13/12/2017 The Papers


13/12/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Coming up in a moment, The Papers.

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Hello, and welcome to our look ahead

to what the the papers

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will be bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Jessica Elgot,

political reporter at the Guardian

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and Steve Hawkes, Deputy political

editor at The Sun.

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Good to see you both, no fisticuffs.

Never.

I don't want any violence

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tonight.

It will be good-natured.

The times devotes its front page to

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the Tory rebellion.

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The Telegraph leads

on the government's parliamentary

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defeat this evening due what it

calls a "mutiny" by Tory rebels.

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The Guardian also features

the Brexit rebellion on its front

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page, alongside Chris Froome's

statement that he is not a cheat,

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after the results of an "adverse"

drugs test emerged.

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The Financial Times reports

that the UK will soon receive

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imports of Russian gas,

as well as predictions that banks

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will only move 6% of jobs out

of London after Brexit.

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The Daily Mirror's top story

is comedian Peter Kay's apology

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to fans after cancelling his

100-date comeback tour due

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to unforeseen family circumstances.

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The Daily Express front page also

features Peter Kay's tour

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cancellation, alongside warnings

that millions of people

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face "pension crisis",

because they are not saving

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enough for retirement.

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And the Metro's main story

is the death of 3-year-old

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Lia Pearson, the fourth child to die

following a house fire

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in Greater Manchester on Monday.

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We are on leave of a EU summit, a

pretty crucial one, but there are

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some people who believe Theresa

May's cans are now tied. Look at the

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front page of the Guardian. Tory

rebellion humiliates PM on Brexit

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bill. A very close vote in the

Commons this evening. 309 to 305, I

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think it was, a majority of four for

those people who feel that

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Parliament should have a big say in

the final Brexit deal. Also the

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front page of The Times. Revenge of

the rebels. MPs win the right to

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final vote on Brexit. Jessica, this

is a humiliation, isn't it?

And just

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think at the end of last week Edward

like Theresa May was in a really

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strong position on moving the Brexit

talks on to the next stage, so we

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can start to talk about trade. And

suddenly she was going into the

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summit on the back of a really

humiliating defeat in Parliament,

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and the European leaders might start

saying to each other, is she really

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going to have the backing to deliver

a deal, even if we agree it?

The

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whole point about Brexit, Steve,

some would argue, is that Parliament

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would get primacy, it would be the

final arbiter of laws in this

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country. And surely the rebels at

the Tory party would argue this, and

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Labour and the Lib Dems and the SNP

would say, this is what Brexit is

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all about.

There is that line, you

want to take back control, this is

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it. It is driving them mad. This is

got to come back to the Commons for

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another reading so it could be

changed, but it is the tone, the

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shift. It is what it means full stop

Theresa May tomorrow morning goes to

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Brussels about a crunch summit about

the start of trade talks. Now her

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negotiating hand is weakened by

this. You have three different

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things, the arch Remainers who now

think that Brexit can be stopped,

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people like Lord Adonis saying this

is the first step, we can derail

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this. The arch Brexiteers who always

thought this was going to happen,

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something would stop it. And the

Tory party is furious with these

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rivals, saying it hands the

initiative to the EU. How does it

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possibly help our party?

The front

page of the Daily Mail as welcome

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which we will bring up, it is

reporting on this story. I think it

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will come, here it is, eventually.

Jessica, the fact is, I know we all

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said, it is a hoary old phrase, a

week is a long time in politics,

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Theresa May last week flying to

Brussels was enjoying her eggs

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Benedict, Heurtaux stand her orange

juice. She has no appetite on that

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plane tomorrow, has she? She will be

as sick as a pig!

This has been the

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hallmark basically of Theresa May's

entire career as PM, about how

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quickly things can change will stop

look at that front page. Proud of

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yourselves question?

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look at that front page. Proud of

yourselves I mean, what is that?!

To

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be honest, they probably are proud

of themselves.

Jess was pointing

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out, the Telegraph front page where

they had the mutineers were stopped

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Nicky Morgan tonight, a lot of these

Tory MPs will face huge problems in

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their own constituencies, but she is

saying the Telegraph front page,

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they will have T-shirts made of it.

It emboldened them. 17 million

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people wanted Brexit, remember, so a

lot of them will say, great, they

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would be happy about this.

But all

these MPs are the ones on the front

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of the Daily Mail, they will make

the point that this is not going to

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derail Brexit. This is backing

Brexit up, it is giving the people a

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voice.

These MPs voted for Article

50, the moment of triggering it that

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set the two-year timeline in motion,

which means that, unless we

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unilaterally withdraw it, then we

are leaving the EU at the end of the

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process. This doesn't derail it, but

does it make a softer Brexit more

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likely, is that the underlying

motivation for some of these rebels?

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Probably.

There is a vote next week,

we get an amendment about the end

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date. That will be key, because of

the rebels rebel then, there will be

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real issues. Because then they would

be accused of starving Brexit.

Sure,

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absolutely. The Financial Times,

sticking with Brexit. Banks defied

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gloomy Brexit with forecast with

plans to just remove 6% of London

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jobs. The suggestion was there would

be the flight of the talents in the

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banking world, Steve, but actually

the banks think it is all OK.

6%

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doesn't define all OK I suppose, but

it is big, coming from the FT. They

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have been very pro-Remain. They will

be happy with the night's vote.

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There was a all these jobs this is

just 6%. Who knows, if the

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transition deal comes, which is the

main thing about tomorrow, then

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everyone takes a breath, justices

will keep the jobs here. It is the

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last part that perhaps we should be

more worried about, it says it is

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not about what happens on day one,

it is three to five years down the

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line.

But Jessica, your newspaper,

doom and gloom when it comes to

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Brexit. The sky will fall in, it

will all be a disaster. The front

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page of the Financial Times, look at

that!

How unfair! (!) This is the

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FT's own analysis of how it will go.

It is different to the city bosses

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who say we will have to move unless

we get a deal. It sort of shows you

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how much they are trying to

influence it. There was a tweet if

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you weeks ago from the CEO of

Goldman Sachs, saying I have just

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been to Frankfurt, what a lovely

place this is, I will spend a lot

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more time here. It is all mood

music.

This is reality.

These are

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the raw figures. At the moment, 6%

is still significant.

That is

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interesting, given the vote tonight,

and that MPs will now have more than

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likely the final say on a deal, are

you going to get these

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constituencies, the banking sector,

they will build ringing up their

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local MPs, when they they went

bother going to Theresa May any

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more, just ring up the guy in the

constituency office.

When all the

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dust settles down, Labour stops

patting itself on the back, you have

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the European Parliament's main

negotiator in the Telegraph crowing

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about this is a great day for

democracy. That will go down like a

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lead balloon in the Tory party, you

have the opposition, as such,

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crowing about what a great job the

rebels have done. Looks like it will

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be a softer Brexit, that is what

they need, what they want. I have

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forgotten your point now, Clive!

That is the beauty of the hung

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parliament. People can ring up their

MP, try and change their minds, and

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it might change what the government

says.

It is the beauty of

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representative democracy.

That

snapped election, well done,

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Theresa.

Which is why we don't often

have referenda in this country, some

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might argue.

I wonder what David

Cameron would say?

Indeed. Back to

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the Telegraph, NHS staff 's

shortages, millennials demanding

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career breaks?

It is probably true,

I probably just about fit into the

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millennial bracket.

Wow.

I feel like

my contemporaries definitely want

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more flexible working hours, to work

from home or, take a couple of

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months off and work longer hours for

other months. I think the world of

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work is changing. It is something

employers need to adapt to and it is

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healthier. So many studies showing

it is.

Not healthy for the NHS,

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though, that seems to be the

problem! While you are enjoying your

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holidays, whatever, staff are needed

in the NHS, so it is causing a

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problem here.

There could be more

bursaries fitness training and that

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sort of thing. It is easier to blame

millennials who want a holiday.

When

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robots are doing everything from you

could have a really long career

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break.

But nursing would be one of

those areas where you could not get

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it to do it properly, that's the

thing.

Some of the things you hear

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from perhaps the older, my

generation, but they talk sometimes

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about the younger staff who come in,

and their work ethic, and there is

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that divergences. The older worker

who has been used to working eight

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till seven, the young ones come in

and say I don't want to do that.

I

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don't think it is necessarily about

not wanting to work hard.

It is just

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different, yes.

And flexibility.

Being a bit more constructive with

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your use of time, I suppose.

Jessica, women feel more unhappy

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than men until they reach their

mid-80s.

There is a quake Orton

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great quote, some of your viewers

might be thinking, I wonder why that

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is? Psychiatrists say it is maybe

because so many are widowed by them.

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That might be a reason!

Women decide

to become happier when they are

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widowed!

When they haven't got

blokes hanging around them being a

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pain?

I am not too sure about that.

This great stat that men who are

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widowed, single or divorced are more

vulnerable to developing depression,

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but married women are more likely to

develop depression. There is a real

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insinuation running through this.

We

shouldn't dwell on that, Steve. We

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will go to the express was to look

at this photograph, ladies and

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gentlemen. This is a squirrel, and

he has got his nuts, and there is a

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bird wanting to fly in and Nick his

nuts, or her nuts. Look at that,

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fantastic photograph. It is ice. Ice

age squirrel in shock as cheeky bird

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pinches it snapped. Look at the

photograph beneath. There is a nut

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inside the ice, I am being told. Our

photo copier is on the blink and I

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can't see a dam thing. At the bottom

of the page is this story about a

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whole Christmas dinner, battered and

fried. Brussels sprouts, chicken,

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the potato, everything, deep-fried.

Steve?

Perfect. We had our Christmas

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party last night so I probably could

have finished this off at lunchtime.

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Or at five in the morning when he

got home, more like it!

It is one of

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those great stories of Christmas, it

takes you away from some of the more

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serious stuff, but it is a Fish bar

in Devon that has deep-fried

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everything. We will have to try it,

bring it in, Clive.

Jessica?

It says

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£9 95. I don't know how much people

spend on Christmas dinners for

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themselves, but you end up spending

quite a lot. That seems like really

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good value. It is the deep-fried

mince pie that comes with it in the

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box that puts me off.

The quote from

the chip shop owner, Andrew

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Marshall. It is a little heavy.

LAUGHTER

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Jessica, Stephen, good to see you.

Thanks for that, and to youth are

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watching. That is it for the night.

Don't forget, you can see all of the

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front pages of the papers online and

the BBC website.

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It's all there for you -

seven days a week at bbc dot co uk

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forward slash papers -

and if you miss the programme any

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evening you can watch it

later on BBC iPlayer.

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Thank

you Jessica Elgot and Steve Hawkes.

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Goodbye.

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