19/01/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


19/01/2017

News. Meet the man who monitors media reporting about Muslims and tackles the inaccuracies he finds. What is clean food - and does it make you healthier?


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This morning Theresa May will tell business and political leaders

:00:09.:00:17.

at the World Economic Forum meeting in the Swiss resort of Davos

:00:18.:00:20.

It's the Prime Minister's first Brexit speech since she said

:00:21.:00:26.

on Tuesday that Britain could not possibly stay in the single

:00:27.:00:29.

Also, are the British press biased against Muslims?

:00:30.:00:38.

Last month nine articles about Muslims in UK news

:00:39.:00:40.

outlets were corrected after they were proven to be wrong,

:00:41.:00:43.

We've been speaking exclusively to the activist waging a war

:00:44.:00:49.

on the false reporting which he says breeds division across the country.

:00:50.:00:55.

The Sunday Times article stated in its headline enclaves of Islam and

:00:56.:01:07.

the UK is 75% Muslim, and it is about to report on integration

:01:08.:01:10.

across the country. But what the report actually said was one school

:01:11.:01:14.

had students who thought that the majority of the country were Asian.

:01:15.:01:16.

Asian rather than Muslim? This year's secondary school league

:01:17.:01:23.

tables are out shortly, and for the first time,

:01:24.:01:25.

a new measure is being Attainment 8 assesses each

:01:26.:01:28.

student's achievement across eight GCSE subjects,

:01:29.:01:31.

while Progress 8 measures how they progress

:01:32.:01:35.

through secondary school. The Government's aim is to focus

:01:36.:01:36.

on pupils' development rather than just exam results,

:01:37.:01:39.

but will it be any better? Welcome to the programme,

:01:40.:01:41.

we're live until 11 this morning. Also, has clean eating

:01:42.:01:55.

become a dirty word? Tonight a BBC programme calls

:01:56.:02:01.

into question the advice of healthy eating gurus who have been telling

:02:02.:02:05.

us to eat clean - eating food in its most natural state

:02:06.:02:08.

and avoiding anything processed. We will be speaking to the Cambridge

:02:09.:02:10.

scientist taking on the gurus Have you tried clean

:02:11.:02:13.

eating - are you a fan? Do get in touch on that

:02:14.:02:21.

and all the stories we're talking about this morning -

:02:22.:02:26.

use the hashtag #Victorialive and If you text,

:02:27.:02:28.

you will be charged at the standard Several people have been

:02:29.:02:30.

killed after a hotel Up to 30 guests and staff

:02:31.:02:38.

were in the Rigo-piano Hotel on San Grasso mountain

:02:39.:02:43.

in the central Abruzzo region. The avalanche was triggered

:02:44.:02:45.

by a series of powerful earthquakes Rescuers are having to ski

:02:46.:02:47.

to the hotel as roads Let's speak to Andrea

:02:48.:02:51.

Vogt, a freelance Andrea, what are you hearing about

:02:52.:03:00.

this? There is a very complex rescue operation under way. As you

:03:01.:03:06.

mentioned, the first rescuers arrived on skis, and all of the

:03:07.:03:09.

emergency vehicles have not been able to get through to the site.

:03:10.:03:14.

There are believed to be up to 30 people, seven staff, and the rest

:03:15.:03:18.

were guest at the hotel when the earthquake and then the avalanche

:03:19.:03:22.

hit, so right now several people have been airlifted out with

:03:23.:03:33.

hypothermia. There were below freezing temperatures during the

:03:34.:03:36.

night, and the hotel was covered with snow and debris, part of it did

:03:37.:03:40.

collapse, so very difficult conditions to survive in, and there

:03:41.:03:46.

are fears that many may have perished after this earthquake

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triggered an avalanche. It has just been hammered. Tell us more about

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the area. Is it a popular area, a busy area with skiers? No, it is

:04:00.:04:10.

quite isolated, it is a long the Gran Sasso mountain. Some of these

:04:11.:04:13.

people may be the people who were displaced by the original

:04:14.:04:18.

earthquake. One of the first things the rescuers will try to do is to

:04:19.:04:21.

get to the guest list, but it is a very remote area, mountainous and

:04:22.:04:27.

remote and difficult to get in. You may be familiar with Amatrice where

:04:28.:04:35.

the earthquakes hit last August, that church tower collapsed

:04:36.:04:38.

yesterday, so what we are seeing is many of these buildings that were

:04:39.:04:41.

made on stable by the first earthquakes are now collapsing

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further, so lots of things, many hamlets have not been reached, but

:04:48.:04:51.

rescuers are focused right now on this hotel that was completely

:04:52.:04:55.

covered with debris and snow, about four metres of snow on site. Andrea,

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thank you very much indeed far dating us. We will keep you updated

:05:00.:05:03.

with the latest on that. But now let's catch up with the latest news

:05:04.:05:09.

with Annita in the newsroom. Thank you very much.

:05:10.:05:13.

Theresa May will tell world leaders in Davos this morning that the UK

:05:14.:05:16.

It's her first visit to the World Economic Forum as Prime Minister.

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Many in the audience will be hostile to her plan to take Britain out

:05:22.:05:24.

Let's speak to Tanya Beckett in Davos.

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Good morning. We heard Theresa May's Brexit speech on Tuesday. Will her

:05:27.:05:35.

message be slightly different today for this audience? Yes, so she is

:05:36.:05:44.

talking to a group of people who live and breathe capitalism and

:05:45.:05:48.

trade, so she has to really set her store as being one which is open for

:05:49.:05:52.

business. Yes, Britain might be leaving the European Union, however,

:05:53.:05:58.

it is very much interested in doing deals elsewhere, and in order for

:05:59.:06:03.

this to work well, for Brexit to work well, that needs to be very

:06:04.:06:08.

much part of the deal, so she is going to be wanting to talk to banks

:06:09.:06:12.

who have already said that if Britain is coming out of the single

:06:13.:06:18.

market, they need to set up subsidiaries, and people have been

:06:19.:06:21.

long thinking this is the case, with what remains of the EU. She is also

:06:22.:06:27.

going to want to trade ministers from other countries -- talk to

:06:28.:06:30.

trade ministers from other countries to do business as soon as they can,

:06:31.:06:34.

and businesses will welcome what she had to say because it offers them

:06:35.:06:37.

some degree of certainty, and they like that. Any other snippets that

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she could offer in terms of what sort of deal she might do with the

:06:43.:06:47.

EU would also be welcome. They have to make some practical decisions.

:06:48.:06:51.

Then she will have to face representatives from other EU

:06:52.:06:54.

countries, and that might be more tricky. Tanya Beckett in Davos,

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thank you for that. We'll bring you that speech live

:06:58.:07:00.

to you in the next few minutes. This is the scene, the podium where

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she will make that speech, and we are expecting that to happen just a

:07:09.:07:11.

few minutes after half past nine. We will bring that to you live.

:07:12.:07:17.

There are reports of troops from Senegal entering

:07:18.:07:19.

Gambia, as the political crisis there escalates.

:07:20.:07:24.

The defeated President Yayha Jammeh has ignored a midnight deadline

:07:25.:07:27.

to give way to the winner of last month's election, Adama Barrow.

:07:28.:07:29.

West African military forces have been preparing to move in to enforce

:07:30.:07:32.

1,000 British holiday-makers have returned home from Gambia

:07:33.:07:36.

with the Foreign Office advising against all but essential

:07:37.:07:38.

Scientists are working to deal with three diseases

:07:39.:07:46.

they fear could become global health emergencies.

:07:47.:07:48.

A group of charities and governments is spending more

:07:49.:07:50.

than 370 million pounds to tackle Middle East Respiratory Syndrome,

:07:51.:07:52.

A girl who was kidnapped as a baby 18 years ago

:07:53.:08:01.

has defended the woman who took her from

:08:02.:08:03.

Lexis Manigo was abducted by Gloria Williams, a woman

:08:04.:08:07.

Miss Manigo has praised her upbringing by the woman

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I understand what she did was wrong, but just look at my life itself, you

:08:12.:08:23.

know? I understand that one mistake, but it wasn't all bad. Everything

:08:24.:08:28.

that came out of it was not bad. It would be wrong if I would say, no, I

:08:29.:08:34.

don't want to get to know them, you know, curiosity, I will get to know

:08:35.:08:36.

them, of course. . A British man who travelled

:08:37.:08:44.

to America from the UK to have sex with boys has been sentenced to 13

:08:45.:08:47.

years in a US prison. 70-year-old Paul Charles Wilkins,

:08:48.:08:51.

from Cambridgeshire flew to California in January 2016

:08:52.:08:52.

and was caught in an Bomb disposal teams were called at

:08:53.:09:07.

almost 600 schools after warnings of a potentially hazardous material

:09:08.:09:13.

used in chemistry lessons. The army carried out hundreds of controlled

:09:14.:09:15.

explosions between October and December last year.

:09:16.:09:19.

Today is Barack Obama's final day in office as Donald Trump

:09:20.:09:22.

prepares to be sworn in as the 45th US president.

:09:23.:09:25.

Yesterday, the first lady Michelle Obama,

:09:26.:09:26.

was captured doing a final lap of the White House, as pictures

:09:27.:09:29.

In his last press conference as head of state, Mr Obama said he looked

:09:30.:09:37.

forward to spending more time with his wife and his

:09:38.:09:40.

Man, my daughters are something. And they just surprise and enchant

:09:41.:09:57.

and... Impress me more and more every single day as they grow up.

:09:58.:10:00.

President Obama. That's a summary of the latest BBC

:10:01.:10:04.

News - more at 9.30. Thank you very much, Annita. Later

:10:05.:10:15.

in the programme, we will be talking to the finish winner of the X Factor

:10:16.:10:22.

who has signed a deal with Sony. Lots to come between now and 11,

:10:23.:10:26.

including a discussion on clean eating. What do you think about

:10:27.:10:30.

that? Has it changed the way you eat? Do you feel like you should eat

:10:31.:10:37.

more clean as a result of all the bloggers out there talking about

:10:38.:10:39.

that? Do get in touch with us

:10:40.:10:42.

throughout the morning - use the hashtag Victoria live

:10:43.:10:45.

and If you text, you will be charged Now let's get the sport with Hugh. A

:10:46.:10:56.

shock at the Australian open? Good morning, Joanna.

:10:57.:10:59.

A huge shock at the Australian Open in the last hour - defending

:11:00.:11:03.

He was beaten in five sets by the wild card

:11:04.:11:07.

and world number 117, Denis Istomin from Uzbekistan.

:11:08.:11:09.

Istomin took the first set, but Djokovic won the next two.

:11:10.:11:14.

But he never really looked comfortable.

:11:15.:11:18.

Istomin then took the fourth in a tiebreak to level

:11:19.:11:21.

the match, going on to win the deciding set 6-4.

:11:22.:11:23.

It took 4 hours and 48 minutes, but Istomin

:11:24.:11:25.

And surely the biggest winner here is Andy Murray,

:11:26.:11:29.

who's looking to win his first title in Melbourne.

:11:30.:11:32.

His biggest challenger already out in the second round.

:11:33.:11:39.

A word on the Brits - Johanna Konta says she's looking

:11:40.:11:41.

forward to staying in Melbourne for 'as long as possible' -

:11:42.:11:44.

The British Number One eased to victory over Naomi Osaka

:11:45.:11:48.

of Japan in straight sets - to reach the third round,

:11:49.:11:50.

where she'll face former World Number 1 Caroline Wozniaki.

:11:51.:11:52.

There was bad news though for Heather Watson, defeated

:11:53.:11:54.

by American qualifier Jennifer Brady.

:11:55.:12:03.

Kyle Edmund had high hopes, too, but went out in straight sets

:12:04.:12:06.

No big shocks in last month was Mike FA Cup?

:12:07.:12:14.

-- last night's FA Cup? No, Jurgen Klopp was mad Liverpool made it

:12:15.:12:19.

through, but a tinge of regret for Plymouth. Jake Jervis hit the post

:12:20.:12:26.

of Liverpool in the second half of the replay, however Jurgen Klopp's

:12:27.:12:32.

men move onto phase Wolverhampton Wanderers at Anfield on the fourth

:12:33.:12:35.

round. Newcastle and Southampton also went through after their wings

:12:36.:12:39.

last night. And Manchester United top of one

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leak this morning? Yes, better news off the field than

:12:44.:12:47.

on it, they have become the richest club in football once again for the

:12:48.:12:51.

first time in 11 years. They go ahead of the European champions rail

:12:52.:13:00.

-- Real Madrid, third richest is Barcelona. Eight Premier League

:13:01.:13:06.

clubs make the top 20 of the football money list, including

:13:07.:13:09.

Leicester City for the first time. And England's cricketers hoping to

:13:10.:13:14.

level their one-day series with India, they won the toss and have

:13:15.:13:20.

chosen to bowl, and India are 74-3 after 17 of their 50 overs. Thank

:13:21.:13:23.

you very much, Hugh. Theresa May is about to

:13:24.:13:29.

speak to world leaders at the World Economic Forum in Davos

:13:30.:13:31.

to reassure them that Britain is open for business post

:13:32.:13:34.

Brexit, let's listen in. Theresa May is preparing for her

:13:35.:13:48.

speech to world leaders in Davos. He said, you cannot have all the

:13:49.:14:07.

advantages of being a member of the club if you are outside the club.

:14:08.:14:11.

Theresa May said earlier in the week that no deal is better than a bad

:14:12.:14:20.

deal, and the UK will not be a member of the single market going

:14:21.:14:26.

forward. But she wants the message today to be an outward pitch to the

:14:27.:14:29.

business leaders who will be there, the trade leaders, that Britain is

:14:30.:14:30.

open for business, and wants new trade deals

:14:31.:14:39.

as she looks ahead to global Britain, as she put it in her speech

:14:40.:14:46.

on Brexit. We are expecting her to start to speak shortly on the

:14:47.:14:55.

question of trade deals. For trade negotiations cannot begin until...

:14:56.:15:01.

That is a picture of her earlier in the week with that catchline Global

:15:02.:15:08.

Britain, but in terms of negotiating trade deals, formal negotiations

:15:09.:15:17.

cannot begin until the UK is actually out of the European Union.

:15:18.:15:26.

We are going to be speaking on the programme are little later to the

:15:27.:15:30.

man widely tipped to be the next US ambassador to the EU, and he has

:15:31.:15:35.

been speaking about the potential for a UK/ US trade deal which Donald

:15:36.:15:42.

Trump himself raise just a few days ago, saying the formal negotiations

:15:43.:15:46.

can't begin, but there is no reason why talks can't start, and he talks

:15:47.:15:52.

potentially of a time frame of around 90 days to come up with some

:15:53.:15:55.

sort of a deal, so it will be interesting to talk to him a little

:15:56.:15:58.

bit later on the programme about that. We are still waiting for

:15:59.:16:02.

Theresa May, so we will just move on, but we will go back as soon as

:16:03.:16:05.

she starts to speak. President-elect Donald Trump takes

:16:06.:16:12.

the oath of office tomorrow and it's thought about 900,000 people

:16:13.:16:14.

are expected to gather in Washington But his supporters are

:16:15.:16:17.

already on their way There will be a wreath laying

:16:18.:16:20.

at Arlington National Cemetery with both Donald Trump and his

:16:21.:16:23.

Vice President Mike Pence attending. So let's find out a bit more

:16:24.:16:29.

about what's on the agenda The only thing we have to fear is

:16:30.:17:56.

fear itself. Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you

:17:57.:17:58.

can do for your country. The inauguration is being boycotted

:17:59.:18:31.

by some politicians, and in terms of the numbers going to the

:18:32.:18:40.

inauguration, around 800,000 to 900,000 are expected to go, but that

:18:41.:18:44.

compares with double the number actually when Barack Obama was

:18:45.:18:52.

inaugurated. There has also been a lot made of the fact that various

:18:53.:18:56.

performers were wanted for events who would not do it and we will be

:18:57.:19:01.

speaking more about what is planned and what is anticipated on the eve

:19:02.:19:04.

of Donald Trump's turning from ordinary citizen to the president.

:19:05.:19:13.

We will be talking to the man who is widely tipped to be the United

:19:14.:19:24.

States new ambassador to the EU. Theresa May has just arrived on

:19:25.:19:27.

stage at Davos and so we will listen to her speech.

:19:28.:19:33.

Thank you for the introduction and thank you for inviting me to speak

:19:34.:19:40.

here at the World Economic Forum this morning. This is an

:19:41.:19:45.

organisation that is, as it says in the very first line of your mission

:19:46.:19:49.

statement, committed to improving the state of the world. Those of us

:19:50.:19:55.

who meet here are all by instinct and outlook optimists who believe in

:19:56.:20:03.

the power of public and private cooperation to make the world of

:20:04.:20:08.

tomorrow better than the world of today. And we are all united in our

:20:09.:20:16.

belief that that world will be built on the foundations of free trade,

:20:17.:20:26.

partnership and globalisation. Yet beyond the confines of this hall,

:20:27.:20:29.

those forces for good that we so often take for granted are being

:20:30.:20:39.

called into question. The forces of liberalism, free trade and

:20:40.:20:41.

globalisation that have had and continue to have such an

:20:42.:20:47.

overwhelmingly positive impact on our world, that have harnessed

:20:48.:20:50.

unprecedented levels of wealth and opportunity, that have lifted

:20:51.:20:56.

millions out of poverty around the world, that have brought nations

:20:57.:21:01.

closer together, broken down barriers and improved standards of

:21:02.:21:04.

living and consumer choice, forces that underpins the rules -based

:21:05.:21:11.

international system that is key to global prosperity and security, are

:21:12.:21:18.

somehow at risk of being undermined. And as we meet here, this morning,

:21:19.:21:24.

across Europe, parties of the far left and the far right are seeking

:21:25.:21:31.

to exploit this opportunity. During support by feeding off an underlying

:21:32.:21:37.

and keenly felt sense among some people, often those on modest to low

:21:38.:21:42.

incomes, living in relatively rich countries around the West, that

:21:43.:21:46.

these forces are not working for them. And those parties who embrace

:21:47.:21:53.

the politics of division and despair, who offer easy answers, who

:21:54.:21:58.

claim to understand people's problems and always know what and

:21:59.:22:02.

who to blame, feed of something else as well. The sense among the public

:22:03.:22:08.

that mainstream political and business leaders have failed to

:22:09.:22:12.

comprehend there are legitimate concerns for too long. This morning,

:22:13.:22:21.

I want to set out a manifesto for change, that responds to these

:22:22.:22:25.

concerns, and shows that the politics of the mainstream can

:22:26.:22:30.

deliver the change people need. I want to show how, by taking a new

:22:31.:22:35.

approach, that harnesses the good of what works and what changes -- and

:22:36.:22:40.

changes what does not we can maintain and can build support for

:22:41.:22:47.

the rules -based international system. And I want to explain how,

:22:48.:22:52.

as we do so, the United Kingdom, a country that has so often been at

:22:53.:22:57.

the forefront of economic and social change, will step up to a new

:22:58.:23:02.

leadership role as the strongest and most forceful advocate for business,

:23:03.:23:07.

free markets and free trade anywhere in the world. For that is the unique

:23:08.:23:17.

opportunity that Britain now has. I speak to you this morning as the

:23:18.:23:21.

Prime Minister of a country that faces the future with confidence.

:23:22.:23:26.

For a little over six months ago, millions of my fellow citizens upset

:23:27.:23:32.

the odds by voting with determination and quiet resolve to

:23:33.:23:36.

leave the European Union, and embrace the world. Let us not

:23:37.:23:46.

underestimate the magnitude of that decision, it means Britain must face

:23:47.:23:52.

up to a period of momentous change. We must go through a tough

:23:53.:23:55.

negotiation and forge a new Rol for ourselves in the world full of it

:23:56.:23:59.

means accepting that the road ahead will be uncertain at times, but

:24:00.:24:04.

believing that it leads towards a brighter future for our country's

:24:05.:24:10.

children and grandchildren, too. So while it would have been easy for

:24:11.:24:13.

the British people to shy away from taking such a path, they fixed their

:24:14.:24:19.

eyes on that brighter future, and chose a bold, ambitious course,

:24:20.:24:24.

instead, they chose to build a truly global Britain. I know that this and

:24:25.:24:30.

the other reasons Britain took such a decision is not always well

:24:31.:24:36.

understood internationally, particularly among our friends and

:24:37.:24:40.

allies in Europe. Some of our European partners feel that we have

:24:41.:24:44.

turned our back on them, and I know many fear what our decision means

:24:45.:24:49.

for the future of the US itself. But as I said in my speech earlier this

:24:50.:24:53.

week, arid decision to leave the European Union was no rejection of

:24:54.:24:59.

our friends in Europe with whom we share common interests and values

:25:00.:25:04.

and so much else. -- our decision. It was no attempt to become more

:25:05.:25:08.

distant from them, or to seize the corporation that has helped to keep

:25:09.:25:15.

our continent secure and strong. Nor was it an attempt to undermine the

:25:16.:25:22.

European Union itself. It remains overwhelmingly and compellingly in

:25:23.:25:26.

Britain's national interest that the EU as an organisation should

:25:27.:25:35.

succeed. It would simply restore as we see it Parliamentary democracy

:25:36.:25:37.

and national self-determination. A vote to take control and make

:25:38.:25:45.

decisions for ourselves. And crucially, to become even more

:25:46.:25:49.

global and internationalist in action and in spirit as well.

:25:50.:25:54.

Because that is who we are, as a nation. Britain's history and

:25:55.:25:58.

culture is profoundly internationalist. We are a European

:25:59.:26:04.

country, and proud of our shared European heritage. But we are also a

:26:05.:26:10.

country that has always looked beyond Europe, into the wider world.

:26:11.:26:15.

That is why we are among the most racially diverse countries in

:26:16.:26:18.

Europe, one of the most multicultural members of the

:26:19.:26:23.

European Union. And why, whether we are talking about India, Pakistan,

:26:24.:26:28.

Bangladesh, America, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, countries in

:26:29.:26:31.

Africa, Asia, or those closer to home in Europe, so many of us have

:26:32.:26:36.

close friends and relatives from across the world. And it is why we

:26:37.:26:42.

are by instinct a greater global trading nation that seeks to trade

:26:43.:26:47.

with countries not just in Europe but beyond Europe as well. So at the

:26:48.:26:53.

heart of the plan, I set out earlier this week, is a determination to

:26:54.:26:59.

pursue a bold and ambitious free trade agreement between the UK and

:27:00.:27:05.

the European Union. But more than that, we seek the freedom to strike

:27:06.:27:10.

new trade deals with old friends and new allies, right around the world

:27:11.:27:17.

as well. I am pleased we have already started discussions on

:27:18.:27:21.

future trade ties with countries like Australia, New Zealand and

:27:22.:27:25.

India. Countries including China, Brazil and the Gulf states have

:27:26.:27:30.

already expressed their interest in striking trade deals with us. It is

:27:31.:27:35.

about embracing genuine free trade, because that is the basis of our

:27:36.:27:41.

prosperity. But also, the best way to cement the multilateral

:27:42.:27:44.

partnerships and cooperation that helped to build a better world. For

:27:45.:27:52.

the challenges we face, like terrorism, climate change and modern

:27:53.:27:56.

slavery, don't stop at national borders. Nor do they stop at the

:27:57.:28:03.

borders of continents. The challenges and opportunities before

:28:04.:28:07.

us require us to look outwards in a spirit of cooperation and

:28:08.:28:12.

partnership. That is why, as I said in my speech on Tuesday, I want the

:28:13.:28:17.

UK to emerge from this period of change as a truly global Britain.

:28:18.:28:23.

The best friend and neighbour to our European partners, but a country

:28:24.:28:26.

that reaches beyond the borders of Europe, too, a country that gets out

:28:27.:28:31.

into the world, to build relationships with old friends and

:28:32.:28:37.

new allies alike. And that is exactly what we are going to do. We

:28:38.:28:42.

are going to be a confident country, that is in control of its own

:28:43.:28:47.

destiny once again. It is because of that that we will be in a position

:28:48.:28:52.

to act in this global role. Because a country in control of its own

:28:53.:28:58.

destiny is more, not less able, to play a full role in underpinning and

:28:59.:29:02.

strengthening the multilateral rules -based system. A global Britain is

:29:03.:29:09.

no less British because we are a hub for foreign investment, indeed, our

:29:10.:29:15.

biggest manufacturer, Tata, is Indian, and you still cannot get

:29:16.:29:18.

more British than a Jaguar, or a Land Rover. Britain is no less

:29:19.:29:22.

British because it is home to people from around the world, in fact, we

:29:23.:29:27.

derive so much of our strength from our diversity, we are a multiracial,

:29:28.:29:33.

multiethnic, multi-faith democracy. We are proud of it. Britain is no

:29:34.:29:38.

less British because we have led the way in multilateral organisations

:29:39.:29:44.

like the UN, Nato, IMF and the World Bank over many years. Membership of

:29:45.:29:50.

these bodies over the years magnifies all their members ability

:29:51.:29:54.

to advance the common goods of peace, prosperity and security. I

:29:55.:29:59.

believe strongly in a rules -based global order. The establishment of

:30:00.:30:05.

the institutions that gave effect to it in the mid-20th century was a

:30:06.:30:10.

crucial foundation for much of the growing peace and prosperity the

:30:11.:30:11.

world has enjoyed. And the tragic history of the first

:30:12.:30:22.

half of the last century reminds us of the cost of those institutions'

:30:23.:30:27.

absence. The litany of follies of that time, the mistakes that we

:30:28.:30:30.

should never forget and never repeat. So we must uphold the

:30:31.:30:36.

institutions that enable the nations of the world to work together, and

:30:37.:30:42.

we must continue to promote international corporation wherever

:30:43.:30:46.

we can. One example of that is modern slavery. A scourge of our

:30:47.:30:52.

world, which we can only defeat if we work together. Changing

:30:53.:30:57.

attitudes, rooting out such abhorrent practices and prosecuting

:30:58.:31:03.

the perpetrators. That is why at Davos this year I have convened a

:31:04.:31:07.

high-level panel discussion to continue our co-ordinated effort to

:31:08.:31:13.

save those many lives which are tragically being stolen.

:31:14.:31:20.

International cooperation is vital, but we must never forget that our

:31:21.:31:26.

first responsibility as governments is to serve the people, and it is my

:31:27.:31:32.

firm belief that we as governments, international institutions, as Mrs

:31:33.:31:37.

and individuals, need to do more to respond to the concerns of those who

:31:38.:31:42.

feel that the modern world has left them behind. So in Britain, we have

:31:43.:31:47.

embarked on an ambitious programme of economic and social reform that

:31:48.:31:53.

aims to ensure that as we build this global Britain, we are able to take

:31:54.:32:00.

people with us. A programme that aims to show how a strong Britain

:32:01.:32:03.

abroad can be a better Britain at home. Because talk of greater

:32:04.:32:09.

globalisation can make people fearful. For many, it means their

:32:10.:32:14.

jobs being outsourced and wages undercut. It means having to sit

:32:15.:32:21.

back as they watch their communities change around them, and in their

:32:22.:32:24.

minds, it means watching as those who prosper seem to play by a

:32:25.:32:30.

different set of rules while for many life remains a struggle as they

:32:31.:32:36.

get by, but don't necessarily get on. And these tensions and

:32:37.:32:43.

differences are increasingly exposed and exploited through the expansion

:32:44.:32:46.

of new technologies and the growth of social media. But if we are to

:32:47.:32:53.

make the case for free markets, free trade and globalisation, as we must,

:32:54.:32:59.

those of us who believe in them must face up to and respond to the

:33:00.:33:04.

concerns people have. And we must work together to shape new policies

:33:05.:33:09.

and approaches that demonstrate their capacity to deliver for all of

:33:10.:33:13.

the people in our respective countries. I believe this challenge

:33:14.:33:20.

demands a new approach from government, and it requires a new

:33:21.:33:26.

approach from business, too. The government, it means not just

:33:27.:33:33.

stepping back and as the prevailing orthodoxy in many countries has

:33:34.:33:36.

argued for so many years, not just getting out of the way, not just

:33:37.:33:40.

leaving businesses to get on with the job and assuming the problems

:33:41.:33:44.

will just fix themselves. It means stepping up to a new active role

:33:45.:33:48.

that backs businesses and ensures more people in all corners of the

:33:49.:33:52.

country share in the benefits of its success. And from business, it means

:33:53.:33:58.

doing even more to spread those benefits to more people. It means

:33:59.:34:03.

playing by the same rules as everyone else when it comes to tax

:34:04.:34:08.

and behaviour. Because in the UK, trust in business runs at just 35%

:34:09.:34:13.

among those in the lowest income brackets. And it means putting aside

:34:14.:34:21.

short-term considerations and investing in people and communities

:34:22.:34:26.

for the long-term. These are all things that I know the vast majority

:34:27.:34:29.

of businesses do already, not just creating jobs, supporting smaller

:34:30.:34:37.

businesses, training and developing people, but also by working to give

:34:38.:34:40.

something back to communities, and supporting the next generation.

:34:41.:34:44.

Businesses large and small are the back bone of our economies, and

:34:45.:34:49.

enterprise is the engine of our prosperity. That is why Britain is

:34:50.:34:56.

and will always be open for business, open to investment in our

:34:57.:35:00.

companies, infrastructure, universities and entrepreneurs. Open

:35:01.:35:04.

to those who wants to buy art goods and services, and open to talent and

:35:05.:35:09.

opportunities from the arts to technology, finance to

:35:10.:35:14.

manufacturing. But at the same time as promoting this openness, we must

:35:15.:35:20.

heed the underlying feeling that there are some companies,

:35:21.:35:23.

particularly those with a global reach, who are playing by a

:35:24.:35:26.

different set of rules to ordinary working people. So it is essential

:35:27.:35:31.

for business to demonstrate leadership, to show that in this

:35:32.:35:37.

globalised world, everyone is playing by the same rules, and that

:35:38.:35:42.

the benefits of economic success are there for all our citizens. This

:35:43.:35:48.

work is absolutely crucial if we are to maintain public consent for a

:35:49.:35:52.

globalised economy and the businesses that operate within it.

:35:53.:35:57.

That is why I have talked a great deal about our country delivering

:35:58.:36:02.

yet higher standards of corporate governance to help make the UK the

:36:03.:36:07.

best place to invest of any major economy. That means several things.

:36:08.:36:11.

It means businesses paying their fair share of tax, recognising their

:36:12.:36:17.

obligations and duties to their employees and supply chains, and

:36:18.:36:22.

trading in the right way. Companies genuinely investing in and becoming

:36:23.:36:26.

part of the communities and nations in which they operate, and abiding

:36:27.:36:31.

by the responsibilities that implies. And all of us taking steps

:36:32.:36:37.

towards addressing executive pay and accountability to shareholders. And

:36:38.:36:42.

that is why I welcome the World Economic Forum's compact for

:36:43.:36:49.

responsive and responsible leadership that business leaders are

:36:50.:36:54.

being asked to sign up to at this conference. It is this change,

:36:55.:36:57.

setting clear rules for businesses to operate by while embracing the

:36:58.:37:01.

liberalism and free trade that enable them to thrive, which will

:37:02.:37:05.

allow us to conserve the ultimate good that is a globalised economy. I

:37:06.:37:11.

have no doubt at all about the vital role business plays, not just in the

:37:12.:37:16.

economic life of a nation, but in society, too. But to respond to that

:37:17.:37:24.

sense of anxiety people feel, I believe we, business and government

:37:25.:37:28.

working together, need to do even more to make the case. That is why

:37:29.:37:35.

in Britain we are developing a new, modern, industrial strategy. The

:37:36.:37:40.

term industrial strategy has fallen into something approaching disrepute

:37:41.:37:44.

in recent years, but I believe such a strategy that addresses the

:37:45.:37:47.

long-standing and structural weaknesses in our economy is

:37:48.:37:52.

essential if we are to promote the benefits of free markets and free

:37:53.:37:57.

trade as we wish. Our strategy is not about propping up failing

:37:58.:38:03.

industries or picking winners, but creating the conditions where

:38:04.:38:08.

winners can emerge and grow. It is about backing those winners all the

:38:09.:38:13.

waiting courage than to invest in the long-term future of Britain, and

:38:14.:38:18.

about delivering jobs and economic growth to every community and corner

:38:19.:38:23.

of the country. We can't leave all of this to international market

:38:24.:38:27.

forces alone, or just rely on an increase in overall prosperity.

:38:28.:38:32.

Instead, we have to be practical and proactive. In other words, we have

:38:33.:38:38.

to step up and take control to ensure that free trade and

:38:39.:38:44.

globalisation work for everyone. At the same time, we have embarked on

:38:45.:38:49.

an ambitious agenda of social reform that embraces the same principles.

:38:50.:38:53.

Active, engaged government that steps up and works for everyone.

:38:54.:38:58.

Because if you are someone who is just managing, just getting by, you

:38:59.:39:02.

don't need a government that will get out of the way. You need an

:39:03.:39:07.

active government that will step up and champion the things that matter

:39:08.:39:14.

to you. Governments traditionally have been good at identifying, if

:39:15.:39:18.

not always addressing, the problems and challenges faced by the least

:39:19.:39:23.

advantage in our societies. However, the mission I have laid out for the

:39:24.:39:29.

government I lead to make Britain a country that works for everyone goes

:39:30.:39:32.

further. It is to build something that I have called the shared

:39:33.:39:38.

society. One that doesn't just value our individual rights, but focuses

:39:39.:39:42.

rather more on the responsibilities we have to one another. That

:39:43.:39:47.

respects the bonds that people share, the bonds of family,

:39:48.:39:52.

community, citizenship and strong institutions. And that recognises

:39:53.:40:00.

the obligations we have as citizens, obligations that make our society

:40:01.:40:05.

work. It is these bonds and obligations that make our society

:40:06.:40:10.

strong and answer our basic human need for definition and identity.

:40:11.:40:17.

And I am absolutely clear that it is the job of government to encourage

:40:18.:40:21.

and nurture the Relay ships, networks and institutions that

:40:22.:40:27.

provide that definition and to correct the injustice and unfairness

:40:28.:40:30.

that divides us wherever it is found. Too often today, the

:40:31.:40:37.

responsibilities we have to one another have been forgotten as the

:40:38.:40:42.

cult of individualism has taken hold. And globalisation and the

:40:43.:40:47.

democratisation of communications has encouraged people to look beyond

:40:48.:40:54.

their own communities and immediate networks in the name of joining a

:40:55.:40:59.

broader global community. To say this is not to argue against

:41:00.:41:02.

globalisation, nor the benefits it rings. From modern travel and modern

:41:03.:41:07.

media to new product in our shops and new opportunities for British

:41:08.:41:11.

companies to export their goods to millions of customers all around the

:41:12.:41:17.

world. But, just as we need to act to address the deeply felt sense of

:41:18.:41:20.

economic inequality that has emerged in recent years, so we also need to

:41:21.:41:27.

recognise the way in which more global and individualistic world can

:41:28.:41:33.

sometimes loosen the ties that bind our society together, leaving some

:41:34.:41:37.

people feeling locked out and left behind. I am determined to make sure

:41:38.:41:44.

that centre ground mainstream politics correspondent to the

:41:45.:41:49.

concerns people have today. I am determined to stand up for free

:41:50.:41:56.

markets, free trade and globalisation, but also to show how

:41:57.:42:00.

these forces can work for everyone. And to do so, I turn to the words of

:42:01.:42:06.

the 18th-century force of Edmund Burke, who said: A state without the

:42:07.:42:14.

means of some change is without the means of its own conservation. That

:42:15.:42:21.

great Conservative principle, change in order to conserve, is more

:42:22.:42:24.

important than ever in today's Plex geopolitical environment. And I feel

:42:25.:42:31.

it is of huge relevance to those of us here in Davos this week. And it

:42:32.:42:37.

is the principle that guides me as I leave Britain through this period of

:42:38.:42:44.

change. As we build a new, bold, confident, global Britain and shape

:42:45.:42:47.

a new era of globalisation that genuinely works for all. As we

:42:48.:42:54.

harness the forces of globalisation, so that the system works for

:42:55.:42:58.

everyone, and so maintain public support for that system for

:42:59.:43:04.

generations to come. I want that to be the legacy of our time. To use

:43:05.:43:11.

this moment to provide responsive, responsible leadership that will

:43:12.:43:16.

bring the benefits of free trade to every corner of the world, that will

:43:17.:43:21.

lift millions more out of poverty and towards prosperity, and that

:43:22.:43:26.

will deliver security, prosperity and belonging for all of our people.

:43:27.:43:30.

Thank you. APPLAUSE

:43:31.:43:38.

Theresa May addressing the audience in Davos. Business leaders and trade

:43:39.:43:45.

leaders among them, and the message that there has been a manifesto for

:43:46.:43:48.

change, that she wants to put forward the politics of the

:43:49.:43:52.

mainstream, she says can deliver the change people need. She says that

:43:53.:43:55.

the UK will be stepping up to a new leadership role as the advocate for

:43:56.:43:59.

free trade and global markets because the UK now has a unique

:44:00.:44:05.

position, but she said it is in Britain's national interest that the

:44:06.:44:09.

EU should succeed. Let's get some reaction to that speech.

:44:10.:44:12.

We can go live to Norman Smith in Westminster now.

:44:13.:44:14.

That combination of championing the UK's interests while trying not to

:44:15.:44:21.

alienate partners in Europe? I thought it interesting, because we

:44:22.:44:25.

knew that Theresa May was going to stress how Brexit would lead to a

:44:26.:44:30.

more global, outward looking, confident Britain. What I didn't

:44:31.:44:36.

expect was so much emphasis on the downside of globalisation and, if

:44:37.:44:40.

you like, implicit criticism of many of those in her audience who are, if

:44:41.:44:45.

you like, the international elite, saying in effect that too many

:44:46.:44:48.

bosses of big companies with global reach were not playing by the rules,

:44:49.:44:53.

were not paying their fair taxes, were not taking on board their

:44:54.:44:58.

social responsibility, and were not spreading the benefits of growth and

:44:59.:45:02.

wealth, and that is quite a tough message when you are talking about

:45:03.:45:05.

people sitting there in front of you. And it matters, because she

:45:06.:45:09.

needs those people to be on board for Brexit, bluntly because they

:45:10.:45:14.

have in their hands thousands and thousands of jobs here in Britain,

:45:15.:45:19.

they bring in billions of pounds of investment. These people matter, and

:45:20.:45:25.

Theresa May needs them to be confident about Brexit. And she had

:45:26.:45:30.

a fairly blunt message for them, which is you guys need to shake up

:45:31.:45:36.

the way you operate. You can't carry on as before. Because this is what

:45:37.:45:42.

she called cult of the individual and globalisation, people frankly

:45:43.:45:47.

feel left behind it, it is weakening the bonds of communities. So it was

:45:48.:45:51.

a fairly direct message to the international elite in front of her,

:45:52.:45:54.

that they have got to change their ways. Thank you, Norman.

:45:55.:46:01.

Almost one in 10 secondary schools are under-performing,

:46:02.:46:02.

that's according to Government figures out in the last few minutes.

:46:03.:46:05.

Statistics show that nearly 300 secondaries in England are falling

:46:06.:46:08.

below a new Government target that measures pupils' progress

:46:09.:46:10.

and achievement over eight GCSE subjects.

:46:11.:46:11.

For the first time this year, schools have not been judged

:46:12.:46:14.

on the proportion of pupils scoring at least five C grades at GCSE.

:46:15.:46:17.

Instead, there is a new headline measure called "progress 8."

:46:18.:46:26.

What exactly has changed? For many years, schools were judged on how

:46:27.:46:37.

may people got five GCSEs, including Maths and English, at Grade A* to C.

:46:38.:46:42.

Now, in England, there are two new measures: Progress eight and

:46:43.:46:49.

Attainment eight. So what does this mean? Progress eight is how far a

:46:50.:46:52.

child has progressed from the end of primary school to their GCSEs. It

:46:53.:46:54.

shows whether a student has performed to expectation. And

:46:55.:46:58.

Attainment eight is the results from a pupil's best eight GCSEs including

:46:59.:47:09.

Maths and English So why is this happening now? It's argued that five

:47:10.:47:12.

GCSEs was too narrow a measure to judge how well schools were doing.

:47:13.:47:14.

So it's thought to be fairer to see a pupil's best achievement across a

:47:15.:47:17.

broader spectrum of subjects. But not everybody is happy. Critics have

:47:18.:47:19.

argued that the new system is too complicated for parents and children

:47:20.:47:22.

to understand. Let's talk now to our education correspondent Gillian

:47:23.:47:26.

Hargreaves. Before we talk more about the results just out, first of

:47:27.:47:30.

all, is there much controversy over this system? Schools and head

:47:31.:47:34.

teachers have long argued that a raw score of how well your pupils have

:47:35.:47:40.

done in their GCSEs was not sophisticated enough, there is a

:47:41.:47:45.

school and -- School in Stoke-on-Trent that was told that it

:47:46.:47:49.

required improvement, it is not at the standard that the government

:47:50.:47:52.

says it should be. This morning, on its website, it shows

:47:53.:48:07.

that it's Progress eight score is+0.25 and that will show parents

:48:08.:48:11.

that it is above average and the progress made from the age of 11 to

:48:12.:48:16.

16 is above average, doing very well. That is the sort of example I

:48:17.:48:20.

think of what we are now going to see, a more sophisticated tool. The

:48:21.:48:25.

union state this is great but they say it should not be the only tool

:48:26.:48:28.

with which parents judge a school, they need to look in the round at

:48:29.:48:31.

the curriculum, whether it is the right place for their child. Might

:48:32.:48:35.

be too soon for there to have been a wider evaluation for the new figures

:48:36.:48:39.

to indicate whether there are many more schools like this, which have

:48:40.:48:42.

shifted their place on the tables? 282 schools have not

:48:43.:49:02.

met the minimum level. That is a lower number than last year, it

:49:03.:49:06.

would be comparing apples and pears. Schools are getting better, but it

:49:07.:49:12.

is a bit early yet to see which ones may have done well in the past and

:49:13.:49:20.

are now plummeting. If you start with pupils who are getting good

:49:21.:49:24.

attainment and then they get it, where does that get you? Schools, if

:49:25.:49:29.

they have always had high colour calibre pupils in the past, what

:49:30.:49:33.

they have not been doing is comparing themselves to other

:49:34.:49:37.

schools with very able pupils. -- high calibre pupils. What progress

:49:38.:49:43.

children make is being measured here, comparing children of similar

:49:44.:49:47.

abilities across England. So, yes, if a school in the past has always

:49:48.:49:53.

had very able pupils, it cannot rest on its laurels, because it will be

:49:54.:49:56.

exposed by the new measure. Now we can speak with a month of four,

:49:57.:50:00.

these kids will be affected by the new measures. -- mum of four. And

:50:01.:50:13.

Alison Critchley, Chief Executive of RSA Academies which has seven

:50:14.:50:15.

schools in the West Midland, who also has three daughters at

:50:16.:50:17.

secondary school. You have the raft of schools and the authority, do you

:50:18.:50:19.

know how Have any schools in your area

:50:20.:50:23.

shifted position? Yes, as Gillian has described, addicted elite

:50:24.:50:28.

schools that have served communities with people red children who have

:50:29.:50:31.

come in struggling, the progress that the children make in those

:50:32.:50:35.

schools is really recognised by this new measure, because it judges

:50:36.:50:38.

progress made rather than purely results they get at the end. And

:50:39.:50:42.

also, where schools are stretching the more able, that performance is

:50:43.:50:50.

rewarded. It has definitely made a difference to where schools are

:50:51.:50:55.

appearing on and acknowledging... Can you give us some specific

:50:56.:50:58.

examples, has there been a dramatic shift? Yes, so, with one of our

:50:59.:51:04.

schools, always around the average in terms of the proportion of

:51:05.:51:10.

children getting five GCSEs at ATC grade, I have not checked on the

:51:11.:51:12.

finalised version but it is now something like +0.4. Just above

:51:13.:51:26.

average? -- A-C grade. If you were at +0.5 then it would mean that you

:51:27.:51:30.

are getting one great above what you expect in four of your GCSEs, it is

:51:31.:51:36.

about a grade in half of the GCSEs higher, it is a difficult message to

:51:37.:51:40.

understand, that is the difficulty in explaining what zero point for

:51:41.:51:44.

actually means. You have four children, do you understand it? I

:51:45.:51:49.

have been given the low down by my eldest daughter, doing their GCSEs

:51:50.:51:52.

this year, she will be in the first batch to do a harder exam, I kind of

:51:53.:51:57.

understand where this is coming from and I understand the league table

:51:58.:52:01.

ranking a little bit better than most parents. Yes, I think in a way

:52:02.:52:08.

it is great, it allows better students to perform and show off

:52:09.:52:15.

their academic capabilities. You have four... So you will be looking

:52:16.:52:20.

at a new school for your child who is in year six, will this change the

:52:21.:52:25.

way that you pick a school? To be honest, no, I look at the whole

:52:26.:52:30.

thing, not just results, but the environment, the teachers, does it

:52:31.:52:38.

look happy and school, and the curriculum itself. -- does the

:52:39.:52:45.

school look happy. You think it is a good new system. Any potential

:52:46.:52:54.

snags? Certainly an improvement on the five A-C measure because it

:52:55.:52:59.

reflects progress, if you are trying to reduce everything a school does

:53:00.:53:05.

down to one number, and rank them from top to bottom, there is no

:53:06.:53:13.

measure that would show that. Making a decision about a school, you need

:53:14.:53:17.

to visit. The other risk and potential downside about it is how

:53:18.:53:23.

schools respond to the measure, awful lot of pressure on schools, on

:53:24.:53:29.

heads, on governors, to get the best they can, and part of it is about

:53:30.:53:38.

the GCSEs that children take. As well as having to do English and

:53:39.:53:42.

maths, the children how to do three more subjects from the back

:53:43.:53:47.

subjects, and so schools are being encouraged to put children in for

:53:48.:53:49.

geography and sciences and modern foreign languages. -- eBacc. That

:53:50.:53:53.

would suit lots of children, but for others, more vocational offers,

:53:54.:53:59.

perhaps a better option, so look at the curriculum, so that you can get

:54:00.:54:08.

them test Progress eight score. -- so you can get the best Progress

:54:09.:54:14.

eight score. There is obviously a natural level of ability, how much

:54:15.:54:17.

can that be affected, depending upon which school pupil goes to? It can

:54:18.:54:25.

make a significant difference, the other risk of the measure, a lot of

:54:26.:54:34.

schools are between +0.5 and -0.5 and there is a risk of over

:54:35.:54:37.

interpreting what that might mean, it might be a set of subjects that

:54:38.:54:42.

children have put in for, rather than the quality of the teaching.

:54:43.:54:51.

You have a 14-year-old son at school doing GCSEs next year, have you had

:54:52.:54:55.

a chance to check out where the school is now on the latest league

:54:56.:55:01.

tables with this new criteria? Yes, I have, he's not taking the next

:55:02.:55:05.

year, he has another few years before taking them, and so we have

:55:06.:55:11.

at the talks, and we know exactly what is going on. How is the school

:55:12.:55:16.

doing, has it changed its position on the league table? Not that I am

:55:17.:55:22.

aware of, no. What you think about it, do you think it is a better

:55:23.:55:35.

system? It is difficult to say. Less able, will not be able to take the

:55:36.:55:38.

different levels because we have foundation levels, higher levels,

:55:39.:55:44.

but soon, that is going to be taken away and all children will be doing

:55:45.:55:53.

the same ability and the same tests. It is going to be harder for the

:55:54.:55:56.

children that are struggling. What you think about that, will it make a

:55:57.:56:03.

difference? Is potentially good, if schools respond by narrowing the

:56:04.:56:08.

curriculum that they offer, I think the combination of the new measure

:56:09.:56:12.

with the budget pressures that many schools are facing means they have

:56:13.:56:15.

to look carefully at the range of options that they offer for 15 and

:56:16.:56:21.

16-year-olds, if they only have a small group doing art, drama, a

:56:22.:56:24.

vocational option, they may decide they are unable to offer that and

:56:25.:56:28.

then children are pushed into a different set of options, which may

:56:29.:56:32.

be less good for their ability. Less suitable. Thank you all very much.

:56:33.:56:38.

If you want to check out how your school is doing, you can go on the

:56:39.:56:42.

BBC news website and put in your postcode and the list of schools in

:56:43.:56:45.

your area will come up. Let us know your thoughts.

:56:46.:56:54.

Donald Trump is preparing to be sworn in as the 45th US president.

:56:55.:56:57.

He has said he expects record crowds at his inauguration.

:56:58.:57:00.

We will be hearing from a key member of his transition team,

:57:01.:57:03.

the man tipped to be the new US ambassador to the EU,

:57:04.:57:06.

Chilly start of the day across southern areas but not everywhere,

:57:07.:57:21.

in Farnborough and Hampshire, -- in Hampshire, -6, now it is -3, in

:57:22.:57:26.

Reading, -3 as well, and that is where we have some clear skies. Not

:57:27.:57:35.

all of us have clear skies, this is quite a murky scene taken earlier in

:57:36.:57:38.

Derbyshire, we have a weather front dangled across parts of the UK,

:57:39.:57:44.

fairly weak but what it has been producing is a fair bit of cloud and

:57:45.:57:48.

a little bit of drizzle and patchy rain. Looking to the north, clear

:57:49.:57:54.

skies, -3, some sunshine. And also some sunshine across southern areas

:57:55.:57:58.

and again, cold feel, but beautiful here, Fife. Through the morning,

:57:59.:58:07.

hanging onto the sunshine, still cold at the moment, still some

:58:08.:58:15.

little pockets of mist, particularly around Bristol, could be slow in

:58:16.:58:19.

clearing, most of the mist and fog we have had has lifted, cloud

:58:20.:58:23.

further north, into the afternoon, you can see in the south-west,

:58:24.:58:29.

hanging onto the sunshine, we could import more cloud from the North Sea

:58:30.:58:33.

through the afternoon, it will still be a beautiful day but a cold one,

:58:34.:58:38.

six is the maximum in London. Moving north, damp note, fizzling through

:58:39.:58:44.

the day, pushing further north, a lot of clout, in the north-east,

:58:45.:58:47.

hanging onto the sunshine, a few showers at times. Cloudy start,

:58:48.:58:56.

remaining cloudy, we could see some breaks in the hills, south Wales at

:58:57.:59:00.

the moment, some sunshine, we should see some across West Wales,

:59:01.:59:04.

generally, for Wales, cloudy picture. Through the evening and

:59:05.:59:09.

overnight, it is going to be cold, some frost, some patchy mist and

:59:10.:59:12.

fog, and the cloud breaking further north. Still broken across the

:59:13.:59:22.

north-east, so it will be cold. For the rest of the UK, not anticipating

:59:23.:59:27.

any problems with frost at all. Tomorrow, losing mist and fog,

:59:28.:59:31.

sunshine across southern areas, extending into Wales. Still have a

:59:32.:59:37.

weak front, still producing the odd spot of drizzle, or light rain, but

:59:38.:59:42.

you can see how the cloud has eroded through the day. -- you can see how

:59:43.:59:46.

the cloud has eroded. Tomorrow, a bit more of it across the northern

:59:47.:59:51.

and western parts, and Northern Ireland, better chance tomorrow of

:59:52.:59:54.

seeing more in the way of breaks. Temperature wise, coming down in the

:59:55.:59:58.

north comic used to double figures, the king at eights and nines,

:59:59.:00:03.

generally where we should be at this stage in January. -- coming down in

:00:04.:00:10.

the North, used to double figures, looking at eights

:00:11.:00:19.

Today's top story - many people are missing

:00:20.:00:28.

after an avalanche buried a hotel used by skiers in central Italy.

:00:29.:00:29.

There are believed to be up to 30 people, seven staff, and the rest

:00:30.:00:32.

were guests on this hotel when the earthquake and then the avalanche

:00:33.:00:36.

hit. We will bring you the latest from there in just a moment. Also,

:00:37.:00:40.

Donald Trump comes President of the United States tomorrow. We speak to

:00:41.:00:45.

the man tipped to be his ambassador to the EU about the challenges

:00:46.:00:51.

ahead. And is there a dirty truth behind clean eating? Ahead of

:00:52.:00:54.

tonight's BBC programme that questions the advice of healthy

:00:55.:00:58.

eating gurus you tell us to eat clean and avoid processed food. We

:00:59.:01:02.

meet the Cambridge scientist taking on the food fad advocates.

:01:03.:01:19.

Let's catch up with all the news with Annita in the newsroom.

:01:20.:01:32.

A series of powerful earthquakes hit and Treacher yesterday. The latest

:01:33.:01:48.

we are seeing is from the head of Italy's civil protection department

:01:49.:01:51.

praising the rescuers who he says struggled through the snow to reach

:01:52.:01:59.

the hotel. Saying it was a very complicated operation reached by

:02:00.:02:04.

courageous men who faced unbearable conditions.

:02:05.:02:13.

Let's speak to Jiovanni Grezzi from the Agence

:02:14.:02:15.

He's in the Amatrice region, about 50 kilometers from where

:02:16.:02:20.

What is the latest you have on the fate of the people in the hotel? The

:02:21.:02:28.

latest news we have other moment is that there should be a at least 20

:02:29.:02:37.

dead, because people inside were trapped under the avalanche from

:02:38.:02:40.

last night, and they have spent all night under snow, so everyone's via

:02:41.:02:46.

is that there are at least 20 dead people. But somewhere I hearing have

:02:47.:02:52.

been rescued from the hotel. There were two people who had gone outside

:02:53.:03:02.

to their cars, so they were not stuck under the rubble from the

:03:03.:03:13.

hotel, so one person, his family, children are trapped inside under

:03:14.:03:18.

the avalanche. The situation is very difficult, we have one dead body,

:03:19.:03:27.

but we fear the worst. Do people think that the earthquakes in the

:03:28.:03:30.

region yesterday caused this avalanche? Of course, the reports

:03:31.:03:37.

are that the earthquake, the earth moving, caused the avalanche,

:03:38.:03:40.

because they were very strong here. It is not very far from the

:03:41.:03:47.

epicentre of the earthquake, just out side Amatrice. Thank you very

:03:48.:03:52.

much. Theresa May has told the World

:03:53.:04:09.

Economic Forum that the UK will be open for business from Brexiteer

:04:10.:04:11.

ready to embrace the world. It's her first visit

:04:12.:04:19.

to Davos as Prime Minister. The Prime Minister also called

:04:20.:04:21.

for businesses to do more to help those who feel "locked out and left

:04:22.:04:24.

behind". It means Britain must go through a

:04:25.:04:27.

tough negotiation and forge a new role for ourselves in the world. It

:04:28.:04:30.

means accepting that the road ahead will be uncertain at times, but

:04:31.:04:32.

believing that it leads towards a brighter future for our country's

:04:33.:04:39.

children and grandchildren, too. Reports from Iran say a number of

:04:40.:04:43.

firefighters have been killed after a fire caused a high building in the

:04:44.:04:49.

capital Tehran to collapse. People are reported to be trapped under the

:04:50.:04:52.

debris of the building which host a shopping centre. State TV showed the

:04:53.:04:55.

moment when the building came down. There are reports of troops

:04:56.:05:01.

from Senegal entering Gambia, as the political

:05:02.:05:03.

crisis there escalates. The defeated President Yayha Jammeh

:05:04.:05:05.

has ignored a midnight deadline to give way to the winner of last

:05:06.:05:07.

month's election, Adama Barrow. West African military forces have

:05:08.:05:10.

been preparing to move in to enforce 1,000 British holiday-makers have

:05:11.:05:13.

returned home from Gambia with the Foreign Office advising

:05:14.:05:18.

against all but essential And that's a summary of the news.

:05:19.:05:40.

Thank you very much, Annita. Is the British press biased against

:05:41.:05:43.

Muslims? One man believes that's the impression it gives, and has made it

:05:44.:05:47.

his job to put it right. We have a special report on that. Now let's

:05:48.:05:51.

catch up on the sport with you. A huge shock at the

:05:52.:05:53.

Australian open this morning, defending champion

:05:54.:05:54.

He was beaten in five sets by the wild card

:05:55.:06:01.

and world number 117, Denis Istomin from Uzbekistan.

:06:02.:06:03.

Istomin took the first set, but Djokovic won the next two.

:06:04.:06:09.

It looked like it would have been a victory for him.

:06:10.:06:14.

Istomin then took the fourth in a tiebreak to level

:06:15.:06:17.

the match, going on to win the deciding set 6-4.

:06:18.:06:19.

It took 4 hours and 48 minutes, but Istomin

:06:20.:06:21.

And surely the biggest winner here is Andy Murray,

:06:22.:06:27.

who's looking to win his first title in Melbourne.

:06:28.:06:29.

His biggest challenger already out in the second round.

:06:30.:06:33.

Joanna Konta eased to victory over naming Asarco, but bad news for

:06:34.:06:51.

Heather Watson and Kyle Edmund, who went out. I looked to impose myself

:06:52.:06:56.

on the match early, and I knew that if I was going to give her any

:06:57.:07:00.

breathing room or any opportunity that she was just going to become

:07:01.:07:03.

more and more dangerous, so I did try my best not to let that happen,

:07:04.:07:08.

and after getting that break in the first set, I felt I did a good job

:07:09.:07:11.

and also running with the momentum of it, and that also helped.

:07:12.:07:17.

Liverpool, Southampton and Newcastle all through to the fourth round of

:07:18.:07:25.

the FA Cup. Lucas Leiva scored the only goal the Liverpool, his first

:07:26.:07:30.

for the club in seven years. They beat Plymouth Albion and will face

:07:31.:07:36.

Wolves at Anfield in the next round. Two, three, four to zero would have

:07:37.:07:45.

been OK. We just wanted to get the next round, no penalty shoot,

:07:46.:07:51.

leaving Plymouth, as nice as it is here, as early as possible, because

:07:52.:07:57.

the next game is waiting. All good. Manchester United have become the

:07:58.:07:59.

richest club in football once again for the first time in 11 years. They

:08:00.:08:04.

go ahead of European champions Real Madrid and the third richest club

:08:05.:08:09.

Barcelona after record revenues of ?515 million last season. Eight

:08:10.:08:14.

Premier League clubs are in the top 20 of the football money list,

:08:15.:08:18.

including Premier League champions Leicester City for the first time.

:08:19.:08:23.

England's Chris Woakes is taking three wickets as they made a great

:08:24.:08:26.

start to the second one-day international against India. He took

:08:27.:08:32.

the early wickets of Raul, Virat Kohli and da one. India were 25-3,

:08:33.:08:42.

but Yuvraj Singh has helped steady things and is currently an 81, with

:08:43.:08:48.

India 156-3 after 29 of their 50 overs as England try to level the

:08:49.:08:55.

series. More sport later in the hour, Joanna. Thank you.

:08:56.:09:05.

President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office tomorrow and it's

:09:06.:09:08.

thought about 900,000 people are expected to gather in Washington

:09:09.:09:10.

But his supporters are already on their way

:09:11.:09:14.

as events kick off today - there will be a wreath laying

:09:15.:09:16.

at Arlington National Cemetery to honour military veterans.

:09:17.:09:18.

And also a concert later tonight - with both Donald Trump and his

:09:19.:09:21.

Inauguration day tomorrow is full of tradition and ceremony

:09:22.:09:25.

Let's talk now to Professor Ted Malloch -

:09:26.:09:37.

a key adviser to Donald Trump during his election

:09:38.:09:39.

and the man tipped to be his ambassador to the EU.

:09:40.:09:40.

You have been talking to government advisers here at Downing Street.

:09:41.:09:45.

Have you told them to read Donald Trump's book if you want under Stan

:09:46.:09:48.

the Man? You must have had somebody in the room if you heard that! I

:09:49.:09:53.

think it is the best way to understand Donald Trump, because he

:09:54.:09:56.

is a transactional figure who really thinks in those terms. So explain a

:09:57.:10:02.

bit more about what it is that they need to understand when they are

:10:03.:10:09.

dealing with him? He views the world is a set of deals, as transactions,

:10:10.:10:16.

and he positions himself. He is really a fantastic negotiator, so if

:10:17.:10:19.

you are going to be across the table from him, or trying to bargain with

:10:20.:10:24.

him, it is very helpful to know his mind on how he approaches a subject.

:10:25.:10:29.

One of the lines of advice in the book is, the worst thing you could

:10:30.:10:32.

possibly do in a deal is seen desperate to make it. That makes the

:10:33.:10:36.

other guy smell blood and then you are dead. Was Theresa May's line

:10:37.:10:43.

when she said about the EU/ UK deal, no deal is better than a bad one, is

:10:44.:10:49.

that straight out of Donald Trump's playbook? Maybe she's reading it

:10:50.:10:54.

already in preparation for the summit! I thought her speech was

:10:55.:10:58.

brilliant, her finest hour, and it seems like she is saying the same

:10:59.:11:02.

thing at Davos. How do you think she's playing her hand? I think she

:11:03.:11:07.

is playing it very strong, and this kind of clean Brexit that is harder

:11:08.:11:12.

than some people expected is very forceful. The possibility for

:11:13.:11:17.

Britain to be a global Britain, which was suggested in her speech, I

:11:18.:11:25.

think it is a brilliant strategy. It is the best card that Britain has to

:11:26.:11:30.

play, and it's best partner will be the United States. So tell us more

:11:31.:11:34.

about that, because the UK is not allowed to formally begin trade

:11:35.:11:38.

negotiations until it has actually left the EU, which would be two

:11:39.:11:43.

years after Article 50 is triggered, but you think there is a way around

:11:44.:11:47.

that, and that potentially, you said a deal could be struck in 90 days

:11:48.:11:52.

through informal discussions? I think that is possible. We're

:11:53.:11:56.

talking about informal discussions, something that is off the record,

:11:57.:12:00.

that is private, and the preparatory work is done, so to then have a

:12:01.:12:05.

formal statement when the time allows it, this is the way diplomacy

:12:06.:12:14.

works. Lawyers don't run the world. 90 days, some people are saying it

:12:15.:12:19.

can take up to ten years for trade deals. How could you be so sure 90

:12:20.:12:25.

days would do it? It has been suggested by some people close to

:12:26.:12:31.

both sides that if it was really desired, and you put the right

:12:32.:12:35.

people together, and you use some existing frameworks, you could have

:12:36.:12:39.

a minimalist agreement within 90 days and build on it from there. The

:12:40.:12:43.

largest mergers and acquisitions in the world take less than 90 days.

:12:44.:12:52.

You have described Arnold Trump in the context of the negotiations

:12:53.:12:55.

between the US and the UK on a deal is being a white knight coming to

:12:56.:13:01.

help a damsel in distress. It is sounded like the United States is

:13:02.:13:05.

looking very benignly on the UK right now. Why would that be? It

:13:06.:13:13.

would be because the US/ UK special relationship is a part of our

:13:14.:13:16.

history as it is a part of your history. I can tell you first hand

:13:17.:13:21.

Winston Churchill would be going back into the Oval Office in the

:13:22.:13:27.

form of his bust, and that solid relationship is important to the

:13:28.:13:33.

global economy, it is important to the transatlantic alliance, and it

:13:34.:13:38.

is also the case that Donald Trump has origins in the United Kingdom.

:13:39.:13:43.

He is very well disposed towards a relationship with the

:13:44.:13:48.

English-speaking people. We are talking about a man who is coming

:13:49.:13:54.

into office vowing to make America great again, who as we said in his

:13:55.:13:58.

book on business, he makes very clear that it is all about the art

:13:59.:14:01.

of the deal. What is in it for America? It is sounding like it is

:14:02.:14:07.

all about what is in Britain's best interests right now. What is the

:14:08.:14:11.

wider context? Is there something to be said for if there are strong

:14:12.:14:16.

messages going out to the UK that actually looking to other countries

:14:17.:14:19.

for good trade deals out of the EU, that sends strong signals to other

:14:20.:14:27.

countries in the EU right now. It does, and it is a message in the

:14:28.:14:30.

sense that it speaks volumes to other countries, but I think it is

:14:31.:14:37.

also the case in any negotiation, trade negotiation, there is a kind

:14:38.:14:43.

of reciprocal agreement, so it is not like the US is going to offer

:14:44.:14:47.

Britain a free deal. There will be a exchange. The US having access to

:14:48.:14:56.

the British economy is significant, the passing of financial services

:14:57.:14:59.

between the two markets is significant. The relationship on

:15:00.:15:03.

defence issues has always been important, on intelligence. So I

:15:04.:15:07.

think these things will be beefed up in this new era of the special

:15:08.:15:13.

relationship. In the context of you being the frontrunner to be the new

:15:14.:15:17.

EU Ambassador, that message coming from the United States shake things

:15:18.:15:21.

up a bit, doesn't it? Imported European countries, the key members

:15:22.:15:25.

of the European Union, going to elections, the message that they may

:15:26.:15:31.

be better off outside the constraints of EU trade. These other

:15:32.:15:37.

things that European countries themselves to decide. The United

:15:38.:15:41.

States certainly did not pressure, quite the opposite, the British

:15:42.:15:46.

people to vote for Brexit, if I recall President Obama was wrought

:15:47.:15:50.

over to tell them to get an order in four remain. So the US under Donald

:15:51.:15:57.

Trump will be a very different order, and in his interview with

:15:58.:16:06.

Michael Gove in Bild magazine that was released suggested this in stark

:16:07.:16:09.

terms. I keep saying you are the frontrunner to be the US ambassador

:16:10.:16:14.

to the EU, I think all the existing ambassadors are out of post on

:16:15.:16:17.

Friday. Would you expect to be told then, before, whether you are in or

:16:18.:16:19.

out? These are political appointments,

:16:20.:16:25.

and I think that, certainly in the coming weeks, all those

:16:26.:16:30.

announcements will be made. And indeed, all the cabinet, as of this

:16:31.:16:36.

morning, is in place. Donald Trump announces agriculture Secretary this

:16:37.:16:40.

morning, and so now we will get onto the next of appointment. Let's talk

:16:41.:16:50.

now to Benjamin Marchi and Tim Young - two Republican voters who are

:16:51.:16:52.

heading to the inauguration celebrations later today.

:16:53.:17:03.

On the eve of this inauguration, we are looking now to a president about

:17:04.:17:10.

him a lot is known, about whom it is thought that things are known, and

:17:11.:17:15.

much is feared, how do you see him? I don't think he's that feared, you

:17:16.:17:19.

know, it is interesting because a lot of the media has spun it that he

:17:20.:17:26.

is more feared... It is the coasts where the media is, media from Los

:17:27.:17:30.

Angeles and New York are a little more worried about what is going to

:17:31.:17:33.

do than people in the flyover states. Although they are not the

:17:34.:17:45.

popular vote, they represent a majority of the country. How do you

:17:46.:17:48.

feel about America's place in the world? I am ecstatic about our place

:17:49.:17:54.

in the world right now, right now, for a change, I think Donald Trump

:17:55.:18:00.

is going to give us a posture wholly different from the last eight years,

:18:01.:18:06.

one which will be more respected and appreciated throughout the world. We

:18:07.:18:17.

will not be drawing unintentional red lines. More divisive? It will

:18:18.:18:22.

not be that divisive, there will be naysayers out there. There will be

:18:23.:18:26.

naysayers who nit-pick and pull apart things that he says, art at

:18:27.:18:32.

the end of the day, we are excited about him truly making America great

:18:33.:18:39.

again and the team news putting together continues to give people

:18:40.:18:42.

that I talk to on irregularly 's is a lot of confidence in his ability

:18:43.:18:54.

to lead the free world. What do you think will happen, will he hit the

:18:55.:18:58.

ground running? That is what I have been told from insiders as well,

:18:59.:19:03.

complete 180, it is interesting, the symbolism, the term of the unknown

:19:04.:19:08.

soldier is where the wreath will be laid, there is always a changing of

:19:09.:19:11.

the guard, this is a significant changing of the guard, all the

:19:12.:19:15.

policies, almost unanimously, all of his policies, Barack Obama's

:19:16.:19:20.

policies, will be flipped with the new changing of the guard under

:19:21.:19:25.

Donald Trump. You are both heading off to the celebrations today, ahead

:19:26.:19:27.

of the inauguration tomorrow. the Finnish pop star Saara Aalto

:19:28.:19:33.

who came second in The X Factor has already signed a record

:19:34.:19:41.

deal with Sony. We will speak to Saara

:19:42.:19:43.

in her first interview of 2017. We've forgiven the avocado

:19:44.:19:52.

for its high fat content and deemed We're swapping full fat

:19:53.:19:56.

lattes for sugar-free, and using gadgets to swirl

:19:57.:20:01.

courgettes into a gluten-free But can the food we eat

:20:02.:20:06.

really "clean" our bodies Cambridge University scientist

:20:07.:20:11.

Dr Giles Yo In a moment, we'll talk to Dr Yo,

:20:12.:20:19.

and also to the founder of a healthy food festival and a woman who says

:20:20.:20:24.

she was so obsessed by clean eating But first, let's watch part

:20:25.:20:28.

of Dr Yo's programme, where he goes on a journey

:20:29.:20:31.

to America and sees the extreme side of the lifestyle

:20:32.:20:34.

at a Californian ranch, where cancer patients are being

:20:35.:20:36.

treated with alkaline food. VOICEOVER: Up ahead, the pH miracle

:20:37.:20:50.

branch. -- ranch. A millionaire 's paradise, funded by alkaline eating.

:20:51.:20:55.

He has a moat, he has a moat here. I don't see any alligators coming to

:20:56.:21:03.

eat me, Robert?

:21:04.:21:05.

Hello, yes. Hello, I'm Giles.

:21:06.:21:10.

Dr Giles! Very pleased to meet you.

:21:11.:21:11.

Is this where miracles happen, this is your miracle ranch?

:21:12.:21:17.

I want to know how Robert thinks we can use food to stay well.

:21:18.:21:22.

Are you familiar with the fishbowl metaphor?

:21:23.:21:28.

OK, the fishbowl metaphor begs a question, and the question is,

:21:29.:21:32.

if the fish is sick, what would you do?

:21:33.:21:37.

Treat the fish or change the water? I'd change the water, right?

:21:38.:21:40.

he means eat alkaline food to stop ourselves becoming acidic.

:21:41.:21:45.

The human body, in its perfect state of health,

:21:46.:21:47.

Robert invites me to share in his daily alkaline routine.

:21:48.:21:58.

My brain needs to prepare... I'll join you.

:21:59.:22:09.

Tastes like green tea. It tastes like cold green tea.

:22:10.:22:26.

STUDIO: Social media has seen the clean eating

:22:27.:22:28.

But it's not all good news, nutritionists have reported the rise

:22:29.:22:31.

of a psychological condition known as orthorexia,

:22:32.:22:33.

Dr Yeo cooks with one of Instagram's biggest health bloggers,

:22:34.:22:37.

Deliciously Ella, who promotes a plant-based diet.

:22:38.:22:38.

She's one of the most popular brands associated

:22:39.:22:41.

and he examines how far her plant-based cooking

:22:42.:22:46.

She tells him the idea of "clean" has lost its way.

:22:47.:22:52.

The gurus of clean are doing nothing wrong in helping people eat more

:22:53.:22:59.

healthily but with their growing influence comes a

:23:00.:23:01.

responsibility to ground their promises improved. Now, one of the

:23:02.:23:06.

most influential figures on the movement says it has lost its way.

:23:07.:23:11.

My problem with the word clean is that it has become too complicated,

:23:12.:23:16.

loaded, now bit implies dirty, that is negative, we should not have

:23:17.:23:20.

that. I think it is sad to me that clean has been taken so far out of

:23:21.:23:25.

how it was originally meant to be used by people, as far as I

:23:26.:23:31.

understood it, it meant natural, unprocessed, now it doesn't mean

:23:32.:23:33.

that, it means diet, it means fad. Let's talk more about it. Dr Giles

:23:34.:23:47.

Yeo from the University of Cambridge went on this journey to investigate

:23:48.:23:52.

clean eating. Rose Lloyd Owen runs a healthy eating food and yoga

:23:53.:23:57.

festival featuring Deliciously Ella and many of the top clean-eating

:23:58.:24:03.

bloggers. And also joining us, Kerry Armstrong, who says she was so

:24:04.:24:06.

obsessed by clean eating that became dangerously ill and believed certain

:24:07.:24:08.

food was 'unclean. Until I became physically unwell, I have never

:24:09.:24:11.

thought anything about type, if you look at a search engine, how do you

:24:12.:24:16.

get better, I began researching it, and I thought I had been poisoning

:24:17.:24:20.

myself, I took it to Olympic standards, I went from eating any to

:24:21.:24:24.

within 18 months weighing six stone, and only eating watermelon. I took

:24:25.:24:31.

it as extreme as you can get it, my teeth were crumbling, hair falling

:24:32.:24:34.

out, never left the house, completely fixated with the idea of

:24:35.:24:40.

cleaning myself to get well again. This is a concept that you have

:24:41.:24:43.

looked at for your programme... That is an extreme example, but having

:24:44.:24:48.

looked closely at it, what is your assessment on whether food can make

:24:49.:24:53.

you ill, can make you well? It depends, as with everything, it's

:24:54.:24:57.

depends, for example, if we start with what I agree with, in terms of

:24:58.:25:02.

when I look at the food, undoubtedly, we have a broken food

:25:03.:25:06.

environment we need to fix, a lot of the diseases we have are not diet

:25:07.:25:14.

related, we have got to fix obesity, we have got to fix the food

:25:15.:25:17.

environment we are in, that is why I went on the journey. The problem is,

:25:18.:25:24.

if you take what I think without control verse is a healthy diet, eat

:25:25.:25:30.

more eat less meat, but then wrap it around pseudoscience to say that it

:25:31.:25:33.

can suddenly cure you, it can cure you of cancer, any number of other

:25:34.:25:39.

ailments, then I have a problem. The phrase that is being used now is

:25:40.:25:50.

orthorexia, the of session with clean eating, how money people are

:25:51.:25:53.

susceptible to it becoming a disorder? It is almost like a

:25:54.:25:58.

variant of anorexia, orthorexia, where you have a controlled

:25:59.:26:05.

psychosis in order to keep control of your life. -- control psychosis.

:26:06.:26:11.

It is tied up in social media, the clean phenomenon, a lot of the food

:26:12.:26:15.

gurus that are out there reach millions of followers, what happens

:26:16.:26:19.

is, while the vast majority of those millions of followers will treat it

:26:20.:26:24.

as it is, that looks like a pretty plate of food, I'm going to have

:26:25.:26:28.

that, but you will have a percentage of human beings... Completely

:26:29.:26:33.

randomly, what I did was I joined Instagram, for the show, I did this

:26:34.:26:37.

and that, and I posted a picture of my breakfast, a sausage and egg and

:26:38.:26:44.

muffin, and a cup of tea. I lost 10% of my followers in 24 hours, because

:26:45.:26:50.

of the people who were following me. Couldn't bear to look at a sausage.

:26:51.:26:58.

I was funny, I documented it, but imagine you are susceptible, imagine

:26:59.:27:04.

that this is my life, I have worked hard for this plate of food but for

:27:05.:27:07.

some reason, a percentage of people don't want it, and they are banned

:27:08.:27:12.

in you, that is where the problem begins, those people feel bad. Rose,

:27:13.:27:19.

you have said that you are a founder of a healthy eating festival, can

:27:20.:27:23.

you believe that people cannot bear to look at a picture of a sausage?

:27:24.:27:35.

That is a little crazy, we have a festival in a couple of weeks, and

:27:36.:27:41.

the ethos we have there is to bring in all sorts of different eating,

:27:42.:27:45.

all sorts of different ways of eating, and celebrate everybody,

:27:46.:27:53.

everybody... Does it celebrate eating a sausage, eating a packet of

:27:54.:27:59.

biscuits, if you feel like it, it is not something you should do all the

:28:00.:28:05.

time, but... Absolutely... This is about extremes. Nobody is saying it

:28:06.:28:10.

should be extreme, nobody is saying it should be all or nothing, but

:28:11.:28:14.

this is where the problem is, none of these guys are saying, you must

:28:15.:28:19.

do this, you should do this 100% of the time, very much advocate a

:28:20.:28:25.

70/30, spaghetti is not going to kill you but how about making it out

:28:26.:28:30.

of celeriac, courgette, because essentially, you are getting more

:28:31.:28:33.

vegetables into your diet, and that is better for you. There will be

:28:34.:28:37.

people who interpret that as, therefore, there is this lovely

:28:38.:28:40.

healthy option which looks beautiful in Instagram, eating the pasta is

:28:41.:28:52.

bad. And like anything, with anything, that becomes big, there

:28:53.:28:56.

will be people who take it too literally and take the wrong message

:28:57.:29:00.

and I think no one is giving that message out, simply trying to find

:29:01.:29:04.

more interesting and delicious ways of cooking vegetables. You have

:29:05.:29:10.

talked about how you initially started wanting to make yourself

:29:11.:29:14.

feel better, and it went down a very extreme path, when you were... Tell

:29:15.:29:18.

us about the images you were seeing... The messages that you were

:29:19.:29:23.

taking on board from the environment around you. To be honest, pet, we

:29:24.:29:29.

could go on all day about why it is social and media's full, or my

:29:30.:29:38.

friend, what I am not taking responsibility, I forgot, plain and

:29:39.:29:41.

simple, it is not what goes into my mouth that makes me worthwhile as a

:29:42.:29:46.

person, it is what comes out of it. I elevated food to a place it does

:29:47.:29:50.

not belong, it is not my salvation. I was spiritually bankrupt, I was

:29:51.:29:55.

looking for mindfulness within my plate, you do not get spiritual

:29:56.:29:58.

well-being from what you eat, it is how you live and contribute, and I

:29:59.:30:04.

had walked that, taken that out of perspective. -- warped that. To make

:30:05.:30:09.

myself well, I had to leave food alone, have it be in experience,

:30:10.:30:13.

because foods does not love you back but people can. That is how I got

:30:14.:30:18.

well. It has nothing to do with healthy eating. Food elevated to a

:30:19.:30:23.

place it does not belong... It is a good phrase, how much you think that

:30:24.:30:29.

is happening? Food keeps us alive, it ought to be elevated to... We put

:30:30.:30:36.

it in us, it makes us who we are. I definitely agree that we should

:30:37.:30:39.

respect the food that we eat but respecting the food that we eat, or

:30:40.:30:43.

pasting something on there that does not actually do... That is where I

:30:44.:30:50.

think issues begin to happen. One thing of what you said:

:30:51.:30:59.

Saying that I can't blame other be bought for it, but the problem is

:31:00.:31:05.

you are still living within a particular environment that foisted

:31:06.:31:08.

that upon you. But that isn't me taking responsibility. I don't have

:31:09.:31:13.

to react to that, and to keep myself safe from something like that, when

:31:14.:31:18.

you know who you are, social media cannot do hate you, and you will not

:31:19.:31:25.

get sick like this. I agree, I think eating disorders have existed for a

:31:26.:31:30.

long time. And they are thinking disorders first and foremost. Yes,

:31:31.:31:35.

unfortunately it is in your mind, what you are seeing may influence

:31:36.:31:41.

your mind, but the problem is within you wait before you go on social

:31:42.:31:46.

media. Can I just interrupted. When you say it is all in the mind, you

:31:47.:31:49.

paste eating disorders into some form of weird mental condition. I

:31:50.:31:55.

didn't mean that. But we are still trying to understand it, there is a

:31:56.:32:00.

susceptibility, a genetic susceptibility. But that makes me

:32:01.:32:05.

feel hopeless, but I am not, I am strong, I have done it. I have

:32:06.:32:11.

studied obesity, and I know that there are people who are susceptible

:32:12.:32:14.

to obesity, and equally there will be people who are susceptible to

:32:15.:32:26.

accepting there is a biological, genetic input in part. I'm not

:32:27.:32:32.

saying I'm giving up, but why am I well now, then? I'm sorry, let me

:32:33.:32:40.

come in. It is a longer discussion. Your programme is on tonight, BBC

:32:41.:32:48.

Two, 9pm. Thank you very much to all of you. Keep letting us know your

:32:49.:32:50.

thoughts on that one. Still to come: Is the British press

:32:51.:32:56.

out to get Muslims? - one man believes that's

:32:57.:32:58.

the impression it gives - and has made it his job

:32:59.:33:00.

to put it right. The Finnish pop star Saara Aalto

:33:01.:33:03.

who came second in The X Factor has already signed a record

:33:04.:33:08.

deal with Sony. We will speak to Saara

:33:09.:33:13.

in her first interview of 2017 With the news here's Annita

:33:14.:33:16.

in the BBC Newsroom. At least 20 people have reportedly

:33:17.:33:25.

been killed after a hotel was hit by an avalanche in central

:33:26.:33:35.

Italy. Up to 30 guests and staff

:33:36.:33:37.

were in the Rigopiano Hotel on San Grasso mountain

:33:38.:33:40.

in the Abruzzo region. The avalanche was triggered

:33:41.:33:42.

by a series of powerful earthquakes Giovanni Groetzki from the news

:33:43.:33:49.

agency is in the region about 50 kilometres from where the avalanche

:33:50.:33:53.

struck. The latest news we have at the moment is that there should be

:33:54.:34:00.

at least 20 dead, because people inside were trapped under the

:34:01.:34:05.

avalanche from last night, they spent all night under snow, so we

:34:06.:34:14.

fear, everyone's fear is that there are at least 20 dead people.

:34:15.:34:19.

Theresa May has told the World Economic Forum that the UK

:34:20.:34:22.

will be open for business after Brexit, and ready to 'embrace

:34:23.:34:24.

the world.' It's her first visit to Davos as Prime Minister -

:34:25.:34:27.

she also called for businesses to do more to help those who feel "locked

:34:28.:34:31.

Reports from Iran say a number of firefighters have been killed,

:34:32.:34:43.

after a fire caused a high-storey building in the capital

:34:44.:34:46.

Dozens more people are reported to be trapped under the debris

:34:47.:34:50.

of the 17-storey Plasco building, which hosts a shopping centre.

:34:51.:34:52.

State TV showed the moment when the building came down.

:34:53.:34:58.

The leading contender to be the new US ambassador to the EU says that

:34:59.:35:05.

Donald Trump 's presidency will spark a new era of US UK relations.

:35:06.:35:12.

He said a trader could be negotiated in as little as 90 days and said

:35:13.:35:15.

Donald Trump looked favourably on the UK. I think the US/ UK special

:35:16.:35:21.

relationship is a part of our history as it is a part of your

:35:22.:35:25.

history. I can tell you first hand Winston Churchill will be going back

:35:26.:35:28.

into the Oval Office in the form of his bust, and that solid

:35:29.:35:35.

relationship is important to the global economy, it is important to

:35:36.:35:39.

the transatlantic alliance, and it is also the case that Donald Trump

:35:40.:35:47.

has origins in the United Kingdom. He is very well disposed towards a

:35:48.:35:50.

relationship of the English-speaking people. That is a summary of the

:35:51.:35:56.

latest news. Do join me for BBC newsroom live at 11 o'clock.

:35:57.:36:00.

I have to just read quick to have seen. Gabriella Simmon-Bird just

:36:01.:36:13.

heard that Sarr alto will be an the show, and I got so excited, I

:36:14.:36:17.

started clapping. Let's get some support with you. No round of

:36:18.:36:24.

applause from the! Novak Djokovic has gone out of the Australian open.

:36:25.:36:28.

The defending champion beaten in five sets by the wild card world

:36:29.:36:32.

number 117 Denis Istomin in a match that lasted nearly five hours. The

:36:33.:36:38.

British number one Johanna Konta is the third round, beating Naomi

:36:39.:36:46.

Asarco, and she faces Caroline Wozniacki next, Heather Watson and

:36:47.:36:51.

Kyle Edmund are both out. Liverpool beat Plymouth Argyle, Lucas Leiva

:36:52.:36:56.

with their only goal of the game. Southampton and Newcastle also went

:36:57.:37:00.

through. Manchester United have returned to the top of football's

:37:01.:37:03.

money list for the first time since 2004, overtaking Real Madrid who

:37:04.:37:08.

have held the top spot for the last 11 years. And Yuvraj Singh has made

:37:09.:37:15.

a century of India to frustrate England's bowlers. They are 208-3,

:37:16.:37:24.

England hoping to level the series. We will be back more after 11

:37:25.:37:25.

o'clock. Are large sections of the British

:37:26.:37:30.

press biased against Muslims? Last month there were nine

:37:31.:37:33.

corrections to articles concerning Muslims in the British

:37:34.:37:35.

media - this month The activist behind most of these

:37:36.:37:38.

complaints and corrections says inaccurate media reporting

:37:39.:37:43.

about Muslims has led But critics argue there

:37:44.:37:45.

is an attempt to prevent The most high-profile apology last

:37:46.:37:49.

month was given to a Muslim family falsely accused of being extremists

:37:50.:37:56.

by columnist Katie Hopkins Zahid Mahmood last month received

:37:57.:37:58.

very public apology. Daily Mail columnist

:37:59.:38:07.

Katie Hopkins had suggested that he and his brother

:38:08.:38:09.

were extremists with links to Al-Qaeda, after US authorities

:38:10.:38:11.

refused to let them and their family On December 19th, the paper

:38:12.:38:14.

and Hopkins were forced to apologise and pay ?150,000 in damages

:38:15.:38:23.

to the family. Type my name, teach my kids,

:38:24.:38:27.

look, you will never see me on any of this,

:38:28.:38:29.

it wouldn't come up. How did it then feel to have that

:38:30.:38:31.

article written about you? It's cutting wounds and putting

:38:32.:38:42.

salt on it, you know? We haven't overcome the emotional

:38:43.:38:44.

trauma that we went through, with the kids, in front

:38:45.:38:46.

of their eyes, and then two days later being accused

:38:47.:38:50.

on the national media - it was worldwide media, not just

:38:51.:38:52.

in the UK, it was worldwide. The apology to Zahid and his family

:38:53.:39:00.

came alongside eight other corrections to articles

:39:01.:39:03.

concerning Muslims last month. This is far higher than previous

:39:04.:39:06.

months, and is partly down Miqdaad Versi is an activist

:39:07.:39:08.

and also Assistant Secretary General He has taken it upon himself

:39:09.:39:16.

to start systematically monitoring stories concerning Muslims,

:39:17.:39:23.

and has so far put in more than 50 complaints to newspapers

:39:24.:39:26.

and to Ipso, the press regulator. Not all succeed, but he was behind

:39:27.:39:33.

eight corrections last month. How much of a problem

:39:34.:39:35.

are these inaccuracies? Nowadays, things just spread

:39:36.:39:39.

virally on social media, and that's what the problem really

:39:40.:39:42.

is, that these individual stories get traction,

:39:43.:39:44.

and far right websites, extremist websites, take it up,

:39:45.:39:51.

and that's the problem. Then when there is a correction,

:39:52.:39:55.

that doesn't go as far, it doesn't go to those far right

:39:56.:39:58.

websites, so the individuals who saw it in the first place have this view

:39:59.:40:01.

that this is reality. Five of the corrections

:40:02.:40:08.

in December related to The Sunday Times article

:40:09.:40:14.

stated in its headline, "Enclaves of Islam see UK as 75%

:40:15.:40:18.

Muslim." And it's about a report

:40:19.:40:22.

by Louise Casey on integration In reality, what the report actually

:40:23.:40:24.

said was one school had students who thought that the majority

:40:25.:40:37.

of the country were Asian. And it was to do with one

:40:38.:40:41.

school only, rather So this was entirely incorrect,

:40:42.:40:47.

which the Sunday Times acknowledged, Also last month, the Daily Mail had

:40:48.:40:51.

to correct an article The correction read,

:40:52.:40:55.

"A headline on an earlier version of this article said that

:40:56.:40:59.

Malia Bouattia claimed that young Muslims are travelling to join Isis

:41:00.:41:04.

in Syria due to cuts to education. It also said that Miss Bouattia had

:41:05.:41:07.

refused to condemn Isis. The correct position is that

:41:08.:41:12.

Miss Bouattia claimed that young Muslims are travelling to join Isis

:41:13.:41:15.

in Syria for reasons including Government cuts to education

:41:16.:41:17.

and mass unemployment, and Miss Bouattia

:41:18.:41:19.

has condemned Isis." This one is The Sun On Sunday mixing

:41:20.:41:23.

up two black Muslims, one who is fighting against extremism

:41:24.:41:28.

and one who's accused of extremism. And this one is by ITN News,

:41:29.:41:32.

where they seem to misinterpret a poll, claiming that half of UK

:41:33.:41:39.

Muslims would not report extremism, So previously we had individuals

:41:40.:41:42.

taking on the press where they felt they had been misreported,

:41:43.:41:47.

but now you are taking on any story that you think's inaccurate

:41:48.:41:50.

about Muslims or Islam, That's right, so because nobody else

:41:51.:41:52.

seems to be doing this, there've been so many articles

:41:53.:41:58.

about Muslims overall that have been entirely inaccurate,

:41:59.:42:01.

and they create this idea within many Muslim communities that

:42:02.:42:05.

media's out to get them. And the reason that's the case

:42:06.:42:09.

is that nobody's challenging these newspapers and saying,

:42:10.:42:12.

"That's not true." The Muslim Council of Britain has

:42:13.:42:17.

been unequivocal on this, it's raised this issue again

:42:18.:42:19.

and again that inaccurate reporting leads to hostility against Muslims,

:42:20.:42:22.

and that's a problem not just for Muslim communities

:42:23.:42:24.

but for the wider society. The Independent Press

:42:25.:42:32.

Standards Organisation, Ipso, confirmed that it is receiving

:42:33.:42:34.

lots of complaints It also pointed out that the two

:42:35.:42:36.

articles about which it's had the most complaints

:42:37.:42:42.

since it was formed in 2014 I think I, like anyone else, want

:42:43.:42:45.

a press that's going to be accurate, that's going to care about the facts

:42:46.:42:57.

and verifying them, but I think this campaign

:42:58.:43:00.

of complaints that we've seen, particularly over the last six

:43:01.:43:02.

months, it looks like, I don't think that's really

:43:03.:43:04.

what's driving it. I think what we're seeing

:43:05.:43:06.

here is a quite concerted attempt to often ringfence Islam

:43:07.:43:09.

from criticism and to try and chill discussion about a lot of issues,

:43:10.:43:12.

and I think for me the standout case of this was a story that was run

:43:13.:43:16.

by both The Sun and the Mail Online in May last year, a suspected honour

:43:17.:43:19.

killing, so both papers ran with this, they referred to it

:43:20.:43:22.

as an Islamic honour killing, And so a complaint was made

:43:23.:43:25.

which stated that Islam doesn't condone honour killings,

:43:26.:43:34.

that this is a cultural thing, not a religious thing,

:43:35.:43:36.

and as a result of this, Ipso ruled and required

:43:37.:43:40.

the newspapers to print, and this is almost a direct quote,

:43:41.:43:44.

that the religion of Islam does not I thought that was just

:43:45.:43:47.

absolutely staggering, because, as we all know,

:43:48.:43:51.

a religion is just an assortment of ideas and principles,

:43:52.:43:54.

these things are contested. What these papers were effectively

:43:55.:43:58.

asked to do, and what they did, was to print one accepted

:43:59.:44:01.

interpretation of religion, and to me this was just

:44:02.:44:03.

like back-door blasphemy law. Do you worry about a chilling

:44:04.:44:15.

effect, that your constant critique will make people scared

:44:16.:44:18.

of covering these issues? Not really, because in reality

:44:19.:44:20.

newspapers report on a range All I'm asking for is

:44:21.:44:22.

responsible reporting. For Zahid, this is not just

:44:23.:44:29.

about incorrect reporting, though. He feels the response to both

:44:30.:44:33.

the original article by Katie Hopkins and her apology

:44:34.:44:35.

was very reactionary. First, they were all against us,

:44:36.:44:41.

when Katie Hopkins published the article, and then when she made

:44:42.:44:43.

an apology a year later, then they all turned against her,

:44:44.:44:50.

so there's no middle ground. The upsetting part is not the actual

:44:51.:44:53.

element of Katie Hopkins, it's the mindset of people,

:44:54.:44:57.

how they can very easily be led against somebody

:44:58.:45:01.

or in favour of somebody. I feel proud to be living

:45:02.:45:04.

in London as a Muslim. Where people from different

:45:05.:45:10.

backgrounds, different countries, different tribes, different

:45:11.:45:12.

languages, faith, beliefs, But there are elements

:45:13.:45:13.

which are actually destroying these relationships and this unity

:45:14.:45:17.

which we have within the community. How do you feel about

:45:18.:45:24.

Katie Hopkins now? In fact, my wife and I would

:45:25.:45:25.

formally like to invite her to our In fact, my wife and I would

:45:26.:45:32.

formally like to invite her to our We have no grudge against her,

:45:33.:45:38.

and we would like her to learn and know that we are as British

:45:39.:45:43.

as she is. In fact, my wife's grandfather

:45:44.:45:46.

and great-grandfather both fought They fought for the very

:45:47.:45:48.

freedom of this country. Many people wouldn't

:45:49.:45:59.

be so forgiving. This is what I've been brought up

:46:00.:46:01.

with, this is the teaching of the Prophet Muhammad,

:46:02.:46:03.

peace be upon him, that he has taught us

:46:04.:46:05.

to remove evil with goodness. She made allegations,

:46:06.:46:10.

we want to show her the goodness, and we want to invite her to our

:46:11.:46:12.

house so she can first-hand meet us. STUDIO: Last month, the Daily Mail

:46:13.:46:27.

and columnist Katie Hopkins apologised to Zahid Mahmood

:46:28.:46:29.

after suggesting he and his who is behind these complaints

:46:30.:46:31.

regarding inaccurate media And Tom Slater, who is

:46:32.:46:41.

Deputy Editor of Spiked Online As you saw there in the film,

:46:42.:46:45.

Zahid Mahmood who received an apology from Katie Hopkins

:46:46.:46:48.

after she labelled him an extremist We got in touch with Katie

:46:49.:46:51.

and put this offer to her what impact do you think this is

:46:52.:47:00.

having? It is not just me saying this, this is academise from

:47:01.:47:02.

Leicester University, Cambridge University, European Commission on

:47:03.:47:04.

racism and intolerance, all are saying the same thing, reckless

:47:05.:47:09.

reporting leads to hate crime, leads to hostility against Muslims. This

:47:10.:47:15.

is not just me saying it, this is nationally, academics,

:47:16.:47:17.

internationally, human rights activist, those who are looking at

:47:18.:47:21.

this issue at the United Nations level, specifically talking about

:47:22.:47:26.

how media has caused hostility against Muslims in the UK. Do you

:47:27.:47:31.

think newspapers and journalists have to be more wary of what is

:47:32.:47:37.

being said in that context, if there is a link between what is said in

:47:38.:47:41.

the papers and what is happening in the community? First and foremost, I

:47:42.:47:46.

am dubious of the link that is set between reporting and people's

:47:47.:47:50.

reactions, that projects a quite low view of the public, that they can be

:47:51.:47:55.

whipped into a frenzy by a you force headlines but we all want a press

:47:56.:47:59.

that is going to be factual and care about accuracy but I do not believe

:48:00.:48:03.

that is what is driving this, I think the mail online, the example

:48:04.:48:06.

referred to in the film, perfect example, newspapers effectively

:48:07.:48:12.

required to print what is according to him, the acceptable version of a

:48:13.:48:18.

particular religion, that is like something out of the days of the

:48:19.:48:21.

Star chamber, I cannot believe it so is going along with this, unless you

:48:22.:48:27.

have a direct line, there is no requirement to print these things.

:48:28.:48:32.

-- Ipso. Did you read the tips are ruling? It did not say that. It

:48:33.:48:40.

didn't say that, -- did you read the Ipso ruling? That is what the ruling

:48:41.:48:45.

was, the fact that the mail online chose to respond and they decided to

:48:46.:48:50.

explain the reasoning, and apologise in the way they did, that is a

:48:51.:48:56.

choice for the Mail Online, they did not ask them to make a theological

:48:57.:49:00.

decision. That means ask you a question, when there are statements,

:49:01.:49:04.

like the Sun saying, supermarket terror, gunmen... Here we go...

:49:05.:49:18.

Gunmen screaming opens fire in Spanish supermarket while carrying

:49:19.:49:22.

bag filled with petrol and gunpowder... Similar stories in the

:49:23.:49:28.

Daily Mail and the express. The reality is, these are factually

:49:29.:49:32.

incorrect, you can tell they are not factually correct because the sun

:49:33.:49:36.

decided to make changes, changing the article entire it, it is of the

:49:37.:49:42.

reality, it just wasn't true. -- changing the article entirely.

:49:43.:49:48.

Stories across-the-board are found to be inaccurate, are you saying

:49:49.:49:51.

that stories that relates to Islam needs to be monitored more

:49:52.:49:56.

carefully? I'm not talking about favours, I'm talking about fairness.

:49:57.:50:01.

We have a situation right now where people have a low view of the press,

:50:02.:50:05.

I believe in journalism and the fact that we want to have a strong press

:50:06.:50:13.

out there, we will seek a challenge authority, but when there is

:50:14.:50:16.

inaccuracy is, that undermines really good reporting. Forge gnarly,

:50:17.:50:23.

we have seen examples. You have said that it is OK for editors to keep

:50:24.:50:32.

this... -- unfortunately, we have seen examples. These newspapers did

:50:33.:50:39.

print corrections under their own polishing, but it is under pressure,

:50:40.:50:43.

the sun and the mail Online printed the same sentence, that tells us

:50:44.:50:47.

what is going on in this instance, we should all care about

:50:48.:50:49.

corrections, some of the corrections we are talking about, these

:50:50.:50:56.

newspapers repeated this misreading, this misrepresentation of a

:50:57.:50:59.

particular statistic, but you'd suggest this is spreading hate, and

:51:00.:51:03.

I disagree with that for two reasons: look at the Sunday Times

:51:04.:51:06.

retraction, they made the point that this story was published before the

:51:07.:51:11.

story came review came out, that is a product of churn-alism, which is a

:51:12.:51:19.

big problem, and it encourages a climate which sees issues which

:51:20.:51:24.

affect Muslims as something as touchy, and the reason that

:51:25.:51:28.

something like the Casey Report exploded as it did, as most

:51:29.:51:33.

egalitarian would have, there is a feeling that integration is not

:51:34.:51:36.

going as well as we would like all stop we should be allowed to talk

:51:37.:51:40.

about that. Looking closely at any story, and saying, where there are

:51:41.:51:45.

factual inaccuracies, they need to be corrected. I think there is

:51:46.:51:48.

definitely a moral obligation on newspapers to correct things but

:51:49.:51:51.

what we're looking at here is something much broader, I see this

:51:52.:51:59.

as a much broader context, not just about is fellow here, it is a

:52:00.:52:03.

broader climate, this hyper session with Islamophobia, it is a chilling

:52:04.:52:07.

discussion, what has been done quite successfully is to conflate

:52:08.:52:11.

criticism of Islam, discussion of issues that affect the Muslim

:52:12.:52:15.

community, with criticism of those as individuals, they have racialised

:52:16.:52:19.

discussion and that is inimical to free speech. There has been 25

:52:20.:52:24.

corrections in the last year, 13 in the last six weeks, every week there

:52:25.:52:29.

has been two corrections on average on issues related to Muslims, let's

:52:30.:52:33.

listen to the academics who say that this is a problem, who say this is

:52:34.:52:38.

causing hate rhyme. Rather than listen to opinions by individuals,

:52:39.:52:41.

listen to academics, facts, hopefully we can have a stronger

:52:42.:52:45.

press, so we can have responsible reporting for all. Thank you both

:52:46.:52:46.

very much. It was only last month that Finnish

:52:47.:52:52.

pop star Saara Aalto came but the 29-year-old has already

:52:53.:52:55.

signed a record deal with Sony. She entered the show after years

:52:56.:52:59.

of performing as a singer where she couldn't get a record

:53:00.:53:02.

deal because she wanted

:53:03.:53:04.

to sing in English. In a moment we will talk with Saara

:53:05.:53:06.

in her first interview of 2017 but first here she is performing

:53:07.:53:10.

in the semi-finals of The X Factor, with the song that she sang

:53:11.:53:13.

in her first audition, You came second, it was a journey,

:53:14.:53:39.

you thought you were out, then you are back in after a month of being

:53:40.:53:43.

out, and then you were in the bottom two quite a few times and had to

:53:44.:53:47.

sing to stay in the show. That must have tested your resilience? It did,

:53:48.:53:53.

definitely, it was a journey, I feel it was all worth it and somehow it

:53:54.:53:57.

made me stronger each week, so I am quite happy that it happened like

:53:58.:54:01.

that. Probably didn't feel like it at the time. I feel like it was

:54:02.:54:09.

meant to be. You were pretty well-established in Finland when you

:54:10.:54:12.

went on the show, you went on because you wanted to be able to

:54:13.:54:17.

sing in English, why wasn't the Finnish market enough for you? Well,

:54:18.:54:22.

I was ten when I saw the Spice Girls performing on television and I was

:54:23.:54:26.

like, that is where I want to be, I want to be an international singer,

:54:27.:54:30.

that is when I composed my music in English even though I could not

:54:31.:54:35.

quite speak English yet. It has always been my way of doing and I

:54:36.:54:38.

always see myself singing all around the world, and if you sing in

:54:39.:54:43.

finish, you have two stay in Finland. I just have this passion,

:54:44.:54:49.

for languages, to see the world, to sing to everybody, and that is why I

:54:50.:54:54.

came here. Have talent shows change, when I was a kid, they were very

:54:55.:54:58.

much for amateurs, someone who had no other prospect of getting a

:54:59.:55:04.

singing career, or a career in the public eye, unless they went on

:55:05.:55:13.

those talent shows to break out. There are people like you who have

:55:14.:55:16.

had a degree of success and now people like you are on talent shows.

:55:17.:55:21.

Every show they have people who asked Artin, and they dream about

:55:22.:55:26.

being singers, but in every show they also have people who have been

:55:27.:55:31.

working for it for and years. But, you know, nowadays, it is very hard

:55:32.:55:37.

to get your face out there, you need help and these kind of shows are a

:55:38.:55:41.

very good platform for people to really show their talent. Your

:55:42.:55:45.

girlfriend was the person who suggested that you go on the show,

:55:46.:55:49.

she didn't really feature very much in your personal story on the show,

:55:50.:55:53.

people have questioned why, why do you think that was? Well, actually,

:55:54.:55:58.

me and my girlfriend were always on social media together, giving

:55:59.:56:05.

interviews, I think those BTs that were on the show, the video clips, I

:56:06.:56:09.

think we had so many things that we wanted to fit in and they were only

:56:10.:56:13.

one minute long, we did not have time to go into my personal life. --

:56:14.:56:19.

VTs. I didn't even realise that myself because I was with my

:56:20.:56:22.

girlfriend all the time, very openly. You work on mental health

:56:23.:56:29.

shops for kids, in Finland. Why do you do that? We have this no fear

:56:30.:56:35.

project, together, lectures for young people, going for their

:56:36.:56:40.

dreams, being who they are, that is the most important thing in life,

:56:41.:56:44.

that is why I want to be a singer, that is why I want to encourage

:56:45.:56:48.

young people or old people to live their life as they are. I think

:56:49.:56:54.

people need love and encouragement. Do you feel you are living the

:56:55.:57:00.

dream? Yes, definitely, definitely. Do you see yourself as a role model?

:57:01.:57:05.

At least that is the response that I get, which is really nice, I get

:57:06.:57:10.

e-mails, and private messages on social media, young girl saying that

:57:11.:57:15.

I give them a lot of strength, and encouragement. So that is the best

:57:16.:57:22.

feedback that I can get, really. Gabriella, I mentioned a tweet from

:57:23.:57:26.

her, she said she spontaneously clapped at home when she said you

:57:27.:57:29.

were coming on the show, she wanted a shout out, so it would mean the

:57:30.:57:38.

world. Hello, Gabriela, I am so glad that you tweeted to me and I am so

:57:39.:57:42.

glad if I can bring you any happiness and joy for your life, I

:57:43.:57:47.

wish you all the best. And everybody, always remember, love

:57:48.:57:50.

will always win in the end! For you, a record deal with Sony, what is

:57:51.:57:56.

next! We have the X Factor tour coming up, and then we have an arena

:57:57.:58:04.

concert. Already so sold out, it is going to be huge. I have two prepare

:58:05.:58:08.

for that. And then, writing new songs and hopefully getting my first

:58:09.:58:12.

angle out as soon as possible. Of course, we must take our time and

:58:13.:58:17.

find the best song. Great to have you with us. Thank you very much.

:58:18.:58:23.

Thank you for your company as well. I will see the same time tomorrow,

:58:24.:58:25.

have a good afternoon.

:58:26.:58:28.

Meet the man who monitors media reporting about Muslims and tackles the inaccuracies he finds.

What is clean food - and does it make you healthier?

Singer Saara Aalto talks about life after the X Factor and coming to the UK.


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