19/11/2017 The Papers


19/11/2017

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injuries to suggest another person

was involved in her death.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Henry Zeffman,

Political reporter at the Times

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and Public Affairs

Consultant Jacqui Francis.

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A flavour first of all of the front

pages as a whole. The Financial

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Times reports that ministers are

expected to give Theresa May the go

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ahead to increase the Government's

Brexit divorce bill offer to move on

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EU negotiations. There's the Times.

They say Robert Mugabe's refusal to

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resign as Zimbabwe President has

left the country in despair. The

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Metro also leading on Zimbabwe,

describing Mugabe as "clinging on to

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power". And the Daily Mirror says

former defence chiefs have accused

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the Government of damaging front

line by cutting funding. And the

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Daily Mail says that universities

have used wealth screening to look

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at students' earnings.

In the Guardian, they look at the

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chaos in Zimbabwe following Robert

Mugabe's decision not to Republic

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sign this evening.

And the Sun claims victory in the

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campaign on energy tariffs reporting

that changes to Rates could save

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households £75 a year.

Let's begin with a closer look at

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some of the front pages and we'll

start with the Guardian and the top

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story is Zimbabwe after that

surprise decision, to most people,

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that Mugabe is not resigning after

all.

It was the most extraordinary

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speech. Robert Mugabe who has ruled

Zimbabwe for almost 40 years,

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flanked by the military. Quite clear

who was in charge now, delivered

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this 30-minute speech - a ramble is

a fairer thing to say. But even

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while watching it, you were

expecting the ramble to come to a

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close saying - and here's how I'm

going to Republic sign. And it --

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resign. And it just didn't happen.

Now it's chaos in Zimbabwe. People

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trying to work out whether he missed

off a bit of the speech, which was

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meant to say he was resigning or

whether this is a plan to reassert

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control, or whether the military for

happy for him to stay in charge as

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long as some of the people around

his wife, Grace, have less

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influence, but it is the most

extraordinary spectacle.

What did

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you make of it? It when on for 20

minutes saying, it will come, it

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will come, and it just never did.

I

think something else is going on in

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the background and in this

particular article, it said the

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South African development community

is to meet in Angola and they're

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talking about the possibility of

letting him stay and letting things

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naturally come to an end. So the

idea that you would impeach him,

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that still would take months. So

he's not going straightaway, if you

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go through a process. If you tell

him to go, fine. But if you want the

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constitutional process to take

place, it does take time to do that.

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And it sounds like there is now a

disonance between - you've got to go

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now, the people on the streets want

you to go, this is what we've been

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negotiating but constitutionally,

and in the speech, he seems to be

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talking about the constitution to do

things properly. So I think if he's

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clever enough, he's put them between

a rock and a hard place, really.

And

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a lot of commentators even talking

about the fact that Mugabe, at the

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age of 93, is quite a wiley player

in all of this.

Certainly. And

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although he did seem quite doddery,

as you might expect for someone of

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his age. And at some points, he

fumbled on the words and one of the

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generals who led the coup turned the

pages for him. But he talked at one

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point about presiding over Zanu-PF's

forthcoming party Congress, even

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though they kicked him out from the

leadership position and are going to

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start impeachment proceedings

tomorrow, so clearly he has a way,

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in his mind, a way that he's going

to stay on top.

If we look at the

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Times. Their angle, "Zimbabwe in

despair" as Mugabe clings on. And

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we're expecting then to see more

demonstrations on the streets

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because of course this, although

it's a political story, it's very

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much a story of what the people of

Zimbabwe are looking for as well?

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Yes, the war veterans. Everything

pointed at the fact that he was

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going to go. No negotiations about

how long he was going to go. And it

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just seems that there's a huge

disappointment in the air and that

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is a really dangerous thing, because

people are taking to the streets.

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They're going to want to say - but

the military, you said this was

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going to happen, and it hasn't. And

it's a coup, but it's not a coup.

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And that is the tipping point where

it could turn into violence, and

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that's what everybody wants to

avoid.

Yes, it was noticeable, I

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thought, in his speech, he referred

several times to the track record of

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Zimbabwe as a peaceable people, as

if almost saying - this may not be

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what you're expecting everyone, but

let's not get carried away and turn

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into riots on the street?

This

started as a palace coup, if it

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were. It wasn't a ground-up thing,

although we've seen protests of that

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sort in Zimbabwe before. But now

that the generals have started this

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process, even if they think that

they can control it by putting

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someone else from Zanu-PF, Mugabe's

former deputy in charge, actually,

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what the people on the streets are

asking for is much more profound, a

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change in the economy, a change in

how the country works. And that's

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quite different, and those two

visions might be hard to reconcile.

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Take us back to the Guardian but

we'll drop back to bottom of the

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page now. Hammond rules out £4

million cash emergency boost for the

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NHS. This looks at a lot of

mutterings in there about what may

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or may not be in it, and the

suggestion is that money for for the

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nation -- for the NHS, not.

At this

time, everybody brings out the

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begging bowl for something. And this

seems from Simon Stevens is head of

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the NHS, who had said it needs the

cash injection of $4 billion. And

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he's saying, no, I want reforms

first - you should have done more to

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get the NHS in better shape. So it's

kind of tit-for-tat. "You said you'd

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do something about social care, you

said you'd get the NHS in better

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shape and then we can give you more

money." And Simon Stevens says, you

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haven't done any of that. I suppose

he's saying, why should I not ask

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for more money because you haven't

done what you were supposed to do.

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So it is the toing and froing, but

Hammond says everybody does this at

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this time of year.

It's true that

the horse trading is starting at

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this time of the budget and talking

about house business and other

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things we might expect to see.

The

story shows how constrained Philip

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Hammond is coming into this. A lot

of the MPs, bruised by the election

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result, say you need to loosen the

belt a bit, particularly when it

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comes to the public sector, but

Philip Hammond, leaving aside the

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fact that he's probably more

economically dry than some of the

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MPs doesn't have that capacity and

he seas saying to the NHS, you've

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got to find savings yourself because

I've got a lot of other stuff on my

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plate.

Let's stay with Philip

Hammond because the Daily Telegraph

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over on the side there, he may be

under pressure on one front, but

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also putting pressure, he says on

Theresa May. And this is to do with

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money for the EU and specifically

the divorce bill and the shenanigans

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going on about how much.

We're back

to this thing of - what do we want

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first. There's no "show me the

money" which is what Brexit and the

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EU is saying. First of all, Philip

Hammond and the rest want to know,

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what exactly are we going to be

getting out of this? When then we

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can start talking about how much

we're going to get. It's the

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ordinary people who are concerned.

The money is large amounts of money,

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but this has been going on for so

long and people are wondering - when

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are you going to talk about

substance? Real issue that is impact

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upon us? People are making decisions

about whether to stay in this

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country. Businesses, in particular,

are making decisions, while they're

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still saying - well, we're not going

to negotiate this until you tell us

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exactly how much money you're going

to give us, and we're not going to

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give you as much money as you want

until you tell us what you're going

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to get out of it. Stalemate,

impasse.

And the FT choosing to

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explore this story. May set to

secure Cabinet support for a higher

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divorce bill offer and she may have

her work cut out with some of the

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characters in her Cabinet?

What this

story explains well is that this

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isn't just a question about how much

Britain is going to offer the EU,

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it's also a question about how

divided Theresa May's Cabinet is, on

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Brexit but on much else. So there

are basically two factions on the

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Brexit war Cabinet subcommittee that

will decide whether they'll approve

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Theresa May doubling the offer from

£20 million to £40 million. And on

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the one hand, Philip Hammond wants

to make a generous offer and stay

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close. But on the other hand, you

have Boris Johnson, the Foreign

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Secretary, and back in alliance with

Michael Gove, the man who crushed

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Boris Johnson's hopes of leading the

Tory Party. It is a multisided

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scenario. It's a psycho drama, some

might say. And Theresa May, a more

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skilled politician than Theresa May

would struggle to solve it. But she

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is certainly struggling.

It's

interesting, coming back to what you

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were say, Jacqui, about the politics

of it, for the Westminster geeks,

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it's all very exciting for a lot of

people watching and thinking - how

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is it that all these months in,

we're still at stage one and the EU

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negotiators are saying, until this

is sorted, we can't move on and we

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just seem to have got stuck?

I think

we got stuck because the division is

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- is our heart really in it? And the

EU, I suppose, sent that. And maybe

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they are on our side, trying to make

it as difficult as possible,

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thinking - they'll come to their

senses. Once we've discussed this,

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they'll go - maybe. And then another

thing, another thing. And then,

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Theresa May has this fractured

Cabinet, which are pulling her this

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way and that way. And she's trying

to negotiate her way through two

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things and finding it increasingly

difficult. And Europe are just

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pulling their hair out going - look,

we're talking about money. If you're

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not talking about anything else, we

don't want to discuss it. Money

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first. Show us the money.

While

you're saying show us the money, the

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is beautiful there for Henry on the

Daily Mail. Millions spied on by

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greedy top universities. What's this

all about?

It's a really interesting

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story, actually. So the Mail says

that top universities, 24 of them,

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all of them in the Russell group,

the top group of universities, have

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hired investigators to basically

find out how rich all of their

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former students are. But it goes

well beyond just income, it's also

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their investments, their pensions,

who their friends are, the value of

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their homes. Now, on the one hand,

this is a story about universities

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trying to get money to fund research

and new buildings and all the stuff

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they do in the 21st century, but

it's also a really interesting story

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about how much we put online these

days. The Mail says there is a

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suggestion that some of them might

have broken the law, but some of

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them, a sophisticated person with

access to Google could find out

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themselves. So there is the question

of - what are we putting out there?

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It might be just the universities

trying to fine out, but there are

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other people who might like to know

sometimes.

Did this surprise you,

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Jacqui?

No, it didn't, because

universities have always used their

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alumni to try to fundraise, and in

America, it's a very, very big

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thing. You know, if you've got very

famous and very important alumni,

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you can build amazing things. So

this is no surprise. I suppose, my

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one surprise is that they paid a

firm to do this, when, as we said,

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there are a number of social media

organisations that you could just

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quickly go online to tell you

everything you need to know about

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these individuals.

It's interesting

that parallel you draw there with

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the States, because it's a huge

thing in America. There's an

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expectation really that you give

back to your old alma mater and I'm

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not sure that that is transferred

across the pond there?

I went to

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university in America and yes, you

constantly get letters saying that

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now you're an alumni, would you

consider making a monthly or

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whatever donation. So it is big

business for the institution.

We're

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going to finish with money, as well,

because this is money for all of us,

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not just those who are being

targeted by their old universities.

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The Daily Telegraph - Black Friday

deals are not always what they seem.

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Are we going to be disappointed?

The

concept of Black Friday is an

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American import as well, so I

suppose being doubly shafted by

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American culture tonight. This

actually doesn't surprise me too

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much. It basically says that

shoppers are predicted to spend £2.6

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billion, or £1.8 million per minute

this Friday as part of Black Friday

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but some of the discounts aren't

what they seem. That's not just the

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case on Black Friday. Sometimes in

supermarket, you might see wine

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marketed at 40% off, but when you

look into it, it was only that

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higher price for 15 minutes on the

previous Friday. So it's basically a

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call on all of us to wise up and not

necessarily get carried away with

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when we're told to shop and work out

when's best to buy what you need.

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Because this is Which, the consumer

group, who have looked at prices

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around Black Friday 2016 and

monitored the prices up to Black

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Friday. Do we need to be a little

bit less gullible?

I think we do,

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but there are some savvy shoppers

out there. But yes, you're right, we

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all look at something and go -

great, 40% off. But sometimes

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there's a little in the small print

that will say - from this period to

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this period, at some point, it was

this price, so there's always been

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the issue that the price had gone up

and then they discounted it, so were

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you getting a good deal? Just be

careful what you wish for because

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it's not always correct.

In two

words, are you looking for anything

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on Black Friday?

Possibility!

Not

saying what?

Possibility a phone!

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OK, phone for Jacqui. Where will

your bargain be?

New TV to watch BBC

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favourites.

You love it. Lots of

Browny points. That's it for the

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papers. Thanks to Jacqui and Henry.

All the front pages are online on

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the BBC News website. You can read a

detailed review of the papers all

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there for you seven days a week at

BBC.co. Uk slash papers. You can see

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us each day there with each night

there shortly after we've finished

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and giving Henry a very large drink.

Thank you, that's it from us for

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tonight. Coming up next, it's the

Film Review.

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