20/11/2017 The Papers


20/11/2017

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the the papers

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will be bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Jim Waterson,

political editor at BuzzFeed,

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and Larisa Brown,

defence editor at the Daily Mail.

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Tomorrow's front pages...

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starting with Brexit...

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Brexit really means

Brexit, says the Metro.

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They are quoting EU

negotiator Michel Barnier

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on their front page.

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The FT leads with German

Chancellor Merkel's vow

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to stand firm despite the collapse

of her coalition talks.

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The Express

reports on a so-called breakthrough

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in the treatment of high blood

pressure.

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The i claims that the Prime Minister

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will offer £40 billion

for the Brexit divorce bill

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in the hope of progressing talks.

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The Telegraph suggests that tests

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for cancer could be offered

in supermarket car parks in order

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to reach people who might avoid

going to the doctor.

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The Times claims Tory Brexiters are

telling the Prime Minister to take

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advantage of Chancellor Merkel's

domestic problems and reduce

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the amount offered in

a divorce bill.

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The Guardian leads with the inquiry

into the spending of the Vote Leave

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campaign and whether it

broke finance rules

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during the referendum campaign.

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The Daily Mirror's front-page leads

on Great British Bake Off Judge Paul

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Collingwood's marriage break-up. --

Pol... Paul Collingwood.

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Let's start with the Brexit tots and

the divorce Bill.

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Theresa May member of the Cabinet to

discuss tactics on Brexit ahead of

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the European Council meeting in

December. It was widely anticipated

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she was going to discuss the crucial

issue of the divorce Bill.

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Yesterday, we were told it would be

40 billion and that is what the i is

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reporting this evening. Critchley,

she has been given the green light

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by Michael Gove on Boris Johnson,

who are very sceptical. It looks

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like she will increase the UK offer.

But it is going to come on the

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condition that there will be some

headway with the EU and they will

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actually progressive trade talks and

authority over Britain.

Clearly

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desperately hoping to get a bit of a

breakthrough at the summit in

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December, whether EU leaders have to

decide whether they are prepared to

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begin talking about trade.

It is now

one ever. You have no option. They

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have to push ahead in the next stage

of the docks by the start of next

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year rows with as much as a deal

being struck by the time we get out

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of the EU. So this is not so much

that Britain has a chance to

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negotiate, we have to start offering

what the EU is willing to take.

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Theresa May talked about 20 billion

and now seems 40 billion is a thing

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that will get the sign. The

interesting thing is that Boris and

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golf has said, we see the situation

as it is, we're willing to push

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ahead. Right project, move onto the

next stage because otherwise the

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Brexit deal will be a disaster.

They

have to hope it works, because of

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the torment and CNET is enough

progress on a few other things, they

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will have thrown away the best

negotiating card.

A lot of

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Brexiteers have come out in light of

this and are furious that we would

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increase our divorce Bill. They say

that we should not have to cough up

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much of it.

This money has to come

from somewhere. 40 billion, if you

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sign that offers an ongoing cost and

it ends up in the Treasury book on

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the finances is a bit more

competition and initially think, but

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this is money that could be spent on

something. It could be spent on

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domestic priorities and the NHS and

hospitals. There is enormous

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pressure for Robert -- public

spending. Selling this to the public

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will be quite hard, that we are

still being monitored EU, that will

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not go down well. Hamida is under a

lot of pressure on Wednesday to

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cough up cash for infrastructure to

the NHS and defence. -- Hammond.

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Whilst also sorting out the deficit.

We have a huge debt crisis at the

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moment. National debt is something

like 1.8 jillion pounds. --

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trillion.

A Chancellor is going to

be saying, well, there's not much

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money to spend, we have to keep a

tight on public spending, one

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suspects there could be more of this

row to go.

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Let's have a look at the Metro.

Michel Barnier, speaking earlier,

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saying that Brexit really means

Brexit.

The telling thing for this

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is that he has spoken in English. He

is normally quite... Your whiskers

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answers at press conferences in

French and is always reluctant to

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engage in English back and forth

with John Oster press conferences.

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-- he always answers. He has

delivered this foreign English

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reading audience and skier the

average reader and make them realise

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the situation's gravity. Two big EU

agencies based in London, an auction

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process like the Eurovision Song

Contest, the medicines agency will

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go to Amsterdam after the vote and

the bank agency will go to Paris.

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This is the real effect of Brexit

and we are already seen it at home.

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The government said it wants to

promote global Britain after Brexit.

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But those agencies moving is not a

great diplomatic sign. Michelle

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Bachelet is wanting to play hardball

and his comments are showing us that

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things will not be easy after we

decide what this divorce is going to

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be.

He was talking about a trade

deal and said that the dome happened

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so long as Britain stays very close

to the EU on a lot of those

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regulations on food standards and

social roles and environmental

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protections and so on, which a lot

of the Brexiteers want to...

That

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seems to my mind to be increasingly

the way things are going. We will

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have a technical Brexit and

definitely come out of the year but

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the reality for a terms of their

relationship with other countries

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and how they work in terms of

regulations is going to stay pretty

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similar. We're just going to copy

and paste everything across and

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technically we will be out but in

reality we will be pretty much on a

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lot of the same regulations.

Of

course, all this is complicated by

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the situation in Germany. A lot of

the newspapers picking up on Angela

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Merkel's difficulties in forming a

coalition.

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The Times talking about, Theresa May

told to exploit the metal prices and

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exploit the Brexit Bill.

Germany in

a great time political turmoil and

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that, why don't the UK use this

opportunity and say, oh, actually,

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we should not be giving billions and

try and force the EU's and. Germany

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and France are the two countries

that have been quite tough in this

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process. We are told other countries

are quite willing to let the talks

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progress onto trade. By taking

advantage of this, it is hoped that

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the UK can move forward without

putting up too much cash.

It is

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telling that this is the same way

that no-one expected Theresa May's

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election gamble to feel so

dramatically. Merkel was supposed to

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easily win her fourth term in office

in Germany. The opposition said they

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would not go into another grand

coalition, will have attempts to

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form coalitions with other parties

has failed, it seems. That is not

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how German politics works. We have

had Brexit there was not supposed to

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happen, Donald Trump's victory, was

not supposed to happen. Things that

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are not supposed to happen in

politics keep happening.

Although

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the Times are quoting some of the

ardent Brexiteers saying, well, if

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the E is weakened by Merkel's

plight, we could reduce the Brexit

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Bill, it might make things more

contributed in terms of getting

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progress.

The argument is it could

prolong the Brexit talks. How can

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they discuss it with Germany doesn't

have a functioning government? It is

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worrying because they need at least

a sort of government to represent

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Germany on the table.

Several of the

other papers have variations of

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those very telling pictures of

Angela Merkel. Another one on the

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front page of the Daily Telegraph.

The difficulties and the anguish

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etched on Angela Merkel's says.

As

we said, this was not supposed to

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happen. When we think about the

Brexit Bill, we think of it has one

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set of negotiations that when it is

concluded with toxin brussels, we

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have a deal. This needs to be signed

off by other nations. It is not as

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simple as on the eve of Brexit, we

sign a bit of paper a bit like

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ending a war of something. This is a

lot more complicated and needs to be

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signed off by all the Parliaments.

Merkel being in an unstable position

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is not good for that.

The caption

says Merkel faces battle for

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survival. She said today she would

not resign and that she would rather

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have another election than try and

form a minority government. We will

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see what happens.

But that could

take months, of course.

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Another story on the Telegraph...

Cancer tests at supermarkets.

This

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is the idea that Britain actually

isn't that great at long-term cancer

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survival rates. One of the problems

is getting people tested, getting

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them to go to the GP and checked out

at hospital. Maybe, if you start

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doing the tests in as of market car

park will people do their weekly

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shop, you could pick things up early

and treat them and get better

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survival rates. Make sure people can

live slightly longer and happier

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lives. There was a telling stat

there which is -- statistic in the

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other the UK isn't the worst -- is

the one of the worst countries in

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terms of these rates.

And you might

get the more quickly than you can at

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most GPs!

People are frustrated that

they try and get an appointment and

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can't actually get one. The chief

Executive of NHS England is also

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confirming plans that there will be

home testing for bowel cancer

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screening. A lot of people don't

even want to leave the house to deal

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with these issues and the idea that

you can do this at home would be

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very welcome for a lot of people.

The Telegraph has another story

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about the Eurotunnel changing its

name to create what it calls a more

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Anglo-Saxon identity.

Goodbye

Eurotunnel plc, hello... I have lost

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the name! It is in tiny text on the

Telegraph front page. It is

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apparently a more Anglo-Saxon name.

Getlink four. It is a bit of a silly

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story but you will see more of this,

corporate businesses trying to work

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out their identity after Brexit.

How

many people will use the term

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Getlink instead of the Eurotunnel?

We should also just look at one

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another story express has on its

second page.

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The Queen presenting a rare gong

develop before a party at the

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castle. -- to Philip. Celebrating 70

years of marriage. Really is an

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extraordinary achievement.

Very long

time.

We don't see Prince Philip

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burial -- very often any more. Quite

a nice picture of them all out on a

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trip.

I like the idea of the Queen

giving her personal honour to him

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two 70 years of marriage, which is a

bit of a strange relationship.

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Congratulations for putting up with

me for 70 years, have a nice little

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metal, darling.

Yes, here you are

darling, the Knight grand Cross of

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the Royal Victoria in order for

services to the sovereign.

How has

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he gone 70 years without getting

this so far? What is wrong with 60?

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Cash she been dangling this in front

of him, waiting until he hit his 90s

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to get it? Why did he have to wait

so long?

You wonder if that is what

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usually open to get as they

celebrate their 70 years together.

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Exactly.

Quite an achievement when

you consider especially so much of

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the time spent here in the public

eye, even though as you said Prince

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Philip taking a slight back seat now

that he has stood down from his

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formal public duties.

I like the

fact that he took out his nephews,

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which conjures up the idea of

smokers are clear. When you're 96,

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his nephew Maximillian is 84. Less a

sort of energetic family reunion,

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Maura Gentle carry right through

Windsor Park by the looks of things.

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-- carriage ride.

Thank you both very much indeed for

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joining us tonight. You can see the

front pages of the papers online BBC

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website.

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It's all there for you seven days

a week at bbc.co.uk/papers.

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And if you miss

the programme any

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evening, you can watch it

later on BBC iPlayer.

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Now to catch up

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No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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