17/06/2016 Victoria Derbyshire


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17/06/2016

Politicians, friends and the public pay tribute to MP Jo Cox who was killed on Thursday. Russian athletes await a decision on being able to compete in Rio.


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Vigils have been held to remember the murdered Labour MP Jo Cox.

:00:09.:00:14.

In London, MPs laid flowers and lit candles outside Parliament.

:00:15.:00:18.

And in the village of Birstall where she was shot and stabbed

:00:19.:00:21.

in the street, hundreds packed into the parish church.

:00:22.:00:28.

She was not for money or power, she was a real woman.

:00:29.:00:42.

I am Jane Hill in Birstall where constituents of Jo Cox have been

:00:43.:00:48.

arriving all morning to lay flowers. We will be talking to local people.

:00:49.:00:53.

Also this morning, should Russian track-and-field athletes be allowed

:00:54.:00:55.

As athletics chiefs meet to decide, we'll ask British

:00:56.:00:59.

athletes what they think, following Russia's doping scandal.

:01:00.:01:04.

Here in Paris, we're looking back at an epic day for the Home Nations

:01:05.:01:08.

as England beat Wales, and Northern Ireland

:01:09.:01:12.

send their travelling fans delirious with victory over Ukraine.

:01:13.:01:15.

All three sides afre well placed to make it into the last 16

:01:16.:01:18.

Welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning

:01:19.:01:35.

with reaction throughout the next two hours to the murder of Jo Cox.

:01:36.:01:40.

A little later we'll be hearing from some of her closest colleagues

:01:41.:01:45.

and we'll be asking whether security concerns will now mean our

:01:46.:01:48.

relationship with our local MPs will have to change.

:01:49.:01:51.

Do get in touch on all the stories we're talking

:01:52.:02:00.

about this morning - use the hashtag #victorialive

:02:01.:02:03.

and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.

:02:04.:02:06.

Let's go back to Jane Hill in Birstall. Hello from Birstall, less

:02:07.:02:13.

than ten miles from Leeds, a small market town where you really get the

:02:14.:02:18.

sense that people still can't quite believe that British MP has lost her

:02:19.:02:25.

life. All morning we have been standing here by one of the focal

:02:26.:02:29.

points of the town, the local memorial here, to Joseph Priestley.

:02:30.:02:35.

I have been watching people coming, consistently, to lay flowers. A lady

:02:36.:02:41.

arrived a little while ago with her young daughter, for example, and she

:02:42.:02:44.

said she just wanted to pay her respects. Jo Cox was an MP who

:02:45.:02:52.

helped her, she had cause to go to one of her regular sessions with the

:02:53.:02:56.

public, she wanted help for a problem, and she was very helpful

:02:57.:03:01.

and she wanted to lay flowers for that reason. She particularly

:03:02.:03:04.

remembered that Jo Cox leaves behind her two small children. This lady

:03:05.:03:10.

said, I have children of a similar age myself, and was clearly very

:03:11.:03:14.

upset at the thought of children of such a young age no longer having

:03:15.:03:19.

their mother around. There are so many similar sentiments like that

:03:20.:03:25.

here in this market town. The strength of feeling was illustrated

:03:26.:03:28.

last night with a vigil in a nearby church. It was packed out with

:03:29.:03:34.

hundreds of people attending to remember a much loved local MP. This

:03:35.:03:39.

report from our correspondent Fiona Trott.

:03:40.:03:43.

From all backgrounds and all faiths, they came together

:03:44.:03:45.

A woman who was killed while working for them,

:03:46.:03:52.

She was a people person, she was for us.

:03:53.:03:59.

She had so much warmth and compassion.

:04:00.:04:12.

Police say Jo Cox was stabbed and shot near Birstall village library.

:04:13.:04:20.

She was holding a drop-in session for her local constituents.

:04:21.:04:22.

A guy was bent over the woman, I could see her legs sticking out.

:04:23.:04:26.

The words I heard him say was, Britain first or put Britain first,

:04:27.:04:33.

I can't say exactly what it was, but definitely Britain first

:04:34.:04:35.

The BBC understands the man being arrested is called The BBC

:04:36.:04:42.

understands the man being arrested is called Tommy Mair,

:04:43.:04:45.

Jo Cox was more than an MP, she was a wife and mother.

:04:46.:04:53.

In a statement her husband Brendan Cox said...

:04:54.:05:10.

The very heart of this West Yorkshire village remains

:05:11.:05:12.

And the villagers within it are overcome with grief.

:05:13.:05:26.

We will talk to some local people in the next few minutes but first let's

:05:27.:05:33.

get the thoughts of Fiona Trott, because you have been here since the

:05:34.:05:38.

shocking news emerged, and we make no apology for continuing to use the

:05:39.:05:42.

word shock? That's right, look at all of the flowers that people have

:05:43.:05:46.

been laying since yesterday afternoon, and when you walk around

:05:47.:05:50.

in the local community, the cost Jo Cox was such an important member of

:05:51.:05:55.

the community, she was so well liked and it's not difficult to find

:05:56.:06:00.

someone who says that they were helped or inspired by her. A lady in

:06:01.:06:05.

the hairdressers yesterday said that she had a particular problem and got

:06:06.:06:09.

to know Jo Cox well and realised they had children of the same age,

:06:10.:06:15.

she felt the family's loss. Another woman who was buying flowers at the

:06:16.:06:19.

local market to bring to the memorial said that they voted for Jo

:06:20.:06:24.

Cox and gave her a voice. That voice has been silenced. You get the

:06:25.:06:28.

impression that this MP was interested in them and she

:06:29.:06:32.

represented their interests. That is something that people are finding it

:06:33.:06:36.

hard to come to terms with this morning. A brief thought as well

:06:37.:06:40.

about the investigation and how much do we now at this stage? A

:06:41.:06:44.

52-year-old man is still being questioned by the police. He was

:06:45.:06:48.

named locally as Tommy Mair but that has not been confirmed by police. We

:06:49.:06:52.

understand the house where he lives has a police presence and it was

:06:53.:06:57.

searched yesterday. When you look around the village this morning I'm

:06:58.:07:00.

surprised there is still a huge cordon around the heart

:07:01.:07:13.

of the Market Square. It is still in place. None of it has been lifted

:07:14.:07:17.

overnight and it's difficult to get into the village square. Still a

:07:18.:07:19.

huge police presence with at least three or four police vans by the

:07:20.:07:22.

library where this shooting happened yesterday. The 52-year-old man is

:07:23.:07:24.

still being questioned at the moment. And it's hard not to be

:07:25.:07:30.

simplistic at the time I guess, but it is, even I am struck by almost

:07:31.:07:35.

the look on peoples faces and the fact people are so overwhelmed, the

:07:36.:07:40.

fact that this just isn't meant to happen in Britain, this is not a

:07:41.:07:43.

nation where people have ready access to firearms, and in terms of

:07:44.:07:50.

democracy, we are built on the notion that MPs have face-to-face

:07:51.:07:54.

contact with constituents and we can see how close we are to the library

:07:55.:07:58.

where Jo Cox would have held her surgery, where she would have

:07:59.:08:02.

readily met people. That is why there are so many flowers here today

:08:03.:08:06.

and we can't stress enough how untoward, how bizarre this turn of

:08:07.:08:12.

events is to local people? And MPs should be able to do that, shouldn't

:08:13.:08:16.

they? They should be accessible to their constituents and yet we heard

:08:17.:08:22.

from Rachel Reeves, another local MP, who said her surgery was closed,

:08:23.:08:27.

safety was a concern. I spoke to one of the parents yesterday collecting

:08:28.:08:32.

his son from school, primary school, that was in lockdown yesterday,

:08:33.:08:36.

again, something you don't expect to hear about in Britain. He was

:08:37.:08:41.

concerned about his child. They had no idea what was going on. Even he

:08:42.:08:45.

said that it is not something you expect here, it is difficult for

:08:46.:08:49.

people here to come to terms with it. Thank you very much for now. We

:08:50.:08:53.

will be speaking with Fiona throughout the day. It is very

:08:54.:09:00.

sobering and very moving, to read the tributes on the flowers on the

:09:01.:09:05.

memorial behind me. To give you just one example, someone has written

:09:06.:09:15.

simply, why? You lived for others. We will talk more about Jo Cox's

:09:16.:09:19.

international approach and international work in a few minutes.

:09:20.:09:29.

Hisham Runs a local cafe right in the heart of the town. Regrettably,

:09:30.:09:37.

you saw a lot of what happened yesterday afternoon? Yes. I was in

:09:38.:09:46.

the cafe yesterday, and I was talking to some customers having

:09:47.:09:51.

their lunch. We were talking about the pre-match of England and Wales.

:09:52.:09:57.

And the topics around that. Premier League, stuff like that. All of a

:09:58.:10:06.

sudden I could see a river of people going down market Street, screaming

:10:07.:10:16.

and shouting. It is the scene that you see in Spain running after a

:10:17.:10:27.

Bulls. -- bull. It is not a normal scene that you see everyday. We got

:10:28.:10:33.

out. In the back of my mind, something very shocking has

:10:34.:10:38.

happened. I got out and I saw a guy with a baseball cap, dirty white.

:10:39.:10:51.

And an Asian guy tried to tackle him, to stop him. There was a row of

:10:52.:10:59.

cars and an empty space. And he was hitting and shoving him in that

:11:00.:11:05.

area, and pulling at something. I thought he was arguing with his wife

:11:06.:11:13.

or something. We thought it was just a man and wife dispute. So we went

:11:14.:11:17.

back. When we heard back we heard another big screen like in a

:11:18.:11:23.

stadium. We got out again, and this time people were screaming, no!

:11:24.:11:29.

Things like that. We got even further and the guy pulls his hand

:11:30.:11:38.

back and tries to grab the gun, it was probably that big. The size of

:11:39.:11:50.

an average cucumber. It looked like the beginning of a walking stick. It

:11:51.:11:56.

was an old-fashioned gun. Probably handmade, makeshift. It was maybe a

:11:57.:12:04.

vintage shot gun. Something of that type. Not a modern firearm. Anyway,

:12:05.:12:15.

all of a sudden he fires a shot and we just ducked and went into the

:12:16.:12:20.

restaurant. As we entered, there was a second shot, and between the first

:12:21.:12:24.

and second there was about three or four seconds, not more than five

:12:25.:12:29.

seconds. We waited about 30 seconds and went out again and as I went

:12:30.:12:34.

close, very close, the guy disappeared in the thing. As the

:12:35.:12:40.

hours passed and you realise that it was your local MP who had lost her

:12:41.:12:45.

life, give us a sense of what went through your mind and what people

:12:46.:12:55.

were saying. Jo is a great loss. We found out that after her death, I

:12:56.:12:58.

did not know all of her work, but especially she had a ripple effect

:12:59.:13:06.

internationally now, because her work was really happy aspect of an

:13:07.:13:18.

international sound, she was. An the war, helping the children of Syria,

:13:19.:13:24.

she spoke about the Russians not entering into Syria and not bombing

:13:25.:13:31.

there. She campaigned for several charities. In slavery and all sorts

:13:32.:13:34.

of stuff, and she worked with the community. You know, security issues

:13:35.:13:43.

and all sorts of stuff. That she was handling. She handled it very well.

:13:44.:13:49.

I think Jo has left an unfinished job. I think peace and peace, she

:13:50.:13:56.

was such a peaceful lady, she has left two kids and a husband. It's a

:13:57.:14:04.

difficult day for everybody here, I realise that. We must let you go. We

:14:05.:14:11.

came together for the Labour elections. It's a great loss. Thank

:14:12.:14:15.

you very much indeed, reflecting very much the view of so many people

:14:16.:14:22.

here and a lot of what Hicham, who owns a local cafe, has been echoed

:14:23.:14:27.

in the tributes and cards that people have written with their

:14:28.:14:30.

flowers. I mentioned the vigil last night, the local church was packed

:14:31.:14:35.

with people remembering Jo Cox and giving thanks for all her work. The

:14:36.:14:40.

Bishop of Huddersfield is with me. You spoke at last night's vigil. The

:14:41.:14:47.

right Reverend Jonathan Gibbs. What are your thoughts at this extremely

:14:48.:14:51.

difficult time for the community? Yesterday was an enormous shock for

:14:52.:14:55.

everybody. None of us could believe the news as it began to filter

:14:56.:14:59.

through, and I think last night it was the community coming together in

:15:00.:15:04.

shock, there were three or 400 people there, wonderful

:15:05.:15:06.

representation from across the community and faith groups, and many

:15:07.:15:11.

of our political representatives, for whom it was an enormously

:15:12.:15:15.

difficult occasion. The community needed to come together and the

:15:16.:15:18.

church was able to provide a space for people to begin to grieve.

:15:19.:15:23.

And people have been signing a Book of Remembrance, and I noticed that

:15:24.:15:28.

one of the local churches was pointing out that people of all

:15:29.:15:31.

faiths and none have been signing the book. The point is that Jo Cox

:15:32.:15:37.

was a hard-working MP, and that is what unites people. Absolutely, she

:15:38.:15:41.

was a woman of this community, she was born here, she went to school

:15:42.:15:46.

here, she wanted to serve the people of the community in which she grew

:15:47.:15:54.

up. Her family still live here, her parents, and the affection and

:15:55.:15:56.

respect in which he was held across different communities is very clear.

:15:57.:15:59.

I was able to speak to some of our Muslim friends and brothers last

:16:00.:16:02.

night, representing their community, and they spoke of her with enormous

:16:03.:16:06.

warmth. She was held in great affection and with great respect

:16:07.:16:10.

right across the communities, and she will be terribly missed. The

:16:11.:16:14.

fact that she went to Westminster to represent the area she grew up in,

:16:15.:16:18.

that is actually quite unusual in politics, and I get the sense that

:16:19.:16:24.

was hugely important to her and, therefore, to your worshippers, her

:16:25.:16:28.

constituents. Absolutely, I mean it is something very special, and she

:16:29.:16:32.

went into politics with a passion, wanting to make a difference,

:16:33.:16:36.

wanting to make a difference for the people of this community. I know,

:16:37.:16:40.

from talking with people today, that she would be willing to stop and

:16:41.:16:44.

listen and hear concerns. I saw that. One minutes playing with their

:16:45.:16:48.

children on the floor after a church service, then get in up and talking

:16:49.:16:56.

to people and engaging with people. She was a woman of passion and

:16:57.:16:58.

compassion for the people she served, especially in this community

:16:59.:17:01.

which she so loved. What will your role be in the coming days? There

:17:02.:17:06.

are still difficult days ahead, but particularly for her family, but for

:17:07.:17:11.

local people as well. Sure. Obviously, in terms of ministering

:17:12.:17:14.

to the family has cells, her parents live in one of the neighbouring

:17:15.:17:19.

villages, they are connected with the local church, and they are

:17:20.:17:24.

involved in caring for them. One of the league leaders worked with Jo

:17:25.:17:27.

and was with her when she died, so the Church is very much involved in

:17:28.:17:32.

supporting them. We offered a place for people to come together and

:17:33.:17:36.

grieve, and we will continue to offer that space, because there will

:17:37.:17:40.

be a range of different emotions going on - shock and sadness, and

:17:41.:17:45.

Bobley Anderson too, and we need to support one another through this

:17:46.:17:50.

very difficult time. -- and probably anger too. Thank you for your time,

:17:51.:17:58.

the Bishop of Huddersfield. So much of what the bishop was saying there

:17:59.:18:04.

is reflected in these remembrances on the flowers behind me. To leave

:18:05.:18:08.

you with one final thought, Naseem, who laid flowers here, says simply,

:18:09.:18:14.

we have lost one of the good ones. From here in Birstall in Yorkshire,

:18:15.:18:21.

for now, it is back to the studio. Lots of you getting in touch with

:18:22.:18:26.

your tributes to Jo Cox, James on Facebook, rest in peace, Jo, you

:18:27.:18:30.

were an inspiration and will never be forgotten for the good work you

:18:31.:18:34.

have done, always full of passion, you will be sadly missed. My

:18:35.:18:38.

thoughts and prayers to a family and friends in this tragic time. Anthony

:18:39.:18:42.

on Facebook, so sorry to hear about Jo Cox, this is too sad for words.

:18:43.:18:49.

Philip said, I cannot recall being so upset at the death of someone I

:18:50.:18:52.

never met, the most decent people killed by hatred. May his soul rest

:18:53.:18:57.

in peace. Mike has texted, to honour and respect the memory of such a

:18:58.:19:01.

promising young lass and one of our own MPs, both sides of the

:19:02.:19:04.

referendum must now clean up their campaigns, being as honest and open

:19:05.:19:10.

as young Jo Cox was. And from John, a very tragic loss of life. Lots of

:19:11.:19:15.

tribute being paid to Jo Cox, not just in Britain, but from around the

:19:16.:19:19.

world and in her constituency hundreds of local people came

:19:20.:19:22.

together to remember their MP, who they say never forgot that she had

:19:23.:19:25.

been elected to serve their constituents.

:19:26.:19:29.

She were lovely, weren't she? Yeah, really lovely.

:19:30.:19:31.

Not what we expected, was she? No.

:19:32.:19:33.

Because we did expect, grammar school, Cambridge,

:19:34.:19:35.

we thought, oh God, she's going to be a snob.

:19:36.:19:37.

But no, far from it. Absolutely lovely.

:19:38.:19:39.

I wrote to her a few times, actually.

:19:40.:19:41.

She always replied, and she was so approachable.

:19:42.:19:52.

Candles were lit outside Westminster, the Prime Minister said

:19:53.:19:58.

Parliament had lost a great start, and Jeremy Corbyn led tributes,

:19:59.:20:01.

praising her deep commitment to humanity.

:20:02.:20:04.

A real servant of democracy in every way one could want or imagine.

:20:05.:20:07.

A wonderful woman, parliamentarian, mother, wife.

:20:08.:20:10.

Her life has been taken through an act of warped hatred.

:20:11.:20:14.

Jo fought to help the refugees from the Syrian civil war.

:20:15.:20:22.

She gave a voice to those whose cry for help

:20:23.:20:25.

and I know it contributed to a change in policy.

:20:26.:20:34.

She will never know how many lives she helped to transform.

:20:35.:20:42.

The Leeds Central MP, Hilary Benn,

:20:43.:20:45.

who's a long-time friend, tweeted, "May you rest eternal, Jo."

:20:46.:20:49.

"We were all so proud to have known you and to call you our friend."

:20:50.:20:53.

US presidential contender Hillary Clinton

:20:54.:20:58.

has also spoken of a "cruel and terrible assassination".

:20:59.:21:01.

The American Secretary of State said the attack

:21:02.:21:03.

was "an assault on everybody who cares about democracy".

:21:04.:21:07.

Canadian MP Nathan Cullen, who's a friend of Jo Cox,

:21:08.:21:09.

Jo Cox used her voice for those who had none.

:21:10.:21:15.

She dedicated her passion to those who needed it most,

:21:16.:21:18.

and she harnessed her limitless love,

:21:19.:21:20.

even and especially for those who allowed hate to consume them.

:21:21.:21:24.

Her husband Brendan said it beautifully, she would have wanted

:21:25.:21:29.

two things above all else to happen now,

:21:30.:21:32.

that our children are bathed in love,

:21:33.:21:38.

and that we all unite to fight

:21:39.:21:40.

against the hatred that killed her.

:21:41.:21:42.

To Brendan and Jo's beautiful children, we express our

:21:43.:21:44.

deepest condolences. Excuse me.

:21:45.:21:46.

Let's talk to two of her friends and Labour colleagues now.

:21:47.:21:49.

Anna Turley became an MP at the same time as Jo last year.

:21:50.:21:52.

And Clive Betts is the MP for Sheffield South East.

:21:53.:21:58.

Anna, you started in Parliament with Jo after last year's

:21:59.:22:00.

general election and formed quite a bond?

:22:01.:22:06.

It is heartbreaking, you look at these photographs of this vibrant

:22:07.:22:11.

woman and cannot believe it has happened. Exactly, it is just so

:22:12.:22:15.

difficult to comprehend and to process, such an act of unspeakable

:22:16.:22:20.

wickedness and hatred to somebody who was such a good soul, such a

:22:21.:22:25.

kind heart, so compassionate, so decent. Those smiling pictures you

:22:26.:22:28.

see in the paper, that is what we saw every day with Jo, she always

:22:29.:22:35.

smiled, always bundles of energy, effervescent, she fizzed with

:22:36.:22:39.

energy, passion and commitment. She was just inspiring, someone you

:22:40.:22:43.

looked up to unfold, wow, she is making a difference, and impact on

:22:44.:22:49.

the world. -- and thought. She will be held in so much honour and esteem

:22:50.:22:53.

by her legs in parliament, but all of our hearts go out to her family,

:22:54.:22:58.

who have lost the most wonderful mother and wife, and we think of

:22:59.:23:03.

them today. You talk about someone who had such an impact, having only

:23:04.:23:07.

been an MP for a year, but she clearly shone out. What was the

:23:08.:23:11.

first that you came across, the first time you came across her?

:23:12.:23:20.

Well, I mean, I had met her before, but when she stood out for me

:23:21.:23:23.

exceptionally was when she got agent questions on issues like Syria and

:23:24.:23:27.

Iraq Yuji. We have it in your programme about what a brilliant

:23:28.:23:33.

constituency MP she was. -- and refugees. But she was a global

:23:34.:23:37.

citizen who strove to leave the world a better place than she

:23:38.:23:41.

founded, and that inspired as the most. I think of a massive smile,

:23:42.:23:45.

she seemed to have more hours in the day than everybody else. I remember

:23:46.:23:48.

going to have bowed once for an evening dinner, and we got back

:23:49.:23:54.

late, and you have prepared a three course meal. -- back to her boat. We

:23:55.:24:04.

laughed at the time and called her superwoman, she was phenomenal, I do

:24:05.:24:08.

not know how she did it. All we can do to pay tribute is to try to take

:24:09.:24:12.

forward the issues that she wanted us to take on, to live with love, to

:24:13.:24:16.

tackle bigotry and hatred and hostility where ever we see it,

:24:17.:24:20.

particularly in political debate, we all have a responsibility to take

:24:21.:24:25.

that forward. What are your thoughts of Jo this morning? Just reflecting

:24:26.:24:30.

what Anna was saying, the last time I remember seeing Jo was walking

:24:31.:24:35.

across Portcullis House, with that wonderful bouncy stride, she turned

:24:36.:24:38.

and smiled with that great, infectious smile, and she was so

:24:39.:24:41.

full of life and determination. It was not just for its own sake, it

:24:42.:24:48.

was a behalf of other people, pushing forward causes, whether in

:24:49.:24:52.

her constituency or on the international stage. I just reflect

:24:53.:24:55.

now on the comments she made in a maiden speech. There is more that

:24:56.:25:00.

unites us than divides us, and she applied that whether representing

:25:01.:25:04.

all the people in her constituency, from many different backgrounds,

:25:05.:25:08.

face and ethnicities, or on the international stage, where she

:25:09.:25:11.

campaigned for countries to come together to solve problems on the

:25:12.:25:15.

global stage. That was a wonderful approach she had delight, and so

:25:16.:25:21.

much passion, so much intelligence, but a wonderfully nice, pleasant

:25:22.:25:25.

person as well. What an enormous loss. Just the sort of person you

:25:26.:25:29.

would want as an MP, what promise did her career hold? In must

:25:30.:25:35.

promise, because she was passionate, she was determined, she could be

:25:36.:25:38.

very forceful in making arguments. But because of the way, she made

:25:39.:25:45.

them, because she was so approachable, a genuinely nice

:25:46.:25:48.

person, I think she carried that with more conviction. She did not

:25:49.:25:52.

antagonise people or upset them with aggression. She sought to persuade

:25:53.:25:57.

them by reasoned and rational argument in a most wonderful way.

:25:58.:26:01.

And therefore I think she had a great future haired offer, because

:26:02.:26:05.

people took her seriously and really had high regard for her. -- ahead of

:26:06.:26:10.

her. We're just saying goodbye to viewers on BBC One, but we will

:26:11.:26:16.

continue talking on BBC News. So sorry to interrupt you there,

:26:17.:26:23.

Clive, but clearly a woman who was greatly loved. Absolutely, and you

:26:24.:26:30.

have heard tributes in the last few hours across the political divide,

:26:31.:26:35.

even when Members of Parliament might disagree, they recognise his

:26:36.:26:39.

sincerity and recognise the sort of person she was, open and honest and

:26:40.:26:45.

decent. And she had enormous respect for those personal attributes, as

:26:46.:26:49.

well as for the campaigns and principles she fought for. Did she

:26:50.:26:54.

ever speak to you about any security concerns? It has emerged that there

:26:55.:26:59.

had been some issues, it seems absolutely not related to what has

:27:00.:27:02.

happened, but security had been looked at. Well, it she did not

:27:03.:27:08.

mention any specific concerns, but all the time about the increasing

:27:09.:27:13.

nature of hostility and aggression, particularly towards female MPs,

:27:14.:27:18.

particularly on social media. Many of us who came in last year were

:27:19.:27:22.

quite shocked and taken aback at how much aggression there is targeted

:27:23.:27:27.

towards MPs, most of us come to try and do public service, and Jo was

:27:28.:27:31.

the best of the best at that, and we often talk together, Jo, myself and

:27:32.:27:37.

others, about how distressed we were about the aggression, hostility and

:27:38.:27:41.

the nature of the debate. We were all reviewing our security, and I

:27:42.:27:45.

think it needs to be looked at. Jo would not have wanted us to be

:27:46.:27:49.

hiding behind walls, our job is to be in the community, to be at

:27:50.:27:52.

surgeries, public events, to see people. We chat to people when we

:27:53.:27:57.

are doing shopping, walking out dogs. This is our job, to be amongst

:27:58.:28:02.

the people, we cannot hide from that, everything that is good and

:28:03.:28:06.

great about our job, Jo embraced that. Clive, do you think that

:28:07.:28:11.

security needs to change? How do you balance that in parrot for MPs to be

:28:12.:28:16.

accessible? Well, security is being reviewed all the time, and we don't

:28:17.:28:21.

talk about details of that, but in the House of Commons you can see,

:28:22.:28:25.

when I became an MP in 1992, people could walk up to the main reception

:28:26.:28:30.

desk and just ask to see add MP. Now you have to go through significant

:28:31.:28:35.

security checks and there are an police around the Palace of

:28:36.:28:40.

Westminster. Different in the constituency, nobody would want

:28:41.:28:45.

armed police following us around, and all MPs will be dealing with

:28:46.:28:49.

people whose benefits have been stopped, who are facing eviction

:28:50.:28:54.

from their homes, who need help from their MPs. We cannot refuse to see

:28:55.:28:58.

people in those circumstances because of security worries. So

:28:59.:29:02.

there is always a challenge, we have always got to be careful and

:29:03.:29:06.

sensitive about it. But in the end, we are elected by our constituents,

:29:07.:29:11.

and we have to be there for our constituents when they need us. The

:29:12.:29:14.

bishop was talking about the emotions that people will be

:29:15.:29:19.

feeling, the sadness, the last - but also the anger, how are you feeling

:29:20.:29:25.

this morning? -- the loss. I am still struggling to process it, I

:29:26.:29:28.

think there will be several stages of grief to go through. There is

:29:29.:29:32.

some talk of recalling Parliament, and some of us want to come together

:29:33.:29:37.

to share our grief and memories of Jo, and to think about her and how

:29:38.:29:41.

she would have wanted us to go forward. It is just a shocking time,

:29:42.:29:45.

but as I say, mostly our thoughts are with her family, who wonderful

:29:46.:29:49.

husband and children, because at the end of the day this is what is most

:29:50.:29:55.

important, and it is then that we think of today.

:29:56.:30:02.

Thank you very much for joining us and sharing your memories. Let us

:30:03.:30:11.

know your thoughts, all of the usual ways of getting in touch. Still to

:30:12.:30:14.

come, should Russian track and field athletes be allowed to compete after

:30:15.:30:20.

the doping scandal? We will ask British athletes what they think.

:30:21.:30:26.

Let's catch up with the day 's news with a neater. -- Anita.

:30:27.:30:35.

Vigils have been held for the Labour MP Jo Cox, who died yesterday

:30:36.:30:38.

after being shot and stabbed in an assault in her constituency.

:30:39.:30:41.

The 41-year-old mother became an MP in the general election last year.

:30:42.:30:44.

David Cameron said the killing was tragic and dreadful news.

:30:45.:30:46.

She was attacked in the village of Birstall

:30:47.:30:48.

after she held her constituency surgery.

:30:49.:30:53.

Russian athletes will find out later today whether they will be allowed

:30:54.:30:56.

following claims of widespread doping.

:30:57.:30:59.

Members of the world governing body of athletics

:31:00.:31:00.

are meeting in Vienna to make the decision.

:31:01.:31:06.

The team was suspended earlier this year

:31:07.:31:11.

following a damning report into alleged drug use.

:31:12.:31:13.

Barack Obama has made a new appeal for greater gun-control measures

:31:14.:31:16.

to be introduced in the United States.

:31:17.:31:18.

The US President met survivors and relatives

:31:19.:31:23.

He's calling on the Republican-controlled Congress

:31:24.:31:24.

to pass new legislation following the attack.

:31:25.:31:36.

As has been true too many times before, I held and hugged grieving

:31:37.:31:50.

family members and they asked why this keeps happening and they

:31:51.:31:53.

pleaded that we do more to stop the carnage.

:31:54.:31:55.

The Labour Party has held the south-London constituency

:31:56.:31:56.

of Tooting in the by-election sparked by Sadiq Kahn's

:31:57.:31:59.

Junior doctor Rosena Allin-Khan won with a majority of more than 6,000.

:32:00.:32:07.

A two-minute silence was held during the count

:32:08.:32:09.

Allin-Khan chose not to make a victory speech

:32:10.:32:15.

Two drugs which work together to shrink tumours in skin cancer

:32:16.:32:19.

have been approved for use by the NHS in England.

:32:20.:32:23.

In trials, the treatment, called combination therapy,

:32:24.:32:24.

shrank the most aggressive type of skin cancer in most patients.

:32:25.:32:29.

The move to approve the drugs is one of the fastest in NHS history

:32:30.:32:32.

and is likely to influence similar decisions elsewhere in the UK.

:32:33.:32:39.

The American rock star Meat Loaf has been taken to hospital

:32:40.:32:41.

after collapsing on stage during a concert in Canada.

:32:42.:32:43.

Fans at last night's concert in Edmonton saw the 68-year-old

:32:44.:32:49.

while performing his hit song I'd Do Anything For Love.

:32:50.:32:52.

Canadian media reported the music venue was then cleared

:32:53.:32:54.

Meat Loaf had previously cancelled two recent concerts due to illness.

:32:55.:32:58.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News, more at ten.

:32:59.:33:05.

Thank you. Let's catch up with the sport. Sally is in Paris. Good

:33:06.:33:14.

morning. If you're an England or Northern Ireland fan this morning

:33:15.:33:18.

you probably will still be celebrating, but heartbreak for

:33:19.:33:21.

Welsh bands after seeing their side concede a last-minute goal

:33:22.:33:25.

yesterday. We will start with Northern Ireland, they beat Ukraine

:33:26.:33:28.

2-0 which keeps them with a chance of qualifying for the knockout

:33:29.:33:32.

stages. Gareth McAuley put them ahead before they had to overcome

:33:33.:33:38.

bizarre summer conditions. A huge hailstorm briefly caused the match

:33:39.:33:42.

to be suspended and players and officials ran for cover. It did not

:33:43.:33:47.

hold them back for long, despite heavy Ukrainian pressure Niall

:33:48.:33:50.

McGinn poked home a second goal lead in stoppage time to spark wild

:33:51.:33:56.

celebrations. A night to remember. We did not just come here to making

:33:57.:34:04.

up the numbers. Getting here is just a party from now on and it's a

:34:05.:34:09.

bonus, we are not here to make up the numbers, watch out the Germans,

:34:10.:34:14.

we are coming for you. It's amazing, the last ten minutes were so nerve

:34:15.:34:17.

wracking, you could feel the tension. My prediction was 2-0, I'm

:34:18.:34:24.

glad we won, bring on Germany. 30 years of being a Northern Ireland

:34:25.:34:29.

fan, now I know why I've done it. They change the formation and had a

:34:30.:34:33.

completely different approach, the horizontal rain did it! Fantastic.

:34:34.:34:40.

It's a proud day for me, for the country as well. The first win in

:34:41.:34:46.

the European Championships, it's our first time so it must be our first

:34:47.:34:51.

win! The level of performance is what I'm most proud of, the players

:34:52.:34:55.

reacted to the defeat in the first game and the disappointment of the

:34:56.:34:58.

first game. I thought today every of was magnificent. The rain was

:34:59.:35:05.

obviously the thing that helped! England are now top of group B after

:35:06.:35:12.

the 2-1 win over Wales, their first victory at this championship. Daniel

:35:13.:35:15.

Sturridge scored in injury time to clinch the dramatic win. Wales had

:35:16.:35:20.

lead at half-time before Roy Hodgson made a double substitution which

:35:21.:35:25.

paid off as Jamie Vardy equalised and then Daniel Sturridge put them

:35:26.:35:29.

on the brink of qualification with his goal, and that prompted

:35:30.:35:36.

jubilation from the manager! As you saw on the bench, probably the most

:35:37.:35:40.

spontaneous exhibition if you like of pure joy from myself and the

:35:41.:35:44.

coaching staff that we have seen for a fair while, but that is what these

:35:45.:35:48.

tournaments do to you, they make certain that you suffer. When you go

:35:49.:35:53.

into a game of this magnitude and up against that quality, you have to do

:35:54.:35:57.

something special to get something out of it and I thought the guys

:35:58.:36:02.

showed such heart, they stuck in the game, and with 30 seconds, 60

:36:03.:36:06.

seconds remaining to give up that point that we worked so hard to get,

:36:07.:36:13.

that was disappointing. I think you will like this, if you want to

:36:14.:36:17.

impress the Queen, here's how. Jockey Ryan Moore Road Order Of

:36:18.:36:24.

Saint George to victory in the Gold Cup at Ascot, have a look at this. I

:36:25.:36:31.

say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, you can't get much more

:36:32.:36:37.

colour-coordinated than that! Her Majesty looked quite pleased about

:36:38.:36:41.

that as well. We will have more sport throughout the morning. You

:36:42.:36:45.

picked their colours first? Maybe she was paying tribute to him. I

:36:46.:36:49.

would imagine it would be the Queen. Thank you very much, Sally. Let's

:36:50.:36:53.

talk more about the loss of Jo Cox. She has been described as a devoted

:36:54.:36:58.

wife and mother of two Her husband Brendan posted this

:36:59.:37:01.

photo and said she had an energy and a zest for life

:37:02.:37:05.

that would exhaust most people. The couple divided their time

:37:06.:37:08.

between her Batley and Spen constituency in West Yorkshire and

:37:09.:37:10.

living in a houseboat on the Thames, The commute to Westminster was out

:37:11.:37:15.

of the ordinary, too. Usually I'm hoping I'll be zipping

:37:16.:37:19.

down to the House of Commons, which is about half an hour away

:37:20.:37:22.

from where I live on the boat, Now this is the way to start

:37:23.:37:26.

the day, isn't it? Yorkshire born and bred,

:37:27.:37:30.

Jo Cox only became an MP last year, of representing her "proud,

:37:31.:37:33.

no-nonsense" constituency. The spirit of nonconformity

:37:34.:37:41.

is as prevalent now in my part of West Yorkshire,

:37:42.:37:43.

as it was in the time of my two immediate predecessors,

:37:44.:37:47.

Mike Wood and Elizabeth Peacock. They were both known

:37:48.:37:52.

for their own brand of independent, nonconformist service,

:37:53.:37:55.

albeit in very different ways. And I intend to maintain

:37:56.:37:57.

that established tradition, Before her election,

:37:58.:37:59.

she was a tireless She spent ten years

:38:00.:38:07.

in international development, which took her to conflict

:38:08.:38:21.

zones around the world. She met her husband Brendan working

:38:22.:38:23.

for Oxfam, who have described her as a "passionate campaigner

:38:24.:38:26.

on humanitarian issues". She also worked closely

:38:27.:38:28.

with Sarah Brown, the wife of former

:38:29.:38:29.

Prime Minister Gordon Brown. When we spoke to her last October

:38:30.:38:31.

ahead of a Commons debate on Syria, she called repeatedly for Britain

:38:32.:38:35.

to do more to help the victims

:38:36.:38:37.

of Syria's civil war. working in many conflicts zones

:38:38.:38:39.

all around the world. I've seen that military

:38:40.:38:43.

intervention can save lives. It did in Kosovo, it did in Bosnia,

:38:44.:38:45.

it did in Sierra Leone. There is a case that can be made,

:38:46.:38:49.

when you've got an intervention grounded in the protection

:38:50.:38:53.

of innocent civilians, My big proposal tonight

:38:54.:38:57.

in the House of Commons, when we debate this, will be I think

:38:58.:39:02.

the Government should consider a no-bombing zone,

:39:03.:39:04.

to stop President Assad raining down aerial bombardment

:39:05.:39:06.

on innocent civilians, killing children and grandmothers,

:39:07.:39:08.

and mums and dads, to change the battlefield dynamic

:39:09.:39:11.

and force him to the table. Jo Cox's colleagues in the House of

:39:12.:39:23.

Commons are clearly in shock at what happened. Carole Walker is in

:39:24.:39:26.

Westminster to talk about the impact that she had in that very short

:39:27.:39:31.

political career. She was passionate, and by all accounts a

:39:32.:39:35.

very good woman? Absolutely. You got a real sense of how strongly

:39:36.:39:39.

motivated she was there when she came to Parliament, she was only

:39:40.:39:43.

here for a year, but she really made her mark in that time, she was

:39:44.:39:48.

already marked out as a rising star, someone who would have had such a

:39:49.:39:52.

great future ahead of her, she brought all of that experience of

:39:53.:39:56.

working around the world for aid agencies, and here in Parliament she

:39:57.:40:02.

continued to campaign passionately to help some of the most

:40:03.:40:05.

disadvantaged around the world. And I think that is why you have seen

:40:06.:40:10.

such warm and glowing tributes from right across the Houses of

:40:11.:40:14.

Parliament, for someone who really cared about what she was doing, but

:40:15.:40:19.

was really motivated to try to help others in society. And of course

:40:20.:40:24.

somebody who got along so well with so many people, very approachable

:40:25.:40:29.

and personable, often turning up at Parliament with her two young

:40:30.:40:33.

children, now sadly grieved. Many MPs will be thinking of her family

:40:34.:40:40.

and their loss today. Ordinary politics has been suspended for now,

:40:41.:40:43.

and it is hard to imagine how things move forward, what will be happening

:40:44.:40:49.

there? Well, you are right. Campaigning in the EU referendum has

:40:50.:40:53.

been temporarily suspended, all of the campaigns did that as a mark of

:40:54.:40:57.

respect last night. It is not yet clear when that will resume. The

:40:58.:41:04.

campaigns will simply have to try to judge the public mood and decide

:41:05.:41:08.

when they think it is appropriate to return to that. It will be

:41:09.:41:13.

interesting to see whether her death does affect the tone of the

:41:14.:41:20.

campaign, which had become pretty frenetic and personal and of a very

:41:21.:41:24.

highly pressurised nature. It will be interesting to see whether the

:41:25.:41:28.

tone remains somewhat more subdued and quiet. There has been talk of

:41:29.:41:33.

possibly recalling Parliament, clearly there is nothing crucial for

:41:34.:41:38.

Parliament to decide. MPs may well pay tribute. No firm decisions on

:41:39.:41:43.

that yet, but I think MPs are still thinking about the loss of such a

:41:44.:41:49.

bright, a bold, capable MP. And of course the loss felt by her family.

:41:50.:41:53.

Thank you, Carol. Until yesterday, the last attack

:41:54.:42:09.

on an MP was against the Labour He was stabbed in the stomach by

:42:10.:42:12.

a student in his east London office. But in spite of that,

:42:13.:42:17.

he doesn't want to make it harder After I was attacked,

:42:18.:42:20.

six years ago now, the police spoke to every MP about their arrangements

:42:21.:42:24.

in their constituency surgeries, There may be things

:42:25.:42:26.

that can be done. What none of us would want is a big

:42:27.:42:30.

change in the culture of our country, which would make it

:42:31.:42:33.

much harder for people to get After I was attacked,

:42:34.:42:37.

the police said to me, would you like a metal

:42:38.:42:43.

arch, a metal detector But the problem with that would be,

:42:44.:42:45.

it would make going to see your MP a pretty unpleasant experience,

:42:46.:42:51.

and none of us want that to happen. I want my constituents

:42:52.:42:54.

to come and talk to me, and I don't want to make it

:42:55.:42:57.

hard for them to do so. Dr David James is the co-founder

:42:58.:43:10.

of the Fixated Threat Assessment Centre, a Home Office unit

:43:11.:43:13.

which examines security risks to politicians

:43:14.:43:15.

and other public figures. Thank you for joining us. There has

:43:16.:43:23.

been a survey done of MPs, and what they encounter and how vulnerable

:43:24.:43:27.

they feel, what does that survey show? It has shown that around 80%

:43:28.:43:31.

of MPs have been subject to intrusive harassment by

:43:32.:43:39.

constituents. But nearly a fifth of all MPs have suffered some sort of

:43:40.:43:42.

attack or attempted attack during their time in Parliament. We know

:43:43.:43:48.

quite a lot about this now. There are two very important facts. The

:43:49.:43:53.

first is that most of the people who attack politicians are mentally ill

:43:54.:43:59.

owners with some personal grievance. The second thing is that most of

:44:00.:44:03.

them give some sort of warning behaviour of what they make you want

:44:04.:44:07.

to do in the form of threatening letters or difficult visits to the

:44:08.:44:11.

constituency. The Nigel Jones case was won in point, you will remember

:44:12.:44:15.

that in his constituency surgery he was attacked and his aide was

:44:16.:44:21.

killed. This was 16 years ago. Yes. The aggressor in that incident had

:44:22.:44:25.

been to the constituency surgery dozens of times before, raving in a

:44:26.:44:30.

paranoid fashion. There was no mechanism to deal with it. This is

:44:31.:44:33.

why the Home Office setup the fixated threat assessment centre

:44:34.:44:39.

which is there to have difficult behaviours referred to it, so it can

:44:40.:44:44.

assess and manage risk from mucking up warning behaviour is reported to

:44:45.:44:48.

it. It relies on MPs actually bringing matters to its attention.

:44:49.:44:54.

One of the problems is that MPs, some MPs tend to see this sort of

:44:55.:44:57.

aggressive behaviour as just something that goes with the job. It

:44:58.:45:02.

isn't and it shouldn't be. What would you say the answers are? We

:45:03.:45:06.

are hearing from Steven Timms even, who was attacked and badly injured

:45:07.:45:12.

as a result, even he says, actually, in the end, the balance of being

:45:13.:45:17.

open as a constituency MP versus security means that he would prefer

:45:18.:45:21.

openness. Obviously everyone will have a different perspective but how

:45:22.:45:24.

do you see it? Where should the balance be?

:45:25.:45:28.

Well, I would agree with what he said, but because people give

:45:29.:45:34.

warning signs of what they may go on to do, it is important that these

:45:35.:45:38.

are brought to the attention of the authorities. MPs are reluctant to

:45:39.:45:44.

complain to the police or us about the behaviour of their constituents.

:45:45.:45:48.

There is a worry that they may be seen as shopping their constituents.

:45:49.:45:53.

But actually these people are mentally ill and in need of

:45:54.:45:57.

attention. So if MPs do report them to the authorities, they are likely

:45:58.:46:01.

to end up getting the psychiatric care that they need and have not had

:46:02.:46:05.

before. There are things that can be done, but it is at that sort of

:46:06.:46:11.

level. We certainly don't want to have fortified constituency

:46:12.:46:17.

surgeries. Thank you for joining us, Dr David James. One tweet from Ali,

:46:18.:46:23.

Jo's legacy will remain in our hearts for ever. Seeing the footage

:46:24.:46:28.

is both inspiring and heartbreaking. Heather has tweeted, saddened and

:46:29.:46:32.

shocked by the killing of Jo Cox, she was born for a purpose and

:46:33.:46:36.

lifted by showing kindness and peace. She challenged the things

:46:37.:46:42.

that isolate Westminster from the public, conviction politician and

:46:43.:46:47.

local MP. Sarah on Facebook, we are talking about our memories of Jo Cox

:46:48.:46:51.

and the thing she inspired us to do, I am on it to have been able to call

:46:52.:46:56.

such an inspirational lady a friend and to have shared moments of life

:46:57.:47:00.

with her. Thank you for your thoughts, keep letting us know your

:47:01.:47:04.

thoughts this morning. The usual ways of getting in touch.

:47:05.:47:07.

Should Russian track and field athletes be allowed to compete

:47:08.:47:09.

They were suspended from international competitions

:47:10.:47:12.

last November after a damning report by the World Anti-Doping Agency.

:47:13.:47:15.

The agency described a culture of cheating

:47:16.:47:16.

and what it called state-sponsored doping.

:47:17.:47:18.

Later today, the International Association of Athletics Federations

:47:19.:47:23.

- headed by Lord Coe - will decide whether Russia has

:47:24.:47:25.

changed enough for its athletes to be allowed to travel to Rio.

:47:26.:47:28.

But what exactly did Russian athletes do wrong?

:47:29.:47:30.

It's the worst doping scandal in history.

:47:31.:47:35.

It could all end with a full Olympic ban for Russia.

:47:36.:47:41.

But how did we get here in the first place?

:47:42.:47:44.

Talk of Russian doping has been around for years.

:47:45.:47:46.

Just days before the Beijing Olympics,

:47:47.:47:48.

seven athletes were suspended for providing fake urine samples.

:47:49.:47:55.

Four years later in London, and Russia had a successful Games.

:47:56.:47:58.

A total of 71 medals in what was called the Clean Olympics.

:47:59.:48:03.

In 2014, a German TV station broadcast claims

:48:04.:48:08.

that most Russian athletes were using banned substances,

:48:09.:48:12.

could make positive tests disappear for cash.

:48:13.:48:17.

The World Anti-Doping Agency set up an independent commission

:48:18.:48:19.

to look into the claims, headed by this man,

:48:20.:48:22.

The same TV station and the Sunday Times

:48:23.:48:29.

this time claiming that so-called blood doping is rife in athletics,

:48:30.:48:35.

with 80% of Russia's medal winners under suspicion.

:48:36.:48:37.

It said the sport's governing body, the IAAF,

:48:38.:48:41.

had done next to nothing to stop it.

:48:42.:48:44.

The then front-runner to lead that organisation, Lord Coe,

:48:45.:48:48.

Nobody here is questioning the right of a news organisation,

:48:49.:48:54.

a newspaper, to challenge, to kick the tyres,

:48:55.:48:57.

to forensically examine the work of our federation.

:48:58.:48:59.

To say we are sitting here on our hands

:49:00.:49:01.

simply not investigating, or turning a blind eye to this,

:49:02.:49:04.

and Wada's independent commission published its findings.

:49:05.:49:15.

Russia was guilty of systemic state-sponsored doping.

:49:16.:49:18.

Our recommendation is that the Russian Federation be suspended.

:49:19.:49:23.

said it had retested frozen samples from the two most recent Games.

:49:24.:49:32.

31 athletes from the Beijing Olympics failed those retests,

:49:33.:49:35.

23 athletes from London also failed, eight of those were again Russian.

:49:36.:49:43.

Sport chiefs must now decide if the country is doing enough

:49:44.:49:47.

for the ban to be lifted, or whether its athletes should now

:49:48.:49:50.

be stopped from travelling to the Rio Games.

:49:51.:49:57.

In the studio with me is Olympic relay runner Andrew Steele,

:49:58.:50:00.

who competed in the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

:50:01.:50:03.

He's been told he could now be awarded a bronze medal

:50:04.:50:06.

after coming fourth behind the Russian team back then.

:50:07.:50:09.

And also part of the conversation is former swimmer and Olympic silver

:50:10.:50:12.

medallist Sharron Davies, who appealed to have her medal

:50:13.:50:14.

upgraded after allegations of doping came to light.

:50:15.:50:22.

Thank you for joining us. Andrew, explained where you are with

:50:23.:50:28.

possibly being upgraded to bronze from fourth place eight years later.

:50:29.:50:34.

Yeah, quite a bizarre scenario eight years, looking back at the Beijing

:50:35.:50:38.

Olympic Games. We finished fourth in the relay, the fastest time to ever

:50:39.:50:43.

not win a medal. And so we finished just behind the Russian team, who

:50:44.:50:50.

ran an unusually fast time, unexpectedly so. So if we see that

:50:51.:50:56.

the B samples come back positive, the A samples did test positive, we

:50:57.:51:00.

stand to be upgraded to third, and the process of awarding those medals

:51:01.:51:04.

goes ahead. How do you feel about it? You were robbed of the podium

:51:05.:51:12.

moment. No, that is the most bothersome part for me. A lot of

:51:13.:51:16.

people will say, think of the endorsements you could have had as

:51:17.:51:19.

an Olympic medallist, but what matters to me is that we did not get

:51:20.:51:23.

that moment of joy, of recognition for our hard work at the time. You

:51:24.:51:29.

cannot ever really get that back. In this bizarre mixture of a Venn

:51:30.:51:34.

diagram of joy and anger, where they cross, it is a very bizarre feeling.

:51:35.:51:39.

I would be thrilled to call myself a medallist, but angry that I did not

:51:40.:51:43.

get to experience it at the time eight years ago. So you are hoping

:51:44.:51:47.

to compete in Rio, how would you feel about competing alongside

:51:48.:51:52.

Russian athletes? I would not feel that comfortable with the idea. I

:51:53.:51:56.

believe personally there has to be quite a harsh stand made, and clean

:51:57.:52:02.

athletes will get caught up in this, like there will be the unfortunate

:52:03.:52:05.

cases of clean Russian athletes, if Russia are bad, who do not get to

:52:06.:52:09.

compete at the Olympic Games. But I cannot see any way to send a clear

:52:10.:52:13.

message that the sport is transforming other than to Ban

:52:14.:52:16.

Russia as a whole. If the assessment is that they think enough is being

:52:17.:52:23.

done, would you take that at face value? Probably not. Wada released a

:52:24.:52:27.

report on their recent activity in Russia over the last 6-9 months, and

:52:28.:52:32.

it didn't paint a very clean picture. It doesn't appear from my

:52:33.:52:36.

point of view that the right moves have been made to make sure the

:52:37.:52:41.

sport is clean in Russia. And if that is the case, I really would not

:52:42.:52:45.

be all that comfortable competing against Russian athletes in Rio.

:52:46.:52:50.

Sharron, you lost out to a gold medal to an athlete, a swimmer,

:52:51.:52:57.

later tested positive for banned substances. That was even longer ago

:52:58.:53:01.

for you, how do you feel about everything? Well, I am still very

:53:02.:53:07.

much involved with swimming, and ICO athletes competing against people

:53:08.:53:11.

who have tested positive ones. -- I see our athletes. I think we have to

:53:12.:53:17.

work on bigger deterrence. The Russians are not getting their house

:53:18.:53:22.

in order, this is a state system, not individuals. This is a

:53:23.:53:25.

state-sponsored system, so the only way we can make the Russians behave

:53:26.:53:30.

and do proper testing internally is to come down on the whole country.

:53:31.:53:34.

Personally, I would like to see the whole country, not just track and

:53:35.:53:38.

field, because we can be sure it is not just track and field that is

:53:39.:53:42.

doing this. Do you think much has changed? No, sadly not. That report

:53:43.:53:48.

that has just been talked about, over the past few months there have

:53:49.:53:52.

been 700 tests, many of them cancelled, objects put in front of

:53:53.:53:55.

the testers to make it difficult for them to get to the athletes. 111

:53:56.:54:01.

tests were the athletes could not be found, 58 positive tests. That is

:54:02.:54:09.

not change. So Russian athletes at Rio, yes no? Personally, I would

:54:10.:54:13.

love to see them not there. They have to give a strong deterrent for

:54:14.:54:17.

things to change. You talked about my particular situation, that was

:54:18.:54:21.

the East Germans many years ago. We knew at the time, you could see it,

:54:22.:54:27.

to be honest, they had huge success, nobody did anything about it. There

:54:28.:54:30.

were two victims, people like myself, whose lives could have been

:54:31.:54:34.

different, people who were fourth, maybe could have been medallists,

:54:35.:54:39.

but also those athletes themselves, taking drugs with no idea what the

:54:40.:54:45.

long-term effects are. We should be protecting the clean athletes but

:54:46.:54:48.

also those who have been persuaded to take drugs as well. So then they

:54:49.:54:55.

knew, they did not categorically no, but there were signs. Does everybody

:54:56.:55:01.

look at each other with suspicion? Unfortunately so, I think, now.

:55:02.:55:03.

Certain countries have said they read like more than others, Russia

:55:04.:55:11.

was one of those, thanks to, I guess some high profile cases over the

:55:12.:55:14.

past. We were suspicious when we finished fourth. If we said we would

:55:15.:55:20.

run to: 58, we thought we would have a chance of a medal, and we did not

:55:21.:55:24.

expect Russia to do that. Sometimes people perform better than expected,

:55:25.:55:28.

but we were certainly suspicious, and it seems, this many years later,

:55:29.:55:32.

that perhaps we were vindicated in our suspicion at the time. You have

:55:33.:55:37.

signed a letter to Wada, asking for all countries to be looked at, what

:55:38.:55:41.

do you want to happen? I just think that we really need to move to a new

:55:42.:55:45.

plane of what is normal for sport here. We are losing faith in

:55:46.:55:50.

athletics, in particular. The sport has been really degraded by these

:55:51.:55:54.

ongoing doping scandals. We need to make a clear stand against even the

:55:55.:55:59.

federation as a whole, and that is a big step, one of the biggest

:56:00.:56:02.

decisions we will ever have in Olympic sport, I guess. But I cannot

:56:03.:56:06.

see we will change without doing that. It will be unfair on a few,

:56:07.:56:11.

but how else will we do this? We need all our resources and deterrent

:56:12.:56:16.

available to make a change. So the public can reignite their love for

:56:17.:56:22.

the sport and be sure that what they see is a true performance. Sharron,

:56:23.:56:29.

you are nodding. It is just so sad, and people watch the Olympics and do

:56:30.:56:33.

not know whether it is a drug aided win or not. I just want a healthier

:56:34.:56:38.

nation, I want people to be involved in sport and to love doing it, and

:56:39.:56:42.

we need to work harder to get drug cheats out. Sharron Davies, Andrew

:56:43.:56:47.

steel, thank you very much. Good luck, you are still waiting to hear

:56:48.:56:51.

if you are going to Rio. Coming up, the NHS in England agrees to fund

:56:52.:56:56.

two pioneering drugs that fight skin cancer, we will have the details.

:56:57.:57:01.

Now, let's catch up with the latest weather update with Matt Taylor, how

:57:02.:57:02.

are things looking? Stormy once again, have you managed

:57:03.:57:12.

to avoid them? No, keep getting caught! The Weather Watchers

:57:13.:57:15.

pictures have been capturing the scene, lots of lightning across the

:57:16.:57:19.

UK, some particularly severe storms, this one not far from Heathrow,

:57:20.:57:24.

having an impact on the roads, and airports have been suffering as

:57:25.:57:28.

operations have to be reduced. As well as the lightning, we have seen

:57:29.:57:32.

hail and flooding, and reports quite widely across parts of Oxfordshire

:57:33.:57:38.

of a funnel cloud, a prequel set to tornadoes. -- precursor. That is not

:57:39.:57:47.

uncommon in the UK, but we're not done with the storms yet, and there

:57:48.:57:50.

will be more storms today across the UK, some of them quite severe once

:57:51.:57:55.

again. It is towards parts of the south-east, East Anglia, we have

:57:56.:57:58.

already got thunderstorms rumbling away. It is not just here where wet

:57:59.:58:03.

weather will be confined, a damp day across eastern Scotland and the

:58:04.:58:06.

north-east of England. Lots of cloud, though, sunshine breaking

:58:07.:58:08.

through with lift temperatures across southern areas, and the

:58:09.:58:15.

storms going again. East Anglia and the south-east of the worst ones

:58:16.:58:18.

today, we have to watch conditions closer to Queens and Ascot. In

:58:19.:58:25.

between the areas, there will be heavy showers around, we cannot rule

:58:26.:58:28.

out the odd rumble of thunder, but perhaps not as bad as elsewhere.

:58:29.:58:34.

Further rain, in the north, brightness to the western parts of

:58:35.:58:41.

Scotland, Northern Ireland, the Isle of Man. In the East of Scotland, and

:58:42.:58:45.

other cool day, heavy rain around Aberdeenshire and the Moray Firth.

:58:46.:58:49.

Through tonight, storms for a time across the south, they will ease

:58:50.:58:52.

away, rain across eastern Scotland slides down through easternmost

:58:53.:58:55.

counties of England, a bit of a breeze here. Not desperately cold,

:58:56.:59:00.

not much lower than double figures for many. It did a weekend, a sign

:59:01.:59:04.

of some good news, goodbye to the storms, this area of high pressure

:59:05.:59:08.

kicks the storms into northern parts of Europe, and it keeps things much

:59:09.:59:13.

dry for many of us. But a completely dry story on Saturday, central and

:59:14.:59:17.

eastern England rather grey, cool, rain and drizzle at times. Nowhere

:59:18.:59:21.

near the intensity of rain as we have seen of late. Most of you will

:59:22.:59:25.

have a dry Saturday, the best warmth across western areas, where

:59:26.:59:28.

temperatures will get into the high teens. As we go into Sunday, it is

:59:29.:59:32.

eastern areas where we will most likely see the driest and brightest

:59:33.:59:39.

weather, and the warmest too. In the West, lots of cloud, patchy rain and

:59:40.:59:42.

drizzle, later in the day more in the way of heavy rain. By and large,

:59:43.:59:46.

compare to this week, the storms are easing, the weekend looking much

:59:47.:59:50.

better, and that is also the same in Kazakhstan, where we have got

:59:51.:59:53.

showers at the moment. Tim Peake returns to earth tomorrow and it is

:59:54.:59:57.

looking brighter across central Kazakhstan, where he is expected to

:59:58.:00:01.

land during tomorrow morning. That is how it is looking, see you soon.

:00:02.:00:08.

Hello it's Friday, it's ten o'clock, I'm Joanna Gosling,

:00:09.:00:10.

Welcome to the programme if you've just joined us.

:00:11.:00:14.

Tributes continue to flood in for the murdered Labour MP Jo Cox.

:00:15.:00:18.

Last night vigils were held outside Parliament and in

:00:19.:00:20.

the village of Birstall, where she was shot and stabbed.

:00:21.:00:22.

Her fellow Labour MP and friend Anna Turley has given

:00:23.:00:25.

us her own recollections of Jo Cox...

:00:26.:00:28.

Those smiling pictures you see in the paper, that is what we saw every

:00:29.:00:36.

day, she was always smiling, bundles of energy, she was fizzing with

:00:37.:00:41.

energy and passion and commitment. I'm Jane Hill in Birstall, where

:00:42.:00:45.

local people are arriving in the Market Square all the time to lay

:00:46.:00:50.

flowers. Many simply saying thank you.

:00:51.:00:52.

Also this morning - a charity is accusing the government

:00:53.:00:55.

of ignoring the issue of who cares for our increasingly

:00:56.:00:57.

We'll speak to people who are worried about who'll care for them -

:00:58.:01:05.

Lots of you getting in touch to pay tribute to Jo Cox this morning. John

:01:06.:01:22.

on Facebook, still can't quite believe the events of yesterday and

:01:23.:01:25.

that she is no longer with us. I first met her during the general

:01:26.:01:31.

election campaign in the summer of 2014, we did not always see eye to

:01:32.:01:34.

eye from a political point of view but I was amazed by how she

:01:35.:01:40.

connected with people and she was so caring, embracing everything in

:01:41.:01:43.

front of her, she would always find time for you even know she was so

:01:44.:01:48.

busy. An e-mail from Sarah, we had a wonderful party on her boat where my

:01:49.:01:53.

children were inspired by her fighting and campaigning nature,

:01:54.:01:56.

they became little campaign is because of her. I am privileged to

:01:57.:02:01.

have shared moments of life with her. Thank you for your comments.

:02:02.:02:06.

Keep getting in touch. All of the usual ways. If you text you will be

:02:07.:02:13.

charged that the standard network rate. Let's get back to Jane Hill.

:02:14.:02:18.

We are spending most of the morning looking at the death of Jo Cox and

:02:19.:02:24.

Jane is in Birstall for us. Good morning. From Birstall. Where people

:02:25.:02:32.

are arriving all the time here in the Market Square, to lay flowers,

:02:33.:02:39.

people of all ages, backgrounds, people bringing their children. It

:02:40.:02:48.

is a market town. Now, with a somewhat unwelcome media presence.

:02:49.:02:52.

Journalists from here and overseas as well, not just British

:02:53.:02:56.

journalists, such is the extraordinary nature of what has

:02:57.:03:00.

gone on in the past 24 hours, local people who simply can't believe that

:03:01.:03:05.

this has happened. As the Yorkshire Post says this morning, a young

:03:06.:03:12.

woman murdered in the line of duty. The messages are extraordinarily

:03:13.:03:16.

touching, it is very moving to read them. A lot of cards simply say

:03:17.:03:20.

thank you. One lady in the last few minutes has laid the statuette of an

:03:21.:03:26.

angel and the cards simply says, you worked so hard for us all, and that

:03:27.:03:31.

is one of the things you pick up on from what people are saying, the

:03:32.:03:36.

feeling that Jo Cox really was a terribly hard-working and well liked

:03:37.:03:43.

local MP. She was from this area, of course. She said herself that she

:03:44.:03:47.

was so proud to represent the part of the country that she grew up in.

:03:48.:03:53.

And those local routes very much welcomed and celebrated, and people

:03:54.:03:56.

remembering that here today. And last night. There was a digital in

:03:57.:04:06.

the church last night. -- a vigil. The church was full. Fiona Trott was

:04:07.:04:08.

there and has Trump now. From all backgrounds

:04:09.:04:12.

and all faiths, they came together A woman who was killed

:04:13.:04:14.

while working for them, She was a people person,

:04:15.:04:19.

she was for us. She had so much warmth

:04:20.:04:25.

and compassion. Police say Jo Cox was stabbed and

:04:26.:04:39.

shot near Birstall village library. She was holding a drop-in session

:04:40.:04:42.

for her local constituents. A guy was bent over the woman,

:04:43.:04:46.

I could see her legs sticking out. The words I heard him say

:04:47.:04:49.

was, "Britain first" I can't say exactly what it was,

:04:50.:04:58.

but definitely "Britain first" The BBC understands the man

:04:59.:05:05.

being arrested is called The BBC understands the man being arrested

:05:06.:05:10.

is called Tommy Mair, Jo Cox was more than an MP,

:05:11.:05:12.

she was a wife and mother. In a statement her husband

:05:13.:05:18.

Brendan Cox said... The very heart of this

:05:19.:05:43.

West Yorkshire village remains And the villagers within it

:05:44.:05:46.

are overcome with grief. Fiona is now with me. As people come

:05:47.:06:02.

and lay flowers, what is striking is that many people still have tears in

:06:03.:06:05.

their eyes, people asked Gill stunned. They are, they are walking

:06:06.:06:10.

around in a daze. -- they still are stunned. The school was on lockdown

:06:11.:06:15.

yesterday and they are now trying to get on with their daily business and

:06:16.:06:20.

it's very hard, the heart of the community, the Market Square is

:06:21.:06:24.

still cordoned off, there is a huge police presence. And of course with

:06:25.:06:28.

the media presence that you mentioned, it has hit them that this

:06:29.:06:32.

did happen yesterday, it is very hard for them to come to terms with

:06:33.:06:37.

it. They are trying to come to terms with it by laying floral tributes.

:06:38.:06:42.

They are continuing to grow, and the messages talk about a woman who was

:06:43.:06:48.

interested in their lives, interested in their local campaigns

:06:49.:06:52.

for a pedestrian crossing and one woman mentioned she had a particular

:06:53.:06:55.

personal problem that the MP was helping her with. She got to know

:06:56.:07:00.

her. They both had children of the same age. She really felt the loss

:07:01.:07:07.

for her family. Another message says, she will be remembered for her

:07:08.:07:11.

tireless work for the less fortunate. You get the impression

:07:12.:07:15.

from speaking to people that Jo Cox represented their interests but she

:07:16.:07:19.

was also very interested in them and it will be hard to come to terms

:07:20.:07:23.

with it. The fact that she was born and bred in the region plays an

:07:24.:07:27.

important part here, the Bishop of Huddersfield who we spoke to in the

:07:28.:07:31.

past hour picked up on that, and you get the sense that it was hugely

:07:32.:07:33.

important to her and she was proud to represent the part

:07:34.:07:47.

of the country where she grew up, and it resonated and it meant

:07:48.:07:49.

something to her constituents? It really does. In this part of the

:07:50.:07:52.

world that means a lot. Someone has left a message that says, for eight

:07:53.:07:55.

Yorkshire Rose. The bishop said that she had passion and compassion. --

:07:56.:08:02.

for a Yorkshire rose. You always get a story about every background and

:08:03.:08:05.

every faith, and that was reflected in the vigil last night. And the

:08:06.:08:09.

thoughts about the police investigation, because there is

:08:10.:08:15.

still a lot of police in evidence and police tape crossing the entire

:08:16.:08:19.

Market Square and it is closed off, it is quite a wide police cordoned.

:08:20.:08:23.

What do we know at this stage? I wonder if we can turn the camera

:08:24.:08:27.

around to the streets, I can see out of the corner of my eye, a fingertip

:08:28.:08:32.

search is going on. It looks like an officer is using a rod. They are

:08:33.:08:40.

checking drains. That is the area outside the library where Jo Cox was

:08:41.:08:48.

stabbed and shot yesterday. Still, 52-year-old man has been arrested

:08:49.:08:51.

and is still being questioned by police today, and you can still see

:08:52.:08:55.

here this morning, this huge police cordoned, huge police presence, this

:08:56.:09:00.

investigation is very much continuing. We will talk again a

:09:01.:09:05.

little later, thank you for now. We will talk to local people throughout

:09:06.:09:09.

the day here as you would expect. For now, from here in Birstall, back

:09:10.:09:11.

to you. We can now speak to two more of Jo's

:09:12.:09:15.

friends and Labour colleagues. Caroline Flint attended the vigil

:09:16.:09:18.

in Birstall last night Thank you for joining us. Just a

:09:19.:09:30.

terribly sad day. Yes it is. I think it's important, you know, everything

:09:31.:09:32.

everyone has said about how wonderful and MP she has been, but

:09:33.:09:39.

also what she brought to her commitment and passion to helping

:09:40.:09:42.

those less fortunate in her life before becoming an MP is important.

:09:43.:09:47.

We have lost someone who had so much more to give. The vigil must have

:09:48.:09:52.

been hard so soon after something so shocking. What were emotions like?

:09:53.:09:59.

It must have been very raw? Yes, it was, but I think people were coming

:10:00.:10:04.

together from Birstall and the surrounding areas, myself and

:10:05.:10:07.

colleagues and others from the Labour Party, and it was a chance to

:10:08.:10:14.

just come together, to hold each other, to think of Jo and take a bit

:10:15.:10:21.

of time out from obviously a lot of discussion about what has happened

:10:22.:10:24.

to really focus on the most important thing, thinking about Jo

:10:25.:10:30.

Cox and her family. When you think about her, what do you remember?

:10:31.:10:36.

What I remember is very much what everyone has been saying, someone

:10:37.:10:51.

who was so positive, someone who had worked in some of the most difficult

:10:52.:10:54.

parts of the world, but like many people who get elected was

:10:55.:10:55.

throwing her heart and soul into being the best she could as an MP.

:10:56.:10:59.

It is so poignant in terms of what happened because much of what MPs do

:11:00.:11:02.

is only seen through what we see in the chamber of the House of Commons.

:11:03.:11:05.

There is such another important side to that part of our lives. Very much

:11:06.:11:11.

feet on the ground and working in the constituency and she was just

:11:12.:11:20.

there for the people she grew up with, doing her best, doing her

:11:21.:11:24.

duty. That obviously brings you into close contact with anybody who wants

:11:25.:11:30.

to get up close. The events that the constituency surgeries are well

:11:31.:11:34.

advertised, anyone can turn up. Have you had concerns and had you ever

:11:35.:11:38.

spoken to her about security concerns about anything like that?

:11:39.:11:45.

No. But I think over the years MPs share some of the things that we

:11:46.:11:51.

face and how to handle bump. -- handle them. It is part of our

:11:52.:11:56.

democracy that is very good and positive, I have spoken to MPs from

:11:57.:11:59.

other parts of Europe and America and other parts of the world and

:12:00.:12:03.

they are astonished at the very up close and personal relationship that

:12:04.:12:08.

we have with our constituents and it's a very good thing. I think we

:12:09.:12:13.

also have to be mindful of not just our security but those of our staff

:12:14.:12:19.

as well. And sometimes you have to deal

:12:20.:13:49.

I also recall that only recently she shared with myself and others that

:13:50.:13:57.

she could not make something because she was applying camomile lotion to

:13:58.:14:04.

the chickenpox spots of... With myself and others, she shared that

:14:05.:14:07.

she could not make something because she was applying camomile motion to

:14:08.:14:14.

the... Sorry, we have lost our line to

:14:15.:14:18.

Caroline Flint, but remembering her friend and colleague, Jo Cox, as so

:14:19.:14:23.

many are this morning. Normal Parliamentary business is suspended

:14:24.:14:27.

for now, campaigning in the referendum is suspended. It is not

:14:28.:14:30.

clear when campaigning will resume, but there was supposed to be a big

:14:31.:14:34.

set these events tonight, Andrew Neil talking to Iain Duncan Smith

:14:35.:14:38.

for the latest in his head to head interviews on the referendum. That

:14:39.:14:44.

is not going to be going ahead. There are also some calls for

:14:45.:14:49.

Parliament to be recalled, as MPs struggled to come to terms with what

:14:50.:14:54.

has happened. And we were hearing from one MP, who was a close friend

:14:55.:15:01.

of Jo Cox, saying it would be a good thing for them to get together in

:15:02.:15:05.

Parliament just to talk about her. Caroline, would you like to see

:15:06.:15:12.

Parliament recalled? I think, you know, if we do come back together to

:15:13.:15:20.

Parliament next week... There as part of me that sort of feels that I

:15:21.:15:25.

would like to have something rather like the vigil service in Birstall

:15:26.:15:29.

the other night, last night, where actually we just can come together

:15:30.:15:35.

in a quiet way and think about what Jo and her family and what has

:15:36.:15:41.

happened. I think that is the most important thing at the moment, and

:15:42.:15:47.

there will be time for all of us to talk about our work and what we do

:15:48.:15:53.

and how we deal with that and where we may need to look at security.

:15:54.:15:57.

What I would not like, Joanna macro, is to come back to Parliament and

:15:58.:16:01.

lose sight of what we want to come back for, which is to think about

:16:02.:16:07.

Jo. If we do go back, I do not know that is making sense to you, but I

:16:08.:16:14.

feel like we should come back and reflect in quietness, maybe with a

:16:15.:16:18.

few contributions, and that is what we should be doing, rather than

:16:19.:16:21.

coming back to Parliament and having a bigger debate about the future and

:16:22.:16:25.

what we do about how we work as MPs. I would like to make sure that we

:16:26.:16:29.

focus on what is the most important thing at this present time, thinking

:16:30.:16:35.

about Jo and her family. That is completely clear and understandable.

:16:36.:16:38.

Anything that any of us go through that is shocking, or we lose

:16:39.:16:42.

somebody dear to us, it changes us. You move on eventually, you deal

:16:43.:16:51.

with it in the long term, but do you feel, even though it has just

:16:52.:16:56.

happened, that it might change the way you see politics? How are you

:16:57.:17:01.

feeling this morning about how you contemplate what has happened? Well,

:17:02.:17:13.

I am feeling sorrow, and so sad, you know, fog Jo's loved ones. -- for.

:17:14.:17:19.

In terms of politics, if something comes out of this, it is about

:17:20.:17:25.

understanding that MPs, anybody in political life should be held to

:17:26.:17:30.

account. And when they do things wrong, they should answer for that.

:17:31.:17:33.

But I think we should be really proud of our democracy, and proud of

:17:34.:17:38.

our political system, because for the most part it is a very good

:17:39.:17:44.

system, and people come into politics with the best of reasons,

:17:45.:17:49.

for the most part, and to do a good job. And I think, if anything, if it

:17:50.:17:54.

says something about what MPs do outside of just being in Parliament,

:17:55.:18:00.

and how that is such an important contribution to helping people,

:18:01.:18:02.

ordinary people, have their voices heard. I think that would be a

:18:03.:18:07.

really good thing. Thank you very much, Caroline Flint, friend and

:18:08.:18:13.

colleague of Jo Cox, joining us. Let's talk more about the questions

:18:14.:18:21.

raised about MPs security, touching on security issues there, with

:18:22.:18:24.

Caroline Flint, people are talking about it this morning, it is still

:18:25.:18:29.

very raw, but it is obviously an issue that will be discussed now and

:18:30.:18:34.

in the coming days and weeks. Yes, absolutely, and it is emerging that

:18:35.:18:39.

there were already security concerns surrounding the Labour MP. It

:18:40.:18:44.

emerged that, in March this year, one man was arrested following what

:18:45.:18:47.

has been described as malicious communication. Now, he was given a

:18:48.:18:53.

caution by police. Just to make it clear, the man who received the

:18:54.:18:57.

caution was not the man who was arrested yesterday on suspicion of

:18:58.:19:01.

murder. We have also heard a lot from her colleagues, as we were just

:19:02.:19:04.

hearing them, and other colleagues who have in fact said she was

:19:05.:19:09.

receiving more malicious communication, and police were

:19:10.:19:12.

looking into this. There are reports that police were looking into

:19:13.:19:16.

beefing up the security surrounding her homes, not only in London, but

:19:17.:19:20.

in Yorkshire. And I have been speaking to Lord Kinnock, who knew

:19:21.:19:24.

her extremely well for around 20 years, and he described to me a

:19:25.:19:28.

little bit about what she was like, but also any security concerns she

:19:29.:19:29.

had. Just a little technical issue at the

:19:30.:19:41.

moment, we are just finding that. We can listen to it now, Frankie. She

:19:42.:19:49.

would use her very high intelligence for its best purpose, solving

:19:50.:19:58.

practical problems. Steve, our sun, her colleague, spoke of her last

:19:59.:20:08.

night when we talked to him, as a doer. And that is what you was, she

:20:09.:20:12.

would identify a problem and pursued, and she was prepared to

:20:13.:20:16.

fight on every front - for justice, fair play, common-sense. And this

:20:17.:20:24.

was a woman that couldn't be suppressed. If she had a fault, and

:20:25.:20:29.

I guess everybody has got a fault, it is that she was too modest. Not

:20:30.:20:38.

in any cloying way, not with false modesty, but I used to say to her

:20:39.:20:44.

sometimes, as indeed Glenys did, but a bit harder for your wife, because

:20:45.:20:49.

of the need to get her - not any selfish motive - the need to get

:20:50.:20:57.

hurt. And she just smiled and... There will always be a sort of

:20:58.:21:00.

giggle in her voice, she had that kind of voice. She was full of

:21:01.:21:12.

merriment. Are you OK? Do you... There have been some concerns and

:21:13.:21:15.

reports that she was perceiving some form of hate mail at some point

:21:16.:21:20.

macro, did she ever speak to you or her family about her personal

:21:21.:21:24.

security? Not in solemn terms like that. In any conversation,

:21:25.:21:30.

occasionally in conversation, these things crop up, when people are

:21:31.:21:37.

politically active. When we talk together. And in fact I remarked on

:21:38.:21:43.

the reality that, whilst when I was a Member of Parliament in the 1970s

:21:44.:21:51.

and 1980s, I would occasionally encounter dances that could I guess,

:21:52.:21:56.

be described as dangerous, sometimes because of political antagonism,

:21:57.:22:03.

sharply felt, and sometimes because people were just utterly hopeless.

:22:04.:22:08.

That was Lord Kinnock speaking to me just a little bit earlier, and this

:22:09.:22:13.

seems to be an issue, the security issue, that has been bubbling up

:22:14.:22:16.

over a number of years. There have been incidents in the past, and

:22:17.:22:20.

something I am sure we are going to be discussing much more in the

:22:21.:22:24.

future, Joanna. Thank you, thank you. We're going to speak to Neil

:22:25.:22:29.

Kinnock's some right now, his sun had known Jo for 20 years, and they

:22:30.:22:36.

shared an office with each other. -- son. Upsetting to see your father

:22:37.:22:41.

clearly so deeply affected by this, how are you feeling? Because she was

:22:42.:22:45.

a good family friend, wasn't she? She was, and we are absolutely

:22:46.:22:51.

devastated. It is a terrible, terrible waste, and she was such an

:22:52.:22:59.

amazing person. I have known her for 20 years, and we share an office in

:23:00.:23:03.

Westminster, and I will always remember her coming in in a cycling

:23:04.:23:08.

gear, cycling helmet, grabbing some stuff. She used to use my cupboard

:23:09.:23:12.

as a wardrobe, grabbing some stuff to get changed. We would have a

:23:13.:23:17.

chat, and you knew that if you saw Jo at the beginning of your day,

:23:18.:23:21.

your day was going to be a better day. She just had so much positive

:23:22.:23:28.

energy and optimism and, you know, she was a real fighter for the

:23:29.:23:33.

causes that she believed in, and she inspired us. She inspired all of the

:23:34.:23:39.

new intake of MPs and many, many others. She really had the street

:23:40.:23:44.

cred, she had been out there working in the refugee camps, working with

:23:45.:23:47.

the poorest and most dispossessed people on the planet. And she just

:23:48.:23:54.

had that authority about her, because of that, but also the

:23:55.:23:58.

special charisma and charm that she had, I mean, she was one in a

:23:59.:24:02.

million. She could never ever be replaced. You obviously, as you say,

:24:03.:24:08.

sharing an office, working at close quarters - did she ever talk to you

:24:09.:24:13.

about security worries? Yeah, a little while ago, I mean we all get

:24:14.:24:19.

dozens, almost on a daily basis, of vicious and aggressive e-mails and

:24:20.:24:26.

tweets and Facebook messages, whatever it might be. You just get

:24:27.:24:32.

used to it, it kind of becomes water off a duck's back, but she did

:24:33.:24:36.

mention a little while ago some kind of creepy messages which she had

:24:37.:24:40.

been getting, but I think that is what was reported in the Times

:24:41.:24:44.

today, and I do not think it was related to the tragic events of

:24:45.:24:47.

yesterday. I think that it was something else. But it reflects the

:24:48.:24:54.

fact that sometimes people develop bizarre obsessions and starts to get

:24:55.:25:01.

feelings of violence and aggression, and sometimes public figures like

:25:02.:25:05.

MPs are on the receiving end of that. MPs, when I have a

:25:06.:25:11.

constituency surgeries, are completely accessible to anybody who

:25:12.:25:15.

wants to come and see them. It was just after one of those sessions

:25:16.:25:21.

that Jo was attacked. Does that need to change? Can that change? Well, I

:25:22.:25:26.

think the fact that we are so close to our constituents and very open,

:25:27.:25:30.

and I run surgeries like that on a very regular basis as well, is

:25:31.:25:36.

really important as part of our democratic process. I think it is

:25:37.:25:39.

very important that we hold onto those and protect them as something

:25:40.:25:46.

that we hold dear. But what I think is more where we could add trying to

:25:47.:25:51.

address this issue is around the mood music. It is around the way the

:25:52.:25:58.

media lays into politicians. I mean, you know, of course we have to have

:25:59.:26:03.

a robust debate, but I think it goes over the mark sometimes, and the way

:26:04.:26:05.

politicians sometimes interact with each other, and then of course the

:26:06.:26:11.

way that all gets into the melting parts of social media, and what

:26:12.:26:14.

social media has done as with everything up, where you can, in 140

:26:15.:26:21.

characters, you can completely monster somebody in terms of their

:26:22.:26:27.

reputation, personally, their family, as individuals. That, I

:26:28.:26:32.

think, is dangerous, because it creates a permissive environment,

:26:33.:26:35.

where sometimes it is not that big a jump from saying and writing

:26:36.:26:39.

horrible stuff to actually doing something horrible. And there I

:26:40.:26:45.

think we need to have a conversation about the tone of our politics, and

:26:46.:26:49.

we need to reflect on that in the light of what has happened to Jo.

:26:50.:26:54.

You are talking about the roles of media and social media in that -

:26:55.:26:57.

what about politicians themselves? Do you think that potentially a

:26:58.:27:00.

legacy of this might be gentler politics? I mean, obviously, in the

:27:01.:27:09.

immediate aftermath of anything, people will look at the way things

:27:10.:27:14.

are done, possibly the type of politics you are talking about, but

:27:15.:27:17.

do you believe there may be a long-term impact? Well, I hope so,

:27:18.:27:22.

and I absolutely agree that you cannot just separate media, social

:27:23.:27:27.

media and politics and politicians. It is all part of one big picture,

:27:28.:27:32.

and that conversation has to take place between all of us in terms of

:27:33.:27:37.

what it means to be in public life in this UK, what sort of example we

:27:38.:27:42.

set to others. But then we have to also get some of those people out

:27:43.:27:47.

there, who are full of hatred and anger, to reflect today, and I hope,

:27:48.:27:55.

to dial it down. And while it's down in the long term, not just for a

:27:56.:28:00.

week or two weeks, whilst at the memory of this appalling thing is

:28:01.:28:05.

still raw, but for ever. I think we do need to change the tone, because

:28:06.:28:09.

if we don't, there is such a risk that this sort of thing could even

:28:10.:28:13.

happen again. And what we also have to reflect on is what Jo Cox stood

:28:14.:28:19.

for through her whole life - she stood for the values of decency and

:28:20.:28:30.

into nationalism and... -- international is. And solving

:28:31.:28:34.

problems together in the community, hope not hate, and I hope that those

:28:35.:28:41.

values that she stood for will be something that we can honour, and

:28:42.:28:51.

when I say we, everybody who has an opinion and is out on social media,

:28:52.:28:56.

they need to reflect on what Jo stood for, and they need to think

:28:57.:28:59.

about their own behaviour in that light. It is clearly very upsetting

:29:00.:29:04.

for you to talk about someone who was very dear to you. Finish, if you

:29:05.:29:12.

will, with what... When you think of Jo now, what will be the key thing

:29:13.:29:17.

about her that will come into your mind? You said before that when you

:29:18.:29:20.

met her at the start of the day, you knew the day would be good. That

:29:21.:29:26.

right, she just had that wonderful optimism and hope radiating from

:29:27.:29:31.

her, such a ball of energy, so you just had to be near her and you

:29:32.:29:35.

picked up some of that positive energy, irradiated off her. But I

:29:36.:29:39.

think I will remember her mostly as a mother, and she often used to

:29:40.:29:44.

bring the kids in, she was constantly juggling the demands of a

:29:45.:29:50.

busy job with being the mother of two young kids. They used to come

:29:51.:29:54.

in, they would draw a picture for me, we would always have a chat, two

:29:55.:29:58.

absolutely lovely kids. And I had the privilege of spending a bit of

:29:59.:30:02.

time at their cottage in Monmouthshire, so not that far from

:30:03.:30:06.

my constituency, so I did spend some lovely time there, and I remember

:30:07.:30:12.

going out on a little canoe trip just in the river by their cottage,

:30:13.:30:17.

with her and the kids and Brendan. And I will always remember that,

:30:18.:30:21.

because you saw the way that she was with those kids and how much she

:30:22.:30:28.

loved them and... I think I will probably remember her in that light,

:30:29.:30:32.

more than any other. Thank you very much, Stephen Kinnock.

:30:33.:30:38.

Lots of you have been getting in touch. Kemal has tweeted, we are all

:30:39.:30:46.

shocked, it has happened in a society of tolerance, there are no

:30:47.:30:51.

words. Martin has e-mailed to say, I want to express sympathy to all

:30:52.:30:54.

those who knew her, I am a 60-year-old veteran, I family means

:30:55.:31:01.

everything to me and my heart goes out to hers. Pam has e-mailed,

:31:02.:31:06.

terribly sad, my condolences. She spent time at the GP practice that I

:31:07.:31:11.

managed, to find out about the sharp end of primary care, a very

:31:12.:31:15.

impressive woman who was genuine in her desire to improve life for the

:31:16.:31:20.

ordinary person. Bill has e-mailed to say, she was truly robbed of her

:31:21.:31:25.

life potential, she was a radiant young lady and adoring mother. I

:31:26.:31:30.

feel sick to hear about her taking from her family and friends. William

:31:31.:31:37.

says, I did not know her but I have felt the grief and emotions, I can't

:31:38.:31:41.

believe what happened to this wonderful woman, my heart goes out

:31:42.:31:47.

to her family. Much more tributes still ahead. Also still to come, the

:31:48.:31:52.

pioneering skin cancer drugs that will be available to everyone in

:31:53.:31:56.

England after the NHS agrees to fund them. We will hear from people

:31:57.:32:00.

worried about who will care from them in old age because they don't

:32:01.:32:04.

have children. A new report says that the government should be doing

:32:05.:32:13.

more for the ageing population. Let's catch up with all of the news

:32:14.:32:18.

with Anita in the newsroom. Thank you, Joanna.

:32:19.:32:20.

Vigils have been held for the Labour MP Jo Cox who died yesterday

:32:21.:32:23.

after being shot and stabbed in an assault in her constituency.

:32:24.:32:26.

The 41-year-old mother became an MP in the general election last year.

:32:27.:32:29.

David Cameron said the killing was tragic and dreadful news.

:32:30.:32:31.

She was attacked in the village of Birstall after she held her

:32:32.:32:34.

Russian athletes will find out later today whether they will be allowed

:32:35.:32:39.

to compete in the Rio Olympics following claims

:32:40.:32:40.

Members of the world governing body of athletics

:32:41.:32:46.

are meeting in Vienna to make the decision.

:32:47.:32:48.

The team was suspended earlier this year following a damning report

:32:49.:32:51.

by the World Anti-Doping Agency which alleged systemic cheating.

:32:52.:33:03.

Barack Obama has renewed his appeal for tougher gun control

:33:04.:33:05.

measures to be introduced in the United States.

:33:06.:33:07.

The US President has met survivors and relatives

:33:08.:33:09.

of the 49 people killed in the Orlando nightclub shooting.

:33:10.:33:14.

He called on the Republican-controlled Congress

:33:15.:33:16.

to pass new legislation following the attack,

:33:17.:33:17.

and said all sides should do more to stop such mass

:33:18.:33:20.

As has been true too many times before, I held and hugged grieving

:33:21.:33:24.

And they asked, why does this keep happening?

:33:25.:33:34.

And they pleaded that we do more to stop the carnage.

:33:35.:33:41.

The Labour Party has held the south-London

:33:42.:33:43.

constituency of Tooting, previously held by Sadiq

:33:44.:33:44.

Khan who last month was elected Mayor of London.

:33:45.:33:49.

Rosena Allin-Khan, who's a junior doctor,

:33:50.:33:52.

won with a majority of more than 6,000.

:33:53.:33:54.

A two-minute silence was held during the count

:33:55.:33:56.

Ms Allin-Khan paid tribute to her, instead of giving a victory speech.

:33:57.:34:04.

The American rock star Meat Loaf has been taken to hospital

:34:05.:34:07.

after collapsing on stage during a concert in Canada.

:34:08.:34:09.

Fans at last night's show in Edmonton saw

:34:10.:34:14.

fall down while performing his hit song

:34:15.:34:18.

Canadian media reported the music venue was then cleared

:34:19.:34:21.

Meat Loaf had previously cancelled two recent concerts due to illness.

:34:22.:34:25.

That's a summary of the latest news, join me for BBC Newsroom

:34:26.:34:28.

See you later, thanks, Anita stops Sally is in Paris again. Over to

:34:29.:34:46.

you. -- thanks, Anita. If you are an England fan you will still be

:34:47.:34:49.

celebrating but heartbreak for Welsh bands after they conceded a

:34:50.:34:53.

last-minute goal. Northern Ireland are still in with a chance of

:34:54.:34:58.

qualifying for the knockout stages after beating Ukraine 2-0. Gareth

:34:59.:35:03.

McAuley put them ahead and then they had to overcome bizarre summer

:35:04.:35:06.

conditions here in France. The hailstorm caused players and

:35:07.:35:12.

officials to run for cover and the match was briefly suspended. They

:35:13.:35:15.

did not bother them much despite heavy Ukrainian pressure.

:35:16.:35:20.

Niall McGinn poked home a second goal lead in stoppage time

:35:21.:35:23.

We did not just come here to make up the numbers.

:35:24.:35:30.

The hard work happened over the past two years.

:35:31.:35:33.

Getting here is just a party from now on and it's a bonus,

:35:34.:35:36.

we are not here to make up the numbers, watch out the Germans,

:35:37.:35:39.

It's amazing, the last ten minutes were so nerve wracking,

:35:40.:35:43.

My prediction was 2-0, I'm glad we won, bring on Germany.

:35:44.:35:51.

30 years of being a Northern Ireland fan, now I know why I've done it.

:35:52.:35:57.

They changed the formation and had a completely different

:35:58.:36:00.

approach, the horizontal rain did it!

:36:01.:36:03.

It's a proud day for me, for the country as well.

:36:04.:36:10.

The first win in the European Championships, it's our first time

:36:11.:36:12.

The level of performance is what I'm most proud of, the players reacted

:36:13.:36:21.

to the defeat in the first game and the disappointment

:36:22.:36:23.

I thought today every one was magnificent.

:36:24.:36:35.

England are top of group B after beating Wales 2-1. Their first

:36:36.:36:39.

victory of this championship. Daniel Sturridge scored in injury

:36:40.:36:42.

time to clinch the dramatic win. Wales had lead at half-time before

:36:43.:36:44.

Roy Hodgson made a double substitution which paid off

:36:45.:36:47.

as Jamie Vardy equalised and then Daniel Sturridge put them

:36:48.:36:50.

on the brink of qualification with his goal, and that prompted

:36:51.:36:53.

jubilation from the manager! As you saw on the bench,

:36:54.:37:01.

probably the most spontaneous exhibition - if you like -

:37:02.:37:10.

of pure joy from myself that we have seen for a fair while,

:37:11.:37:12.

but that is what these tournaments do to you, they make

:37:13.:37:17.

certain that you suffer. We are here to get into the last 16

:37:18.:37:29.

and we have always said that. It was always the middle game of three. We

:37:30.:37:33.

are gutted. We have to move on and put this Tibet and show a reaction.

:37:34.:37:38.

We play on Monday against that of Russian team knowing that if we get

:37:39.:37:42.

a good result, then we are still in the tournament, so it is still all

:37:43.:37:43.

to play for. I think you will like this,

:37:44.:37:47.

if you want to impress Jockey Ryan Moore rode

:37:48.:37:50.

Order Of Saint George to victory in the Gold Cup at Ascot,

:37:51.:37:57.

have a look at this. The moment of the presentation, you

:37:58.:38:06.

cannot get more colour-coordinated than that! I wonder if they had a

:38:07.:38:11.

little conversation beforehand to work it out. That's it from me, I

:38:12.:38:16.

will have more sport throughout the morning. See you later, Sally.

:38:17.:38:19.

The NHS in England is to pay for two pioneering cancer drugs that use

:38:20.:38:23.

James Gallagher is here. What are these drugs and how effective have

:38:24.:38:35.

they been? Let's go back in time ten years and think what was happening

:38:36.:38:40.

to patients with advanced melanoma. The average life span was nine

:38:41.:38:43.

months after diagnosis but with these drugs, they give the immune

:38:44.:38:49.

system boost and allow it to attack cancer which we will explain in a

:38:50.:38:54.

bit, but two years after starting the therapy 69% of patients have

:38:55.:38:57.

tumours that are shrinking, most of these would have been dead before,

:38:58.:39:02.

and a fifth have no sign of cancer at all. Remarkable difference

:39:03.:39:06.

compared to ten years ago. Extraordinary. It has been so

:39:07.:39:11.

effective that it has been fast-track. This is almost unheard

:39:12.:39:15.

of in terms of the speed of drugs being officially licensed. The NHS

:39:16.:39:22.

say this will be offered to every suitable patient in England. There

:39:23.:39:28.

is a body called Nice that approves drugs for England but it is hugely

:39:29.:39:32.

influential in the rest of the UK, Wales and Northern Ireland etc will

:39:33.:39:37.

follow suit. This is great news for skin cancer treatment but in terms

:39:38.:39:40.

of the bigger picture and immunotherapy for cancer patients,

:39:41.:39:45.

does it kind of have implications for that? These have been tried, I

:39:46.:39:51.

have just returned from the world's biggest cancer conference in

:39:52.:39:56.

America, and it is the talk of the town, everybody thinks this will be

:39:57.:40:01.

one of the great pillars of cancer treatment, alongside radiotherapy,

:40:02.:40:04.

this will be the next big thing in treating cancer. One of the things

:40:05.:40:08.

that is so exciting is that it has a really long-term effect. They seem

:40:09.:40:14.

to fail after a few months, and then Michu resists the treatment and the

:40:15.:40:19.

patient dies. For immunotherapy, it only works really well in a small

:40:20.:40:23.

subset of patients but for those for whom it works it lasts for years

:40:24.:40:27.

with a really beneficial effect. Thank you very much. Let's talk more

:40:28.:40:31.

about the tragic loss of Jo Cox. Her husband Brendan posted this

:40:32.:40:42.

photograph and said she had an energy and zest for life that would

:40:43.:40:47.

exhaust most people. They divided their time between their

:40:48.:40:50.

constituency in West Yorkshire and living in a houseboat on the Thames.

:40:51.:40:54.

Their commute to Westminster was something out of the ordinary, too.

:40:55.:40:58.

Normally I hope to be zipping down to the House of Commons about half

:40:59.:41:05.

an hour away from where I live. On a little speedboat. This is a way to

:41:06.:41:10.

start the day, isn't it?! Yorkshire born and bred, she only became an MP

:41:11.:41:15.

last year and at that time she spoke of her joy at representing her proud

:41:16.:41:21.

and no-nonsense constituency. The spirit of nonconformity is as

:41:22.:41:24.

present now in my part of West Yorkshire as it was in the time of

:41:25.:41:30.

my two media predecessors, Mike would and Elizabeth Peacock. They

:41:31.:41:34.

were both known for their own brand of independent, nonconformist

:41:35.:41:38.

service. Albeit in very different ways. I intend to maintain that

:41:39.:41:43.

established tradition in my own unique style. Before her election

:41:44.:41:49.

she was a tireless campaigner, and aid worker. She spent ten years

:41:50.:41:53.

working in international development which took her to conflict zones

:41:54.:41:57.

around the world. She met her husband Brendan working for Oxfam

:41:58.:42:02.

who described her as a passionate campaigner on humanitarian issues.

:42:03.:42:05.

She worked closely with Sarah Brent on, the wife of former Prime

:42:06.:42:10.

Minister Gordon Brown. When we spoke to her last October she called

:42:11.:42:14.

repeatedly for Britain to do more to help the victims of the Syrian Civil

:42:15.:42:19.

War. I spent ten years as an aid worker in many conflict zones around

:42:20.:42:24.

the world and I have seen that military intervention saves lives,

:42:25.:42:28.

it did in Kosovo, Bosnia and Sierra Leone. A case can be made when you

:42:29.:42:33.

have an intervention grounded in the protection of innocent civilians,

:42:34.:42:36.

and military component can save lives. My big proposal when we

:42:37.:42:40.

debate this will be that the government should consider a no

:42:41.:42:44.

bombing zone to stop President Assad raining down aerial bombardment on

:42:45.:42:49.

innocent people, killing grandmothers and mums and dads, and

:42:50.:42:54.

change the dynamic and force him to the table.

:42:55.:42:58.

Holly Lynch is the Labour MP for Halifax and was

:42:59.:43:00.

Holly, thank you for joining us at this very difficult time. How close

:43:01.:43:13.

were you to Jo? We were both newly elected last year, both obviously

:43:14.:43:18.

MPs from the same area of West Yorkshire. Both represented quite

:43:19.:43:22.

similar constituencies actually, we would regularly swap notes about

:43:23.:43:28.

what was working, what was best practice, the challenges we had and

:43:29.:43:32.

how to share information and good ideas about campaigns. She really

:43:33.:43:36.

was an incredible woman and I was her whip as well when I was asked to

:43:37.:43:40.

join the whip's office towards the end of last year. We had a close

:43:41.:43:44.

working relationship but we were good friends as well. What did you

:43:45.:43:51.

take from her? She really was like people have already said, a ball of

:43:52.:43:54.

energy, she was incredibly dynamic in the way she went about her

:43:55.:43:58.

politics and she came in with a real clarity of what she was trying to

:43:59.:44:01.

achieve in Westminster. She really did not waste any time in getting on

:44:02.:44:06.

with that. We have heard tributes from right across the chamber, right

:44:07.:44:10.

across the benches and all over the UK, she really did build support for

:44:11.:44:14.

the arguments she was making from everywhere, and that was grounded in

:44:15.:44:26.

her vast experience of the issues that she was quite often working on.

:44:27.:44:29.

She would take people with her and was really able to make a difference

:44:30.:44:32.

in Westminster in the time that she had on that basis. It was said that

:44:33.:44:35.

she seemingly had more hours in the day than anyone because of how much

:44:36.:44:37.

she packed in, what was her secret? I really could not tell you, I do

:44:38.:44:42.

not know. As we have heard she was rooted in her family as well, two

:44:43.:44:48.

young kids, the kids recently had chickenpox, and she would always

:44:49.:44:51.

update you on the trials and tribulations of being a working mum

:44:52.:44:55.

with two young children, she was besotted with them. On top of that

:44:56.:45:00.

she was this incredibly dynamic MP who managed to achieve so much and

:45:01.:45:04.

she really did set the standard for all of us. About what was possible

:45:05.:45:09.

when you really got stuck in, and this is such a tragedy that she just

:45:10.:45:12.

had those humans with us in Westminster. -- those few months.

:45:13.:45:20.

It seems a lot of people were looking at where her career may have

:45:21.:45:25.

led, what were your thoughts? She had a confidence in our own

:45:26.:45:30.

convictions, when she was speaking, that was very much rooted in her

:45:31.:45:35.

vast experience. When she spoke, she knew she had a mandate to represent

:45:36.:45:38.

those people who had elected. She really did get on with the job, and

:45:39.:45:45.

you could see she was going to go on to great things in Westminster. So,

:45:46.:45:49.

so sad that you won't have the opportunity to do that. Yeah. There

:45:50.:45:54.

has been research done on the vulnerability of MPs, because of the

:45:55.:46:00.

nature of the job. I mean, obviously, what happened to her

:46:01.:46:04.

happened after she had been in contact with constituents, it is

:46:05.:46:07.

something that all MPs do when they go to their constituency, and meet

:46:08.:46:13.

local people, whether it is in a formal session or whether they are

:46:14.:46:18.

out shopping or whatever it is. Did she ever talk to you about any

:46:19.:46:24.

concerns? Well, I think, for all of us that came in in 2015, you do have

:46:25.:46:29.

to get used to the way Westminster works, but also you do have to get

:46:30.:46:33.

quite thick skin quite quickly, actually. It took all us back a

:46:34.:46:38.

little bit, because the nature of the jobs that you engaged with a lot

:46:39.:46:43.

of people, and the nature of democracy is you meet people with a

:46:44.:46:46.

different opinion to yours. You have to listen to all of those, and you

:46:47.:46:50.

try to take those views and opinions with you in your decision-making.

:46:51.:46:54.

There is a challenge, I think, and how we manage that. We have seen

:46:55.:46:58.

that there are people who struggle to articulate that in a way that is

:46:59.:47:03.

responsible and respectable, in going about their business of an MP

:47:04.:47:07.

and engaging on issues where you might have different opinions, but

:47:08.:47:11.

you have already mentioned that Jo was just going about her business as

:47:12.:47:15.

a hard-working MP in a constituency. She was holding an advice surgery,

:47:16.:47:20.

something we all do. You try to make yourself as available as possible as

:47:21.:47:25.

an MP. And so we do have to think about how we can ensure the safety

:47:26.:47:29.

of those people coming to the surgery as well, but our staff, who

:47:30.:47:33.

are often with us, and it would be really sad if we have to change the

:47:34.:47:39.

way we start engaging with people to reflect these very serious but

:47:40.:47:42.

unusual incidents. Holly, thank you very much for joining us with your

:47:43.:47:46.

memories and thoughts this morning. Thank you. Much more coverage coming

:47:47.:47:53.

up on the sad death of Jo Cox with any two Newsroom Live -- with Anita

:47:54.:48:01.

on Newsroom Live. Do you ever worry about who will

:48:02.:48:03.

take care of you in old age? Many elderly people can rely

:48:04.:48:06.

on their children for extra support. But what about those

:48:07.:48:09.

who don't have children? Many say they feel

:48:10.:48:11.

invisible or ignored - according to the charity Ageing

:48:12.:48:13.

without Children - which is calling for a national strategy to deal

:48:14.:48:16.

with issues around ageing. One in five people over the age

:48:17.:48:19.

of 50 don't have children. Britain is an ageing society,

:48:20.:48:21.

with approximately 23 million The number of people aged 60

:48:22.:48:25.

or over is expected to pass A separate adult social care

:48:26.:48:32.

inquiry was launched Here to discuss this

:48:33.:48:36.

issue is Kirsty Woodard, the founder of

:48:37.:48:42.

Ageing without Children She has cared for her elderly mother

:48:43.:48:46.

with dementia for ten years, Ming is worried about who will look

:48:47.:48:51.

after her when she gets older. Sue Lister is 71,

:48:52.:48:56.

and a lesbian with no children. Her partner Anne has children

:48:57.:48:59.

and grandchildren in Vancouver. Thank you all very much for joining

:49:00.:49:16.

us for this conversation. Kirsty, you founded the charity DRS, why did

:49:17.:49:22.

you decide to do that? I have spent 20 years working with older people,

:49:23.:49:25.

so I have always been passionately interested in the effect of ageing

:49:26.:49:29.

on society, but it was really when I came to realise about two years ago

:49:30.:49:33.

that I would never have children of my own that I suddenly thought, what

:49:34.:49:37.

about the older people I have worked with who do not have family? That is

:49:38.:49:42.

going to be me in a 30 or 40 years' time, what is going to happen to me?

:49:43.:49:46.

Because I had seen what had happened to them, and I thought, we have to

:49:47.:49:50.

do better than this, we have to have solutions, because it is a growing

:49:51.:49:55.

number of the population now. And what have you seen happening to

:49:56.:50:00.

people getting old without children? Generally speaking, they are

:50:01.:50:08.

overlooked and ignored, not because people were overtly being horrible

:50:09.:50:09.

or anything, but generally speaking, if they were in a hospital bed, and

:50:10.:50:12.

there were not children to advocate for them, or come along and make

:50:13.:50:16.

sure that they had water or were being taken to the loo or whatever,

:50:17.:50:21.

because the nursing staff are very stretched in rushing about, often

:50:22.:50:25.

they would just get overlooked. I have seen, again, people I had

:50:26.:50:28.

worked with who were trying to get support from social care, buried of

:50:29.:50:32.

the girls to navigate that system on your own. -- very difficult to

:50:33.:50:40.

navigate. Often I would be working with people and their children, we

:50:41.:50:45.

would be getting services in place. People without children, they don't

:50:46.:50:49.

have that extra person to help, they don't have that extra hand who is

:50:50.:50:53.

kind of holding and saying, you know, it will be OK, we will sort

:50:54.:50:58.

this out. Ming, you have been this person for your mum, and now we were

:50:59.:51:02.

worried there is no-one for you when you get older. I did not become

:51:03.:51:07.

consciously worried about it, but it occurred to me when I noticed the

:51:08.:51:12.

campaign, and I thought, gosh, yes, that does apply to me. You don't go

:51:13.:51:15.

through your life, thinking, what will happen to me when I get older?

:51:16.:51:19.

The campaign is encouraging people to think about those issues before

:51:20.:51:23.

it becomes a practical necessity. Because my mum has dementia, she has

:51:24.:51:28.

had it coming on her for 20 years, and throughout all of that time she

:51:29.:51:31.

has retained a level of quite good social function. So she has never

:51:32.:51:36.

considered that she needed help at all, but she was not aware of the

:51:37.:51:41.

increasing needs that she had, and I gradually assumed all of those

:51:42.:51:45.

responsibilities. It is supple, it is gradual, it comes up over a long

:51:46.:51:49.

period of time, and it is only when it gets into crisis mode that you

:51:50.:51:53.

realise how much it does entail. And if you had not been a glance, what

:51:54.:51:57.

do you think would have happened? I do not think my mum would be here

:51:58.:52:03.

today. She's coming up on 90 now, and I am lucky she is in a good

:52:04.:52:08.

home, which I have trust in, but if she had not been able to find a

:52:09.:52:12.

place there, if I had not found that place and supported her to live well

:52:13.:52:17.

in it now, frankly, I don't think she would be alive now. She was

:52:18.:52:20.

getting into crisis regularly before she went into care, not being able

:52:21.:52:27.

to feed herself, look after her domestic circumstances, finances,

:52:28.:52:32.

physical abilities, appointments, advocacy, everything, really. It

:52:33.:52:37.

puts a big burden on you. Yes, it is, and you do it because you love

:52:38.:52:41.

somebody when it is your family, you do it without thinking, because that

:52:42.:52:44.

is the way your relationship works. That is what people need to

:52:45.:52:49.

consider, advocacy is a huge part of caring for someone, and if you do

:52:50.:52:53.

not have that emotional investment, it is hard to think you will take on

:52:54.:52:57.

that level of responsibility. Sue, you have no children of your own,

:52:58.:53:04.

your partner has children in Canada, are you worried about who will fill

:53:05.:53:10.

that role for you as you get older? No, because the quality of life is

:53:11.:53:14.

what I care about, so when my quality of life gets beyond what I

:53:15.:53:23.

am willing that my if I am in pain, I am a campaign, so the whole spirit

:53:24.:53:29.

of Jo Cox is in fusing me and the millions of people who campaign for

:53:30.:53:32.

a more peaceful and a better life around the world. I have joined

:53:33.:53:40.

Dignity In Dying so that if I am within six months of a terminal

:53:41.:53:46.

illness, I want the right to die. I am an atheist, my life is my

:53:47.:53:49.

responsibility, I want to die when I want to die, whose life is it

:53:50.:53:55.

anyway? So I am not worried about it, but what I have done is start

:53:56.:54:01.

following Kirsty's campaign, starting a group in York, and there

:54:02.:54:09.

the people from a total range of reasons why they are there. 50 years

:54:10.:54:12.

married and now they are living alone with no children, never having

:54:13.:54:19.

had children, wondering where to turn. We did a survey, 35% of people

:54:20.:54:25.

did not know where to turn, they were blank, they haven't thought

:54:26.:54:30.

about it. Somebody said that the social services, God help us!

:54:31.:54:35.

Another one said, if it gets too bad, I'd rather die. The Government,

:54:36.:54:43.

this needs to be put on the agenda. People need to do the thinking - if

:54:44.:54:48.

we have got a hugely ageing society, with a huge percentage of people,

:54:49.:55:06.

especially in lesbian, gay, bi and trans, 80% of whom do not have

:55:07.:55:09.

children, we need to put this on the agenda and take care of each other.

:55:10.:55:17.

Kirsty, Ming outline the list of things she does for her mum, how do

:55:18.:55:21.

you find someone who does not have the emotional investment to fulfil

:55:22.:55:26.

that role? What are your answers to this issue? Well, that is one of the

:55:27.:55:30.

reasons why we did the report, was to try and think of some solutions,

:55:31.:55:35.

because at the moment there are not a lot of solutions at there. One of

:55:36.:55:39.

the things we are calling for is a national strategy, because this is a

:55:40.:55:44.

very big problem, a wicked problem, and we need everybody to get around

:55:45.:55:47.

the table and work together to come up with solutions. We talk in the

:55:48.:55:52.

report about investment in advocacy services, we certainly need that.

:55:53.:55:57.

Are there many services as at the moment? Do they do a good job?

:55:58.:56:02.

Advocacy services are fantastic, but they are incredibly overstretched,

:56:03.:56:07.

and are funded. They rely mostly on local authority funding. We know how

:56:08.:56:13.

hard that is being hit. Or they are lying on funding from charitable

:56:14.:56:20.

trusts, which is time-limited. -- they are relying. Sue, I heard what

:56:21.:56:25.

you said, obviously, about the fact that quality of life is what matters

:56:26.:56:30.

to you, and it did not seem to be link with a lack of having children

:56:31.:56:34.

- do you think you would feel differently if you did have children

:56:35.:56:37.

to guide you through your final days? I have never wanted children.

:56:38.:56:48.

I joined a group in Vancouver called No Kidding because of the stigma

:56:49.:56:51.

attached to people who did not want children, had never wanted children,

:56:52.:56:58.

and had travelled the world, had explored, have lived a life full of

:56:59.:57:10.

curious at Yanda wonder and awe. My family line comes to an end with my

:57:11.:57:15.

sister, myself and my brother. That is it. Actually, we are hoping the

:57:16.:57:18.

human population to keep itself down. But I am not worried about

:57:19.:57:26.

that, because I am living life to the full, now. It is very important

:57:27.:57:34.

to appreciate what we are given, and I am looking through this campaign

:57:35.:57:41.

to create peer support and peer caring, so that our groups, the

:57:42.:57:51.

ageing groups without children can and stand what it is like and be

:57:52.:57:56.

there for one another. Thank you all very much. BBC newsroom life is

:57:57.:58:03.

coming up next. Thank you for your company today. -- Newsroom Life.

:58:04.:58:11.

Rebecca has e-mailed, I never knew Jo Cox, but we are so shocked that

:58:12.:58:16.

this could happen to a vibrant mother, wife and MP. Amanda has

:58:17.:58:20.

said, tears for Jo Cox, such a tragic waste of a beautiful soul.

:58:21.:58:24.

There are more tributes coming up on the BBC News Channel. Bye-bye.

:58:25.:58:32.

Hello, there. You left us a voicemail

:58:33.:58:33.

stating you were interested in our mediation services.

:58:34.:58:37.

Politicians, friends and the public pay tribute to MP Jo Cox who was killed on Thursday. Russian athletes await a decision on being able to compete in Rio. And what is it like to grow old without children?