduced nationality, we could not do it,

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because it would make them stateless. So these are people with

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dual nationality. In other words, there is someone else for them to

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go. There are so many people here, and I think that we learned over the

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recent terror attacks of the huge number of jihadists in Britain from

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MI5. We thought there were about 3000. It turned out there were about

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23,000, and 3000 other ones they can try to monitor at the moment. And

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when one falls off another one goes on, sort of thing. If you imagine

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that the IRA, at its height, was about 600 strong, 23,000 people who

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actively wish us harm is hugely dangerous. Keeping out anybody who

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might add to that seems like the best policy. This picture is of a

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woman with her little girl, who lived in Raqqa, the stronghold of

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so-called Islamic State. She managed to escape. She was taken by her

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husband. He said he had a new job. They were living in Dubai at the

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time. A new job in Turkey. They were going to go there and then go to

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Britain. At instead they ended up in Raqqa as you say. Her escape, it is

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quite a shocking story of the house in northern Syria where the Bethnal

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Green schoolgirls who ran off a couple of years ago now, other

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jihadi rides from Bristol and Glasgow, the so-called White Widow,

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cheap talks about how these women, these young girls, were delighted

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about reading about themselves on online British news sites. They

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crowed over reports of terrorist attacks in Europe. She was very

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shocked about that. She managed to escape, her husband was killed, I

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think. It does show, you know, we are hearing stories last week about

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girls coming back. There was a young German girl, 16 years old, who came

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back, or who escaped. So you are getting very mixed messages from

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people who are going out there and seen, it was not what I thought, and

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this, which is quite shocking. Let's move on to the Independent.

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Government relaxed acid laws against expert advice. Yes, this is about,

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as we know, there have been a view rather frightening acid attacks

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where people in the streets, in London, have had acid thrown in

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their faces to no particular reasons. -- a few rather. Very

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damaging, in some cases like changing. This story is not a

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particularly new story, but what it is basically doing is saying that

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the government, the coalition government, in 2015, ignored advice,

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in their desire to burn red tape and cut bureaucracy, they basically cut

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red tape and got rid of the 1972 Poisons Act, against the advice of

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the Poisons Board, and doctors as well. What we do not know, because

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previously to this, anybody selling noxious substances like saucier

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custard and hydrochloric acid would have had to register with their

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council. -- sulphiric acid. What this does not say is, we actually do

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not know what acid has been used, but we have heard police officers

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talking about the kind of stuff you would find in your bathroom or

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kitchen cupboard. We don't know for sure, we don't know how it was

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acquired, but we are likely to see efforts made to have this made an

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offence. Yes, what seems to be happening now, because of the

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horrific attacks, and the number of them, because acid attacks are going

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up as people turn away from knives. Carrying a knife carries a five-year

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penalty, so this is the weapon of choice for people who do not want to

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do that. Amber Rudd seems to be putting back everything in place

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that was originally got rid of by the coalition government. The

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problem, really, and it is the same problem they had at the time, is

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that this is the stuff you do have under your sink. The idea that you

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would need a Home Office licence to bleach or bathroom is going to be

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some kind of problem. -- your bathroom. It takes a bit of working

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out but the important thing is to keep it out of the wrong hands. The

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Mail on Sunday. Revealed, London's shocking drug data. Statistics about

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how many were said to have taken some kind of banned substance while

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they were competing, or before they were competing, at the London

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Olympics. Scary figures. What we are talking about is out of 656 track

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and field finalists, 87 had at one point being caught doping. -- been.

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It is scary because we have the World Championship starting shortly.

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Presumably some of the same sort of athletes. It does seem to appear

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that the policing of this is not working incredibly well. Also, not

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only are they cheating bedfellow competitors, they are cheating the

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people who go and watch them. -- their fellow. Cycling went through

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this. They had to do a very big cleanup. Huge. Lance Armstrong, as

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we Ormeau, was using drugs and cheating right the way through. --

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as we all know. Five years ago we were basking in the glory of

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everything that the London Olympics was. It was great. What is so awful

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is that for the people who really worked their socks off, they may

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have missed out on medals and stuff like that, and who wants to compete

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with cheaters? It's not the same if you work hard

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and you are stripped of the title, you weren't there on the day to

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receive the title. The Sunday Times, let them eat pheasant says Be the

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Botham. This is Ian Botham, cricketing hero, Walker

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extraordinaire and he's a land owner and a pheasant shoot. He has joined

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forces with something called the country food trust. There are huge

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concerns about the number of people using food banks and there's a move

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within the countryside to provide people with cheap and readily

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available food, such as pheasant. Sue Reeve, known as Mrs very picky

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on Twitter, reminds us, there you are, reminds us that only non-

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perishable food is good for food banks but they have a coming plan to

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turn it into easy cook meals. Exactly. They don't have to hang

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them and pluck them. If you can do that it seems ideal. The hunting

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lobby are going to be pretty furious. Why? They don't like

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shooting pheasants and partridges. You mean the antihunting lobby? They

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don't like shooting pheasants and partridges. A lot of people go on

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corporate shoots and they don't even take them home. If the food is

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wasted then put it in a food bank. It's not just food banks, it is

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frozen pies and curries and things like that. Pheasant curry, I've

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never never tried that! There's a thought, Saturday night, Sunday

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lunch, not sure!

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