01/07/2016 Victoria Derbyshire


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01/07/2016

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Hello, it's nine o'clock, I'm Joanna Gosling,

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Commemorations are being held here and in France to mark

:00:11.:00:14.

the 100th anniversary of the Battle of the Somme.

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It was one of the bloodiest battles of the First World War -

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more than one million men were killed and wounded.

:00:30.:00:33.

As Michael Gove, Justice Secretary and would-be Prime Minister,

:00:34.:00:36.

prepares to delivers his pitch for the top job, we'll look

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back on one of the most tumultuous weeks in politics.

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Plus a special report from Great Yarmouth,

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which saw one of the highest referendum Leave

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We'll hear from residents about their concerns

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We are not a racist town. We are concerned about job losses. My

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biggest fear is that the British people will be taken over by

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immigration. I fear that these people will come in without any

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conditions. It will be unlimited. Hello, welcome to the programme,

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we're live until 11 this morning. We'd love to hear what you make

:01:19.:01:22.

of the last seven days. Wherever you stand on the EU,

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whichever party you support, I'm sure you'll agree it's been

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a roller-coaster of a week. Do get in touch on all the stories

:01:28.:01:31.

we're talking about this morning - use #VictoriaLive, and if you text,

:01:32.:01:35.

you will be charged at the standard People have fallen silent

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across Europe this morning for two minutes to mark the centenary of one

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of the bloodiest battles of the First World War:

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the Battle of the Somme. More than 19,000 British

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soldiers lost their lives on the first day alone,

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the worst day in the history More than one million servicemen

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were killed or injured on all sides as the British and French

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armies fought the Germans. As the time approached, the Kings

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first artillery fire their guns. Then silence, as people stopped to

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remember. At the Grave of the Unknown Warrior

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in Westminster Abbey, in Edinburgh, at the Scottish

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National War Memorial, at the Somme Museum

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in Northern Ireland. In Wales, at cafes Park in Cardiff.

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Children were silent at the National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire.

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And in France, at the Thiepval Memorial,

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Then, as Big Ben chimed, the sound of whistles,

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the signal that sent the men over the top,

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This was one of the sites where the battle began,

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At precisely 28 minutes past seven,

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British soldiers had tunnelled through the trenches

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underneath the German lines to plant explosives.

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What remains is the Lochnagar Crater,

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almost 300 feet in diameter and 70 feet deep.

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It has been preserved so people will never forget.

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Today, children laid a wreath of conciliation, representing

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the 21 nations from where people lost their lives and were injured.

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that we will not let the stories from this place be forgotten.

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And I think the desire to pay tribute, to remember, to honour our

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respective nation 's war dead, has not diminished. And we still feel

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the need to be here. All through the night,

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vigils were held around the country. Now the nation remembers that first

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day of the battle. In Exeter, each of the 19,240 soldiers who died on

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this day, have been represented by a 12 inch figure wrapped and bowed in

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a hand-stitched shroud, another symbol that they will never be

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forgotten. Sophie Long is at a service

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of remembrance at the Thiepval We are listening to very rousing

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music being played by the BBC Symphony Orchestra. Most of the

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10,000 guests here today have now taken their seats. In the next hour

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or so we are expecting the VIPs to arrive, several members of the Royal

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family. Prince Charles will be here with the Duchess of Cornwall, the

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Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry. We are expecting David

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Cameron and President Hollande to attend. Before the service gets

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under way, a film will be played. The Battle of the Somme. It was

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filmed by two cameramen during the Battle 100 years ago. They were

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filming in the front line. It was played in 1916 to more than 22

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million people. At an early stage the Battle of the Somme became part

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of the national consciousness. After that, we are going to hear the

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stories of a lot of men who fought here. Men who didn't go home. The

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Thiepval Memorial was inaugurated in 1932 and has been a focal point of

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commemorating and remembering what happened here 100 years ago. It is

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hard to imagine, but on this day, the first day of the Battle of the

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Somme, this would have been a battlefield. So many people know the

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horrors that unfolded. There was hope it was going to be a decisive

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battle but that was not the case. It ended up being the bloodiest day in

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British military history. On that Memorial, the names of 72,000 men,

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all of whom fought here and were never found. Towards the end of the

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ceremony, Rita Will be laid by Prince Charles and President

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Hollande, and 300 Reddish schoolchildren and 300 French

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schoolchildren will lay floral tributes at the graves of many

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unknown soldiers at the other side of the memorial.

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Now a summary of the rest of the day's news.

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The civil war in the Conservative Party continues,

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as Michael Gove prepares to set out why he thinks he should

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be the party's leader and our next Prime Minister.

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His declaration yesterday that he would run is seen by some

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as a betrayal of his fellow Brexiteer, and previous

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Meanwhile, in the Labour camp, Angela Eagle yesterday

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postponed her anticipated decision to challenge Jeremy Corbyn,

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though the Labour leader remains under intense pressure

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Let's get more from our political correspondent

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Let's talk about Michael Gove. And absolutely stinging attack from Ken

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Clarke? It has been an extraordinary 24-hour is in Westminster because of

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this race in the Conservative Party. We had these surprising events

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yesterday in which not just Michael Gove entered the race, but Boris

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Johnson pulled out of the race. Nobody was expecting that. What we

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have had this morning is more of the fallout, with Kenneth Clarke, the

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euro friendly Tory grandee, laying into Mr Gove and saying, it is time

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for him to step down. This is too much of a distraction, he believes,

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to the substance of the challenge the Prime Minister is going to face.

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Withdrawing Britain from the European Union, disentangling

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ourselves from 40 years of law and legislation, trying to get a good

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deal on trade. All while trying to bring down immigration. We have the

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Civil War on the front benches of the Conservative Party between some

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of those leading figures after the events of yesterday. Who is falling

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behind who? We are seeing some shifting sands of support. And some

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very hostile headlines about Michael Gove. Words like betrayal, treachery

:08:25.:08:30.

being used. Saying that Boris Johnson was Brexecuted over this.

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What we have later is Michael Gove setting out his pitch for what he

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wants to be Prime Minister. I'm sure that will help to distract from some

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of the personality politics. I spoke to Dominic Rabb, a key ally of

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Michael Gove. He is backing him for his bid to be leader and Prime

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Minister. I put to him some of those issues about the questions about Mr

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Gove. Frankly, it feels to many people

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outside in the country, like the parlour games of the Westminster

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village. When the dust settles we have a huge decision to make this

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country, who will lead us forward. We have great candidates but there

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is one candidate, Michael Gove, who has the vision to lead us out of the

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EU in a positive and optimistic way, or raising the life chances of our

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children. They are the two golden ingredients we need in a leader.

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Things are not looking any more settled for a Labour?

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Absolutely. The turmoil continues. Since Sunday we have had a mass

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exodus from the Labour front benches. Jeremy Corbyn still has

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dozens of Shadow ministerial post he has to fill. We have what was

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looking like a leader -- leadership challenge from Angela Eagle do to be

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announced yesterday. That did not happen. We wait to see what happens

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today. We are going to get John McDonnell, the Shadow Chancellor, a

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big ally of Mr Corbyn, giving a speech later about the economic

:10:00.:10:07.

impact in his view of Brexit. That that will be an attempt by Mr

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McDonnell to show that the leadership continues. Trying to be

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in opposition. I think those questions about Mr Corbyn and

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potentially the challenge go on. Tom Bateman.

:10:17.:10:17.

MPs are urging the Government to make radical changes

:10:18.:10:20.

to the laws on prostitution in England and Wales.

:10:21.:10:22.

The Home Affairs Select Committee says soliciting should no longer be

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a crime for sex workers, and those who have a criminal record

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for offences related to prostitution should

:10:29.:10:30.

Scientists say they've discovered the first clear evidence

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that the ozone layer over Antarctica has begun to heal.

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Last year, the hole had shrunk since the year 2000 by an amount

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Scientists say it may be down to the phasing out of ozone-harming

:10:44.:10:48.

The electric car company Tesla is being investigated

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in the United States after one of its cars crashed into a lorry

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while on autopilot, killing its driver.

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It's believed to be the first death linked to the technology,

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which takes control of the car to change lanes

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The car maker says drivers were warned to keep their hands

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on the steering wheel even when autopilot is engaged.

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That's a summary of the latest BBC News, more at 9:30.

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In a moment we'll have more on an extraordinary week in politics.

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Do get in touch with us throughout the morning, use #VictoriaLive,

:11:26.:11:30.

and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.

:11:31.:11:37.

Let's ketchup with all the sport. We can get latest from Tim.

:11:38.:11:46.

Good morning. Extraordinary for Wales in the last few weeks. They

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are getting ready for their most important match in 50 ages. Chris

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Coleman's side Aaron Lille to take on Belgium. -- 50 years. Their

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captain, Ashley Williams, is fit to play after being taken off against

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Northern Ireland at the weekend. For Welsh football fans, it does not get

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any bigger than this, does it, Katie Gornall? No, it doesn't. They are

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within a whisker of the semifinal for the first time in a major

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tournament. We have seen more Wales fans arriving during the morning. A

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lot of Belgium fans as well. Wales fans making themselves heard last

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night. They will be heavily outnumbered here today. We are just

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more -- less than ten miles from the Belgian border. We might as well be

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in Belgium. There are a Belgian flags flying above the square. Above

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the municipal buildings as well. We are expecting 150,000 fans to come

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to the stadium today. Wales will have to be in fine voice. They are

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the underdogs but it is a very special moment for this country,

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something Wales fans have been talking to me about. Something

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Gareth Bale has been discussing, but his pride in seeing Wales here.

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It is amazing to be in the round of 16 and to get the victory. To have

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our families there, it was amazing to share it with them. Obviously the

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kids came on at the end. It was emotional. We have not seen them in

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a long time. We can look back at pictures and videos and have an

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amazing memory of that time. Hopefully there's more to come. Why

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have Wales done so well? There has been a lot of talk about their team

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spirit in tournament. That is right. spirit in tournament. That is right.

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Their team spirit, we have seen, is very strong. Their work ethic.

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Everyone on this team has contributed. I think a lot has to be

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said for the contribution of Gareth Bale. He is their star player, the

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world's most expensive player. He has scored three goals already. He

:13:54.:13:57.

has been one of the standout players at Euro 2016. They know they are the

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underdogs coming into this game against Belgium, ranked second in

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the world. Wales do have a good record against them. They took four

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points off them in qualifying. They have to play better than they did

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against Northern Ireland. They had to rely on an goal. It big test for

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Wales against Belgium. The good news is they have their captain, Ashley

:14:24.:14:27.

Williams, back. They can look to that good record. And also, Belgium

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have some problems in defence. An injury and suspension. That is

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something Wales will look to exploit. If they can do that, they

:14:35.:14:38.

will reach their first-ever semifinal in a major tournament and

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play Portugal. First, they have to get past Belgium tonight. And what a

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prize it is. Katie Gornall. Very excited about this match. Just

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11 hours to wait. Yes, come on, Wales!

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It's a week since the country voted to leave the EU and it's fair to say

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it would have been hard to predict just how much political upheaval

:15:04.:15:06.

We've lost a Prime Minister, kicking off a leadership contest

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and Labour MPs are in open revolt against their leader.

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There's barely anyone left to figure out

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how we actually go about leaving the EU in practice.

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You're not the only one, here's a quick reminder.

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If the EU referendum was supposed to provide clarity

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about the UK's future, it did anything but.

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But the British people have made a very clear decision

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to take a different path, and as such, I think the country

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requires fresh leadership to take it in this direction.

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It is therefore a statement of the obvious that the option

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of a second referendum must be on the table,

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On Sunday, Labour MPs began calling for their party's leader,

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I no longer had confidence in his leadership,

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and he then dismissed me from the Shadow Cabinet.

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I feel that I have served in the best way I can

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12 members had left Jeremy Corbyn's team

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of Shadow Cabinet ministers, believing their leader had failed

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to campaign hard enough to keep the UK in the EU.

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The total number would later reach 20.

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But if they thought it would be a knockout blow, it wasn't.

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Don't let those people who wish us ill divide us.

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for the kind of world we want to live in.

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At the same time, Tory front runners began jostling

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for position with Boris Johnson the early favourite.

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He showed that he had gone up a level, I think,

:16:56.:16:58.

in people's estimation, in the debates.

:16:59.:17:03.

On Tuesday, the limelight fell back on Corbyn

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as he unveiled his new Shadow Cabinet.

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Later that day, however, MPs in his own party passed

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a motion of no confidence in him by 172 votes to 40.

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But he was not the only person we were all talking about.

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I know that virtually none of you have ever done a proper

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Or worked in business, or worked in trade,

:17:23.:17:31.

Nigel Farage told the EU what he thought of them,

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The British people voted in favour of the exit, why are you here?

:17:41.:17:50.

While Scottish MEP Alyn Smith fought for his country's EU status.

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Remember this. Scotland did not let you down.

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Please, I beg you, chers collegues, do not let Scotland down now!

:18:03.:18:08.

By Wednesday, deputy Labour leader Tom Watson said Corbyn

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Corbyn was putting the party at risk of long-term damage by staying put.

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My party is in peril. We are facing an existential crisis.

:18:19.:18:21.

And I just don't want us to be in this position

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because I think there are millions of people in the country

:18:25.:18:27.

who need a left-leaning government who can give people opportunity.

:18:28.:18:30.

It might be in my party's interest for him to sit there,

:18:31.:18:37.

And I would say, for heaven's sake, man, go!

:18:38.:18:42.

Angela Eagle seems likely to mount a challenge against Corbyn,

:18:43.:18:49.

while five contenders are trying to become the next Conservative

:18:50.:18:51.

Boris Johnson ruled himself out of the race.

:18:52.:19:00.

Having consulted colleagues, and in view of the circumstances

:19:01.:19:05.

in Parliament, I have concluded that person cannot be me.

:19:06.:19:10.

The favourites to become the next Prime Minister

:19:11.:19:14.

are now Theresa May and Michael Gove.

:19:15.:19:16.

Under my leadership, the Conservative Party will be able

:19:17.:19:19.

to come back together and govern, not just in the interests

:19:20.:19:22.

of the 17 million Leave voters, or 16 million Remain voters,

:19:23.:19:25.

but in the interests of the whole country.

:19:26.:19:30.

This is about making sure that our country can make a success

:19:31.:19:35.

through the challenges and the opportunities that lie ahead.

:19:36.:19:37.

The next leader should be in place by early September,

:19:38.:19:40.

when proper negotiations with EU leaders can begin.

:19:41.:19:43.

Maybe then we will see a period of stability, perhaps.

:19:44.:19:54.

who worked for Nick Clegg while he was Deputy Prime Minister.

:19:55.:20:03.

Sean Worth was a special adviser to David Cameron

:20:04.:20:05.

Michael Jacobs, special adviser to the former Prime Minister

:20:06.:20:09.

And joining us down the line is Geoff Aberdein,

:20:10.:20:14.

who was Alex Salmond's chief of staff during Scottish

:20:15.:20:16.

Thank you all for joining us. That was quite a punch line from Boris

:20:17.:20:27.

Johnson yesterday, were you are shocked as everyone else? Yeah,

:20:28.:20:32.

definitely, I think a lot of the people in his team, certainly his

:20:33.:20:43.

supporters, were shocked by the move from Michael Gove, people talking

:20:44.:20:46.

today about treachery, stabbing him in the back. The important thing is

:20:47.:20:49.

to have this flushed out now, because I do not think he will be

:20:50.:20:55.

fleshed out in the first round of voting, which ends on Tuesday, see

:20:56.:20:59.

if he can get back onto the policy agenda. That is the biggest issue

:21:00.:21:04.

for him, the move on Boris. I mentioned you work for David

:21:05.:21:07.

Cameron, over the years there has been so much speculation about who

:21:08.:21:13.

harbours which ambitions, and in a week all of these things have

:21:14.:21:17.

unfolded at speed. What have you been thinking? I always suspected

:21:18.:21:22.

that Michael Gove might have this ambition, he denies it, but he is

:21:23.:21:26.

very well liked, and people in the party say they would like him to do

:21:27.:21:30.

it. Yesterday, he was saying that people pushed there and all that,

:21:31.:21:34.

and I always suspected that, but I didn't think it would come about

:21:35.:21:40.

like this. So yeah, huge surprise. Polly, what you think about what is

:21:41.:21:47.

going on? For Michael, it is all about framing this as a debate about

:21:48.:21:54.

what happens next, because Theresa was in the Remain campaign, and if

:21:55.:21:58.

he can define this as, who can you trust to pull as out of the EU, he

:21:59.:22:03.

has got a chance of winning. I always expected Michael would do

:22:04.:22:06.

this, he was so polished in his denials about wanting to be Prime

:22:07.:22:10.

Minister, you have to be a bit suspicious of that. It is treachery

:22:11.:22:17.

laid bare for voters to see in a way that we have not seen very often in

:22:18.:22:22.

politics. It does feel like a political thriller, but in a way

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Michael can use that to his advantage. He has sacrificed all of

:22:25.:22:29.

his personal friendships for the sake of Brexit, and if you are a

:22:30.:22:37.

passionate Brexiter, which so many Conservative Grassroots members are,

:22:38.:22:41.

that is what you want, someone who put it before personal friendships.

:22:42.:22:45.

Michael, everybody is talking about politics right now, we have talked

:22:46.:22:49.

to some eight times around elections that voters are not necessarily that

:22:50.:22:54.

engaged, but it seems it is all anyone is talking about. The tragedy

:22:55.:22:59.

for the country is that at a time when we are facing a huge

:23:00.:23:03.

constitutional, foreign policy, economic crisis as a result of the

:23:04.:23:07.

referendum, the Conservative Party, which runs the Government, is

:23:08.:23:10.

embroiled in a very nasty and rather shallow leadership debate. And the

:23:11.:23:17.

Labour Party is... And the Labour Party has also fallen apart. If you

:23:18.:23:22.

are a voter who trusts or want to trust you had these to take

:23:23.:23:25.

decisions about what the country is doing, you are looking at gassed at

:23:26.:23:30.

the political class, and we are running into very serious economic

:23:31.:23:34.

problems, and we neither have an economic policy from the Government

:23:35.:23:37.

nor do we have one from the opposition. That is a betrayal of

:23:38.:23:41.

the people who voted in the referendum last week, and it shows

:23:42.:23:47.

that this was a referendum called on shallow grounds, not a serious

:23:48.:23:50.

attempt to run the country, and I think the Prime Minister needs to

:23:51.:23:54.

take a share of the blame, a very large share of the blame for calling

:23:55.:24:02.

the referendum. Geoff, you worked with Alex Salmond, he went after the

:24:03.:24:07.

Scottish referendum was lost, and there was a coronation of Nicola

:24:08.:24:12.

Sturgeon, a smooth transition. Looking at the aftermath of this

:24:13.:24:17.

referendum, what you think? You are right, the benefits of a smooth

:24:18.:24:21.

transition of there for all to see, the SNP have gained from the Labour

:24:22.:24:27.

Party in Scotland. It is not just the SNP, though, in Scotland in

:24:28.:24:31.

general we have seen Ruth Davidson taking over from Annabel Goldie, a

:24:32.:24:36.

seamless transition, and she is a formidable leader in Scotland. Kezia

:24:37.:24:40.

Dugdale is respected as an up and coming leader. We look in Scotland,

:24:41.:24:47.

what is happening in Westminster, I heard the civil war described as a

:24:48.:24:50.

political thriller, but I think it is a political horror. It does not

:24:51.:24:55.

describe my experience of politics in Scotland. There is something to

:24:56.:24:57.

be said for the smooth transition process. You have had experience of

:24:58.:25:04.

an attempt with Gordon Brown. There is a huge difference between what

:25:05.:25:08.

happened in the Scottish referendum, where the result, though close, was

:25:09.:25:12.

for the status quo, and the earthquake here and the country.

:25:13.:25:17.

Really, that comparison doesn't hold. It is not surprising things

:25:18.:25:21.

were relatively smooth in Scotland, we didn't have that as quake. And

:25:22.:25:25.

you cannot have a coronation to an obvious new leader when the parties

:25:26.:25:28.

are completely divided about the direction of travel. The

:25:29.:25:31.

Conservative Party has to make this decision about what kind of Brexit

:25:32.:25:35.

it once, the Labour Party has to make a decision about whether it is

:25:36.:25:39.

going to the left or the centre, and if the party cannot unite around a

:25:40.:25:43.

single leader, you cannot have a smooth transition. So uncomfortable

:25:44.:25:47.

as this is, this is a way it has to be? Well, as Michael was saying, it

:25:48.:25:52.

is awful that the political parties are going through this process just

:25:53.:25:56.

when the country is about to face the toughest negotiations of its

:25:57.:26:00.

life, and potentially a shift back into recession. But unless there is

:26:01.:26:06.

this upheaval, this process in the political parties, there was an

:26:07.:26:10.

absence of leadership. To be fair, nobody plans to put the entire

:26:11.:26:17.

political climate into such chaos! What was the plan, do you think? If

:26:18.:26:22.

the vote had gone this way? The Prime Minister has decided to resign

:26:23.:26:25.

because he lost the referendum, and he probably had to do that. He

:26:26.:26:29.

didn't just walk off straightaway, he is going to manage the process,

:26:30.:26:35.

but his team did not want the outcome, but that is the democratic

:26:36.:26:39.

results that they have to respect. The Labour Party being in meltdown

:26:40.:26:43.

at this particular time is an fortunate, because they could really

:26:44.:26:47.

make a out of this situation. -- unfortunate. But, yeah, all of these

:26:48.:26:57.

events have coalesced around this particular one time, it is just an

:26:58.:27:00.

astonishing period in politics, but it wasn't planned at. But it was

:27:01.:27:06.

deliberately not planned by the Government, the civil service, to

:27:07.:27:10.

put forward any Brexit proposals. I would not have wanted them to do,

:27:11.:27:14.

because I am devastated by the decision. They were closing their

:27:15.:27:18.

eyes? As with the Scottish referendum, they made the decision

:27:19.:27:23.

that you do not plan, you do not put together an economic plan for what

:27:24.:27:26.

you do if you lose, because the opposition parties will use that

:27:27.:27:30.

against you. You know, they liked to be able to say that, you know, they

:27:31.:27:37.

are absolutely committed to the Government being other side of

:27:38.:27:41.

remains. In Scotland, it worked, but of course in this referendum it

:27:42.:27:46.

really didn't. I just wanted to make the point that, yes, privately the

:27:47.:27:51.

civil service should have been planning, because what happened

:27:52.:27:55.

after Thursday was a complete and utter vacuum. You had the Leave

:27:56.:27:59.

campaign in disarray, they did not expect to win, they did not know

:28:00.:28:03.

what Brexit plans they wanted to initiate, and David Cameron very

:28:04.:28:05.

honourably fell on his sword with a great speech, but he did not speak

:28:06.:28:09.

again until Monday. The reason Nicola Sturgeon has come across as a

:28:10.:28:13.

formidable leader is the door was open for her to walk in, establish

:28:14.:28:17.

leadership, and show that she had a plan. Want. I think that, you know,

:28:18.:28:23.

the regret on behalf of both of the campaigns, why didn't we have a

:28:24.:28:29.

plan? -- she had a plan for Scotland. It is a fair point, isn't

:28:30.:28:36.

it? Why not plan in secret? That is absolutely right, except there is

:28:37.:28:39.

now a huge decision about what kind of Brexit we want, do we want to be

:28:40.:28:43.

in the EEA, or do we want something more dramatic? That is why Nick

:28:44.:28:48.

Clegg, among others, have called for a general election or some process

:28:49.:28:52.

that calls for more people than just Conservative Party members in

:28:53.:28:54.

deciding what kind of Brexit we have. Because the economic

:28:55.:28:58.

consequences of that decision are enormous for everybody up and down

:28:59.:29:02.

the country, and the truth is that the Leave campaign had offered two

:29:03.:29:07.

separate and incompatible visions, one of the Europe where we are still

:29:08.:29:10.

very much involved, and one of Europe where we pull out completely.

:29:11.:29:14.

They do not have the legitimacy decide. Do you think there has to be

:29:15.:29:19.

an election? The danger in calling it, although first of all it is

:29:20.:29:24.

possibly attractive for the new Conservative Party leader, because

:29:25.:29:27.

the Labour Party is in such disarray, they would imagine that

:29:28.:29:31.

they could be Corbyn pretty easily, increasing their majority. However,

:29:32.:29:35.

the risk of the early referendum, you will end up having a referendum

:29:36.:29:38.

on the referendum result, effectively. Nobody in the

:29:39.:29:43.

Conservative Party would want that. I don't know what you think,

:29:44.:29:48.

Michael? I think the real question would be, what kind of economic

:29:49.:29:52.

policy is put to the country, whether there is an election or not.

:29:53.:29:56.

If there is, the Labour Party, whoever is the leader, will have to

:29:57.:30:01.

put an alternative policy, economic policy forward. We are going into

:30:02.:30:04.

recession, what you have heard from George Osborne earlier this week

:30:05.:30:08.

was, because we are likely going into recession, we will have more

:30:09.:30:14.

austerity. That is a disaster, economically illiterate, and it

:30:15.:30:16.

would be terrible for the country if we pulled further demand out of the

:30:17.:30:20.

economy by having more austerity, and the Labour Party has an

:30:21.:30:23.

opportunity to speak to all those disenfranchised voters.

:30:24.:30:30.

Labour has the responsibility, rather than seeing them defect to

:30:31.:30:38.

Ukip, which is a protest vote... There is an alternative. Is this a

:30:39.:30:42.

time for a less party politics? We had coalition before. The Tories

:30:43.:30:49.

have a majority. It is not a coalition scenario. But in terms of

:30:50.:30:52.

politicians coming together, could that be achievable, sensible? There

:30:53.:30:58.

has been an idea mooted that this Brexit unit in the civil service

:30:59.:31:05.

will work with cross-party involvement. That would be sensible.

:31:06.:31:13.

But it feels to me, and certainly Remain MPs drunk to Boris, were

:31:14.:31:21.

being told that there will be some moderation, there will be

:31:22.:31:26.

compromises, we will do something more sensible than some of you

:31:27.:31:29.

feared. It does feel like that will happen. That is precisely what

:31:30.:31:35.

Michael used against Boris, by suggesting he would not deliver true

:31:36.:31:39.

Brexit. That desire to be accommodating is not what the

:31:40.:31:42.

Conservative Party grassroots want. I don't think that is true. David

:31:43.:31:49.

has e-mailed, I would like to know why nobody has criticised David

:31:50.:31:53.

Cameron for not following through on taking the UK through the Brexit

:31:54.:31:57.

vote? I do believe the Conservative government will not follow through

:31:58.:32:02.

on the referendum. Another says, there is no next -- exit plan, which

:32:03.:32:06.

proves the Conservatives are incompetent. Ravi says, Labour MPs

:32:07.:32:10.

and are divided over how to depose Jeremy Corbyn. It says it all. Thank

:32:11.:32:15.

you very much. It is busy something we keep talking about. -- obviously.

:32:16.:32:24.

Keep letting us know what you think. Coming up, referendum aftermath. We

:32:25.:32:27.

will have a special report from Great Yarmouth in Norfolk, which was

:32:28.:32:31.

one of the highest Leave votes in the UK. And what is the future for a

:32:32.:32:38.

driverless cars after the first known fatal crash involving one in

:32:39.:32:39.

the United States? Good morning. League two minute

:32:40.:32:57.

silence has been held across Europe this morning in memory of the

:32:58.:33:00.

hundreds of thousands of men who lost their lives in World War I's

:33:01.:33:05.

lobbyist battle, the Battle of the Somme. -- a two-minute silence.

:33:06.:33:12.

Events were also held across the UK to mark the moment 100 years ago

:33:13.:33:18.

when troops left their trenches to go over the top. Britain suffered

:33:19.:33:24.

more than 60,000 dead and wounded on the first day alone in what became

:33:25.:33:27.

the bloodiest battle of the First World War. The surprise challenger

:33:28.:33:35.

for the Conservative Party leadership, Michael Gove, were

:33:36.:33:38.

formally set out his pitch for the job in just over an hour. Boris

:33:39.:33:46.

Johnson has now pulled out and has not said who he is backing. Mr Gove

:33:47.:33:52.

phases Theresa May, as well as Stephen Crabb, Andrea Leadsom and

:33:53.:33:53.

Liam Fox. MPs are urging the Government

:33:54.:33:55.

to make radical changes to the laws on prostitution

:33:56.:33:57.

in England and Wales. The Home Affairs Select Committee

:33:58.:33:59.

says soliciting should no longer be a crime for sex workers,

:34:00.:34:01.

and those who have a criminal record for offences related

:34:02.:34:04.

to prostitution should Scientists say they've discovered

:34:05.:34:07.

the first clear evidence that the ozone layer over Antarctica

:34:08.:34:13.

has begun to heal. Last year, the hole had shrunk

:34:14.:34:16.

since the year 2000 by an amount Scientists say it may be down

:34:17.:34:20.

to the phasing out of ozone-harming The electric car company Tesla

:34:21.:34:25.

is being investigated in the United States after one

:34:26.:34:31.

of its cars crashed into a lorry while on autopilot,

:34:32.:34:34.

killing its driver. It's believed to be the first death

:34:35.:34:38.

linked to the technology, which takes control of the car

:34:39.:34:40.

to change lanes The car maker says drivers

:34:41.:34:42.

were warned to keep their hands on the steering wheel even

:34:43.:34:47.

when autopilot is engaged. That is a summary of the latest

:34:48.:35:05.

news. Let's catch up with the sport. The countdown is on for the Welsh

:35:06.:35:08.

football team ahead of their biggest match in 58 years. The last

:35:09.:35:15.

remaining home nation at Frank -- Euro 2016 play Belgium in Lille this

:35:16.:35:20.

evening. The prize is a semifinal match with Portugal. The Portuguese

:35:21.:35:26.

beat Poland on penalties last night. 1-1 after extra time but Portugal

:35:27.:35:31.

squeezed through on spot kicks. Spain have already headed home but

:35:32.:35:36.

their foreword, nollie toe, is on the move. Manchester City have

:35:37.:35:42.

confirmed his signing for around ?14 million. It is another big day for

:35:43.:35:50.

the Brits at Wimbledon. Dan Evans takes on Roger Federer. Andy Murray

:35:51.:35:54.

is already in round three. He went through in straight sets yesterday.

:35:55.:35:55.

I am back at ten o'clock with more. Britain's decision to leave the EU

:35:56.:36:09.

took many by surprise. Even the leader, Nigel Farage thought his

:36:10.:36:15.

side had lost. He was wrong. More than 17 million people decided to

:36:16.:36:18.

cut our ties with Brussels and in some areas the vote for Brexit was

:36:19.:36:19.

very strong. Great Yarmouth in Norfolk

:36:20.:36:22.

saw the fifth highest Leave vote in the country,

:36:23.:36:24.

at a staggering 71.5%. Michael Cowan has spent the week

:36:25.:36:26.

by the seaside to hear the locals In his film, voters often express

:36:27.:36:37.

views that are uncomfortable but it -- but expressive of what many

:36:38.:36:39.

people feel. In terms of Westminster,

:36:40.:36:40.

the politicians, politics, My biggest fear is that the British

:36:41.:36:41.

people will be taken I would like to see

:36:42.:37:03.

the numbers come down. I would like to see some of the ones

:37:04.:37:08.

on benefits being shipped back. I think the ones that

:37:09.:37:13.

are here right now working, leave them be, but the ones

:37:14.:37:16.

that are trying to get We are too small, mate,

:37:17.:37:18.

we can't fit any more people in, In Yarmouth, the entire Brexit

:37:19.:37:24.

debate is encapsulated on King Over the last decade,

:37:25.:37:45.

they have seen a growing Last year, it rose by 9.3%

:37:46.:37:48.

on the previous year. It is largely Portuguese,

:37:49.:37:52.

who come into the area to work. And what's the telephone number,

:37:53.:37:56.

darling? Sharon's shop has been

:37:57.:37:59.

here for 30 years. She runs daily knitting workshops,

:38:00.:38:02.

or as she affectionately calls them, Now that we've left,

:38:03.:38:05.

what's that going to mean? It means that we can make more

:38:06.:38:13.

of our own decisions for trade Hopefully the jobs will come

:38:14.:38:17.

for most people, and the hospitals and that, hopefully, will get

:38:18.:38:23.

better, and more money to spend. If they get a pansy Prime Minister

:38:24.:38:28.

again, we'll end up with a pansy I've nothing against foreigners

:38:29.:38:37.

here, it's just that they seem They are very loud when speaking

:38:38.:38:42.

and gesturing and it can put some And I think as well in Yarmouth,

:38:43.:38:51.

it's quite a high And they remember how it was and how

:38:52.:38:59.

it is now, and I think that You know there is quite a movement

:39:00.:39:03.

of people who would say people who voted Out

:39:04.:39:08.

were racist, or xenophobic. My quibble with that is,

:39:09.:39:13.

I'm not racist because I have I think people have just had

:39:14.:39:18.

enough, haven't they? And we need to be able to do more

:39:19.:39:25.

for ourselves, the people This time it wasn't like a general

:39:26.:39:30.

election, you never saw any councillors out saying

:39:31.:39:41.

anything about anything. And all the money that they put

:39:42.:39:43.

into those leaflets. When it's a general or local

:39:44.:39:45.

election clustered outside the polling stations,

:39:46.:39:47.

you know, you see them. But we saw nobody this time,

:39:48.:39:50.

from any side whatsoever. Ukip were high here,

:39:51.:39:55.

in places where people And ultimately I think

:39:56.:39:57.

that is what it boils down to. It's that no one is listening to us

:39:58.:40:02.

so the only way you can Across the street in a local pub

:40:03.:40:06.

we met Matthew, Alex and Hayden. They buck the national trend

:40:07.:40:18.

of all being under 30 and voting Yes, finally being on the winning

:40:19.:40:21.

side of something so important that will change the future of this

:40:22.:40:31.

country quite dramatically, It's been good that we've been

:40:32.:40:33.

involved with it for so long and fought so passionately

:40:34.:40:37.

on an issue. It's certainly what we've

:40:38.:40:40.

been campaigning for, We certainly didn't

:40:41.:40:42.

see any visible Remain They were not interested in us,

:40:43.:40:46.

same as the Westminster parties We are too far out of the way

:40:47.:40:50.

in Great Yarmouth for some people. I think for me it is

:40:51.:40:58.

about democracy. I don't feel the EU

:40:59.:41:00.

is a very democratic system. I believe that our generation

:41:01.:41:02.

are stewards of democracy. I don't think it is ours to give

:41:03.:41:07.

away to some unelected I think it's important

:41:08.:41:09.

that our government actually is in control of our own affairs,

:41:10.:41:14.

and that we, the people can vote them in and vote them out

:41:15.:41:17.

depending what they want. Even if this was the worst decision

:41:18.:41:21.

that we've ever made, and so far we have been proven

:41:22.:41:25.

right, the markets haven't crashed, we haven't all lost our jobs,

:41:26.:41:28.

we are not suffering from world War three yet, is that,

:41:29.:41:32.

even if it was the worst decision we ever made,

:41:33.:41:34.

we made it, it wasn't someone else And I think that is

:41:35.:41:37.

what is important. Yarmouth is the 20th most

:41:38.:41:43.

deprived borough in England. It is a busy market today

:41:44.:41:47.

and the area is a popular choice Secondly, it is nice

:41:48.:41:50.

to have England as England, to be able to do the things

:41:51.:42:01.

we want to do when we want to do it. And have our own say,

:42:02.:42:08.

rather than rely on other people. What does that mean to

:42:09.:42:10.

you when you say England is England? What does that look

:42:11.:42:13.

like in the future, now? Er, well obviously I've got

:42:14.:42:15.

grandchildren so I've voted for them as well and I think if we had stayed

:42:16.:42:18.

in there wouldn't have been much I think it's going to take time,

:42:19.:42:22.

I think eventually that will and up being a nice country

:42:23.:42:27.

like it always was. I voted to leave for the fishing

:42:28.:42:30.

industry, so hopefully it We have been in business

:42:31.:42:34.

here for 70 years. And I am hoping that my children

:42:35.:42:41.

will take over this, I believe by voting Out,

:42:42.:42:44.

it's going to help. I voted because I wanted

:42:45.:42:54.

Britain to be British laws. Not being told what to

:42:55.:42:58.

do by other people. Other countries tell us how we have

:42:59.:43:09.

to live, really. We survived for years before

:43:10.:43:11.

we went in, my grandfather, my great-grandfather,

:43:12.:43:14.

everyone, know what I mean. What we fought for would not have

:43:15.:43:19.

lasted two world wars... Everywhere in England

:43:20.:43:24.

the homelessness problems, poverty problems, food problems,

:43:25.:43:31.

do you know what I mean? Me, myself, I was homeless

:43:32.:43:35.

and it took me ages No offence to immigrants,

:43:36.:43:38.

but they come to England, they don't go on the streets,

:43:39.:43:44.

they get put into homes. I am not racist,

:43:45.:43:47.

no things like that. But why should an English person

:43:48.:43:51.

have to go on the streets? Looking forwards, what does

:43:52.:43:54.

that mean for you? It seems like it was a bad move,

:43:55.:43:57.

really, just what people are saying, feeling you racist for wanting

:43:58.:44:02.

to come out of the EU, it is just crazy stuff,

:44:03.:44:07.

like people are scared You're damned if you do,

:44:08.:44:09.

you're damned if you don't. People that voted In are getting

:44:10.:44:15.

slated, people that voted Out, I think it's something the town has

:44:16.:44:18.

had to do. It's a case of, we are not

:44:19.:44:28.

a racist town, we are a town My biggest fear is that the British

:44:29.:44:31.

people will be taken I fear that these people will come

:44:32.:44:36.

in without any conditions, it will be unlimited,

:44:37.:44:41.

and it will be, and it was, and The people of Great Yarmouth can

:44:42.:44:45.

only hope their vote will lead But for a town who feels betrayed

:44:46.:44:55.

and ignored by Westminster, the vote to leave has given

:44:56.:45:00.

them a resounding voice. You can watch that report and again

:45:01.:45:20.

on our programme page. So while voters reflect on the implications

:45:21.:45:24.

of the decision to leave the EU and politicians reel from the

:45:25.:45:27.

repercussions, how are British people living abroad feeling about

:45:28.:45:28.

it all? Jacquelyn MacLennan is a lawyer

:45:29.:45:32.

living in Brussels, Ralph Fenwick is a pensioner

:45:33.:45:38.

living near Malaga in Spain, and Claire Waterhouse

:45:39.:45:40.

is a music teacher in Frankfurt. Thank you all very much for joining

:45:41.:45:49.

us, Ralph, tell us how you are feeling about the fact that we have

:45:50.:45:54.

voted to leave the EU. Well, actually, I am quite sad about the

:45:55.:45:58.

whole thing. I think it has been a long decision, it has been mainly

:45:59.:46:06.

based on racism, on immigration. And it made off you know, we have just

:46:07.:46:10.

had a report issued by the British Embassy who said there will be no

:46:11.:46:14.

change, but that is only for the next two years. There is definite

:46:15.:46:21.

changes which is affecting the older generation here, especially in

:46:22.:46:24.

Spain. The pound has crashed, the exchange rate is plummeting. And

:46:25.:46:31.

within one week, the retired people that are living here in Spain have

:46:32.:46:38.

lost... Their pensions have been devalued about 10% in one week. How

:46:39.:46:43.

are you feeling about your future in Spain? You say the reassurance from

:46:44.:46:47.

the British Embassy has not done much to reassure you. Well, the

:46:48.:46:52.

thing is, there is nothing going to happen for at least two years, and

:46:53.:46:57.

this is what they are saying. Nothing has changed fundamentally

:46:58.:47:00.

yet, because until we sign the Article 50 and actually come out of

:47:01.:47:09.

Europe, nothing can be done, and the benefits that we get here, the

:47:10.:47:14.

health service, the Spanish health service is fantastic, and they get

:47:15.:47:21.

very cheap prescriptions. So that is not going to change for at least two

:47:22.:47:27.

year. The biggest effect that it has had at the moment is the devaluation

:47:28.:47:33.

of the pound, and the exchange rate. We have got Jacqueline back, sorry,

:47:34.:47:38.

Ralph, I want to go to her, because you have been living in Brussels for

:47:39.:47:43.

a long time. Your kids are there, tell me how you are feeling about

:47:44.:47:49.

that. Yes, good morning, we are very shocked, three generations of my

:47:50.:47:53.

family are very shocked, we live in Brussels, my parents live in the

:47:54.:47:56.

North of Scotland, one of my children is in the UK, the other is

:47:57.:48:01.

still in school in Brussels. And we all feel that this was equivalent to

:48:02.:48:09.

a bereavement in some sense, that there is just this huge uncertainty,

:48:10.:48:16.

and my parents feel that this vote has really deprived my children and

:48:17.:48:21.

others in their situation of the future that they could expect. And

:48:22.:48:27.

so that is something which we are dealing with at the moment. I think

:48:28.:48:32.

your kids are trying to get citizenship there, is that what you

:48:33.:48:39.

are doing? Yes, my children, their immediate reaction was that they

:48:40.:48:42.

have grown up in Brussels, they have the right to Belgian citizenship,

:48:43.:48:48.

and they should activate that right immediately. That was not something

:48:49.:48:51.

that they had done before, my sons are in their early 20s, my daughter

:48:52.:48:58.

is 18, but they went to the commune this morning and paid 150 euros

:48:59.:49:02.

each, and that complete their dossier. They signed up to an

:49:03.:49:10.

agreement with the Belgian constitution, and it is explicit in

:49:11.:49:14.

their agreement to ensuring that fundamental rights are at here to

:49:15.:49:18.

do. And I thought that was terribly ironic, because at the same time

:49:19.:49:23.

Theresa May, who has put herself forward as the candidate, confirmed

:49:24.:49:26.

that she would move forward with Brexit and that she would move

:49:27.:49:31.

forward to take the UK out of the European can on human rights. So I

:49:32.:49:38.

do feel very sad that the situation has come to this and that other kids

:49:39.:49:45.

in the UK, particularly in the north of Scotland, where indeed there may

:49:46.:49:49.

be challenges with employment opportunities, but they could see

:49:50.:49:54.

their futures... I want to bring in Clare, a music teacher living in

:49:55.:49:58.

Frankfurt, how are you feeling? Do you feel your future is secure? I'm

:49:59.:50:04.

not sure at the moment! Like I have said, we know that nothing is going

:50:05.:50:09.

to happen soon, so we know no immediate changes will happen, but

:50:10.:50:13.

there is definitely an underlying sense of uncertainty, it is like

:50:14.:50:18.

being in a weird sense of limbo, and it is what people keep asking me,

:50:19.:50:22.

are you going to be OK to work, are you allowed to stay? We genuinely

:50:23.:50:26.

don't know! I was hoping to start up a company over the summer, and now

:50:27.:50:31.

and stomach and just thinking, how much more complicated is it going to

:50:32.:50:37.

be? What about people living around you? How are they viewing the

:50:38.:50:41.

decision by the UK to leave the EU, your friends and neighbours, what

:50:42.:50:46.

are they saying? Everybody has been shocked and surprised, I have not

:50:47.:50:49.

spoken to anyone who has supported the Brexit. Somebody actually

:50:50.:50:55.

offered me their condolences, so that is true that people feel a

:50:56.:50:57.

sense of bereavement. Everyone I have spoken to has just been so

:50:58.:51:05.

surprised, and then both expats and locals here, and other British

:51:06.:51:09.

people I have spoken to, the expats that I've been here for longer, they

:51:10.:51:15.

feel a sense of shame, which is so sad. And then other expats I have

:51:16.:51:20.

spoken to, some English, some from other places but have an English

:51:21.:51:24.

passport, or thinking, I don't know what is going to happen, just

:51:25.:51:28.

worried about what could be around the corner, because we don't know,

:51:29.:51:31.

and it would be such a shame for something to happen that means I am

:51:32.:51:35.

not able to work here, or my partner is not able to stay here. Because we

:51:36.:51:41.

want to stay. Ralph, have you spoken to locals about their view of

:51:42.:51:47.

Brexit? Well, first of all, I wholeheartedly agree with the last

:51:48.:51:49.

correspondent, with absolutely everything she said. It is a total

:51:50.:51:55.

shock, and here in Spain the people I have spoken to, overwhelmingly,

:51:56.:52:01.

they voted to stay in, those of us who were allowed to vote, because

:52:02.:52:05.

people who have lived in Spain for over 15 years were not allowed to

:52:06.:52:11.

vote. So, really, there was not too many people voted from Spain, they

:52:12.:52:16.

had to vote online, and it was made extremely difficult. There is one or

:52:17.:52:20.

two people I have spoken to since voted to come out. They have

:52:21.:52:26.

actually said to themselves, what have we done? When it sinks in,

:52:27.:52:35.

Boris, as you know, he was very important in this debate, and now he

:52:36.:52:39.

has left the sinking ship, he has run away and left it an awful mess

:52:40.:52:44.

to clear up. But as the lady said, from Brussels, nothing is going to

:52:45.:52:49.

happen immediately. But the uncertainty is there, and what the

:52:50.:52:53.

people are concerned about is being is like especially their health.

:52:54.:53:00.

Presently, most of the Brits have got what they call an E111 from the

:53:01.:53:08.

National Health Service in the UK which allows them free health

:53:09.:53:12.

treatment here... Thank you all for joining us, Brits living abroad,

:53:13.:53:16.

your thoughts and feelings on the Brexit. Lots of you at home,

:53:17.:53:20.

watching and getting in touch after our discussion earlier about the

:53:21.:53:24.

politics of it all, Steve has tweeted is obvious in England needs

:53:25.:53:29.

its own parliament away from London. Christopher has e-mailed, I would

:53:30.:53:31.

like to suggest the country has a referendum on whether we should have

:53:32.:53:37.

had a referendum at all. If the answer was no, we do away with the

:53:38.:53:42.

result. Monica says, Labour cannot run their own party, how could they

:53:43.:53:46.

run a country? Fred says, the two who go through to leadership battle

:53:47.:53:52.

will be Theresa May and whoever Boris endorses, not Gove. Norman has

:53:53.:54:01.

tweeted, the Brexit vote was out, anything else is undemocratic.

:54:02.:54:07.

Britain, believe in yourself. Thank you for all your thoughts.

:54:08.:54:10.

Coming up... being held to remember

:54:11.:54:14.

the Britain's bloodiest battle, We speak to the the family

:54:15.:54:20.

of one of the thousands of British soldiers

:54:21.:54:25.

who went over the top on that day. Investigators in the United States

:54:26.:54:30.

are looking into the first known fatal accident involving a vehicle

:54:31.:54:32.

being driven on autopilot. The driver of a Tesla electric car

:54:33.:54:36.

died in a collision with a lorry in Florida, as he was using

:54:37.:54:39.

technology which allows the vehicle So where does this leave

:54:40.:54:42.

the future of driverless cars? Professor Noel Sharkey should know,

:54:43.:54:50.

he's professor of artificial intelligence and robotics

:54:51.:54:52.

at University of Sheffield. Thank you very much for joining us,

:54:53.:55:04.

what you think, hearing that there has now been the first fatality in a

:55:05.:55:09.

driverless car? It is very bad news for the field, I think, in general.

:55:10.:55:15.

There is no clear message yet about what caused the accident, which is

:55:16.:55:20.

very worrying. Tesla is saying that the car was not able to recognise

:55:21.:55:26.

the white side of a tractor trailer that the car was involved in a

:55:27.:55:30.

collision with against a brightly lit sky, it had driven across the

:55:31.:55:36.

car's pad. Is that an understandable, acceptable

:55:37.:55:41.

explanation to my no, I don't think it is. It would explain why the

:55:42.:55:45.

front facing camera was fooled, but there is also front facing radar,

:55:46.:55:51.

and it is surrounded by six sonar sensors, ultrasonic sensors, and

:55:52.:55:56.

those all work on sound. So there is no way bright light would affect

:55:57.:55:59.

those at all, so they should have detected it. I suspect what it is,

:56:00.:56:05.

because the Tesla car is so low, this was supposed to be a very high

:56:06.:56:10.

trailer, so it did not actually detect the trailer, but the

:56:11.:56:12.

windscreen smashed into it. The camera would be able to see a bit

:56:13.:56:17.

higher than the other sensors, so that is probably a problem. But if

:56:18.:56:21.

the sensors were higher, perhaps on the roof, it wouldn't have happened.

:56:22.:56:26.

Obviously, in any situation where you are handing over control to

:56:27.:56:30.

something or someone else, you need to have complete faith in it. This

:56:31.:56:36.

is only the first fatality, but what you think it might do to trust in

:56:37.:56:41.

this system? Well, you can never... Unpredictable things happen on all

:56:42.:56:47.

roads, and Tesla cars have done 194 million miles, and the world average

:56:48.:56:52.

for a fatalities 64 million miles. I think it could disrupt public trust,

:56:53.:56:55.

and this is just the first accident. The trouble is that these people

:56:56.:56:59.

keep selling the idea that there will be less fatalities on the road

:57:00.:57:03.

as a result of driverless cars, and I believe that will be the case

:57:04.:57:06.

eventually, but there is no evidence for it at the moment. We should go a

:57:07.:57:10.

bit slowly, they are going for long at this, because if we lose public

:57:11.:57:16.

trust, the technology will be toast. How much is this technology being

:57:17.:57:21.

rolled out at the moment? Well, in California, there are nine companies

:57:22.:57:28.

now driving around, and Californian law, not in this country, but

:57:29.:57:31.

Californian law has changed to accommodate it. But they need to be

:57:32.:57:36.

insured by Google. Google were planning to sell their cell thriving

:57:37.:57:39.

cars, they are much more advanced, they were planning to sell them this

:57:40.:57:46.

year, but the bill in California means they can only lease them, and

:57:47.:57:50.

they have to be fully accountable for any accident. Tesla is trying to

:57:51.:57:54.

get out of this, but they are saying somebody should always have their

:57:55.:57:58.

hand on the wheel at all times, and the car actually reminds you of

:57:59.:58:02.

that. But it is a very big ask, if you are driving a long distance, and

:58:03.:58:06.

you have very much reduced attention, your mind is going to

:58:07.:58:10.

wander, but when you are not actually controlling the car, with

:58:11.:58:14.

your hands on the wheel, your mind is going to wonder. You also get

:58:15.:58:18.

something called automation bias, which means that if something works

:58:19.:58:22.

well most of the time, you just come to trust it and do not use your own

:58:23.:58:27.

judgment at all. So it is a bit of a worry. Thank you for joining us,

:58:28.:58:33.

thank you. We will have the latest news in just a few moments, but

:58:34.:58:36.

first a weather update with Peter. It may be hard to believe given

:58:37.:58:43.

recent experiences, but this time last year on the first to light we

:58:44.:58:47.

were in the middle of a heatwave, temperatures at Heathrow reached a

:58:48.:58:53.

scorching 37 degrees. -- on the 1st of July. Today we will be lucky of

:58:54.:58:57.

anywhere gets above 20 degrees, definitely on the cool side and set

:58:58.:59:00.

to stay this way through the weekend. Breeze is blowing in from

:59:01.:59:05.

the Atlantic bringing some spells of sunshine, but also a scattering of

:59:06.:59:09.

fairly heavy showers, and more persistent rain across the far

:59:10.:59:12.

south-east is taking its time to get out of the way as well. That is the

:59:13.:59:15.

message for the rest of the day, sunny spells and showers, some quite

:59:16.:59:19.

heavy, hail and thunder in the mix across Scotland, Northern Ireland

:59:20.:59:23.

and northern England, but equally some decent gaps between them,

:59:24.:59:27.

rattling through quite quickly on a brisk wind. Mid-teens at best across

:59:28.:59:31.

the northern half of the UK, maybe high teens as you come further

:59:32.:59:36.

south. Out of the breeze, it will feel OK. For Wimbledon, the chance

:59:37.:59:40.

of one or two interruptions, but we should see a fair amount of play

:59:41.:59:44.

through the course of the day, just a few annoying showers potentially

:59:45.:59:47.

drifting through. That freshening breeze could make it tricky for the

:59:48.:59:52.

players out on court. Through this evening and overnight, we're going

:59:53.:59:54.

to keep the show was going, because the breeze keeps blowing in from the

:59:55.:59:59.

Atlantic, particularly across northern and western parts. Quite a

:00:00.:00:03.

few clear spells, on the cool side by the end of the night,

:00:04.:00:06.

particularly across northern areas, well down into single figures. As we

:00:07.:00:10.

move into the start of the weekend, it is low pressure that is

:00:11.:00:14.

dominating at the moment across the UK. High pressure is wishful

:00:15.:00:18.

thinking! That is where it is likely to stay for the moment, in the

:00:19.:00:22.

south, and low pressure means and settled weather, brisk winds blowing

:00:23.:00:28.

through, against sunshine and showers for Saturday. The further

:00:29.:00:33.

south you are, the better your chance of missing the showers. From

:00:34.:00:37.

Northern Ireland and northern England northwards, 14-15d at best,

:00:38.:00:41.

well below the seasonal average. Different for Sunday, just a chance

:00:42.:00:45.

of some thicker cloud, patchy rain running in across southern most

:00:46.:00:49.

areas, some uncertainty about that. Still showers across Scotland and

:00:50.:00:53.

Northern Ireland, in between not too bad a day, perhaps try with lighter

:00:54.:00:56.

winds as well, and looking ahead into the early part of next week, it

:00:57.:01:03.

is a very similar pattern, signs of thing settling down a little bit

:01:04.:01:05.

across the South, temperatures beginning to pick up just a touch,

:01:06.:01:08.

but still a chance of a few showers the further north you are.

:01:09.:01:11.

Hello, it's 10 o'clock, I'm Joanna Gosling.

:01:12.:01:12.

Welcome to the programme if you've just joined us.

:01:13.:01:15.

The seven days since the UK voted to leave have brought political

:01:16.:01:20.

turmoil, shocks to the financial market and recriminations

:01:21.:01:23.

Our studio audience give us their take on the last

:01:24.:01:29.

week and what the future holds for Brexit Britain.

:01:30.:01:35.

Plus, a special report from Great Yarmouth,

:01:36.:01:37.

which saw one of the highest Leave votes in the country.

:01:38.:01:40.

People living there tell us how they voted and why.

:01:41.:01:48.

Enough. It is saturated now. And we need to be able to do more for the

:01:49.:01:59.

people here already. You can see the full report on our

:02:00.:02:01.

programme page. Remembering the Somme -

:02:02.:02:09.

one of the bloodiest battles of the First World War,

:02:10.:02:11.

where more than a million men Glory beckons for Wales -

:02:12.:02:15.

if they beat Belgium tonight, Now over to the BBC Newsroom

:02:16.:02:22.

and Anita with a summary People have fallen silent

:02:23.:02:37.

across Europe this morning for two minutes -

:02:38.:02:47.

to mark the centenary of one of the bloodiest battles

:02:48.:02:49.

of the First World War: the battle More than 19,000 British

:02:50.:02:52.

soldiers lost their lives on the first day alone,

:02:53.:02:55.

the worst day in the history More than one million servicemen

:02:56.:02:58.

were killed or injured on all sides as the British and French

:02:59.:03:01.

armies fought the Germans. As the time approached, the King's

:03:02.:03:04.

First Artillery fired their guns. Then silence, as people

:03:05.:03:15.

stopped to remember. At the Grave of the Unknown Warrior

:03:16.:03:19.

in Westminster Abbey, in Edinburgh, at the Scottish

:03:20.:03:22.

National War Memorial, at the Somme Museum

:03:23.:03:25.

in Northern Ireland. In Wales, at Cathays

:03:26.:03:28.

Park in Cardiff. Children were silent

:03:29.:03:32.

at the National Memorial And in France,

:03:33.:03:35.

at the Thiepval Memorial, Then, as Big Ben chimed,

:03:36.:03:39.

the sound of whistles, the signal that sent

:03:40.:03:45.

the men over the top, This was one of the sites

:03:46.:03:48.

where the battle began, At precisely 28 minutes

:03:49.:03:55.

past seven, British soldiers had tunnelled

:03:56.:03:58.

through the trenches underneath the German lines

:03:59.:04:05.

to plant explosives. What remains is the Lochnagar

:04:06.:04:08.

Crater, almost 300 feet in diameter

:04:09.:04:11.

and 70 feet deep. It has been preserved

:04:12.:04:15.

so people will never forget. Today, children laid a wreath

:04:16.:04:19.

of conciliation, representing the 21 nations from where people

:04:20.:04:22.

lost their lives and were injured. that we will not let the stories

:04:23.:04:28.

from this place be forgotten. And I think the desire to pay

:04:29.:04:36.

tribute, to remember, to honour our respective nations' war dead,

:04:37.:04:39.

has not diminished. And we still feel the need

:04:40.:04:45.

to be here. All through the night,

:04:46.:04:49.

vigils were held around the country. Now the nation remembers that

:04:50.:04:53.

first day of the battle. In Exeter, each of the 19,240

:04:54.:04:57.

soldiers who died on this day, have been represented

:04:58.:05:01.

by a 12 inch figure wrapped and bound in a hand-stitched shroud,

:05:02.:05:10.

another symbol that they will In just over an hour,

:05:11.:05:13.

the surprise challenger for the Conservative leadership,

:05:14.:05:21.

Michael Gove, will formally set out

:05:22.:05:22.

his pitch for the job. Mr Gove, currently the Justice

:05:23.:05:25.

Secretary, declared that he would run yesterday morning,

:05:26.:05:27.

confounding expectations that he'd be supporting a bid

:05:28.:05:29.

from Boris Johnson. The former Mayor of London has now

:05:30.:05:33.

pulled out, and hasn't Mr Gove faces the new frontrunner

:05:34.:05:36.

Theresa May, as well as Stephen MPs are urging the Government

:05:37.:05:42.

to make radical changes to the laws on prostitution

:05:43.:05:49.

in England and Wales. The Home Affairs Select Committee

:05:50.:05:51.

says soliciting should no longer be a crime for sex workers,

:05:52.:05:54.

and those who have a criminal record for offences related

:05:55.:05:57.

to prostitution should Scientists say they've discovered

:05:58.:05:59.

the first clear evidence that the ozone layer over Antarctica

:06:00.:06:07.

has begun to heal. Last year, the hole had shrunk

:06:08.:06:09.

since the year 2000 by an amount Scientists say it may be down

:06:10.:06:13.

to the phasing out of ozone-harming That's the news for now.

:06:14.:06:16.

I'll have more at 10.30. Thank you. A of you getting in touch

:06:17.:06:35.

on the aftermath of the referendum result, a week on. -- lots of you.

:06:36.:06:46.

Margaret has e-mailed, why are we concentrating on all of these

:06:47.:06:50.

self-serving politicians? All of them are grubby candidates, anxious

:06:51.:06:56.

to jump on the leadership platforms. Significant number of people to vote

:06:57.:07:01.

to leave have now changed their minds. Politicians need to govern a

:07:02.:07:04.

country by doing what is best for the UK by voting in the House of

:07:05.:07:09.

Commons to reverse Brexit. And another says that Theresa May should

:07:10.:07:15.

not be trusted on Brexit. She wants to kick Article 50 as far down the

:07:16.:07:19.

road as she can. Thank you for getting in touch. I will be talking

:07:20.:07:28.

to our audience in a few minutes. Do stay with us.

:07:29.:07:29.

Now let's catch up with the sport. Here's Tim.

:07:30.:07:33.

We are hoping there could be some triumph for everyone to cheer

:07:34.:07:39.

tonight? Absolutely. It has been a big week for the country but Wales

:07:40.:07:43.

are getting ready for their biggest match in 58 years. They take on

:07:44.:07:47.

Belgium in the quarterfinals of Euro 2016 this evening. Tata nationally

:07:48.:07:53.

Williams is fit to play after being taken off against Northern Ireland

:07:54.:07:58.

at the weekend. The squad had a look at the Stadium yesterday and the

:07:59.:08:01.

much criticised pitch which has already been relayed during the

:08:02.:08:05.

tournament. Not that Wales will worry as they look to make history.

:08:06.:08:07.

It is amazing to be in the round of 16 and to get the victory.

:08:08.:08:10.

To have our families there, it was amazing

:08:11.:08:12.

Obviously the kids came on at the end.

:08:13.:08:15.

We can look back at pictures and videos and have an

:08:16.:08:21.

amazing memory of that time. Hopefully there's more to come.

:08:22.:08:29.

The winners of Wales against Belgium will play Portugal in the

:08:30.:08:35.

semifinals. They beat Poland on penalties last night. It was 1-1

:08:36.:08:41.

after extra time. When they eventually got to spot kicks,

:08:42.:08:45.

Ricardo Quaresma scored for Portugal. One player who appeared at

:08:46.:08:54.

Euro 2016 is Spain foreword Lolito. He has signed for Manchester City

:08:55.:08:58.

this morning from Celta Vigo. He has agreed a four-year contract. --

:08:59.:09:04.

Nolito. He is the fourth signing of Pep Guardiola's rain as Manchester

:09:05.:09:11.

City manager. The two previously worked together at Barcelona. Some

:09:12.:09:18.

more transfer news. Crystal Palace have signed midfielder Andros

:09:19.:09:22.

Townsend from Newcastle for ?30 million on a five-year deal.

:09:23.:09:27.

Townsend just missed out on a place in the England squad for Euro 2016.

:09:28.:09:32.

Although he might be happy about that given the Iceland result.

:09:33.:09:36.

Another chance for Britain to shine at Wimbledon. Dan Evans faces the

:09:37.:09:40.

biggest challenge of his career as he takes on seven time champion

:09:41.:09:46.

Roger Federer on centre court. Andy Murray is safely through to the

:09:47.:09:49.

third round after a comfortable win against -- against Yen-Hsun Lu. The

:09:50.:09:56.

second seed winning in straight sets. Murray will now face John

:09:57.:10:05.

Marcus Willis against Roger Federer Marcus Willis against Roger Federer

:10:06.:10:08.

on Wednesday. Today it is the turn of another Briton, Tara Moore. She

:10:09.:10:13.

is aiming to try to produce an almighty shock. She is a wild card

:10:14.:10:19.

ranked 227th in the world. She played brilliantly to come through

:10:20.:10:26.

against Svetlana Kuznetsova. That against Svetlana Kuznetsova. That

:10:27.:10:30.

match is second on Court number three. Play starts at 11 o'clock.

:10:31.:10:38.

Julia Stepanov has been cleared to compete as a neutral athlete at the

:10:39.:10:46.

rear -- Rio Olympics. She revealed that doping was rife in Russian

:10:47.:10:51.

track and field. The Russian Athletics Federation remains banned

:10:52.:10:55.

from international competition for state-sponsored doping. Plenty of

:10:56.:10:59.

sport around today. Thank you. We are hoping for some

:11:00.:11:02.

good British glory today. Fingers crossed.

:11:03.:11:04.

We've had resignations, sporting embarrassments,

:11:05.:11:07.

A week ago, Britain was part of the EU.

:11:08.:11:10.

But come last Friday morning, the UK had voted to leave

:11:11.:11:13.

and David Cameron had stepped down as Prime Minister.

:11:14.:11:15.

The EU Parliament had its first meeting in over 40

:11:16.:11:18.

We already know the Conservative candidates who want to be the next

:11:19.:11:23.

One of the front runners, Boris Johnson, has announced

:11:24.:11:28.

he won't be standing, after Michael Gove withdrew

:11:29.:11:30.

his support, and said he would stand himself.

:11:31.:11:34.

Theresa May, Liam Fox, and Stephen Crabb have also

:11:35.:11:36.

launched their bids, as has the Energy Secretary,

:11:37.:11:39.

And in the Labour Party, the former Shadow Business Secretary,

:11:40.:11:43.

Angela Eagle, has delayed her plan to challenge Jeremy Corbyn

:11:44.:11:45.

after a week of resignations from the shadow cabinet.

:11:46.:11:55.

We're going to speak to our studio audience shortly.

:11:56.:11:58.

What is being said in Westminster today? What a difference a week

:11:59.:12:10.

makes, particularly in politics. The focus is on Michael Gove's speech in

:12:11.:12:15.

about an hour, setting out his vision for a post Brexit world under

:12:16.:12:20.

his leadership and under his prime minister ship. The next leader of

:12:21.:12:23.

the Conservative Party will become the next Prime Minister. I think it

:12:24.:12:27.

is very to say he has not exactly had a totally positive response from

:12:28.:12:31.

them picking up on his treachery, them picking up on his treachery,

:12:32.:12:36.

and his betrayal. One even suggested he had taken a big part in the

:12:37.:12:41.

Brexecuted of Boris Johnson. There are a number of Tory MPs who say he

:12:42.:12:49.

has been treacherous. Let's hear what... Sorry, I have forgotten who

:12:50.:12:51.

it was! This is what Ken Clarke said. We

:12:52.:12:57.

need to have a Prime Minister firmly in place as quickly as possible and

:12:58.:13:00.

I think Michael would do us all a favour if he now stood down. It

:13:01.:13:04.

Prime Minister and leader of a party needs to be trusted by his or her

:13:05.:13:13.

colleagues. Michael's behaviour is, frankly, almost bizarre. I was

:13:14.:13:18.

strongly against Boris Johnson becoming Prime Minister. But this

:13:19.:13:25.

sudden move by Michael, who was his right-hand man on he suddenly

:13:26.:13:32.

wielded the knife, I think upon reflection means he is not

:13:33.:13:35.

altogether suitable for the time being.

:13:36.:13:39.

One of the candidate who has been having a positive outing is Theresa

:13:40.:13:43.

May. This morning, she has had the backing of the daily Mail newspaper.

:13:44.:13:47.

Last night we heard she had two Cabinet colleagues on her side,

:13:48.:13:52.

Patrick Magoffin and Michael Fallon. There are five candidates in the

:13:53.:13:58.

race. Stephen Crabb, Andrea Leadsom and Liam Fox. This is a fight we

:13:59.:14:01.

will be hearing plenty about. And it will be a fierce one.

:14:02.:14:06.

Thank you. So many names to grapple with right now. The question is,

:14:07.:14:12.

what happens next for the Conservatives and Labour? With me,

:14:13.:14:15.

our audience of eight people to talk about this. And where we go from

:14:16.:14:19.

here. Neil Walker voted Lib Dem last year but is a former Labour voter.

:14:20.:14:30.

He once Jeremy Corbyn to go. Release once Jeremy Corbyn to stay. Then

:14:31.:14:35.

wants to see a Brexit lead the Conservative Party. Tony Murray

:14:36.:14:38.

voted independent in the last election. He voted Leave but never

:14:39.:14:43.

expected this outcome. Shea is a labour voter upset about the Labour

:14:44.:14:47.

resignations but happy that Boris has not put himself forward for the

:14:48.:14:51.

Conservative leadership. Esther Green, a floating voter, would like

:14:52.:14:56.

to see Theresa May as the next leader of the Conservative Party.

:14:57.:14:59.

Jamie Cunningham is conservative, very disappointed that Boris Johnson

:15:00.:15:03.

is not standing but is now backing Michael Gove to be Conservative

:15:04.:15:08.

party leader. Kim Allen, Conservative voter, is optimistic.

:15:09.:15:09.

Thank you all. Keima, you are optimistic? Yes, I

:15:10.:15:20.

think the decision from last week as a result of the referendum, it just

:15:21.:15:25.

demonstrates, of course, the country is split in terms of what they want

:15:26.:15:31.

the outcome to be. I'm optimistic, but we will have to address some of

:15:32.:15:36.

the underlying issues that people feel about immigration and services.

:15:37.:15:41.

So I'm optimistic that once we get through the turbulence that we are

:15:42.:15:44.

going through now, things will stabilise, and once we have strong

:15:45.:15:51.

leadership, things will get back to the way they were. A lot of you have

:15:52.:15:56.

been here through the week, can you believe what has been unfolding? It

:15:57.:16:00.

has been unbelievable, you have got Nicola Sturgeon cosying up with the

:16:01.:16:04.

EU, Nigel Farage moving things over four us! You know, Jeremy Corbyn

:16:05.:16:12.

walking the plank. And you have got the Conservatives, they looked like

:16:13.:16:16.

they are a split as anybody, with knives coming out. You couldn't make

:16:17.:16:21.

it up, really, you know. Shakespeare would have got four long plays out

:16:22.:16:28.

of it, it is unbelievable. I'm just laughing at the idea that Nigel

:16:29.:16:33.

Farage was moving things over four us... I was joking! Every time you

:16:34.:16:40.

wake up, there has been more little power playing, manoeuvring,

:16:41.:16:44.

jostling. I think it is really sad. A few weeks ago, we were talking

:16:45.:16:47.

about how we should value our MPs more, be less cynical about them,

:16:48.:16:51.

but when you see the kind of behaviour that as a boulder June the

:16:52.:16:54.

campaign and since, is it any wonder that people are cynical and don't

:16:55.:17:05.

know who to trust? Does anyone know where we are going now? It is a car

:17:06.:17:13.

crash in slow motion. You can't rule anything out, that is the problem. I

:17:14.:17:17.

don't think anybody has a plan of what is going to happen,

:17:18.:17:21.

particularly in the Labour Party, I have no idea, day-to-day, what is

:17:22.:17:26.

going on there. Equally, with the Conservative Party leadership, we

:17:27.:17:29.

are still waiting to hear what each of the candidates have to say, to

:17:30.:17:33.

sort of really understand who is going to be our next Prime Minister,

:17:34.:17:37.

whether we will get a general election, so we can decide whether

:17:38.:17:43.

it is somebody we support. Uroosa, is this part of the democratic

:17:44.:17:46.

process that we have to go through now? Or would you like to see things

:17:47.:17:51.

being done differently? There should definitely be a new general

:17:52.:17:56.

election. Do you all agree about that? No, I don't think so. If they

:17:57.:18:04.

are going to pursue the position of Prime Minister, we should have a

:18:05.:18:08.

chance to vote them in, they should not just assume the position and do

:18:09.:18:11.

what ever they want to do, that is not how it works. No, I think we

:18:12.:18:18.

vote political parties in, the most important thing is we stabilise,

:18:19.:18:23.

give some certainty to the country and have strong leadership on both

:18:24.:18:27.

sides. And I think it will take some time for either political party to

:18:28.:18:31.

actually express and sort of say exactly what they plan to do for the

:18:32.:18:39.

country. So an early general election, at this time, it wouldn't

:18:40.:18:42.

be the right thing to do. If you are really serious about democracy, the

:18:43.:18:46.

mandate that the Tories now have is significantly... Well, I don't

:18:47.:18:49.

believe they have a mandate as a result of the referendum, but their

:18:50.:18:52.

manifesto will have to change from the basis on which they were elected

:18:53.:18:57.

15 months ago, and if you want to assume authority and take us through

:18:58.:19:01.

the process of extracting ourselves from Europe, and all the obligations

:19:02.:19:06.

of that, public services, further austerity or not, you have to put a

:19:07.:19:10.

manifesto together and get the electorate to vote on that. It is

:19:11.:19:16.

not democratic to just assume... If they were just replacing the Prime

:19:17.:19:18.

Minister because he had left, and they were carrying on with the old

:19:19.:19:22.

manifesto, that is one thing. But we are talking about a different

:19:23.:19:26.

direction, and don't the public have a right, particularly from a party

:19:27.:19:31.

that goes on about undemocratic institutions in their European

:19:32.:19:37.

Union? What do you think on this? I completely agree with Neil, to be

:19:38.:19:42.

honest with you. The repercussions of the assault from the EU

:19:43.:19:46.

referendum are massive, and I think it completely undermines the mandate

:19:47.:19:50.

that the Tories had 15 months ago when they were elected. -- the

:19:51.:19:54.

result. Whoever comes in, it would be disingenuous of them to move

:19:55.:19:58.

forward and not call an election, they must do that, because by the

:19:59.:20:02.

same token, right, Leave campaigners were criticised for having no plan,

:20:03.:20:07.

but the Government didn't have a plan either. They were firmly of the

:20:08.:20:11.

mind that we would vote to remain, so they have no plan. So we have to

:20:12.:20:18.

go back to the electorate and say, look, this is what we are offering,

:20:19.:20:22.

let's press forward. I disagree, we have the biggest popular mandate in

:20:23.:20:26.

history to leave the European Union, and once we have a new leader of the

:20:27.:20:30.

Conservative Party, it is their job to stabilise the country, activate

:20:31.:20:34.

Article 50 and take us out of the EU, because that is what the people

:20:35.:20:39.

voted. The majority of MPs were not in agreement with leaving, so are

:20:40.:20:44.

you confident that MPs will deliver what the country has voted for? I

:20:45.:20:48.

think there will have to respect the mandate that the people have given

:20:49.:20:53.

towards Brexit. It is not up to them to decide against the will of the

:20:54.:20:58.

people, when the majority of people decided we should not remain in the

:20:59.:21:04.

European Union. I respect the decision, but it is about a

:21:05.:21:09.

manifesto. That was a mandate to leave, we are talking about a

:21:10.:21:12.

manifesto for the next four or five years, and those things are quite

:21:13.:21:17.

separate. Otherwise we are facing a government that stays in power until

:21:18.:21:21.

2020 and makes decisions based on our decision to leave Europe. I

:21:22.:21:25.

think the new leader of the Conservative Party will want to have

:21:26.:21:31.

her own... I am sure it is going to be a woman, I am sure Theresa May

:21:32.:21:35.

will be the next leader! I am rooting for her, but I think that

:21:36.:21:39.

the mood is not right, the country are still in shock. The political

:21:40.:21:44.

leaders need to get together, come together, decide where we go from

:21:45.:21:51.

here, get things stabilised. Tony Watt to say something. I think the

:21:52.:21:56.

most important thing is that we are not lied to. Whoever is elected, be

:21:57.:22:00.

honest with the British people, what we are going to do, what you think

:22:01.:22:05.

you can get. Do not lie anymore, as much as possible! There is a danger

:22:06.:22:10.

of a snap election making people power hungry and doing whatever they

:22:11.:22:14.

can to get votes and not be authentic. What people want, with

:22:15.:22:18.

Corbyn being laid at the moment, they want authenticity and honesty.

:22:19.:22:24.

Can I just make one last point? Jeremy Corbyn, I am an ex Labour

:22:25.:22:31.

supporter, and I would sooner have a Labour Party that had morals and

:22:32.:22:35.

stood by their ideals in opposition and held the Government to account

:22:36.:22:40.

on my behalf, that have a Labour that was Conservative light and in

:22:41.:22:44.

power. At the moment, the problem is, to have a strong opposition, you

:22:45.:22:51.

have to be united behind your leader, and the Labour MPs who are

:22:52.:22:54.

resigning from the Shadow Cabinet, and those who are potentially taking

:22:55.:22:58.

leadership campaigns, waiting to stay if he steps down, the

:22:59.:23:02.

opposition does not look robust enough, strong enough to counter

:23:03.:23:05.

what ever the next Conservative Prime Minister does. When you look

:23:06.:23:09.

at the political figures who are standing within their parties, or

:23:10.:23:13.

wanting to stand, if there is a leadership

:23:14.:23:19.

deliver what you are all talking about, which is MPs who will listen?

:23:20.:23:24.

I think Jeremy Corbyn is Labour's only hope, personally. He's not

:23:25.:23:30.

listening to his MPs right now. They are not listening to him, he has the

:23:31.:23:34.

mandate from the membership. The MPs in your party are listening to their

:23:35.:23:38.

grassroots, they are saying that this guy is not electable. I would

:23:39.:23:45.

think that you had Ed Miliband before, and they weren't listening.

:23:46.:23:48.

They said, we have to listen to get into government, and I think that is

:23:49.:23:55.

where a lot of MPs, 80 almost, they decided they would rather

:23:56.:23:58.

respectfully ask him to step down. I think that is the right thing for

:23:59.:24:01.

him to do. But the Conservative side, of course, you have got

:24:02.:24:05.

Theresa May, and I have explained that I am backing her because I

:24:06.:24:07.

think she's a strong candidate and would be able to bring the country

:24:08.:24:15.

together and move the country forward. The Labour Party have been

:24:16.:24:18.

clear on this, if you want a leadership election, 51 MPs sign a

:24:19.:24:22.

nomination form and back one candidate. You do not resign, you do

:24:23.:24:26.

not put letters at there, stabbing your leader in the back as you walk

:24:27.:24:33.

out of the door. What I really struggle with this argument in the

:24:34.:24:37.

Labour Party, it has been framed as the Parliamentary Labour Party

:24:38.:24:39.

against the grassroots membership. There is another significant part in

:24:40.:24:43.

that relationship, which is the electorate, OK? If you want to move

:24:44.:24:48.

into power, ultimately, you have to engage with the electorate, and I

:24:49.:24:52.

and many of my friends and some of my family, who did support Labour in

:24:53.:24:55.

the past, feel there is not a place for us in the party because we are

:24:56.:25:01.

being... The focus is very much on politics because of what is going on

:25:02.:25:05.

in politics, but is it what you want the focus to be on? We have just had

:25:06.:25:09.

the referendum is old, and the issues going forward are about how

:25:10.:25:14.

that is delivered. -- the referendum result. We all need to calm down a

:25:15.:25:20.

little bit, you have got the vote that has happened, and that is done,

:25:21.:25:24.

and that will progress forward, slowly but surely. There is no panic

:25:25.:25:28.

over that, and we desperately need to try and disentangle these issues.

:25:29.:25:33.

The vote has happened, the Government still functions, markets

:25:34.:25:37.

have recovered, people have got some of their money back, everything is

:25:38.:25:41.

OK, let's stop panicking. But the political chaos is something

:25:42.:25:45.

different, the process of people scrambling on, over each other's

:25:46.:25:51.

heads to try to get to the top. Isn't the danger how we got the

:25:52.:25:54.

vote? That is causing a lot of uncertainty and fear, you are seeing

:25:55.:26:00.

the rise in hate crime. I don't see one candidate from any party that

:26:01.:26:04.

has all possesses the required tools to unify their party or even the

:26:05.:26:11.

country. There is no-one on the list from either side that can do that,

:26:12.:26:15.

and this has opened the lid on a much bigger problem. We have a

:26:16.:26:19.

political system that doesn't listen properly, it never does, and people

:26:20.:26:24.

feel, you know, removed and disenfranchised from that. As a

:26:25.:26:27.

country, one of our next big questions is, do we need to change

:26:28.:26:32.

our system? Do we need to look at PR? Something has got to change to

:26:33.:26:35.

start to be able to represent people properly. Uroosa? The campaigns were

:26:36.:26:44.

not clear, they were not operating on facts, it was a whole exaggerated

:26:45.:26:48.

thing, appealing to extremists on both sides, that is what it did. It

:26:49.:26:52.

didn't appeal to anybody in the middle, there were no hard facts

:26:53.:26:55.

given to the public, this will happen if we leave, this will happen

:26:56.:27:01.

if we remain. A week and, you all reconciled to be was old -- the

:27:02.:27:11.

result? Is everybody on that page or not? I am not happy. In the sense

:27:12.:27:18.

that, like I say, I voted to come out of the EU, but not for the

:27:19.:27:24.

break-up of the United Kingdom... So you have got regret? There is a time

:27:25.:27:27.

for Scottish independence and for Sinn Fein to test the people of

:27:28.:27:31.

Northern Ireland, but I do not think this is the time. I agree that we

:27:32.:27:37.

need a period of calm, you know, before... Nicola Sturgeon is in

:27:38.:27:42.

Europe... You cannot be calling for calm... The Scottish people feel

:27:43.:27:45.

like they were lied to chewing their referendum, hold on a moment. I was

:27:46.:27:50.

not in favour of Scottish independence, but it is a decision

:27:51.:27:54.

for them. But now I can see why they want to do this, they absolutely

:27:55.:28:01.

want to leave, because the Leave campaign, take our country back.

:28:02.:28:03.

Nicola Sturgeon is taking her country back for the Scottish

:28:04.:28:08.

people, that is down to them. Over 1 million Scottish people voted to

:28:09.:28:14.

remain. Sorry, voted to leave! Voted to leave!. You were trying to make a

:28:15.:28:20.

point. You ask if we were reconciled, and I am still gutted

:28:21.:28:23.

that we are going to be leaving, I know lots of people who voted to

:28:24.:28:28.

remain, and lots of young people. I don't think there is going to be a

:28:29.:28:32.

second referendum, I do not think there is any likelihood of Article

:28:33.:28:36.

50 not being triggered, just waiting it out. I think we will come to the

:28:37.:28:40.

conclusion that it is to do happen. What was quite good to see over the

:28:41.:28:47.

referendum campaign, whether the campaign was that some people have

:28:48.:28:51.

said that there were lies being told on either side, but things were

:28:52.:28:55.

focused on policy in fact, not personality. And yet in the

:28:56.:28:58.

aftermath we have seen a lot of focus on personality of Jeremy

:28:59.:29:02.

Corbyn, on the way Theresa May dresses, on the personality of

:29:03.:29:05.

Michael Gove, whether he is treacherous. It is a shame not to

:29:06.:29:10.

have the focus on policy again, in the leadership campaigns, and still

:29:11.:29:14.

have that focus on personality and personal politics, rather than the

:29:15.:29:17.

policies that they want to propose for the country. I want to get from

:29:18.:29:22.

each of you your view on who should be the Labour leader and the Tory

:29:23.:29:26.

leader, we'll start with you, Neil. The Tory side, it is like sticking a

:29:27.:29:34.

pain in a bunch of them, Theresa May would be the acceptable face, that

:29:35.:29:39.

as far as I am prepared to go. The rest are just... Well, it is very

:29:40.:29:43.

difficult. Angela Eagle would be an interesting healing person, but I am

:29:44.:29:49.

not sure, I think we need to skip a generation, with all due respect.

:29:50.:29:53.

Look at something like Stephen Kinnock. Jeremy Corbyn should stay

:29:54.:29:59.

for Labour. Tories? Look up and don't like any of them! If you had

:30:00.:30:04.

to pick one? May be Theresa May. I'm glad Boris Johnson is not in it. If

:30:05.:30:09.

it were in my gift, I would go Andrea Leadsom. For Labour, I just

:30:10.:30:14.

couldn't pick, they are as horrendous as one another.

:30:15.:30:19.

Jeremy Corbyn and Theresa May. Jeremy Corbyn and I don't want any

:30:20.:30:28.

of the Conservative Party candidates. Theresa May and if

:30:29.:30:35.

Jeremy Corbyn were to step down, I would like to see Stella Creasy.

:30:36.:30:40.

Michael Gove is the right person to take this country forward. For the

:30:41.:30:45.

Labour Party, I don't think there is a credible leader. The party will

:30:46.:30:50.

have to split eventually. I like Theresa May. I don't think the

:30:51.:30:59.

Labour Party needs a stronger candidate than Jeremy Corbyn. It has

:31:00.:31:05.

got the country talking about politics. Thank you. Keep your

:31:06.:31:07.

thoughts coming in. We'll have more on the

:31:08.:31:12.

centenary commemorations being held to remember the bloodiest

:31:13.:31:15.

day in the history of the British Army,

:31:16.:31:19.

the Battle of the Somme. we speak to the Wales fans who can't

:31:20.:31:31.

quite believe that their team are on the brink of a place

:31:32.:31:37.

in the semifinals. First, the news. Good morning. A

:31:38.:31:58.

two-minute silence has been held across Europe this morning in memory

:31:59.:32:01.

of the hundreds of thousands of men who lost their lives in World War

:32:02.:32:05.

I's bloodiest battle, the Battle of the Somme. Events were also held

:32:06.:32:16.

across the UK to mark the moment 100 years ago when troops left their

:32:17.:32:20.

trenches to go over the top. Britain suffered more than 60,000 dead and

:32:21.:32:24.

wounded on the first day alone in what became the bloodiest battle of

:32:25.:32:26.

the First World War. In around half an hour,

:32:27.:32:28.

the surprise challenger for the Conservative leadership,

:32:29.:32:31.

Michael Gove, will formally set Mr Gove, currently

:32:32.:32:32.

the Justice Secretary, declared that he would run yesterday

:32:33.:32:35.

morning - confounding expectations that he'd be supporting

:32:36.:32:38.

a bid from Boris Johnson. The former mayor o London has now

:32:39.:32:43.

pulled out, and hasn't Mr Gove faces the new

:32:44.:32:45.

frontrunner Theresa May, as well as Stephen Crabb,

:32:46.:32:48.

Andrea Leadsom and Liam Fox. MPs are urging the Government

:32:49.:32:54.

to make radical changes to the laws on prostitution

:32:55.:32:56.

in England and Wales. The Home Affairs Select Committee

:32:57.:32:58.

says soliciting should no longer be a crime for sex workers,

:32:59.:33:01.

and those who have a criminal record for offences related

:33:02.:33:03.

to prostitution should Scientists say they've discovered

:33:04.:33:05.

the first clear evidence that the ozone layer over Antarctica

:33:06.:33:11.

has begun to heal. Last year, the hole had shrunk

:33:12.:33:14.

since the year 2000 by an amount Scientists say it may be down

:33:15.:33:17.

to the phasing out of ozone-harming The electric car company Tesla

:33:18.:33:22.

is being investigated in the United States after one

:33:23.:33:29.

of its cars crashed into a lorry while on autopilot,

:33:30.:33:32.

killing its driver. It's believed to be the first death

:33:33.:33:36.

linked to the technology, which takes control of the car

:33:37.:33:38.

to change lanes The car maker says drivers

:33:39.:33:41.

were warned to keep their hands on the steering wheel even

:33:42.:33:44.

when autopilot is engaged. That is a summary of the latest

:33:45.:33:57.

news. Join me at 11 o'clock for BBC newsroom life. Let's catch up with

:33:58.:34:06.

the sport. Thank you. The countdown is on for the Welsh football team

:34:07.:34:10.

ahead of their biggest match in 58 years. The last remaining home

:34:11.:34:15.

nation at Euro 2016 play their quarterfinal against Belgium in

:34:16.:34:21.

Lille this evening. The prize is a semifinal match with Portugal. The

:34:22.:34:25.

Portuguese beat Poland on penalties last night. Not a great game.

:34:26.:34:34.

Portugal squeezed through 5-3 on spot kicks. Spain have already

:34:35.:34:38.

headed home but there are forward, Nolito, is on the move. Manchester

:34:39.:34:44.

City have confirmed his signing from Celta Vigo for around ?14 million.

:34:45.:34:49.

It is another big day for the Brits at Wimbledon. Dan Evans takes on

:34:50.:34:54.

Roger Federer for a place in round three, on Centre Court. Andy Murray

:34:55.:34:58.

is already there. He comfortably went through in straight sets

:34:59.:35:04.

yesterday. More sport with me on the BBC News channel throughout the day.

:35:05.:35:07.

We will follow all the build-up to that match.

:35:08.:35:09.

It will go down in history as the bloodiest battle

:35:10.:35:12.

In 1916, the Battle of the Somme, claimed the lives

:35:13.:35:15.

of a million British, French and German young men.

:35:16.:35:17.

On this day alone - July the 1st - 20,000 British

:35:18.:35:20.

Today marks the centenary of the battle.

:35:21.:35:26.

Communities up and down the country have been coming together to

:35:27.:35:30.

remember those that gave their lives for the freedoms that followed.

:35:31.:35:33.

Let's take a look at the events here and in France so far.

:35:34.:35:49.

Hundreds of men in full fighting kit and strangely quiet came streaming

:35:50.:35:56.

down, packing the front line and reserve trenches. We have been

:35:57.:36:01.

informed of the huge mine which will be blown up at 7:30am, and the great

:36:02.:36:07.

explosion will be the signal to go over the top. We took up our

:36:08.:36:11.

position in the communication trench leading into the front line. There,

:36:12.:36:17.

we stood rather silently, wondering if we had much longer to live. And

:36:18.:36:21.

suddenly brushing the ugly thought of death away. Just as the waiting

:36:22.:36:28.

was becoming unbearable, and the terrible strain causing some men to

:36:29.:36:34.

alter almost unnatural noises, we felt a queer, dull forward. And our

:36:35.:36:39.

trench rocked and a great blue flames shot Mac into the sky,

:36:40.:36:42.

carrying with it hundreds of tonnes of earth. The great mine had gone

:36:43.:36:46.

up. It was 7:30am. Zero hour. That was the silence a little

:36:47.:39:03.

earlier this morning. Earlier I spoke to Tricia Platts,

:39:04.:39:06.

whose great uncle, Percy Dixon, served in the Battle of Somme

:39:07.:39:09.

and sadly died later in war in 1918. Tricia began by telling me how

:39:10.:39:12.

she first became to learn I have been aware of him probably

:39:13.:39:24.

all my life, just as all our family work, simply because of the little

:39:25.:39:28.

photograph on the mantelpiece. It was only when I gave up work that I

:39:29.:39:32.

pursued him in detail and did some research. I was amazed to discover

:39:33.:39:39.

that he was in fact a Bradford pal. I did not realise that at the time

:39:40.:39:44.

the family had any connection with Bradford. But Percy's father had

:39:45.:39:50.

died in 1896, leaving mother with ten children. Seven of the children

:39:51.:39:53.

she then took from North Lancashire to Bradford to find work, which is

:39:54.:39:59.

why Percy was there in 1914 when war was declared. And he was a young man

:40:00.:40:08.

of about 24 in August, 1914. You said you were always aware of him

:40:09.:40:11.

because of a little photograph on the mantelpiece. Is that because

:40:12.:40:16.

the family and loss of the fact he the family and loss of the fact he

:40:17.:40:21.

died so young? It is difficult to say at this distance. As a young

:40:22.:40:26.

person, as a child, you don't ask questions. It was uncle Percy, he

:40:27.:40:31.

was lost in the war, you know. And of course we didn't know. But we

:40:32.:40:35.

didn't think to ask the questions. It was only much later I decided to

:40:36.:40:41.

look at what had happened to him. He was a Bradford pal. Tell us exactly

:40:42.:40:46.

what that was? He was not a professional fighter. He was a local

:40:47.:40:51.

boy who volunteered alongside others like him? Exactly like that. They

:40:52.:40:55.

were different for two reasons. They were all volunteers. And the

:40:56.:41:01.

Battalion was raised by the city of Bradford. It happened and lots of

:41:02.:41:06.

other towns as well, not just in the North of England, but Birmingham and

:41:07.:41:10.

some in the south, where the local mayor and the local alderman got

:41:11.:41:15.

together, formed a committee and said, we will raise a battalion for

:41:16.:41:21.

the city. In Bradford they raised two -- Battalions pretty quickly.

:41:22.:41:26.

How do you feel about that being a part of your family history? It is a

:41:27.:41:31.

part of everyone's history, I guess. I could be one of thousands of

:41:32.:41:34.

people sitting here this morning talking about an ancestor who was a

:41:35.:41:38.

pal. The majority of the army at that time came through as

:41:39.:41:43.

volunteers. I could be anyone, really. And I'm sure there will be

:41:44.:41:48.

lots of people watching who have an ancestor who was a pal of some sort

:41:49.:41:54.

from some town across England. And today, as we think about the start

:41:55.:41:58.

of that battle 100 years ago, think of those young men as they went over

:41:59.:42:04.

the top, it does make it feel quite personal, particularly when you have

:42:05.:42:07.

a story like yours in your family where you can put a face to it. How

:42:08.:42:13.

do you feel today remembering that? Well, a huge mixture. Admiration. I

:42:14.:42:20.

don't feel personally a sense of pride. I think it's too far away for

:42:21.:42:27.

that. I think it's more a sense of admiration, respect and certainly do

:42:28.:42:35.

think that these young men, the average age was actually over 25,

:42:36.:42:40.

imagined themselves to be very ordinary chaps who just did

:42:41.:42:45.

something together, joined together, served together, and then of course,

:42:46.:42:49.

a lot of them died together four were wounded at the same time. It is

:42:50.:42:56.

a huge mix of feelings. Yes, quite emotional as well. I know that you

:42:57.:43:00.

are going to be marking the day in Bradford as you have done for the

:43:01.:43:06.

last ten years. Tell us what you will be doing? The city of Bradford,

:43:07.:43:14.

I don't know, in the early 2000s started commemorating the first day

:43:15.:43:18.

of the Somme because of growing interest really in the history of

:43:19.:43:23.

the city. And at 11 o'clock they hold a service at the Cenotaph in

:43:24.:43:28.

Bradford and remember men of the pals but also men of the West

:43:29.:43:33.

Yorkshire Regiments and Jill -- of the regiments in which men from

:43:34.:43:37.

Bradford served during the Battle of the Somme. It is the first day of

:43:38.:43:42.

the long 148 day battle. So we have a lot to think about in the next

:43:43.:43:46.

three or four months. It is interesting when you talk about

:43:47.:43:50.

growing interest. As these events get ever further away, there is

:43:51.:43:53.

always discussing about whether it means for the younger generations

:43:54.:43:58.

that it is something, that there is such a distant connection to...

:43:59.:44:03.

There is lessening interest. How do you see it? Of course. British

:44:04.:44:13.

history is taught, 20th century history, is taught in British

:44:14.:44:19.

schools now. So events like the Great War, the Second World War, are

:44:20.:44:24.

part of the curriculum. So young people, I think, are better informed

:44:25.:44:27.

today than I was when I was at school. I don't recall ever doing

:44:28.:44:32.

any 20th-century history in the classroom. I think it is coming

:44:33.:44:35.

across to children much more than it did in my time. And I think, of

:44:36.:44:42.

course, people of my generation are realising that our ancestors were

:44:43.:44:43.

closely involved. Tricia Platts, whose uncle,

:44:44.:44:47.

Percy Dixon, served We're looking at live pictures from

:44:48.:45:02.

Thiepval. You can see President Hollande, the first of many

:45:03.:45:05.

dignitaries arriving for a memorial service. Around 10,000 people

:45:06.:45:11.

gathered there underneath the Thiepval Memorial, which, as you can

:45:12.:45:17.

see, stands high over those fields were so many fell.

:45:18.:45:23.

Members of the Royal Family will be attending, the Prince of Wales, the

:45:24.:45:28.

Duchess of Cornwall, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Harry,

:45:29.:45:33.

also Prime Minister David Cameron, and the French president and other

:45:34.:45:37.

leaders will be joined there at that memorial today to mark 100 years

:45:38.:45:43.

after the day that the Battle of the Somme commenced, the bloodiest day

:45:44.:45:50.

in British military history. Let's talk more about the Battle of the

:45:51.:45:54.

Somme with Paul Nixon, who is a military historian, joining us from

:45:55.:46:01.

France on this day. Paul, tell us more about the Battle of the Somme,

:46:02.:46:06.

why it was so bloody. It is very hard to imagine how so many people

:46:07.:46:16.

could have died on this one day. It was never intended to be that way.

:46:17.:46:22.

The British Army felt that they had obliterated the German defences,

:46:23.:46:28.

there was a week-long artillery bombardment of the German lines

:46:29.:46:32.

prior to going over the top. The attack was postponed because of bad

:46:33.:46:35.

weather. When the troops went over on the 1st of July, the thought was

:46:36.:46:39.

that there would be no Germans left, and they would simply walk over. Of

:46:40.:46:43.

course, that was not the case, the Germans had been sheltering in very

:46:44.:46:47.

deep dugouts, the bombardment lifted ten minutes before they went over,

:46:48.:46:52.

giving the Germans time to mount their machine guns and line up

:46:53.:46:56.

British troops in their sights. So that is why we lost 19,240 men

:46:57.:47:01.

killed on that first day. And amongst those men, young men, many

:47:02.:47:06.

who had never fought before, obviously, people who volunteered in

:47:07.:47:12.

huge numbers, alongside men like them in their local communities. To

:47:13.:47:18.

a large extent, it was a group of inexperienced people going to war.

:47:19.:47:24.

Well, it was. I don't think we should think that it was due to

:47:25.:47:29.

inexperience that the result was so many casualties. Experienced troops

:47:30.:47:36.

also met the same fate, but it was Kitchener's army, there were many

:47:37.:47:41.

Pals battalions within them, they have trained hard from August 1914

:47:42.:47:47.

and had not gone out to France until later. So they were well trained,

:47:48.:47:52.

but there was only so much... No training would have prepared them

:47:53.:47:55.

for bullets coming straight at them from machine guns, it was simply a

:47:56.:48:01.

slaughter. As we talk to you, Paul, we can see the Duke and Duchess of

:48:02.:48:05.

Cambridge arriving, also Prince Harry. As they arrive for this

:48:06.:48:13.

service at Thiepval. Writes and there are also ceremonies

:48:14.:48:57.

across the United Kingdom toonie be hundreds of thousands who died in

:48:58.:49:04.

the Battle of the Somme, which started on July the 1st 1916. It was

:49:05.:49:14.

the time when British, Commonwealth and French forces went over the top

:49:15.:49:19.

100 years ago. The British Army suffered almost 60,000 casualties on

:49:20.:49:24.

the first day alone, and in all more than 1 million men were killed or

:49:25.:49:28.

wounded on both sides over the course of that battle, which lasted

:49:29.:49:30.

141 days. There the Duke and Duchess of

:49:31.:49:43.

Cambridge joining thousands who are gathered there in Thiepval for a

:49:44.:49:51.

service to honour those who died 100 years ago.

:49:52.:50:00.

And here yesterday the Queen led events to mark the 100 year

:50:01.:50:07.

anniversary, there have been services in Westminster Abbey in

:50:08.:50:12.

London, also services in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. And the

:50:13.:50:17.

Duke of Cambridge has already paid tribute to the fallen soldiers,

:50:18.:50:22.

saying, we lost the flower of a generation.

:50:23.:50:33.

And those fields that we are looking at there in Thiepval, which are in

:50:34.:50:43.

the centre of those fields, that memorial at Thiepval, that is where

:50:44.:50:50.

so many soldiers fell. That is where they are remembered today, and still

:50:51.:50:54.

many people go to the cemeteries and the memorials of northern France, a

:50:55.:51:00.

very moving experience if you have ever done it, in order to run under

:51:01.:51:05.

those who file. Of course, so many fell, and their bodies were not

:51:06.:51:09.

recovered, so names are marked on many memorials.

:51:10.:51:22.

And that Battle of the Somme, which was one of the bloodiest of the

:51:23.:51:30.

First World War went on for five months, and it was fought over a 15

:51:31.:51:37.

mile front. But it was a war which had a heavy towel, a million killed

:51:38.:51:42.

and wounded in that battle. -- toll. OK, we will have more coverage as

:51:43.:51:55.

events there in Thiepval get under way.

:51:56.:52:03.

It is nine minutes before 11 o'clock, let's turn our attention to

:52:04.:52:06.

Wales, football, they are playing their biggest game in nearly 60

:52:07.:52:11.

years tonight, taking on Belgium at the European Championships in

:52:12.:52:14.

France. They have gone further than any of the Home Nations at Euro

:52:15.:52:18.

2016. Wales know a win would see them facing Portugal in the last

:52:19.:52:23.

four. Katie Gornall is in Lille, where the atmosphere is building, a

:52:24.:52:28.

lot of expectation and hope. Well, hope! Definitely hope, I think

:52:29.:52:33.

everyone here in eight Welsh shedders keeping their fingers

:52:34.:52:36.

crossed, it is getting a lot more lively here in Stade Pierre-Mauroy,

:52:37.:52:41.

we have seen more fans arriving over the past hour or so. -- in a Welsh

:52:42.:52:50.

shirt is. This is almost like a home game for Belgium, we are very close

:52:51.:52:54.

to the border. There is a party going on in the bars down there,

:52:55.:53:03.

earlier I saw Belgian fans doing a conga around the square. I have a

:53:04.:53:07.

couple of Welsh fans with me now, Andy and Charles have made the trip

:53:08.:53:11.

over, what a match, how excited I knew about this game, the first time

:53:12.:53:17.

since 1958 that Wales are playing in the quarterfinal of a major

:53:18.:53:20.

tournament? There have been some big qualifiers over the years, but not

:53:21.:53:25.

thing like this, these are at home is massive, 25,000 fans turning out

:53:26.:53:28.

for it, you can sense the atmosphere, massive game. Andy, are

:53:29.:53:33.

you concerned about being outnumbered by the Belgian fans

:53:34.:53:37.

coming over the border? Not really, we have all been having a good time,

:53:38.:53:43.

it does not matter how many is here, 20 35,000, we will make ourselves

:53:44.:53:49.

heard, we will have a great time. How do think this game is going to

:53:50.:53:54.

go today? Wales are underdogs, Belgium are second in the world. We

:53:55.:53:58.

are obviously the underdogs, but Gareth Bale as impressed in the week

:53:59.:54:03.

that we are Belgium's bogey team, we played them twice in qualifying, won

:54:04.:54:08.

in Cardiff and true in Brussels, they did not score past us. They

:54:09.:54:12.

have got some amazing attacking players, but if we can keep it tight

:54:13.:54:16.

at the back, a moment of magic from Bale and we can do it. I know that

:54:17.:54:21.

you were telling me before that you have been to some of the game is

:54:22.:54:24.

already in this tournament, but what plans did you have to change to make

:54:25.:54:29.

this game? I don't think every Wales fan would have expected you to get

:54:30.:54:34.

this far. I did not by God us getting past the train down to Paris

:54:35.:54:43.

at two days' notice. -- I did not bank on. You do not have much time

:54:44.:54:47.

to plan these things, but you just get it done. You are meant to be on

:54:48.:54:53.

a stag do. I'm going to try to catch the last day of tomorrow, he is

:54:54.:54:56.

getting married next week, so would we make the final, I might be there!

:54:57.:55:03.

Sorry about this, Henry, but I'm sure he will understand if Wales get

:55:04.:55:09.

to the final. How do you think it is going to go today? I think we will

:55:10.:55:14.

win 1-0. I am pretty confident to be fair, and I am never normally

:55:15.:55:22.

confident. I like your confidence! If Wales do win, it would be their

:55:23.:55:27.

first appearance in a semifinal of a major tournament ever. We spoke

:55:28.:55:31.

about 1958, that was against Brazil, they were beaten 1-0 by Pele, so

:55:32.:55:36.

they are hoping to do better against Belgium. Belgian Marrack second in

:55:37.:55:39.

the world, they have got Eden Hazard playing for them, but Wales have a

:55:40.:55:44.

good record, they picked up four points against them in qualifying.

:55:45.:55:50.

-- Belgium are ranked. Chris Coleman just want is players to enjoy the

:55:51.:55:54.

occasion, and if they make the semifinal, Portugal weight, so we

:55:55.:55:58.

would see the whole Wales come out to Lille for that. Not just the

:55:59.:56:03.

whole of Wales, they are the home late in, will they can do it! -- the

:56:04.:56:12.

only home nation left in. Back to two per barrel in France, the

:56:13.:56:19.

service to remember the centenary of the Battle of the Somme. -- back to

:56:20.:56:26.

Thiepval. We are awaiting the arrival of the Prince of Wales.

:56:27.:56:33.

Others have already arrived, that is the memorial at Thiepval, with the

:56:34.:56:39.

many thousands of names inscribed on the side. Thousands among the 1

:56:40.:56:49.

million who, in all, fell, 1 million killed or injured over the course of

:56:50.:56:53.

the five-month Battle of the Somme. And there the fields where so many

:56:54.:57:01.

fell in that battle that lasted 141 days, fought over a 15 mile stretch

:57:02.:57:08.

of front line. And this day, 100 years ago, was the bloodiest day in

:57:09.:57:16.

the history of the British Army. 19,240 British soldiers died on that

:57:17.:57:21.

first day of the battle, on that 15 mile front, near to the River Somme

:57:22.:57:26.

in northern France. The British captured three square miles of

:57:27.:57:33.

territory on that first day. Five months later, the British had

:57:34.:57:38.

advanced just seven miles, and the German defence had not been broken.

:57:39.:57:43.

In all, more than a million dead and wounded on all sides, including

:57:44.:57:49.

420,000 British, about 200,000 from France, and an estimated 465,000

:57:50.:57:56.

from Germany. It had been intended that the Battle of the Somme would

:57:57.:58:01.

be a decisive victory for the British and French against the

:58:02.:58:06.

German forces. And there you can see the people who are gathered to

:58:07.:58:11.

attend the service of commemoration, 10,000 members of the public chosen

:58:12.:58:14.

by ballot, hundreds of schoolchildren among them. And we

:58:15.:58:24.

will have coverage of that service on BBC Newsroom Live, which is

:58:25.:58:28.

coming up next, attended by the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of

:58:29.:58:32.

Cornwall. She will lay a wreath at the grave of her own great-uncle.

:58:33.:58:35.

Thank you very much for your company today. Have a good afternoon.

:58:36.:58:43.

? The weather fittingly sombre there in northern

:58:44.:58:46.