11/11/2015 Victoria Derbyshire


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11/11/2015

Veterans talk about the importance of Armistice Day, Victoria Derbyshire talks about her latest bout of cancer treatment, and a Muslim woman talks about the abuse she faces.


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Hello, it's Wednesday, it's 9.15, I'm Joanna Gosling in for

:00:00.:00:08.

Victoria Derbyshire, welcome to the programme.

:00:09.:00:10.

as the nation remembers the British military deaths since World War I,

:00:11.:00:15.

we'll speak to four men who served in some of the biggest

:00:16.:00:17.

I Frank Rosier and was in with you in the next few minutes.

:00:18.:00:31.

I Frank Rosier and was in Gloucestershire Regiment. I am

:00:32.:00:36.

Doctor David Jackson and I served in the Falklands and Northern Ireland.

:00:37.:00:42.

I am Mike North and I served in the Gulf and Northern Ireland. I am

:00:43.:00:51.

serving officer in the Royal offered sure -- Oxfordshire engineers.

:00:52.:00:55.

Plus, we'll bring you Victoria's latest video diary, following her

:00:56.:00:57.

I am having my first session of chemotherapy, part of my treatment

:00:58.:01:06.

for cancer. The chemotherapy drugs are being given to me. It is an

:01:07.:01:12.

insurance policy, that is how it is described to me, in case there are

:01:13.:01:17.

any microscopic traces of cancer elsewhere in my body. The

:01:18.:01:21.

chemotherapy drugs will kill it, as well as the good cells, but that is

:01:22.:01:24.

The full diary after 10.00am this morning,

:01:25.:01:27.

and you can watch it now on our programme page, bbc.co.uk/victoria.

:01:28.:01:30.

Also coming up in the programme, we'll get reaction after

:01:31.:01:32.

a senior Russian athletics official acknowledged his country does have

:01:33.:01:35.

We know our problem, we know we have a problem with doping. Of course we

:01:36.:01:51.

should change the mentality of many coaches, especially the coaches in

:01:52.:01:53.

We'll get reaction from employment minister priti patel.

:01:54.:02:33.

we'll bring you some footage from an extraordinary MPs' debate yesterday

:02:34.:02:37.

about whether breast feeding should be allowed in the House of Commons.

:02:38.:02:40.

if you've got a view on breast feeding in public you

:02:41.:02:43.

As always do get in touch throughout the programme with your views on any

:02:44.:02:47.

Texts will be charged at the standard network rate.

:02:48.:02:51.

And don't forget you can watch the programme online wherever you

:02:52.:02:54.

are via the bbc news app or our website bbc.co.uk/victoria

:02:55.:02:56.

and you can also subscribe to all our features on the news app,

:02:57.:02:59.

by going to add topics and searching Victoria Derbyshire.

:03:00.:03:01.

Over 1.2 million British military have been killed in conflicts

:03:02.:03:03.

since World War 1 and today a two-minute silence will

:03:04.:03:06.

be observed to commemorate those who died in the two world wars

:03:07.:03:09.

It starts at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day

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of the eleventh month, the time in 1918 when the guns fell silent along

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the Western Front, and an armistice, or a truce, was declared.

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It has been known as Armistice Day ever since.

:03:20.:03:21.

Our correspondents will be across the UK

:03:22.:03:22.

at 11 bringing you that two-minute silence this morning, but first,

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we've brought together veterans from a number of different conflicts

:03:26.:03:28.

Britain's been involved in over the years to share their experiences.

:03:29.:03:31.

Joining us here in the studio are Frank Rosier, who served in the

:03:32.:03:34.

Second World War and took part in the DDay landings, Dr David Jackson,

:03:35.:03:37.

who served with the marines in the Falklands and in Northern Ireland,

:03:38.:03:40.

Mike Lobb, who served in the Gulf War in 1990

:03:41.:03:42.

and Major Sartaj Singh Gogna, who's still in the army and has done

:03:43.:03:46.

Thanks for joining us today - still to come. We'll bring you Victoria's

:03:47.:03:54.

You all have different experiences of different conflicts, but first to

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tell me what Armistice Day means for you. Possibly because I and the

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eldest here, my generation is the last link to the First World War

:04:10.:04:14.

veterans because it was our parents and uncles who fought that war. I

:04:15.:04:20.

have very fond memories of my two uncles and my dad who got wounded in

:04:21.:04:26.

the war. I remember them quite a lot and I also remember the lads I left

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behind in Normandy. They were very young boys and I will never forget

:04:31.:04:37.

those boys. So, Remembrance Day, the 11th of the 11th, is very important

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for me. I think for me it is about remembering. For me it is about loss

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and I had two great uncles who served in the First World War, so

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again it is also about reflecting on their loss, which is a connection to

:04:56.:05:03.

my family as well. For me it is about thinking about losing my best

:05:04.:05:10.

friends. I come from a long line of military people. My grandfather

:05:11.:05:14.

served in the Second World War and my father served after that and they

:05:15.:05:19.

are both no longer with us. It is a chance for me to remember them and

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other friends. We have all lost people that we served with, but for

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me it is also about looking forward. We lost people so that we could move

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on and other people could move on and that is the way I like to think

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of it. For me remembrance is as much as it is a time to think about those

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who we have lost, it is also time to think about what they have left

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behind and the families who remain. One individual going down impact

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upon the team, not just that individual. The team extends to

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their families and the way we look after them. During my service,

:06:00.:06:06.

having lost soldiers, it is remembering their families and how

:06:07.:06:11.

we can support them as well. The great sacrifice those individuals

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have given. You have all spoken of how loss has touched you and you

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have all been involved in conflicts. Frank, you spoke of the young age of

:06:21.:06:24.

many of those who served in the Second World War alongside you. You

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were only 17 when you signed up. What I was never told was that by

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1942 we were running out of men, so they lowered the recruiting age to

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17. That is when everybody of that age volunteered. I would go as far

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to say more than half the armed forces those days were volunteers.

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Consequently we volunteered at 17 and after training, by the time we

:06:57.:07:01.

got to D-Day, the eldest amongst us would be in their early 20s. To

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think that really we got through it because of the comradeship of the

:07:10.:07:14.

fellows I was with. We helped one another. The British Army has a

:07:15.:07:20.

wonderful weapon called humour, and the ability to laugh at situations.

:07:21.:07:26.

It gets you out of trouble time and time again. But leaving those young

:07:27.:07:34.

boys, there are 14 in a French cemetery, and I go over there and I

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still cry. The youngest was 19 and the eldest was 24. That was 14th in

:07:41.:07:51.

my platoon. Others were killed elsewhere. I came home wounded. Very

:07:52.:07:58.

few of us got through the war unhurt. Many were wounded and went

:07:59.:08:04.

back again. There is a lot to think about these days. I spent four years

:08:05.:08:10.

in hospital in a plastic surgery unit and I think of those lads who I

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was with, the same age but who lost their legs and who were badly

:08:17.:08:22.

burned. How did they get on in life? What happened to them? There is an

:08:23.:08:27.

awful lot to remember and an awful lot to be sad about. The thing about

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experiencing war is if you have four of us sitting in a room we do not

:08:37.:08:41.

need to talk about war, I know it is a cliched the band of Brothers, but

:08:42.:08:46.

we have a common understanding that does not need words. What is

:08:47.:08:50.

important is what you do afterwards and how you lead your life. And in

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some ways to me it is about living life with passion and moving on.

:08:58.:09:02.

Does it matter if others understand what you have been through? Today it

:09:03.:09:10.

is about the nation remembering. Does it matter? It is important

:09:11.:09:16.

society has a better understanding of the culture and some of the

:09:17.:09:21.

difficulties war veterans and families have in society. I run a

:09:22.:09:28.

group that encourages a better dialogue between the civilian world

:09:29.:09:31.

and the ex-Armed Forces world. That is really important. Frank was in

:09:32.:09:42.

the Army at a time when a lot of people had families who understood

:09:43.:09:47.

what is going on. Perhaps the service we had, the Falklands,

:09:48.:09:51.

Northern Ireland, that blended into normal life for a lot of people. But

:09:52.:09:57.

one thing that strikes me now is because the armed services have been

:09:58.:10:04.

involved in conflict pretty much for the last 12 or 15 years, it is very

:10:05.:10:09.

definitely at the front of people's minds. Everybody knows somebody who

:10:10.:10:14.

has been injured or killed. Mother, father, sons and daughters. They are

:10:15.:10:19.

all really close to it. There is a lot of things that have happened

:10:20.:10:26.

from a veteran's perspective like Help For Heroes. It puts it to the

:10:27.:10:34.

front or people's minds now. It is always important that everybody

:10:35.:10:36.

outside the military understands what we go through. If nothing else

:10:37.:10:43.

to prevent future conflicts. Conflict is not a nice place to be.

:10:44.:10:48.

Without that broad understanding of the horrors of war and that memory

:10:49.:10:53.

of the sacrifices that individuals have had to make an families have

:10:54.:10:58.

had to make and regiments that were decimated, particularly during the

:10:59.:11:02.

First World War and the second, you could hope to prevent conflict in

:11:03.:11:08.

future. You have to sit down and take a moment to remember exactly

:11:09.:11:13.

what that conflict has meant to us. You say conflict is not a nice place

:11:14.:11:15.

to be. Either You say conflict is not a nice place

:11:16.:11:19.

saw always there for you? take five seconds. It was always us

:11:20.:11:32.

and weak on the front line. Most of War, rather than the First World

:11:33.:11:41.

War, was 20 yards apart targets. Tanks and planes, ships, targets,

:11:42.:11:48.

infantry, targets. On this occasion I came face-to-face with this young

:11:49.:11:52.

German boy and to this day why did we not say good morning? We didn't,

:11:53.:12:00.

we both took out our weapons and I won. I sat down on the ground and I

:12:01.:12:05.

cried and it is not nice and it is not easy to kill another human

:12:06.:12:10.

being. That sticks in my mind. This young, German boy, a mother's son. I

:12:11.:12:20.

lost a 2 brothers. My mother with thousands of other women, I am not

:12:21.:12:24.

being patronising, went to hell and back. They never get a mention, the

:12:25.:12:31.

wives in the First World War, the mothers who went through hell and

:12:32.:12:37.

back quite often. That I feel sorry about. You are still having to leave

:12:38.:12:44.

your family behind. How do they get through that? It is strength, my

:12:45.:12:50.

wife supports me day in, day out in my career. When we found in 2012I

:12:51.:12:56.

was about to go to Afghanistan, the week before we found out we were

:12:57.:13:01.

expecting. I knew what the implication of that was. I was going

:13:02.:13:06.

to miss the birth of my daughter, but I was fortunate I married a

:13:07.:13:10.

woman who is so strong that she held the fort whilst I went off and did

:13:11.:13:16.

what I had to do. I was lucky that I had the support of my commander to

:13:17.:13:20.

get back in time for the birth. Testament to the character of my

:13:21.:13:24.

wife who then carried on on her own for three months whilst I went back

:13:25.:13:29.

to service and finish of the rest of the tour. Our families are one of

:13:30.:13:38.

our greatest bonuses and without them that we would not be where we

:13:39.:13:43.

are today. I will always be eternally thankful for my wife or

:13:44.:13:48.

all the support she has shown. It is a way of life some people might

:13:49.:13:53.

think why choose that? Why do something else that might be

:13:54.:14:00.

easier? I wanted a life less ordinary. I started going to

:14:01.:14:05.

university and reading pharmacy and very quickly I realised for me that

:14:06.:14:10.

was not going to cut the mustard. I wanted something that inspired me

:14:11.:14:13.

and motivated me to be a better person. Having seen the likes of

:14:14.:14:21.

Mike go through the Gulf campaign that is what inspired me to pick up

:14:22.:14:24.

the gauntlet and go forth and sign up. In the last 15 years I have had

:14:25.:14:31.

a cracking career around the world and I have had a lot of experience

:14:32.:14:36.

and have made a lot of friends. I have lost some, but it is their

:14:37.:14:41.

memory that we hold today. I would never have changed that decision.

:14:42.:14:48.

What about the element of service and the pride that comes with that?

:14:49.:14:55.

I was an ugly kid, so I thought U might help me out. But I also played

:14:56.:15:00.

a lot of sport and being part of a on the rugby pitch is hugely

:15:01.:15:05.

important to me. 15 people working together to beat 15 people. Joining

:15:06.:15:11.

the military is the same thing. I was saying earlier on I joined the

:15:12.:15:15.

Royal engineers and I love the royal engineers and all the squadron and

:15:16.:15:21.

the guys I have served with. It was not until I went to conflict that I

:15:22.:15:27.

looked further than that and saw how well the infantry operate, how well

:15:28.:15:32.

the artillery and the cavalry operates and you get a real sense

:15:33.:15:36.

that you are part of a much bigger team. That is hugely important. Is

:15:37.:15:44.

it important to all of you that people wear poppies today? That

:15:45.:15:51.

people observe the silence? Yes, because people do and people are

:15:52.:15:56.

kind in buying those poppies. As a better and I have sold poppies in

:15:57.:16:02.

the past. Even though I am wearing a poppy, they put their money in the

:16:03.:16:08.

ten because I am a veteran. I am a member of the British Legion. What

:16:09.:16:11.

they do with that money is pretty good. Building homes for wounded

:16:12.:16:20.

soldiers and Help The Heroes. There is quite a lot going for us. They

:16:21.:16:32.

are better than the government. The support seems to be lacking. We get

:16:33.:16:39.

help from the Legion, from Help For Heroes and people in the street as

:16:40.:16:43.

soon as they know you are a veteran. What support would you like

:16:44.:16:52.

from the government? I should not say this, but I know somebody who

:16:53.:17:00.

was in Iraq and he lost his legs and he was told he was fit for work and

:17:01.:17:03.

they stopped his benefit. That is not right. That lad deserves better

:17:04.:17:09.

than a benefit, he deserves a lot more than that. We got a war pension

:17:10.:17:14.

which I draw today and it is pretty good. It was given to us by the

:17:15.:17:21.

governments in the 40s. I do not know what they get today. My

:17:22.:17:27.

response to do the government do enough? What I found, and I mean in

:17:28.:17:40.

the collective we, what would you like from society? Nobody has sat us

:17:41.:17:45.

down and asked us what we want from society. There are a lot of

:17:46.:17:51.

assumptions about what we need. There are lots of charities out

:17:52.:17:55.

there who are fantastic, small charities, certainly down in Devon

:17:56.:18:00.

and Cornwall, but the fragmentation of it means there are charities

:18:01.:18:04.

everywhere and they do not seem to get together collectively. It is

:18:05.:18:12.

people replicating the same work. If I was to have a minister here I

:18:13.:18:16.

would say you need to bring this all under one umbrella and work together

:18:17.:18:21.

and work collectively as a team, which is what we were like in a

:18:22.:18:28.

team. As the Second World War defined you and your life? I have

:18:29.:18:34.

had a smashing life. I have enjoyed myself. Good Lord gave me the

:18:35.:18:40.

ability to play football and he gave me a brain and my best job was as

:18:41.:18:48.

postman and one day he will kick me upstairs. I had a lovely wife and a

:18:49.:18:54.

lovely son. Unfortunately I have outlived them both. The war has not

:18:55.:19:00.

affected me a bit. I know I lost my eye, but I say I never lost it. I

:19:01.:19:07.

was young enough. Thank you very much for coming

:19:08.:19:08.

in as the nation prepares to remember.

:19:09.:19:12.

Still to come, we'll bring you Victoria's latest

:19:13.:19:17.

video diary, following her first chemotherapy session.

:19:18.:19:27.

And unemployment fell down to 1.75 million. We will bring you reaction.

:19:28.:19:36.

The latest unemployment figures are out and they show unemployment fell

:19:37.:19:47.

As we've just mentioned, a two-minute silence will be

:19:48.:19:51.

observed across the UK at 11 o'clock to remember the nation's war dead.

:19:52.:19:54.

Over 1.2 million British military personnel have been killed

:19:55.:19:56.

Victoria Derbyshire has shared the experience of her first chemotherapy

:19:57.:20:03.

session, as she continues her battle against breast cancer.

:20:04.:20:06.

In the video diary, she explains the process of undergoing treatment.

:20:07.:20:12.

She explains the process of undergoing treatment. On my head I

:20:13.:20:21.

am wearing a cold cap which is to cool my scalp so it reduces the

:20:22.:20:28.

blood flow to my scalp, therefore it reduces the chemotherapy drugs going

:20:29.:20:32.

to my head, which should minimise or reduce hair loss, which is one of

:20:33.:20:36.

One of the heads of Russian athletics has acknowledged that

:20:37.:20:40.

the country does have a problem with doping.

:20:41.:20:42.

Mikhail Butov, the General Secretary of

:20:43.:20:44.

the All-Russia Athletic Federation, has responded to the report

:20:45.:20:47.

by an independent commission, which accused his country's sportsmen

:20:48.:20:49.

TalkTalk has confirmed this morning that the cyber-attack

:20:50.:20:53.

on its website will cost the company an estimated ?30 million.

:20:54.:20:56.

The personal details of more than 150,000 customers were

:20:57.:20:58.

Of those, more than 15,000 had their bank account numbers

:20:59.:21:03.

Let's catch up with the sport. We will have more on the Russian doping

:21:04.:21:21.

scandal in athletics were today the IAAF president Sebastian Coe has

:21:22.:21:30.

said he will clear up the sport. Not everyone is convinced he is the man

:21:31.:21:36.

to clear up the situation. We will get the latest from our

:21:37.:21:39.

correspondent Richard Conway. Sam Burgess explained his decision to go

:21:40.:21:44.

back to rugby league. He did not have the stomach for the fight in

:21:45.:21:51.

rugby union, according to his coach Mike Ford. We will hear from Sam

:21:52.:21:59.

Burgess himself. After England's test series defeat against Pakistan

:22:00.:22:02.

they have a chance to put that behind them with the first one-day

:22:03.:22:06.

international which gets under way at 11am in Abu Dhabi.

:22:07.:22:10.

The latest employment figures are just out.

:22:11.:22:15.

Our business correspondent Ben Thompson is here.

:22:16.:22:20.

Talk us through the figures. Headline rate fell to 5.3%. That is

:22:21.:22:30.

down again on the period before. It is interesting because we have been

:22:31.:22:34.

seeing this trend downwards of the number of people out of work and the

:22:35.:22:37.

numbers claiming jobseeker's allowance. 31.2 million people in

:22:38.:22:47.

work, that is up by 177,000. Also a big rise in the number of people

:22:48.:22:52.

working full-time. We have talked about the unemployment number coming

:22:53.:22:56.

down, but that has been hiding the fact people are working part-time

:22:57.:23:01.

and fewer hours, and they have not been able to add as much as they did

:23:02.:23:07.

before. We have had news on average earnings. That gives us an

:23:08.:23:11.

indication of whether we are feeling better off. We are told they are

:23:12.:23:17.

rising by 2.5%. That is below what we were expecting. We were looking

:23:18.:23:25.

for a figure of 3.2 or 3.3%. Average earnings now rising by 2.5%. But the

:23:26.:23:31.

important thing is inflation, the rise in costs of goods and services

:23:32.:23:36.

and last month that went negative. The gap between what we are spending

:23:37.:23:41.

and earning is getting bigger. In theory it means we should be better

:23:42.:23:47.

off in our pockets. It sounds like a pretty good picture overall. Just

:23:48.:23:53.

one thought. The chief executive of Tesco, Dave Lewis, has been speaking

:23:54.:23:58.

about the national living wage and predicting that could lead to job

:23:59.:24:01.

losses. Those comments were interesting earlier and he was

:24:02.:24:06.

talking about the perfect storm and he was talking about the business

:24:07.:24:10.

rates and the national living wage which starts in April next year. He

:24:11.:24:16.

said taken together that could cost business about ?14 billion. What is

:24:17.:24:21.

interesting is they are saying we will have to be careful about

:24:22.:24:25.

whether we take on more staff because we will have to pay them

:24:26.:24:29.

more. There is a real focus on people paying the wage because the

:24:30.:24:35.

government is not going to subsidise people through tax credits. But it

:24:36.:24:41.

is interesting. I have had a statement from the Chancellor saying

:24:42.:24:47.

the unemployment figures are good and he said the employment rate has

:24:48.:24:50.

never been higher and we are working towards full employment, but he

:24:51.:24:56.

points out there are 7500 job vacancies in the UK. There are still

:24:57.:25:01.

jobs available, but the issue is making sure we have the right people

:25:02.:25:04.

with the right skills for the right jobs. Employers often tell me they

:25:05.:25:10.

have vacancies, but they cannot find the right people. Training is not in

:25:11.:25:15.

the right areas to get people into work. Many people are retraining.

:25:16.:25:21.

Traditional industries are dying, and the steel industry laying off

:25:22.:25:26.

workers. The trick will be getting those people retrain and into jobs

:25:27.:25:31.

that are available into different jobs. Can retrain those people for

:25:32.:25:36.

the jobs that are available? That will be the big challenge to fill

:25:37.:25:42.

these vacancies. We will be speaking to Priti Patel, the Employment

:25:43.:25:48.

Minister a bit later. We will also bring new pictorial's latest video

:25:49.:25:53.

diary after her breast cancer diagnosis and her first chemotherapy

:25:54.:25:55.

More than half of all Muslims in the UK believe government

:25:56.:26:01.

policies have had a negative impact on their lives.

:26:02.:26:03.

That's according to a new report exclusively shown to this programme.

:26:04.:26:06.

A study by the Islamic Human Rights Commission found many

:26:07.:26:08.

people feel they've been treated with suspicion and mistrust.

:26:09.:26:10.

The report's authors say the government's security

:26:11.:26:12.

and anti-extremism measures, among other policies,

:26:13.:26:13.

have fuelled discrimination against Muslims in Britain.

:26:14.:26:15.

In the next hour, we'll get reaction, but first,

:26:16.:26:17.

Divya Talwar from the BBC's Asian Network has this investigation.

:26:18.:26:20.

Our finding suggests homophobia in the UK is at unprecedented levels.

:26:21.:26:42.

You are an F word, a bomber, a terrorist.

:26:43.:26:50.

My biggest fear is to be killed in the street. Muslims are viewed with

:26:51.:26:55.

suspicion and mistrust, we are blamed for everything. I do not know

:26:56.:27:01.

what life is like without Islam phobia or racism. We will be the

:27:02.:27:11.

scapegoats for a very long time. The government has promised to do

:27:12.:27:16.

more to tackle Islam phobia, but with controversial laws introduced

:27:17.:27:20.

this year, will it make the problem worse? A new report claims

:27:21.:27:24.

government policies like those countering extremism are one of the

:27:25.:27:29.

reasons many Muslims feel like they are coming under suspicion, I'm

:27:30.:27:32.

facing discrimination and even abuse. The report says incidents

:27:33.:27:37.

like this are happening around the country. This video has gone viral.

:27:38.:27:48.

It shows a lady shouting racist abuse at two Muslim women travelling

:27:49.:27:55.

on a bus in London. At one point she threatens to kick one of the women

:27:56.:28:02.

who is pregnant in the stomach. Anti-Muslim abuse like this, whether

:28:03.:28:06.

it is verbal abuse, physical assaults or even arson attacks on

:28:07.:28:12.

mosques are thought to be on the rise. New research suggests two out

:28:13.:28:16.

of every five Muslims has faced some kind of abuse in the UK. Every

:28:17.:28:23.

morning before going to work, this lady recites a prayer. She says it

:28:24.:28:27.

is for her protection, to keep her safe when she leaves her house. She

:28:28.:28:33.

is 29 and was born in Saudi Arabia and moved to Cardiff as a child. She

:28:34.:28:38.

started wearing a face veil when she was 14. She said it made her a

:28:39.:28:43.

target for abuse, but recently it has become so frequent she is scared

:28:44.:28:52.

to leave her home. Isil has been constantly connected to Muslims in

:28:53.:28:58.

the media and a lot of the public cannot differentiate between Muslims

:28:59.:29:07.

and Isil. The kind of abuse I get has increased recently. And I get it

:29:08.:29:14.

everywhere I go. Tell me about what you have experienced. The abuse can

:29:15.:29:20.

be verbal and sometimes physical. People pass by and try to take off

:29:21.:29:28.

my bail. These abusers can use the F word, you are a bomber or a

:29:29.:29:35.

terrorist. Do not cut off my head. She used to report the abuse to the

:29:36.:29:40.

pleas, but she says nothing ever happens, so she rarely does.

:29:41.:29:44.

Recently there have been physical attacks where people try to rip her

:29:45.:29:49.

bail. She says she is constantly looking over her shoulder worried

:29:50.:29:53.

she will be abused. She has even started taking a different route to

:29:54.:29:57.

work every morning because she thinks it is safer. What is it like

:29:58.:30:01.

living in constant fear of being attacked? It makes me feel scared.

:30:02.:30:13.

It is unfortunate and a shame that you see people saying that they

:30:14.:30:18.

don't even recognise Islamophobia as a term, let alone the consequences.

:30:19.:30:25.

Islamophobia has become part of our daily life, and it is real. It is

:30:26.:30:36.

affecting me on a daily basis. According to a new report by the

:30:37.:30:43.

Islamist human rights commission, two out of five people questioned

:30:44.:30:47.

said they had faced verbal or physical abuse. More than 40% said

:30:48.:30:51.

they had faced discrimination at work or in education, while more

:30:52.:30:57.

than half of those surveys believed they had been viewed with suspicion

:30:58.:31:04.

and mistrust. Many Muslims I have spoken to feel they are increasingly

:31:05.:31:08.

being profiled and criminalised because of laws to tackle extremism.

:31:09.:31:11.

Nice to meet you. Nice to meet you too. Iman is white and listen. She

:31:12.:31:21.

has not told her family, she doesn't think they will approve so we are

:31:22.:31:25.

keeping her anonymous. Her college suspected she may have been

:31:26.:31:29.

radicalised and she was reported to officers under the government's

:31:30.:31:34.

counter extremist agenda, Tapp prevent. Was there any change in

:31:35.:31:39.

your behaviour that might have aroused any concern? Nothing I

:31:40.:31:42.

thought would trigger anything at all. I guess that was the reason I

:31:43.:31:47.

started wearing a hijab, and that was enough for them to contact my

:31:48.:31:53.

family. The fact that they would think I would be some kind of

:31:54.:31:56.

terrorist is quite upsetting. What do you think they thought? Maybe I

:31:57.:32:01.

was in Isis or running away to Syria to get married, I don't know. I

:32:02.:32:06.

guess Muslim stereotypes were pushed on me. That does show the lack of

:32:07.:32:10.

understanding towards Islam. I don't think they are doing that for people

:32:11.:32:14.

who become Christian, I don't think they are doing that with Hindus and

:32:15.:32:21.

Sikhs and Jews and atheists even. New anti-terrorist mean teachers are

:32:22.:32:24.

under a duty to report those they suspect at risk of under

:32:25.:32:29.

radicalisation. The government says it is just alienating Muslim

:32:30.:32:37.

students. Normal misguided teenagers, a lot of them will get

:32:38.:32:41.

angry and frustrated and turned people support. If the only support

:32:42.:32:45.

is people who are extremists, they are pushing them into the hands of

:32:46.:32:49.

what they are trying to avoid happening. Iman have the meeting

:32:50.:32:52.

with counter extremism officers last month, she says she was interrogated

:32:53.:32:57.

about her views and beliefs. When the Prevent officers were happy that

:32:58.:33:00.

Iman was not a threat, she then said they tried to recruit her to work

:33:01.:33:04.

for them. Which I thought was quite unusual to ask, after I had been

:33:05.:33:08.

accused, and then suddenly it is you are OK now, we know you are not a

:33:09.:33:12.

terrorist but can you come and work for us? It went from one extreme to

:33:13.:33:18.

the other really. I just can't be a normal Muslim girl who was trying to

:33:19.:33:23.

get an education and work and do normal things. I have either got to

:33:24.:33:27.

help within radicalisation or iambic humming radicalised, there is no

:33:28.:33:32.

middle ground. -- or iamb becoming radicalised. The Home Office say

:33:33.:33:37.

they cannot comment on individual cases, but it is about protecting

:33:38.:33:41.

people who might be bombed the ball to the poisoning influence of

:33:42.:33:44.

radicalisation. The Islamic immigrants commission of -- the

:33:45.:33:50.

Islamic human rights commission has been looking into this for nearly

:33:51.:33:54.

two decades. In 2010, a smaller study they carried out suggested a

:33:55.:33:58.

third of Muslims felt government policies like those countering

:33:59.:34:01.

extremism had had a negative impact on them. For years on, the authors

:34:02.:34:06.

behind their latest study say that figure has nearly doubled -- four

:34:07.:34:13.

years on. We have an environment where Muslims feel suspected and

:34:14.:34:17.

life is increasingly difficult. The impact of government policies,

:34:18.:34:21.

particularly those related with security, though not solely, have

:34:22.:34:25.

really had an impact on silencing Muslims to be honest. Not just from

:34:26.:34:29.

the point of view of talking about political things, but even to do

:34:30.:34:32.

things like report anti-Muslim hatred. The government is trying to

:34:33.:34:38.

tackle Islamophobia. Anti-missal and hate crimes will now be seen as

:34:39.:34:43.

specific events. All of these things are welcome always. What we need is

:34:44.:34:47.

a culture change, not little bits of law here and there. It is not to say

:34:48.:34:51.

everyone in the media, every politician, every person in law

:34:52.:34:54.

enforcement is some kind of vile anti-Muslim racist, it is not. But

:34:55.:34:58.

unfortunately we have institutional problems that need to be addressed.

:34:59.:35:07.

Hussein is 26, a British Muslim of anger dishy origin -- Bangladeshi

:35:08.:35:17.

origin. Iman used a worthy face veil, but it came to the point when

:35:18.:35:20.

she had had enough and decided to remove it. That was really

:35:21.:35:30.

difficult. Do you think you will ever return to it? I do think so, it

:35:31.:35:36.

is really difficult to wear it here and the abuse I faced when I was

:35:37.:35:39.

wearing it, I would not want to go back to that. It was scary.

:35:40.:35:48.

Thahira's home city of Cardiff has come under the spotlight after a

:35:49.:35:52.

number of young people travelled to Syria to support so-called Islamic

:35:53.:35:56.

State militants. The small Muslim community here feel they are all

:35:57.:36:00.

coming and it suspicion, and with new laws meaning that nurseries need

:36:01.:36:04.

to look out for signs of radicalisation, parents fear that

:36:05.:36:07.

even their children need to be kept about what they say and how they

:36:08.:36:11.

react. I know that Muslim kids are being monitored very strictly at

:36:12.:36:15.

school, even as young at the age of three, and if any signs of extremism

:36:16.:36:18.

they might show, it is going to be picked up. So I am scared of the

:36:19.:36:25.

things that come out of her mouth! Like recently, we in a Syria

:36:26.:36:30.

fundraiser. She donated some of her toys and helped with the wrapping of

:36:31.:36:32.

the gifts. She keeps talking about that, and she says, money, we will

:36:33.:36:39.

go to Syria, and we will see my toys, she misses the dolls. We will

:36:40.:36:43.

go and see the girl who's looking after her. And I said don't say

:36:44.:36:49.

that, money, we will go to Syria, you don't want anyone to hear.

:36:50.:36:54.

People will get the wrong impression. What impression do you

:36:55.:36:58.

think people would get? They would probably think that I, you know, the

:36:59.:37:04.

worst-case scenario. Joining Isis, I guess.

:37:05.:37:09.

Most of the people I have spoken to for this film were reluctant to talk

:37:10.:37:15.

to me at first. They just don't trust journalists. Many feel the

:37:16.:37:19.

media has an agenda against Muslims, and only negative stories

:37:20.:37:32.

about Islam get reported. Saha is on a mission to get experience. With

:37:33.:37:40.

Muslim suspects, guilty until proven innocent, yes, I see it getting

:37:41.:37:45.

worse unfortunately. But I still am hopeful. I am hopeful of people, the

:37:46.:37:49.

public, to not be socially conditioned. We are not demons, as

:37:50.:37:55.

the media perceive us. Not Isis criminals. We are human beings like

:37:56.:37:56.

you. That was an exclusive That was an exclusive film by

:37:57.:38:03.

Divya Talwar and Athar Ahmad in collaboration with the

:38:04.:38:06.

BBC's Asian Network. We asked the Home Office for

:38:07.:38:08.

their reaction, and they told us: If you want to watch or share that

:38:09.:38:16.

film, you can find it on our and in the next hour, we'll talk to

:38:17.:38:33.

one man who says he's been forced to move home as a result

:38:34.:38:39.

of Islamophobic attacks. Lawrence has texted to say we must

:38:40.:38:58.

never forget our war dead, heroes every one of them. Thousands come

:38:59.:39:01.

from my part of the UK, Northern Ireland proudly fought and died for

:39:02.:39:04.

the cause. I thank them all, may they rest in peace was the Bruce has

:39:05.:39:09.

tweeted to say watching those veterans, and the major looking

:39:10.:39:12.

resplendent makes one so proud. A tweet from Jerome, I wear a poppy, I

:39:13.:39:18.

remember all families of the war dead. Doesn't matter what side they

:39:19.:39:22.

were on, they left families. Another tweet, absolutely Loving Frank, the

:39:23.:39:25.

World War II veteran, saying it as it is about benefits. Take note,

:39:26.:39:33.

David Cameron. Another text, there are no words in language to commend

:39:34.:39:36.

highly enough the actions of these brave men. Lest we forget.

:39:37.:39:41.

Jean-Pierre has said this is the least we can do to remember the

:39:42.:39:45.

bravery of the people who fought for our freedom. Thank you for your

:39:46.:39:49.

comments, keep getting in touch about Armistice and everything else

:39:50.:39:51.

we are talking about here on the programme today. Some breaking news

:39:52.:39:56.

to bring you about the Russian doping scandal. Russia's athletics

:39:57.:40:01.

Federation say they were given 72 hours from the publication of the

:40:02.:40:06.

report on doping to respond to the claims in writing. A spokeswoman

:40:07.:40:09.

says they are currently working on the response and will send it to the

:40:10.:40:19.

IAAF by Thursday evening. Let's catch up with the weather. Carol is

:40:20.:40:23.

here with us. There is a storm on the way, Carol.

:40:24.:40:26.

The first named storm of the season. Abigail is what it will be called. A

:40:27.:40:35.

big gale. It will not affect everything. It will be largely

:40:36.:40:40.

north-west Scotland and northern Scotland but it could clip the north

:40:41.:40:43.

coast of Northern Ireland as well. Looking at gusts of wind from the

:40:44.:40:48.

storm at about 70 or 80 mph, locally across parts of Scotland it could

:40:49.:40:52.

even be 90 mph. The Met office have literally just issued an amber

:40:53.:40:56.

weather warning, which means be prepared for this storm for the

:40:57.:41:02.

outer Hebrides, the far north of Greenland, Scotland -- mainland

:41:03.:41:05.

Scotland, and a big one, not affecting everyone though. The rest

:41:06.:41:09.

of us will be windy but nowhere near as windy as that. It is quite

:41:10.:41:13.

interesting how they have named the storms forced by Javi little list to

:41:14.:41:17.

show you. It is very similar to the way the Americans do it. In

:41:18.:41:22.

alphabetical order, girl, boy, girl, boy, if there is a particularly bad

:41:23.:41:26.

storm, that name like the American hurricane system will never be

:41:27.:41:30.

replaced again. The reason they have named the storms is so that you can

:41:31.:41:34.

focus on them. We will be aware of them, able to track them and it is

:41:35.:41:37.

only substantial storms that will be named, because we have lots of the

:41:38.:41:41.

periods of low pressure that will be named, but ones that are likely to

:41:42.:41:46.

have some impact on the UK or indeed on Ireland, as is the case in this

:41:47.:41:50.

instance. It will be largely north-west in Scotland. How quickly

:41:51.:41:56.

we likely to get through the list? That is the multi-million dollar

:41:57.:41:58.

system, if I knew the answer to that I would be doing the lottery right

:41:59.:42:02.

now. Hopefully not this many. You will notice some of the names have

:42:03.:42:05.

not been put in. The same with the Americans, they don't put in certain

:42:06.:42:15.

letters. Quentin. Ursula. Why could be something else. Jasmine. Z the

:42:16.:42:24.

Zoe. The list will be replaced. I hope we don't see as many storms as

:42:25.:42:28.

this. Today it is not stormy weather we are looking at. Today what we

:42:29.:42:32.

have is much quieter weather. It will be mild once again. It will

:42:33.:42:36.

also be breezy and there will be some rain around as well. For some

:42:37.:42:40.

of us, we will also have some sunny spells. In the sunshine temper just

:42:41.:42:43.

get up to about 17 or indeed 18 Celsius. If we look at the rain, we

:42:44.:42:48.

have the rain across northern England's slipping down across parts

:42:49.:42:50.

of Wales as we go through the course of the day. Still some heavy bursts

:42:51.:42:55.

in it. There will be some sunshine but also some showers. The head of

:42:56.:42:59.

that band of rain a lot of clout, some drizzle and one or two showers

:43:00.:43:04.

as well. Temperatures, this is what you can expect, 11 to 15 or 16

:43:05.:43:09.

Celsius. As we had on through the course of the afternoon we can see

:43:10.:43:12.

in more detail across south-west England a lot of cloud. The rain not

:43:13.:43:15.

too far away from the north coast of Devon and also Cornwall. Southern

:43:16.:43:20.

counties generally, a lot of cloud too with the odd shower here and

:43:21.:43:24.

there, a wee bit of drizzle. In the used some sunshine, parts of

:43:25.:43:26.

Lincolnshire and Norfolk we could have 17 or 18 as the high. Then the

:43:27.:43:31.

rain across Northern Ireland behind it brightening up, a bright

:43:32.:43:33.

afternoon across most of Scotland and some sunshine, but there will be

:43:34.:43:38.

showers in the north and west. Across Northern Ireland and

:43:39.:43:40.

south-west Scotland, we are starting to see some squally showers, very

:43:41.:43:45.

gusty winds around. Moving quite quickly through. For Wales, a cloudy

:43:46.:43:49.

and wet afternoon but still tempters not bad for the stage in November.

:43:50.:43:53.

If we pick up these squally showers moving across Northern Ireland and

:43:54.:43:57.

Scotland, it will move through quite quickly. Gusts of wind 55 mph. It

:43:58.:44:03.

could lead to some tricky travelling conditions for the rush-hour. If you

:44:04.:44:07.

are doing anything to celebrate Diwali, bear that in mind. Behind it

:44:08.:44:16.

will be nippy. But it is Thursday we see the arrival of Abigail on our

:44:17.:44:20.

shores. Heading northwards. You can see from the squeezing isobars it

:44:21.:44:23.

will be windy, particularly on a southern flank. Putting some

:44:24.:44:27.

pictures on that as we go through the course of Thursday, Thursday

:44:28.:44:31.

starts off not a bad note for many of us, some sunshine, the breeze

:44:32.:44:34.

picking up the wind starts to pick up through the day. As the rain

:44:35.:44:39.

arrives. Across Northern Ireland. The large areas in the West, gusts

:44:40.:44:46.

of up to 55 mph. This charge stops at 3pm. It is into the evening and

:44:47.:44:51.

overnight that we have our amber weather warning. The storm really

:44:52.:44:54.

packs a punch. We are talking again just to remind you northern and

:44:55.:44:58.

north-western parts of Scotland. The gusts you can see here are gusts. 70

:44:59.:45:06.

to 80 mph. Locally we could even hit 90 mph so there will be some impact,

:45:07.:45:10.

possibly power cuts, travel disruption as well. It will pass

:45:11.:45:13.

through quite quickly though. The other thing it will do is introduce

:45:14.:45:18.

colder air for a time. There will be some snow on Scottish hills and

:45:19.:45:21.

mountains during the course of the latter part of Thursday and Friday.

:45:22.:45:24.

Friday itself will be colder than it has been for a couple of weeks, but

:45:25.:45:29.

that will be transient. This milder air indicated by the orange colour

:45:30.:45:39.

will sweep across the UK for the weekend. Once again, we will be

:45:40.:45:42.

looking at wet and windy conditions. Not as windy as Abigail will bring

:45:43.:45:45.

us. Finally, as we have a look at Friday, quite a lot of dry weather

:45:46.:45:47.

around. There will be some sunshine as well, some scattered showers too.

:45:48.:45:50.

Temperatures going right down to seven, eight or nine. As I

:45:51.:45:56.

mentioned, the mild conditions, still wet and windy, return to the

:45:57.:45:58.

weekend. the nation

:45:59.:46:07.

will pause for a two-minute silence to remember British military deaths

:46:08.:46:14.

since World War one. This morning veterans have told us

:46:15.:46:16.

why armistice day is so important. Conflict is not a nice place to be.

:46:17.:46:26.

Without that broader understanding of the horrors of war, and that

:46:27.:46:30.

memory of the sacrifices that individuals have had to make,

:46:31.:46:34.

families have had to make, that the regiments that were decimated,

:46:35.:46:38.

particularly during the First World War and second, you couldn't hope to

:46:39.:46:43.

prevent conflict in future. In

:46:44.:46:44.

a moment we'll bring you Victoria's latest video diary following her

:46:45.:46:46.

first chemotherapy session. You can feel alert and normal for a

:46:47.:46:54.

couple of hours, and then suddenly this wave of tiredness hits you and

:46:55.:46:58.

you just have to go to bed. And that, I have to say, that has made

:46:59.:47:02.

me feel a bit disconsolate. Everybody reacts, as I have said

:47:03.:47:06.

before, everybody is different, everybody reacts differently to

:47:07.:47:09.

treatment and I hope you don't mind me sharing this with you.

:47:10.:47:10.

And if you want so share our film you can find it now on our

:47:11.:47:14.

Also coming up in the programme, we'll get reaction after

:47:15.:47:19.

a senior Russian athletics official acknowledged his country does have

:47:20.:47:21.

We know our problem is doping. And of course we should change the

:47:22.:47:36.

mentality of many coaches, especially coaches in the regions.

:47:37.:47:41.

We are going to get some reaction right now to those unemployment

:47:42.:47:51.

figures just out, which show unemployment fell by 103,000 between

:47:52.:47:57.

July and September to 1.75 million. Priti Patel, the employment

:47:58.:48:01.

minister, is in our Westminster studio. Thank you for joining us. It

:48:02.:48:05.

looks like a good overall picture. What is your reaction? Now seeing

:48:06.:48:08.

record levels of implement What is your reaction? Now seeing

:48:09.:48:11.

the country with the implement rate at 73.7%. That is demonstrating

:48:12.:48:17.

security and implement opportunities across the economy, very much

:48:18.:48:20.

through the work of what the government has been doing to secure

:48:21.:48:22.

our economic future and support government has been doing to secure

:48:23.:48:25.

businesses as well when it comes to implement growth and job creation.

:48:26.:48:31.

The chief executive of Tesco has been speaking about job creation.

:48:32.:48:35.

The chief executive of Tesco has is concerned about the new national

:48:36.:48:37.

minimum wage and the impact it might have, that it might lead to jobs

:48:38.:48:42.

being lost. Do you agree with him? We know that the Office for Budget

:48:43.:48:46.

Responsibility also stated that we will see over a million jobs being

:48:47.:48:50.

created as well. I think it is right we have a national living wage so

:48:51.:48:54.

that we can see wages are higher, and at the same time we stopped the

:48:55.:48:57.

subsidising of low wages through welfare. This government was elected

:48:58.:49:02.

with a very clear manifesto pledge and a commitment to reduce the

:49:03.:49:09.

welfare budget, to secure our economy and deal with the problem of

:49:10.:49:12.

low wages which is what we will be doing with the new introduction of

:49:13.:49:15.

the national living wage. Sunday trading would have helped to boost

:49:16.:49:19.

the economy and employment. It has been knocked back by the SNP 's.

:49:20.:49:24.

Should the government have fought harder? When it comes to implement

:49:25.:49:30.

opportunities it is the job of the government could the right

:49:31.:49:32.

conditions for economic growth and job creation and that is what we

:49:33.:49:35.

have been doing. With regards to Sunday trading, there is no doubt

:49:36.:49:39.

that consumer patterns have changed. We see this through supermarkets and

:49:40.:49:42.

people shopping online as well, so there is a great case to be made for

:49:43.:49:46.

reforming our Sunday trading laws and that is something the government

:49:47.:49:50.

will continue to make the case for. Your thoughts on tax credits? There

:49:51.:49:56.

is a report accusing the Treasury of being an acceptably evasive. The

:49:57.:50:06.

Treasury has said it will introduce new measures to mitigate the impact.

:50:07.:50:10.

It has taken a long time though. There has been a Lords revolt, a lot

:50:11.:50:16.

of criticism from the Tory party as well. How has this been handled? The

:50:17.:50:24.

House of Lords voted in an unconstitutional way. Let me be

:50:25.:50:31.

clear here, the Chancellor has stated that he will outline the

:50:32.:50:36.

transitional measures, the support that will help people in the Autumn

:50:37.:50:39.

Statement in about three weeks' time. But I think we have to remind

:50:40.:50:44.

ourselves as to how we got into the situation in the first place. Back

:50:45.:50:49.

in 2010, nine out of ten households and families were being subsidised

:50:50.:50:54.

through tax credits in the form of welfare. We have been very clear

:50:55.:50:57.

that through the welfare reform the destination is still the same, that

:50:58.:51:01.

we will continue to reform welfare, but as the Chancellor said through

:51:02.:51:07.

the Autumn Statement he will outline how he will reform. We will continue

:51:08.:51:14.

to reform welfare. On that point about the people who are impacted as

:51:15.:51:23.

the changes take place, the warnings have been going on for some time.

:51:24.:51:33.

The Chancellor, it looks like the Treasury either failed to see the

:51:34.:51:37.

impact or you didn't care. I would disagree with that come completely

:51:38.:51:39.

on the contrary. The Chancellor has been very clear, he will outline the

:51:40.:51:44.

measures in terms of transitional help and reform and the support he

:51:45.:51:47.

will put in place in the Autumn Statement later on. We are reforming

:51:48.:52:04.

welfare so we can ensure we have lower welfare. We inherited a system

:52:05.:52:07.

back in 2010 that was completely unsustainable. The tax credit bill

:52:08.:52:16.

has shot up from 6 billion since when it was first introduced over

:52:17.:52:20.

?30 billion. That is why we need our welfare reform measures. We will

:52:21.:52:23.

support those families with regards to transitional support and the

:52:24.:52:26.

Chancellor will outline that in the Autumn Statement later this month.

:52:27.:52:31.

The government is doing the right thing, through other measures such

:52:32.:52:33.

as the increase in the national living wage, support with more help

:52:34.:52:37.

with childcare as well. It is that wider package that will help

:52:38.:52:40.

families to ensure they are better off in the long run. Priti Patel,

:52:41.:52:44.

thank you. The rest of our news headlines.

:52:45.:52:46.

As we've just mentioned a two-minutes silence will be

:52:47.:52:48.

observed across the UK at 11 o'clock to remember the nation's war dead.

:52:49.:52:51.

Over 1.2 million British military personnel have been killed

:52:52.:52:53.

I remember the land that I left behind in Normandy. They were very

:52:54.:53:04.

young boys. I will still never forget those boys that I fought

:53:05.:53:11.

with. So Remembrance Day, the 11th of the 11th, is very important to

:53:12.:53:13.

me. Victoria Derbyshire has Victoria Derbyshire has shared the

:53:14.:53:15.

experience of her first chemotherapy session in the video diary she is

:53:16.:53:18.

keeping for this programme. In this part that we are showing

:53:19.:53:20.

in full at 10:00, she explains the on my head, I'm wearing a cold cap,

:53:21.:53:36.

which is to cool my scalp so it reduces the blood flow to my scalp,

:53:37.:53:41.

therefore it reduces the chemotherapy drugs going to my head,

:53:42.:53:44.

which hopefully should minimise or reduce hair loss, which is one of

:53:45.:53:47.

the chemotherapy drugs going to my head, which hopefully should

:53:48.:53:49.

minimise or reduce hair loss, which is one of these

:53:50.:53:50.

One of the heads of Russian athletics has acknowledged that

:53:51.:53:52.

the country does have a problem with doping.

:53:53.:53:54.

Mikahil Butov, the General Secretary of

:53:55.:53:56.

the All-Russia Athletic Federation, has responded to the report

:53:57.:53:58.

by an independent commission which accused his country's sportsmen

:53:59.:54:00.

side at least 14 people are thought to have drowned after a migrant boat

:54:01.:54:13.

sank on its way to grease off the island of Lesbos. What is the

:54:14.:54:22.

latest? All of this happened on the Turkish side of the Aegean Sea so we

:54:23.:54:25.

are relying on the Turkish state media to tell us what actually

:54:26.:54:27.

happened here. We know that 14 people have died. 27 people were

:54:28.:54:33.

rescued. They were pulled from the water and taken to the coast. There

:54:34.:54:36.

is a search going on now to try to find if anyone else perished in

:54:37.:54:40.

these waters. Seven of the people who died here were children, in seas

:54:41.:54:46.

that have seen so much death already. To put this into context,

:54:47.:54:51.

last month alone 160 people, more than that, died in the seas here

:54:52.:54:55.

trying to make this journey from Turkey to Greece to get to Europe.

:54:56.:55:04.

Iraq is and Syrians. They meet in Malta today, the EU leaders, their

:55:05.:55:08.

focus is on the Mediterranean route to Africa, they will be thinking

:55:09.:55:13.

about what happens here. 600,000 people are expected to make this

:55:14.:55:17.

journey before the year is out. Winter is coming. More people will

:55:18.:55:21.

die. So there is pressure on European leaders to try to find a

:55:22.:55:25.

solution to end this migration crisis.

:55:26.:55:28.

Let's catch up with all of the sport. The IAAF president Lord Coe

:55:29.:55:37.

featuring in many of the day's papers as this Russian athletic

:55:38.:55:42.

scandal rolls on. Lord Coe coming in for some heavy criticism actually.

:55:43.:55:45.

Now he is in the firing line, according to the Daily Mail. MPs

:55:46.:55:48.

demand answers on his handling of this doping crisis.

:55:49.:56:03.

Edgewater, the head of UK Athletics having a bit of a go. You can see

:56:04.:56:10.

here in the mirror, the lead from the front, said, Daley Thompson

:56:11.:56:16.

calling for Seb Coe to show strongly the ship. Laming

:56:17.:56:24.

Lord Coe says he will chair a council meeting on Friday where

:56:25.:56:29.

Russia's immediate future in athletics will be decided. The

:56:30.:56:37.

International Olympic Committee president believes Seb Coe and

:56:38.:56:44.

Russia can resolve the situation. We are convinced that the new president

:56:45.:56:50.

Sebastian Coates do whatever is necessary, and also Marussia will

:56:51.:57:00.

cooperate to make progress, and to be sure that Russian athletics is

:57:01.:57:11.

compliant with Wada. This is what it needs to be to participate in the

:57:12.:57:14.

Olympic games will stop Richard Conway has been following the story

:57:15.:57:21.

and interviewed Lord Coe this week. What realistic chance do Marussia

:57:22.:57:24.

having competing in Rio next summer? After listening to Thomas

:57:25.:57:28.

Bach, they will be in courage. He may not have the same kind of

:57:29.:57:32.

profile as Sepp Blatter or even Lord Coe but he is effectively the most

:57:33.:57:36.

important man in world sport. He is the president of the International

:57:37.:57:39.

Olympic committee, and what he says carries weight. If we come back to

:57:40.:57:52.

the international fold and agree with changes and reforms that need

:57:53.:57:56.

to happen according to the Wada International committee report, they

:57:57.:58:01.

can effectively be rehabilitated. It will be a relief to some in Russia

:58:02.:58:05.

because the thought of them missing out on the Rio Olympic Games next

:58:06.:58:10.

year will not be something they want to entertain. They want to be there.

:58:11.:58:13.

So that decision is looming on Friday. Lord Coe under a degree of

:58:14.:58:18.

pressure to make a decision along with his fellow board members will

:58:19.:58:20.

stop with his fellow board members will

:58:21.:58:27.

ground here, which would see Marussia -- Wilsey Russia band.

:58:28.:58:42.

Given the scale of the claims made against them, we will have to wait

:58:43.:58:46.

and see the result of that board meeting on Friday. Thomas Bach

:58:47.:58:52.

saying clearly that Russia can be brought back into the folder they

:58:53.:58:55.

are willing to do the hard work and comply. We have had some breaking

:58:56.:59:05.

news surrounding Lord Coe's predecessor, Lamin Diak. Lamin Diak

:59:06.:59:07.

had been predecessor, Lamin Diak. Lamin Diak

:59:08.:59:16.

the IOC's job for him, I think he has been nudged the -- nudged in

:59:17.:59:23.

that direction. But his time at an end now. That is our sports news

:59:24.:59:28.

correspondent. Another man who has come in for a bit of stick is Sam

:59:29.:59:30.

Burgess, who did not have the stomach to fight for his future in

:59:31.:59:31.

rugby union, that is according to Mike Ford. Burgess arrived in Sydney

:59:32.:59:33.

yesterday after leaving Bath just one year into a three-year deal to

:59:34.:59:47.

rejoin the South Sydney Rabbitohs. Burgess has been explaining his

:59:48.:59:53.

decision to go back to league. Deep down, rugby league gave me a

:59:54.:59:57.

different, something different to rugby union. It is not a mock of

:59:58.:00:04.

rugby union at all. In certain respects, what players go through,

:00:05.:00:09.

what they do, I think rugby league you play with passion and heart. My

:00:10.:00:16.

heart lies in rugby league. The sooner I got back was probably

:00:17.:00:22.

best. Just finally, England's first one-day against Pakistan in Abu

:00:23.:00:25.

Dhabi starting in just under one hour's time. We will keep you

:00:26.:00:26.

up-to-date. Victoria will be back presenting the programme

:00:27.:00:32.

tomorrow for stop a week ago she began the next age in her treatment

:00:33.:00:34.

for breast cancer. She's keeping a video diary for this

:00:35.:00:47.

programme to shed some light on some Many of you may have already

:00:48.:00:51.

seen her first film following She's being treated at Ashford

:00:52.:00:55.

and St Peter's Hospitals NHS It's frank, open and doesn't

:00:56.:00:58.

gloss over some of the treatment. Today I'm having my first session

:00:59.:01:15.

of chemotherapy which is part And the chemotherapy drugs are being

:01:16.:01:18.

given to me as a sort of insurance policy, that is how it has been

:01:19.:01:25.

described to me, in case there are any microscopic traces of cancer

:01:26.:01:28.

elsewhere in my body, chemotherapy drugs will kill it,

:01:29.:01:33.

as well as killing all the good On my head I am wearing a cold cap

:01:34.:01:36.

which is to cool my scalp, so it Therefore, it reduces the

:01:37.:01:46.

chemotherapy drugs going to my head, which hopefully should minimise or

:01:47.:01:55.

reduce hair loss which is one of It may or may not work,

:01:56.:01:58.

but we'll see. While

:01:59.:02:05.

the drugs were being pushed into me, What does feel weird is

:02:06.:02:08.

the cold cap and the temperature And that has given me a headache

:02:09.:02:14.

and made me feel sleepy. And I just sort

:02:15.:02:22.

of want to curl up and go to sleep. In the last few days,

:02:23.:02:30.

in the build-up to this first cycle of chemotherapy,

:02:31.:02:33.

I have been feeling quite vexed and anxious and apprehensive, because it

:02:34.:02:38.

is the fear of the unknown. And also really impatient to get

:02:39.:02:42.

the first one under my belt so I Right now, I have got to wear

:02:43.:02:51.

the cold cap for another hour, But I just

:02:52.:02:57.

like I want to go to sleep. I have just got back

:02:58.:03:06.

from the hospital. I was there for about three hours

:03:07.:03:11.

in total. The worst bit for me was

:03:12.:03:14.

definitely wearing the cold cap. When it came off though,

:03:15.:03:18.

the headache just disappeared and the feelings of nausea just

:03:19.:03:21.

went away which is brilliant. There was actually ice

:03:22.:03:26.

on my hair and in the cap. It felt, I think it reminded me

:03:27.:03:30.

of having a hangover. You have a headache,

:03:31.:03:35.

you don't want to talk to anybody Except with a hangover you want

:03:36.:03:38.

to eat lots of carbohydrates and I I am really glad that it is one

:03:39.:03:42.

down and just five to go. I have spent most of

:03:43.:03:50.

the afternoon and evening in bed. As the day has worn on, I have felt

:03:51.:03:58.

increasingly queasy and drained. It's a grey November morning

:03:59.:04:02.

and it's raining a bit, but I don't mind, because I have spent the last

:04:03.:04:12.

day and a half in bed feeling lethargic and not miserable, but

:04:13.:04:15.

just no motivation to do anything. Now, today, I feel, 48 hours after

:04:16.:04:21.

the first session of chemotherapy, I am desperate for some first air so I

:04:22.:04:25.

have come to take Gracie for a walk. I don't want to speak too soon

:04:26.:04:29.

because it is only the first session of chemotherapy I

:04:30.:04:46.

have had, but I feel OK. I know as chemo goes

:04:47.:04:49.

on things get a little bit worse. The next thing I have to do today is

:04:50.:04:54.

inject myself with a drug that will stimulate

:04:55.:05:02.

the growth of white blood cells I usually, I'm all right with

:05:03.:05:13.

the thought of a needle going in. Sorry,

:05:14.:05:23.

you will have to see my belly. Well, the needle has gone in

:05:24.:05:28.

which is fine. Push the solution in,

:05:29.:05:44.

push the solution in, all the way. This will boost my immunity

:05:45.:05:48.

which will protect me from... OK, that was much better

:05:49.:05:52.

than I was expecting. The other thing I need to tell you,

:05:53.:06:04.

which is obviously not important, but I am telling you anyway,

:06:05.:06:08.

is I haven't washed my hair, combed my hair, brushed my hair or done

:06:09.:06:11.

anything on the advice of nurse Emma who said, the longer you can leave

:06:12.:06:14.

it, the better it might be It is six days

:06:15.:06:19.

since I had the first chemotherapy session and the way it has drained

:06:20.:06:29.

my body has made me feel a bit low. You can feel alert and normal

:06:30.:06:38.

for a couple of hours and then suddenly a wave of tiredness hits

:06:39.:06:41.

you and you just have to go to bed. I have to say that has made

:06:42.:06:44.

me feel a bit disconsolate. Everybody reacts, as I have said

:06:45.:06:47.

before, everybody reacts differently to treatment and I hope you don't

:06:48.:06:50.

mind me sharing this with you. There are five more sessions to go

:06:51.:06:53.

and this time will pass, So many of you getting

:06:54.:06:58.

in touch already sending best wishes Most of the time I have been

:06:59.:08:06.

positive and have said out loud it is what it is. Some people have

:08:07.:08:12.

accused me of being brave. The reality is different, I have been

:08:13.:08:17.

scared. I have sat and watched all of your videos and I feel better. I

:08:18.:08:22.

cried because I felt stronger and better. That sounds crazy, but I am

:08:23.:08:25.

sure you will understand. And if you want to share that diary

:08:26.:08:29.

you can find it on our programme where you can also find her first

:08:30.:08:33.

diary following her mastectomy. Victoria will be back presenting

:08:34.:08:36.

the programme tomorrow and I know she's really grateful for all the

:08:37.:08:39.

messages you've been sending her. Beach mat breaking news. Carl Andre,

:08:40.:08:54.

the 74-year-old British grandfather who was killed in Saudi Arabia for

:08:55.:08:57.

possessing alcohol has arrived back in the UK and is in London. Frank

:08:58.:09:04.

Gardner is here. He is finally back. What happened in the end? This story

:09:05.:09:11.

was broken by the Sun newspaper a few weeks ago because the family

:09:12.:09:15.

were afraid he was going to face a huge amount of lashes, the mandatory

:09:16.:09:20.

punishment if you are caught with alcohol offences. The Saudi

:09:21.:09:25.

government pursued the Foreign Office, who in turn assured the

:09:26.:09:30.

family, that he would not be lashed. He was caught in August last year in

:09:31.:09:35.

Jeddah with quite a large amount of alcohol, which is illegal in Saudi

:09:36.:09:40.

Arabia. He was sentenced to one year in jail, which he accepted. The

:09:41.:09:45.

problem is he was still in jail well after his sentence and it was a

:09:46.:09:50.

bureaucratic mess up by the Saudis. The family were naturally very

:09:51.:09:54.

concerned that all it would take would be won over officious prison

:09:55.:10:00.

governor or a prison guard to say, this man is still in, he is supposed

:10:01.:10:05.

to be lashed, take him to the courtyard. He is a 3 cancer

:10:06.:10:11.

survivor, and an asthma sufferer, and there were fears for his health.

:10:12.:10:16.

survivor, and an asthma sufferer, On Twitter people have not been

:10:17.:10:17.

sympathetic. People the rules, if you break them, you

:10:18.:10:25.

take the punishment. But his sentence expired in August and he

:10:26.:10:28.

was still in prison on the 20th of October, so it was really bad.

:10:29.:10:33.

Philip Hammond flew to Saudi Arabia, had talks with the king, and hours

:10:34.:10:38.

later he was released. Do we know what Philip Hammond said? Did the

:10:39.:10:44.

British Government effectively have to intervene? David Cameron

:10:45.:10:47.

intervene personally because he had been kept in prison so long. I think

:10:48.:10:57.

to be fair, without the media storm I am not sure. The Foreign Office

:10:58.:11:00.

would say they were doing it quietly, but the fact is he were

:11:01.:11:04.

still in prison well beyond that and I cannot imagine the conditions were

:11:05.:11:08.

particularly great, especially if you do not speak the language, it is

:11:09.:11:14.

not your religion or your food. He had been an expat for 25 years in

:11:15.:11:19.

Saudi Arabia. He knew the risks, and he got caught, but he paid more than

:11:20.:11:22.

the fair price. More than half of all Muslims in the

:11:23.:11:31.

UK believe government policies have had a negative impact on their lives

:11:32.:11:34.

- we'll talk to a man who had to move home after being targeted by

:11:35.:11:38.

racists and a man involved in the government's counter

:11:39.:11:41.

extremism strategy. Talk Talk has confirmed this morning

:11:42.:11:43.

that last month's cyber-attack on its website, will cost the

:11:44.:11:45.

company an estimated ?30 million. The personal details

:11:46.:11:48.

of more than 150,000 customers Of those, more than 15,000 had

:11:49.:11:50.

their bank account numbers But the firm's Chief Executive,

:11:51.:11:56.

Dido Harding, admitted that it's too early to tell the real impact

:11:57.:12:01.

on the business. Our business editor is here. ?30

:12:02.:12:15.

million is a lot of money, how have they arrived at that figure? In a

:12:16.:12:21.

cyber attack external criminal gangs fire loads of data at a company's

:12:22.:12:26.

website and a breakthrough their security defences. They get inside

:12:27.:12:31.

the IT infrastructure of a business. A company has to first of

:12:32.:12:35.

all repaired that bit of the business. The other big cost for

:12:36.:12:40.

them was that the cyber attack took down their website. One of the main

:12:41.:12:45.

ways of selling contracts to the public was not functioning and has

:12:46.:12:49.

only just started functioning today. I interviewed the chief

:12:50.:12:54.

executive earlier today and I asked her that despite the controversy,

:12:55.:12:56.

was the business still performing well.

:12:57.:12:59.

The early signs are quite encouraging.

:13:00.:13:01.

Most customers tell us that they think we have done the right thing.

:13:02.:13:05.

We of course saw an immediate step up or spike in customers cancelling

:13:06.:13:08.

their direct debits, but actually, after a few days, we saw many

:13:09.:13:11.

of those customers reinstating their direct debits again.

:13:12.:13:13.

So time will tell but the early signs are that customers

:13:14.:13:15.

What measures is the company now taking to protect itself in the

:13:16.:13:30.

future? Just like in the physical world, cyber crime is a fact of life

:13:31.:13:34.

and there can be no concrete promises this will not happen again.

:13:35.:13:39.

They have spent a lot more on strengthening security and warning

:13:40.:13:43.

their customers about scam calls, people trying to get their account

:13:44.:13:48.

details. They have also brought in British aerospace to look at their

:13:49.:13:52.

security. British aerospace does cyber security protection. But I

:13:53.:13:57.

asked after three data attacks this year whether TalkTalk could really

:13:58.:14:01.

reassure its customers this would not happen again.

:14:02.:14:04.

TalkTalk takes our customers' security incredibly seriously.

:14:05.:14:06.

We have been spending more and more on security over the

:14:07.:14:09.

last two years, and a lot more over the course of the last three weeks.

:14:10.:14:12.

The reality is, we have to keep building our

:14:13.:14:16.

security walls higher and higher, because the cyber criminals are

:14:17.:14:18.

This is not just about TalkTalk, this is the crime of our era.

:14:19.:14:23.

We are committed to doing everything in our power to protect our

:14:24.:14:26.

What impact has this had on the company? Probably not as bad as they

:14:27.:14:40.

originally thought. When they first announced the attack they said all 4

:14:41.:14:44.

million of their customers could have been affected, they now say it

:14:45.:14:50.

is 150,000. Their share price is up 12% this morning. Lots of TalkTalk

:14:51.:14:56.

customers are tied into contracts of up to two years. Even if you want to

:14:57.:15:00.

leave, you could only do that by encouraging quite a penalty. They

:15:01.:15:08.

have hung on to customers in a way that has been more positive than

:15:09.:15:11.

when they originally announced the attack. ?30 million fine sounds like

:15:12.:15:15.

a lot of money. This is a company that is likely to make ?300 million

:15:16.:15:20.

of profit when it announces its full-year results next spring. You

:15:21.:15:25.

have got to keep that ?30 million in context. It is not that big a price

:15:26.:15:30.

and TalkTalk is a business and it is still performing. Lots of you

:15:31.:15:37.

getting in touch with us this morning about Victoria's diary.

:15:38.:15:42.

Linda on Facebook says, wishing you a speedy recovery.

:15:43.:15:58.

Victoria is bread, honest, and inspiring. -- braid. I hope the cold

:15:59.:16:15.

cap works for you. My husband does not have much hair left, so the cap

:16:16.:16:26.

is not necessary for him. John on Facebook says, thank you for

:16:27.:16:34.

sharing. Alison has e-mailed to say she has just watched the video diary

:16:35.:16:38.

and she would like to wish you all the best. Linda said, I am sure it

:16:39.:16:53.

will help people facing similar treatments in the future. That you

:16:54.:16:57.

are on behalf of all women, I wish you well and continued good health

:16:58.:17:01.

for the future. Thank you so much for your comments and Victoria

:17:02.:17:05.

More than half of all Muslims in the UK believe government policies have

:17:06.:17:12.

had a negative impact on their lives - we'll talk to a man who had to

:17:13.:17:16.

move home after being targeted by racists and a man involved in the

:17:17.:17:19.

government's counter extremism strategy. And we'll get reaction

:17:20.:17:21.

after a senior Russian athletics official

:17:22.:17:22.

acknowledged his country does have a problem with doping in sport.

:17:23.:17:36.

Positive news on unemployment - latest figures show it's fallen

:17:37.:17:38.

by more than one hundred thousand to its lowest level

:17:39.:17:40.

There was also a big rise in the number of people working full

:17:41.:17:45.

time, although average earnings didn't rise as much as expected.

:17:46.:17:52.

The Foreign Secretary has released a statement confirming

:17:53.:17:54.

British Grandfather Karl Andree has returned to the UK.

:17:55.:17:56.

Mr Andree was jailed in Saudi Arabia for 12 months

:17:57.:17:58.

and was also sentenced to 350 lashes, after he was allegedly

:17:59.:18:01.

In his statement, Philip Hammond said, "Karl was

:18:02.:18:04.

released from prison hours after my visit to Riyadh on 28th October.

:18:05.:18:07.

He has returned home to be reunited with his family".

:18:08.:18:18.

Two minutes' silence will be observed across the UK at 11 o'clock

:18:19.:18:28.

to remember the nation's war dead. I remember the lads I left behind in

:18:29.:18:34.

Normandy. They were very young boys and I still remembered today those

:18:35.:18:39.

boys I fought with. Remembrance Day, the 11th of the 11th, is very

:18:40.:18:41.

important to me. One of the heads of Russian

:18:42.:18:44.

athletics has acknowledged that the country does have

:18:45.:18:46.

a problem with doping. Mikahil Butov,

:18:47.:18:48.

the General Secretary of the All-Russia Athletic Federation,

:18:49.:18:50.

has responded to the report by an independent commission which

:18:51.:18:53.

accused his country's sportsmen Top top has confirmed this morning

:18:54.:19:10.

the cyber attack on its website will cost the company ?30 billion.

:19:11.:19:17.

Customers had their bank account numbers and sort code stolen. Let's

:19:18.:19:25.

catch up with all the spot. The IAAF president Lord Coe comes

:19:26.:19:30.

under heavy criticism from the head of UK athletics, Ed Warner, as he

:19:31.:19:36.

tries to clean up the sport. Sebastian Coe will chair a council

:19:37.:19:41.

meeting on Friday where Russia's feature will be decided.

:19:42.:19:43.

Sam Burgess did not have the stomach to fight for his future in rugby

:19:44.:19:48.

union, according to the Bath head coach Mike Ford. He arrived in

:19:49.:19:53.

Sydney yesterday after leaving bad just one year after a three-year

:19:54.:19:58.

deal. He said his heart was not in rugby union. Mark Robinson has been

:19:59.:20:05.

appointed head coach of the England's women's cricket team. He

:20:06.:20:07.

is scheduled to start his new role at the end of the year in time for

:20:08.:20:11.

the tour of South Africa in February.

:20:12.:20:20.

One of the heads of Russian athletics has acknowledged that

:20:21.:20:22.

the country does have a problem with doping.

:20:23.:20:24.

Mikahil Butov, the General Secretary of

:20:25.:20:25.

the All-Russia Athletic Federation, has responded to the report

:20:26.:20:28.

by an independent commission which accused his country's sportsmen

:20:29.:20:30.

The head of the Moscow laboratory has resigned.

:20:31.:20:39.

And of course we should change the mentality of many coaches,

:20:40.:20:46.

And we started to do it very, very hard.

:20:47.:20:51.

We organised some educational programmes.

:20:52.:20:56.

What is most important, me and the head coach

:20:57.:21:01.

and the interim president, we met with a lot of coaches,

:21:02.:21:05.

It is very important to direct every athlete with this explanation,

:21:06.:21:17.

with our vision of anti-doping intention is in Russia.

:21:18.:21:24.

British middle distance runner Hannah England says cheating Russian

:21:25.:21:32.

Here's Hannah winning silver in the 1500 metres at the World

:21:33.:21:41.

Championships in 2011 and gold in the National Championships in 2010.

:21:42.:21:47.

She was part of Team GB at London 2012 but failed to qualify

:21:48.:21:50.

for the 800 metres final, which was won by a Russian athlete

:21:51.:21:53.

In 2009 Hannah competed in the 1500 at the Indoor Championships

:21:54.:21:57.

which was won by another Russian athlete who failed a test

:21:58.:22:00.

We can speak to the British middle distance runner Hannah England who's

:22:01.:22:07.

You have lost out to Russian athletes as we were reporting

:22:08.:22:18.

there, just running through some of the key moments in your career. You

:22:19.:22:22.

have written an article describing what it was like. Talk us through

:22:23.:22:29.

that. I would like to say I have not been as hard done by competitor some

:22:30.:22:36.

of the other athletes. Jenny Meadows who has had her whole life and

:22:37.:22:40.

career affected by this. For me it was more as a developing athlete I

:22:41.:22:45.

would look at these Russian athletes and then, they are phenomenal, how

:22:46.:22:50.

can they be that good? I questioned by own ability to perform on a world

:22:51.:22:57.

stage against girls like that. It is awful to have unrealistic

:22:58.:22:59.

expectations put on you as an athlete by people who are cheating.

:23:00.:23:05.

You say that people around you would often say if a Russian athlete won

:23:06.:23:09.

it must be drugs, but you did not want to take that view. Why not? You

:23:10.:23:15.

do not want to carry that amount of negativity around with you. As an

:23:16.:23:20.

athlete there is an issue of coming out publicly and saying you question

:23:21.:23:23.

the performance without any evidence. That is tricky to do. Also

:23:24.:23:29.

personally in my day to day life, if you open up your mind to the

:23:30.:23:33.

questions of doping allegations and query that all the time, it is

:23:34.:23:48.

exhausting. For me that would be letting them win before you stood on

:23:49.:23:51.

the start line if I am exhausting myself thinking about that. I tried

:23:52.:23:54.

to put it to the back of my mind and concentrate on myself. Now this

:23:55.:23:56.

report has come out clearly detailing in so much depth what has

:23:57.:24:02.

gone on, how do you feel? Furious. It is massively disappointing. It is

:24:03.:24:07.

not a massive surprise, the extent, how high it has gone with the

:24:08.:24:12.

authorities in Russia. It is alarming and disappointing when

:24:13.:24:17.

there are so many of us who train hard in Britain and train clean and

:24:18.:24:20.

to see the depth of the regime in Russia and what has been going on it

:24:21.:24:27.

is upsetting. You were an athlete who question your ability, how did

:24:28.:24:37.

you feel? Really angry. I push myself every day. I have been out

:24:38.:24:41.

already this morning and I am striving to get the best out of my

:24:42.:24:45.

body. The idea that you are competing against someone who is

:24:46.:24:50.

cheating that system and is not being honest. I feel incredibly

:24:51.:24:54.

lucky that I am in a country that believes what they are doing and I

:24:55.:25:01.

can ignore what other athletes are doing. Do you think Russian athlete

:25:02.:25:05.

should be banned from the Olympics next year? Yes, I do. That is for

:25:06.:25:13.

politicians to decide, not the athletes. But when there is this

:25:14.:25:17.

ingrained problem and it has been shown to be so high up in the

:25:18.:25:21.

system, we do not have a choice. Unless they can show that they are

:25:22.:25:25.

really clean, but I do not think that is possible in the next nine

:25:26.:25:31.

months. What about the public and their overall trust in athletics? I

:25:32.:25:36.

think it is a shame people are seeing this as a story and not the

:25:37.:25:43.

hard work that is going on with the clean, British athletes we have got.

:25:44.:25:47.

It is incredibly important it gets sorted out. I hope fans can hold on

:25:48.:25:53.

there and see that we are going to keep the sport up. If you have ever

:25:54.:25:58.

been inspired by a British athlete, keep looking at that and keep being

:25:59.:26:03.

inspired by what your country does and keep enjoying athletics. Are you

:26:04.:26:08.

confident it can be cleaned up? What needs to be done? To be honest I do

:26:09.:26:16.

not know. Should there be lifetime bans? Absolutely, I have always

:26:17.:26:23.

thought that. I also have thought each level should be dealt with on a

:26:24.:26:30.

different level. Some people take things by mistake and others take

:26:31.:26:35.

things systematically like the rest of athletes, it should be done on a

:26:36.:26:41.

case by case basis. Sebastian Coe, what do you think about the way he

:26:42.:26:47.

is handling it? He has got an incredibly hard job at the moment.

:26:48.:26:52.

It is hard to have faith in the IAAF right now. It is hard to comment on

:26:53.:26:57.

it as well because of legal investigations that are ongoing.

:26:58.:27:01.

Lord Coe has got an incredibly hard job and I hope that he does it well.

:27:02.:27:08.

What about other measures, perhaps for the Olympics next year? Should

:27:09.:27:14.

there be mandatory blood testing? 100%. Why would you not blood test

:27:15.:27:19.

everybody? It should be a given regardless. Hannah England, thank

:27:20.:27:25.

More than half of all Muslims in the UK believe government policies have

:27:26.:27:30.

had a negative impact on their lives - that's according to a new report

:27:31.:27:34.

A study by the Islamic Human Rights Commission found many

:27:35.:27:37.

Muslims feel they have been treated with suspicion and mistrust.

:27:38.:27:40.

The report's authors say the government's security

:27:41.:27:41.

and anti-extremism measures, among other policies,

:27:42.:27:44.

have fuelled discrimination against Muslims in Britain.

:27:45.:27:47.

BBC Asian Network's Divya Talwar has this investigation.

:27:48.:27:49.

Iman is 19 and has recently converted to Islam.

:27:50.:27:56.

She hasn't told her family yet, so we are keeping her anonymous.

:27:57.:27:59.

Her college suspected she may have been radicalised and she was flagged

:28:00.:28:02.

up to officers and the government's counter extremism agenda, Prevent.

:28:03.:28:05.

Was there any change in your behaviour that may have

:28:06.:28:09.

Nothing that I think would trigger anything at all.

:28:10.:28:15.

But yeah, I guess, that was the reason I started

:28:16.:28:20.

wearing a hijab and that was enough for them to contact Prevent.

:28:21.:28:23.

Under new anti-terrorism laws teachers now have a duty

:28:24.:28:27.

to report students they suspect are at risk of radicalisation.

:28:28.:28:30.

Iman believes the government is alienating Muslim students.

:28:31.:28:34.

Normal misguided teenagers, like a lot of us are, when they get angry

:28:35.:28:37.

and frustrated with things, they will turn to people for support, and

:28:38.:28:41.

if the only support they have are those who are extremists,

:28:42.:28:43.

then they are pushing them into the hands of what they are trying

:28:44.:28:46.

The Islamic Human Rights Commission has been looking

:28:47.:28:51.

into discrimination against Muslims in Britain for nearly two decades.

:28:52.:28:55.

A survey they carried out of more than 1700 Muslims living

:28:56.:28:58.

in the UK found more than half believed government policies

:28:59.:29:02.

like those countering extremism had a negative impact on them.

:29:03.:29:06.

The impact on government policies, in particular those related to

:29:07.:29:11.

security but not solely, have really had an impact

:29:12.:29:14.

And I don't think just silencing them from the point of view

:29:15.:29:21.

Even to do things like report anti-Muslim hatred.

:29:22.:29:27.

Almost 60% of Muslims questioned believed they

:29:28.:29:32.

With new duties even on nurseries to look out

:29:33.:29:37.

for signs of radicalisation, some parents fear children need

:29:38.:29:39.

So I am scared of things we can talk about.

:29:40.:29:46.

Recently, we were involved in a Syrian fundraiser.

:29:47.:29:51.

She said, Mummy one day we will go to Syria and we will see my toys,

:29:52.:29:55.

"We will see the girl who has my toys."

:29:56.:29:59.

In a statement, the Home Office said the government is committed to

:30:00.:30:06.

tackling anti-Muslim hatred and the Prevent agenda is about

:30:07.:30:08.

protecting those who might be vulnerable to radicalisation.

:30:09.:30:13.

But the worry in some Muslim communities is new measures to

:30:14.:30:16.

combat extremism will only alienate and demonise them.

:30:17.:30:42.

That was presented by Divya Talwar in collaboration with

:30:43.:30:44.

If you want to watch - or share - the full film you can find it on our

:30:45.:30:49.

So let's talk now to Murad Alam, a Muslim father of two,

:30:50.:30:52.

his family had to move home after being targeted by racists.

:30:53.:30:55.

In Leeds, Adam Walker from the Ahmadiyya Muslim Association

:30:56.:30:57.

who helped the government form its counter extremism strategy.

:30:58.:31:00.

And Azad Ali, from the organisation MEND, that stands for

:31:01.:31:02.

Thank you all for joining us. Murad first of all, your family had to

:31:03.:31:07.

move house after being targeted by racists. What happened? We had a

:31:08.:31:09.

knock on the door one night, somebody had left a wooden cross

:31:10.:31:13.

with ham and pork tied to it. I thought it was quite disgusting at

:31:14.:31:17.

the time. My wife and children were racially abused in the street.

:31:18.:31:22.

Someone cut the broadband line, the telephone line, which I thought was

:31:23.:31:31.

very sinister. Racial graffiti sprayed outside the house. My child

:31:32.:31:35.

was punched in Bing town centre. Quite a few racist incidents. What

:31:36.:31:41.

do you think trigger that? Just fear, really. There were not any

:31:42.:31:44.

Muslim families in the area, they don't know any Muslims, my wife was

:31:45.:31:51.

visibly a Muslim, she wore a standard headscarf, not to cover her

:31:52.:31:54.

face anything, people are just scared of what they don't know. Did

:31:55.:31:59.

it start to happen after you move to a new neighbourhood? We moved to the

:32:00.:32:02.

neighbourhood of Bingham just outside Nottingham after living

:32:03.:32:13.

elsewhere. The report says that the government's

:32:14.:32:17.

I do believe that is the case. They are trying to bring in Draconian

:32:18.:32:22.

laws recently to look at internet history. People here that and they

:32:23.:32:27.

think we don't want this. Then they look for someone to blame. To show

:32:28.:32:32.

we blame it on, the terrorists, who are the terrorists? The Muslims. It

:32:33.:32:35.

is a train of thought I'm getting from a lot of people at the moment.

:32:36.:32:40.

Ad, you are from the foundation who had input into the government's

:32:41.:32:44.

counter extremism policy. Do you think that policy may have helped to

:32:45.:32:49.

fuel the scrum and nation? I think the policy is far more nuanced than

:32:50.:32:53.

that. The Muslim community has supported some of the core

:32:54.:32:59.

principles. For examples and new Islamophobia laws coming into place

:33:00.:33:03.

that looks to tackle irrational fear of Muslims and criminalise

:33:04.:33:06.

aggression, verbal and threatening behaviour, towards Muslims is

:33:07.:33:10.

something that could help people that face this sort of

:33:11.:33:14.

discrimination. So I'm not sure if it has, or certainly the new changes

:33:15.:33:18.

that are coming into place, particularly looking with dealing

:33:19.:33:23.

both with Muslim extremists who are a minority and also the minority of

:33:24.:33:26.

right wing extremists as well. That should certainly help with people in

:33:27.:33:31.

school, people generally, but a case of watch this space and see how it

:33:32.:33:37.

is permitted. When there is a policy of telling people to report any

:33:38.:33:41.

concerns that they have, if they see a change of behaviour or anything

:33:42.:33:45.

that might give rise to concerns, and then you hear from an -- then

:33:46.:33:57.

here from Iman in our film who was reported after she started wearing a

:33:58.:34:12.

Jaye -- a jihab. There is a lot more that needs to be added to the

:34:13.:34:16.

current laws. People should not be wrong leader scrimmage against. The

:34:17.:34:19.

principle should be let the government just how it applies laws.

:34:20.:34:28.

I would certainly agree with that. Azad, does the government have a

:34:29.:34:33.

fine line to tread, to be mindful of the sensitivities around that? Yes,

:34:34.:34:38.

I think the government's approach at the moment is very confused and is

:34:39.:34:43.

confusing the public. What you report showed is that it is having a

:34:44.:34:50.

disproportionate and made a perfect on the Muslim community. If you look

:34:51.:34:54.

at Prevent, and some of the definition of it, democracy is a key

:34:55.:34:59.

value. The government is saying democracy it is an important value

:35:00.:35:02.

and then it invites someone who led a coup in Egypt to number ten. So

:35:03.:35:06.

all of these confusing messages are problematic. I think the government

:35:07.:35:14.

isn't also clear on what it is trying to deal with. Is it trying to

:35:15.:35:24.

deal with a crime. Or is it trying to define and change people's

:35:25.:35:29.

behaviour. That is what a lot of people are concerned about. It is

:35:30.:35:36.

really important for all of us in society to understand what is being

:35:37.:35:39.

impacted is all of our liberties. If I can be given one minute to give

:35:40.:35:43.

you an example, we have recently had a case where a child was reported to

:35:44.:35:48.

children's services because he said my father went to Saudi Arabia and

:35:49.:35:49.

it wasn't a my father went to Saudi Arabia and

:35:50.:35:54.

apparently went on a demonstration. His mother explained that,

:35:55.:35:55.

apparently went on a demonstration. brother -- my husband did go to

:35:56.:35:59.

Saudi Arabia, it was a pilgrimage, brother -- my husband did go to

:36:00.:36:02.

but my son only went to a football match. But that son was reported to

:36:03.:36:10.

a Prevent programme. Children's services were called up, and the

:36:11.:36:14.

parents were told your child will be on our register. How does that make

:36:15.:36:18.

a family feel, how does that make a mother and a father feel? How are

:36:19.:36:24.

they going to feel, I am sending my son to school, my daughter to

:36:25.:36:27.

school, if they talk about Islam, are they going to get reported? I

:36:28.:36:32.

want to get Adam's thoughts on that specific case. That specific case I

:36:33.:36:38.

want to get Adam's thoughts on that would say it is completely wrong and

:36:39.:36:40.

there are clearly ethical problems with how far a nurse or a public

:36:41.:36:47.

servant can be expected to do the job of the police and those spaces

:36:48.:36:52.

that need to be more defined. I think it is problematic when we look

:36:53.:36:54.

at this kind of government strategy as though it is a single strategy

:36:55.:36:59.

and just one entity. It comprises of many different elements. For

:37:00.:37:04.

example, I don't want my child to be exposed in a teaching environment to

:37:05.:37:08.

someone who used to be an extremist. No one would disagree with that. I

:37:09.:37:12.

want my children to be safe from right-wing extremists and also

:37:13.:37:15.

teachers with right wing leanings. We have seen more and more cases of

:37:16.:37:19.

this in schools increasingly everyday. These are elements of the

:37:20.:37:26.

law that are productive. Looking at the online propaganda extremists use

:37:27.:37:30.

is something very worthwhile. I do agree there needs to be much more

:37:31.:37:35.

definition. We can't complete issues. When you talk about heads of

:37:36.:37:38.

states, there are heads of states that come from every single week

:37:39.:37:42.

there are protests regarding every different heads of states that

:37:43.:37:45.

come, many completely unrelated to Islam Feruz. Are you saying it is OK

:37:46.:37:52.

to invite someone that led a coup, that remove the only democratic

:37:53.:37:56.

government in Egypt, is it OK? Then what is the conclusion here? Adam,

:37:57.:38:05.

whilst I totally agree with you... When we look at these sorts of

:38:06.:38:09.

issues, when we look at what example internet laws that come into play,

:38:10.:38:13.

these are things that will impact everybody, these are issues that all

:38:14.:38:19.

Brits have, not just Muslims. Gentlemen, I am really sorry, we are

:38:20.:38:23.

right out of time. At thank you all very much. We

:38:24.:38:28.

We asked to talk to someone from the Home Office ahead of this interview

:38:29.:38:31.

The Home Office did, however, send us this statement:

:38:32.:39:09.

Lots and lots of you still getting in touch with us about Victoria's

:39:10.:39:15.

diary, following her first chemotherapy session. I just want to

:39:16.:39:17.

bring you some more of your comments because so many of your getting in

:39:18.:39:21.

touch. David has treated the same making yourself the story in order

:39:22.:39:25.

to shed light on a social darkness for others is the height of

:39:26.:39:29.

professionalism and bravery. Rose on Twitter. So touching, thank you, you

:39:30.:39:34.

are so brave. Steve has e-mailed, you are a true legend, I am a DJ and

:39:35.:39:38.

just astounded at your bravery for videoing what has happened to you. I

:39:39.:39:42.

lost my parents to cancer when I was 22 and 26 and had a scare myself

:39:43.:39:47.

when I was 35. It was one of the most scary thing is I have ever gone

:39:48.:39:50.

through in my life. I would be honoured to have you as a friend on

:39:51.:39:55.

here and Facebook too if you are OK with that. I do a lot of work with

:39:56.:39:58.

cancers. Heidi has e-mailed to say what a

:39:59.:40:08.

selfless thing to do, so much stigma and mystery surrounding cancer that

:40:09.:40:11.

all we can do is quick with fear in the face of it. You're brave and

:40:12.:40:15.

open account of your story is going a long way to demystify this awful

:40:16.:40:18.

disease and make it seem just a process. Thank you so much,

:40:19.:40:22.

Victoria, keep on keeping on. Best wishes. Kim has text at all the best

:40:23.:40:29.

for you, off tangent, but I loved the nail polish. Much love. A tweet

:40:30.:40:36.

from Kitty, what a courageous woman, giving people a valuable insight

:40:37.:40:40.

into her chemotherapy sessions. Hannah has treated the video on BBC

:40:41.:40:45.

news is so inspiring, and Bill has e-mailed, well done Victoria. My

:40:46.:40:49.

wife went through five years of treatment and had different sentence

:40:50.:40:52.

from each treatment, didn't lose her hair until the last one. You are

:40:53.:40:56.

doing a great job showing it as it is. Well done to you all. Well

:40:57.:41:03.

the fourth Republican debate was supposed to be against romp against

:41:04.:41:07.

Carson but the standout performance was not even a candidate, step

:41:08.:41:13.

forward Gerard Baker, also known as the British guy, the guy with their

:41:14.:41:16.

hair or least flatteringly of all, Humpty Dumpty. Gerard Baker is one

:41:17.:41:23.

of the people moderating this debate. The expectation was that the

:41:24.:41:28.

focus was going to be on Trump against Carson, two of the

:41:29.:41:33.

candidates. But as you mentioned, on twitter it was a different

:41:34.:41:36.

situation. Everyone was wondering where is he from? Is he British. The

:41:37.:41:43.

question about him, is Gerard Baker British, was trending on twitter, a

:41:44.:41:47.

lot of people asking about his accent. If you look at Google

:41:48.:41:49.

trends, the top questions asked about him were where is Gerard Baker

:41:50.:41:56.

from, who is Gerard Baker, is he a US citizen, how old is Gerard Baker

:41:57.:42:01.

and is Gerard Baker British? What are people asking lots of questions.

:42:02.:42:07.

This is a perfect example where you have an audience watching a news

:42:08.:42:11.

event, and this is the great example of the second screen experience

:42:12.:42:14.

because they are on their smartphones or tablets, and asking

:42:15.:42:16.

lots of other questions while they are watching the debate. You saw

:42:17.:42:21.

that happen actually during the UK general election here on the Google

:42:22.:42:26.

trends when the leaders debates were taking place, a lot of people were

:42:27.:42:33.

asking what age is Nicola Sturgeon, what height is David Cameron and so

:42:34.:42:37.

on. It'll have an appetite for information. Thank you very much.

:42:38.:42:40.

Victoria's back tomorrow, and will bring you an interview with

:42:41.:42:40.

the father of one of the people killed in the germanwings air crash,

:42:41.:42:41.

where the pilot deliberately crashed the plane, killing 150 people.

:42:42.:42:44.

Don't forget, you can continue to watch Victoria's video diary on the

:42:45.:42:47.

Thank you for your company today, and for all your messages.

:42:48.:42:50.

I'm here today to tell you the truth.

:42:51.:43:04.

Are you sure you want to continue down this road?

:43:05.:43:06.

Lots of people think they have nothing to lose.

:43:07.:43:09.

They just haven't thought it through.

:43:10.:43:11.

You have the very particular stink of a man out of his depth.

:43:12.:43:15.

You blunder further into a situation you simply do not understand.

:43:16.:43:19.

The programme hears from veterans about the importance of Armistice Day to them.

Victoria Derbyshire talks frankly about her latest bout of cancer treatment.

A Muslim woman opens up about the abuse she faces in her day-to-day life.