27/01/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


27/01/2017

A holocaust survivor tells the programme why society must remain vigilant against anti-Semitism. Plus how gender stereotypes start affecting children as young as six.


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Hello, it's Friday, it's 9am, I'm Joanna Gosling.

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The vicar's daughter and the billionaire -

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Prime Minister Theresa May is in Washington to meet

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President Trump for talks on trade, foreign affairs and strengthening

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The Prime Minister is the first foreign leader to meet

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Mr Trump and his team, who are just one week

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Speaking last night, the president again said he was determined to

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build a wall between Mexico and the US and suggested taxing the goods to

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pay for it. People want protection. On the wall protects. All you have

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to do is ask Israel. They by having a total disaster coming across, and

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they had a wall. It is 99.9% stoppage.

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And, with the NHS in crisis, doctors are increasingly

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We hear from a group of GPs who had to sell off equipment to help cover

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We will speak to a doctor who are selling the recruitment to avoid

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getting into debt. -- selling the Mac equipment.

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A quarter of those living in the UK who survived genocides,

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including the Holocaust, have experienced discrimination

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or abuse linked to their religion or ethnicity.

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On Holocaust Memorial Day, we'll be talking to an Auschwitz

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We talk to an Auschwitz survivor and a student who says he has suffered

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racial abuse since he was a child. Lots coming up today on the show,

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and as ever, we really One of the stories we are talking

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about is whether six-year-old girls think they are less talented

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than six-year-old boys. What do you think?

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Do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning -

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use the hashtag #VictoriaLive. If you text, you will be charged

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at the standard network rate. Theresa May will become the first

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world leader to meet Donald Trump The Prime Minister told senior

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Republicans last night of the importance of the special

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relationship between the two countries, but says they cannot

:02:07.:02:10.

return to "failed" military Mrs May will be hoping

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to lay the groundwork She's also been urged by Labour

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and Conservative MPs to speak out against the use of torture,

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after Mr Trump said he supported Here's our Washington

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Correspondent, David Willis. She arrived on a blustery winter's

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evening in a city reeling from the effects of the new occupant

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of the White House. Theresa May will meet

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with President Trump less than a week after he came to office

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- a week as unpredictable as any And as the Prime Minister's

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motorcade wound its way through the streets of the capital,

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she could probably be forgiven for thinking,

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will the new relationship be more In Philadelphia, the city

:02:58.:02:59.

of the founding fathers, Mrs May earned a standing ovation

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for a speech that dwelt on the shared history of the two

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nations, a relationship which had All part of a charm offensive

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which she hopes will pave the way So I am delighted that the new

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administration has made a trade agreement between our countries one

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of its earliest priorities. A new trade deal between

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Britain and America. It must serve work for both

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sides and serve both Later, she'll become

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the first foreign leader to meet with Donald Trump

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at the White House, the streetwise New Yorker who,

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when it comes to trade deals, has vowed he will always

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put America first. He and Theresa May do

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have things in common, and it remains to be seen

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whether they can find common ground just as the UK is preparing

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to negotiate its departure Let's talk to Carole Walker,

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who's in Westminster. Carol, he is reportedly calling her,

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my Maggie. We have had a speech now from her already in the United

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States, where she has been laying out how she sees the relationship.

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How has that gone down? Well, certainly that speech from the Prime

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Minister went down very well with the audience of senior Republicans,

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but she was addressing. She spoke in very warm and glowing terms about

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the importance of the special relationship and about the shared

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values, although there certainly will be some concerns, not just

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amongst opposition parties, but some Conservative MPs, about this

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emphasis on shared values with Donald Trump, who, after all, has

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said that he thinks the water for terror suspects might be a good

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idea, and is building that very controversial war with Mexico. He

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says he wants to do so. -- wall with Mexico. He is banning immigrants

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from certain Muslim countries. When it comes to the issue with torture,

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there are quite serious implications in terms of the intelligence sharing

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which goes on at the moment between the US and the UK, when Britain has

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very strong rules about not dealing with any intelligence that comes

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from sources when it was extracted by the use of torture. So when I

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spoke to the Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon a little earlier, I

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asked him whether the Prime Minister would be raising those concerns

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directly when she meets President Trump.

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Schumacher very clear to him the British position on torture and that

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will not change. -- she will make very clear to him. We oppose

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torture, and that policy will not change whatever the American policy

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happens to be. She will make that clear. Will she urged him not to go

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down that route because it will have severe implications for future

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intelligence sharing. We worked together on the basis of shared

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intelligence. You're right, if the American position on torture was to

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change, there would be implications. She will make that clear to the

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American Administration. Sir Michael Fallon, that's just one of the

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issues on the agenda. Theresa May talked last night about a change to

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foreign policy. No more of what she called the failed interventions of

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the past. She appeared to be referring to Iraq, but perhaps

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Afghanistan as well. That might chime with the views of the new

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American president. Above all, I think Theresa May wants to take the

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opportunity to get to know the new president. They are very different

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characters, but she talked on the plane on the way over last night

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about sometimes opposites can attract. She wants to establish a

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rapport and a basis for a new economic relationship that can lead

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to a trade deal in the future, something President Trump has spoken

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about very warmly indeed. She will want to try to establish good,

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personal relations with President Trump. But she will be very aware of

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the concerns of many MPs, even some in her own party back in the UK. She

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will need to be seen to be challenging him on issues where they

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disagree, and not pandering so much that she prompts a backlash back at

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home. The importance of this visit is establishing good, personal

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relations. But inevitably trade will be talked about. How much are they

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going to be able to say because there are constraints about how much

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can be done in terms of any trade deals with other countries while the

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UK is still in the EU. That's right, the rules say we can't start formal

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trade negotiations while we are still members of the EU, and it will

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have to wait until the Brexit process has been completed. But I

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think the Prime Minister feels it's very important to capitalise on

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President Trump's signals, that the words he has spoken saying he wants

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to be putting Britain at the front of the queue when it comes to a

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trade deal. President Trump is somebody who doesn't like big,

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multilateral trade deals. He wants to work a bilateral trade basis. He

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has made it clear that it would be about America first, and that could

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be a difficulty. The question is whether Britain can drive a hard

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enough bargain to make sure a future trade deal doesn't just mean lots

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more American goods being imported into the UK. And there are other big

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differences when it comes to trade. We have very different standards

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when it comes to environmental regulations to some of the food and

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hygiene regulations. For example, some American products, cars and so

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on, aren't necessarily things that sell well in the UK. The Defence

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Secretary said this morning there could be a mutually beneficial trade

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deal. But we should be in no doubt that given President Trump's

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background, he will drive a hard bargain. Thank you very much. We

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will speak to a former economic adviser to President Trump as well

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as a former EU trade commissioner in a little while. We will also talk to

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the trade of the foreign affairs select committee. Let us know if you

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have any thoughts we could bring to that conversation.

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Annita is in the BBC Newsroom with a summary

:09:30.:09:31.

Hundreds of millions of pounds promised to schools in England have

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The money had been announced last year as part of a plan to turn

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But the Department for Education has revealed that when the compulsory

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academy plan was ditched the Treasury took back

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Our Education Correspondent Sean Coughlan reports.

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Head teachers in West Sussex and other parts of the country have

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been warning that schools are running out of cash.

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But only last year, the government announced an extra ?500 million,

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for schools as part of their plan to turn every school

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School leaders have been asking what ever happened to that money?

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But it has now emerged that when the academy plan was abandoned,

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most of the money, ?384 million, was in fact taken

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The Education Department said this was the right thing to do.

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The schools are receiving record levels of funding,

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Head teachers are furious that so much money could appear

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and then disappear when schools are struggling to make ends meet.

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A teenager has been charged with murder after a 15-year-old boy

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was stabbed near his school in north-west London.

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Quamari Serunkuma-Barnes was attacked in Doyle Gardens

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on Monday, just as other children made their way home from school.

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The suspect, who is also 15 and cannot be named for legal

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reasons, will appear before Willesden Youth Court later today.

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Jeremy Corbyn faces more dissent in the Labour Party today,

:10:59.:11:02.

as the party whip, Jeff Smith, says he'll defy the leader and vote

:11:03.:11:06.

against the Government Bill that will trigger Article 50.

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The MP said he wasn't convinced the Government had

:11:09.:11:10.

The Shadow Transport Minister, Daniel Zeichner, has also said he'll

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oppose the legislation, while Tulip Siddiq has

:11:17.:11:18.

resigned from the front bench over the issue.

:11:19.:11:22.

Plans to restrict some hip and knee operations in Worcestershire have

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been described as "alarming" by the Royal College of Surgeons.

:11:26.:11:29.

Three clinical commissioning groups in the county want to restrict

:11:30.:11:33.

They hope the move can save around ?2 million.

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But they insist they will continue to carry out more operations

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than many other parts of the country.

:11:45.:11:46.

Three GPs have told this programme they're having

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to sell their sell their equipment to avoid going into personal debt

:11:49.:11:51.

The Studley Health Centre in Warwickshire shut permanently

:11:52.:11:54.

because the partners that ran it claim they were no longer

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The doctors are trying to raise around ?40,000 to cover

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The Department of Health says it has invested an extra

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And we'll be speaking to one of the GPs from that surgery,

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and a former patient, just after 9:30am this morning.

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The taxman's failure to get tough with the super-rich could undermine

:12:16.:12:17.

confidence in the whole system, according to MPs.

:12:18.:12:19.

The Public Accounts Committee says the amount raised each year

:12:20.:12:23.

from wealthy individuals has fallen by ?1 billion,

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and there needs to be a tougher approach.

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HM Revenue and Customs has rejected any suggestion of special

:12:32.:12:33.

A study in the United States suggests girls start to see

:12:34.:12:41.

themselves as less talented than boys do when they

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The researchers described the results as disheartening,

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and said such views were likely to shape girls' decisions about

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That's a summary of the latest BBC News, more at 9:30am.

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Do get in touch with us throughout the morning -

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If you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.

:13:03.:13:08.

If you have any thoughts on Theresa May's visit to the United States, we

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would love to hear them, and what about the latest report that

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indicates six-year-old girls do not think they are as competent as

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six-year-old boys. Where do they get that message from? Let us know your

:13:23.:13:24.

thoughts if you have young children. And Will, they're rolling back the

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years at the Australian Open tennis. It's a bit like an over 30s holiday

:13:29.:13:41.

camp in Melbourne this year. 30-year-old Rafa Nadal hoping to

:13:42.:13:44.

meet 35-year-old Roger Federer in the final of the Australian open but

:13:45.:13:48.

he needs to get past a Grigor Dimitrov. That semifinal is

:13:49.:13:53.

underway. It's 4-1 to Nadal, a good start. He hasn't reached a final

:13:54.:14:00.

since the 20 14th French Open, his 14th Grand Slam. The Spaniard has

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been troubled by injury in the recent years. If he beats Dimitrov

:14:05.:14:07.

today then all four singles finalists will be aged over 30.

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35-year-old Serena Williams meet 36-year-old sister Venus Williams.

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Serena hoping to earn a record 23rd grand slam final. It's their first

:14:26.:14:31.

final together in a Grand Slam since Wimbledon 2009. Serena won that won

:14:32.:14:37.

in straight sets. Dimitrov has never reached a Grand Slam final. He's

:14:38.:14:48.

Roger Federer going for Grand Slam number 18 after beating fellow Swiss

:14:49.:14:56.

Stan Wawrinka yesterday. And Gordon Reid has achieved the career grand

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slam. The wheelchair doubles at the Australian open. And he's only 25,

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and got the whole set. I love the way you talk about over

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30 is being old, I am sure it is in sporting terms let's talk about

:15:18.:15:21.

another guy way off his 30s, Anthony Joshua will be facing bad amir

:15:22.:15:26.

Klitschko with a huge crowd expected to turn out. -- Wladimir Klitschko.

:15:27.:15:32.

Yes, this is boxing history, 90,000 people can attend that fight, for

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the IBF title and the vacant WBA super heavyweight title as well,

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that is on the 29th of April at Wembley, and it will match the

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British record set at White City back in 1939. Crowds are usually cap

:15:53.:15:57.

that 80,000, because the transport networks cannot cope with it, but

:15:58.:16:00.

London mayor Sadiq Khan has come to an agreement with Network Rail and

:16:01.:16:05.

Transport for London to get more services in place. Eddie Hearn said

:16:06.:16:09.

that Sadiq Khan urged me to bring the biggest fights to the city, and

:16:10.:16:13.

he is delighted to have the biggest fight in British boxing history at

:16:14.:16:17.

Wembley. He also promoted the 2014 rematch between Carl Froch and

:16:18.:16:21.

George Groves which said the current post-war record of 80,000, bringing

:16:22.:16:26.

in more than ?20 million. When you meet someday like Anthony Joshua, if

:16:27.:16:31.

you go to its fight, you realise how lucky is by boxing fans, sports fans

:16:32.:16:36.

in general. He acknowledges the whole crowd, and that 27, to bring

:16:37.:16:41.

in 90,000 with a huge career head of him, for a heavyweight, astonishing

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stuff. Great, thank you very much, see you

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later. A new dawn is breaking -

:16:47.:16:48.

Prime Minister Theresa May's verdict on the change in the White House

:16:49.:16:50.

as Donald Trump ends his first week Today Mrs May will meet him -

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the first foreign leader to do so. the other a billionaire star

:16:54.:16:58.

of reality TV. There are frequent and regular

:16:59.:17:06.

meetings between British Prime Ministers

:17:07.:17:08.

and American presidents, but few will be as significant

:17:09.:17:11.

as the visit to Washington today. The Prime Minister will be hoping to

:17:12.:17:22.

prepare the ground for a trade deal after Brexit.

:17:23.:17:23.

Speaking last night to a group of Republican politicians

:17:24.:17:25.

in Philadelphia, Mrs May was very clear about her plans

:17:26.:17:28.

A new trade deal between Britain and America must work for both sides and

:17:29.:17:37.

serve both of our national interests. It must help to grow our

:17:38.:17:41.

respective economies and to prepare the high skilled, high paid jobs of

:17:42.:17:45.

the future for working people across America and across the UK. And it

:17:46.:17:51.

must work for those who have too often felt left behind by the forces

:17:52.:17:57.

of globalisation. Theresa May is the first foreign head of government to

:17:58.:18:02.

speak to Republican Congressmen. It is my honour and privilege to stand

:18:03.:18:06.

before you today in this great city of Philadelphia, to proclaim them

:18:07.:18:12.

again, to join hands, as we pick up that mantle of leadership once more,

:18:13.:18:20.

to renew our special relationship, and to recommit ourselves to the

:18:21.:18:24.

responsibility of leadership in the modern world. And it is my honour

:18:25.:18:29.

and privilege to do so at this time, as dawn breaks on a new era of

:18:30.:18:36.

American renewal. I speak to you not just as Prime Minister of the United

:18:37.:18:41.

Kingdom, but as a fellow conservative who believes in the

:18:42.:18:44.

same principles that and up in the agenda of your party, the value of

:18:45.:18:51.

liberty, the dignity of work, the principles of nationhood, family,

:18:52.:18:57.

economic prudence, patriotism and putting power in the hands of the

:18:58.:19:06.

people. Well, she was keen to stress the special relationship between the

:19:07.:19:11.

two countries. We have the opportunity, indeed the

:19:12.:19:16.

responsibility, to renew the special relationship for this new age. We

:19:17.:19:21.

have the opportunity to lead together again. Because the world is

:19:22.:19:29.

passing through a period of change. And in response to that change, we

:19:30.:19:35.

can either be passive bystanders, or we can take the opportunity once

:19:36.:19:41.

more to lead and to lead together. On foreign policy, she said the two

:19:42.:19:45.

countries must always stand up for their respective friends and allies.

:19:46.:19:49.

The days of Britain and America are intervening in sovereign countries

:19:50.:19:53.

in an attempt to remake the world in our own image are over, but nor can

:19:54.:20:00.

we afford to stand idly by when the threat is real and when it is in our

:20:01.:20:04.

own interests to intervene. We must be strong, smart and hard-headed,

:20:05.:20:10.

and we must demonstrate the resolve necessary to stand up for our

:20:11.:20:15.

interests. And whether it is the security of Israel in the Middle

:20:16.:20:18.

East, or the Baltic states in Eastern Europe, we must always stand

:20:19.:20:23.

up for our friends and allies in democratic countries that find

:20:24.:20:26.

themselves in tough neighbourhoods too.

:20:27.:20:36.

APPLAUSE Well, the speech went down well, as

:20:37.:20:45.

you saw, the visit comes amid rows over who will pay for President

:20:46.:20:49.

Trump's controversial wall along the US border with Mexico.

:20:50.:20:51.

In an interview on Fox News, Donald Trump reiterated why

:20:52.:20:54.

And yet it is good for the heart of the nation in a certain way,

:20:55.:21:02.

because people want protection. And a wall protects.

:21:03.:21:04.

They were having a total disaster coming across,

:21:05.:21:08.

and they had a wall. It's 99.9% stoppage.

:21:09.:21:13.

A proper wall, not a wall that's this high, like they have now.

:21:14.:21:16.

I don't know why they even wasted their time...

:21:17.:21:21.

If you ever saw where they built a little ramp over the wall,

:21:22.:21:24.

I don't even know why they built a ramp.

:21:25.:21:26.

You're talking about a real wall, impenetrable?

:21:27.:21:31.

I'm talking about a wall that's got to be like serious.

:21:32.:21:37.

And even that of course you'll have people violate it.

:21:38.:21:39.

But we'll have people waiting for them when they do.

:21:40.:21:42.

who has been an economic advisor to Donald Trump,

:21:43.:21:49.

MP Crispin Blunt, chair of the Foreign Affairs Select Committee,

:21:50.:21:51.

who worked for the EU Commission for Trade for 30 years.

:21:52.:21:58.

Thank you all very much for joining us. Crispin Blunt first of all, how

:21:59.:22:06.

tricky is this visit for Theresa May to navigate? We have already heard

:22:07.:22:10.

his speech, watched you think about the difficulties for her and how

:22:11.:22:14.

well she has acquitted herself so far? Well, I think she gave a

:22:15.:22:19.

terrific speech to the Republican caucus in Philadelphia, you could

:22:20.:22:24.

see how warmly it was received. And within the Trump administration,

:22:25.:22:26.

obviously you got different signals being sent out, so all this

:22:27.:22:30.

controversy about what the president said about torture, but what people

:22:31.:22:33.

have not commented on is that he said he would take his lead from his

:22:34.:22:38.

Defence Secretary, General James Mattis, from the head of the CIA,

:22:39.:22:44.

claim they are against torture on ethical and practical grounds. The

:22:45.:22:47.

indicated he will be led by the experts see as appointed to his

:22:48.:22:50.

administration, which is quite a good sign. The relationship Theresa

:22:51.:22:55.

May has got to get with the president is to support British

:22:56.:22:58.

interests, and many of those interests are the same as some of

:22:59.:23:01.

the senior and powerful figures that Donald Trump as appointed to his

:23:02.:23:07.

administration. So in the internal administrations dynamic, the Prime

:23:08.:23:09.

Minister of the United Kingdom can be a useful voice into the White

:23:10.:23:14.

House, supporting the analysis of the Secretary of State, the Defence

:23:15.:23:17.

Secretary and the head of the CIA, who share Britain's outlook on the

:23:18.:23:23.

world. Bearing that in mind, the fact that you points to others who

:23:24.:23:26.

he has said he will listen to, he can send out a strong signal and

:23:27.:23:31.

say, this is what I think, but I will listen to them, he will play

:23:32.:23:36.

those two difference dynamics. How forceful should she be when she is

:23:37.:23:40.

talking about something like that? Does she need to be forceful? She is

:23:41.:23:46.

a very good listener, and she speaks calmly, and people listen to her,

:23:47.:23:50.

and she carries a quiet authority with, and I don't think she needs to

:23:51.:23:54.

change your style or her with Donald Trump. The president has already

:23:55.:24:00.

made clear that he sees her as his Maggie, as he puts it. We need to

:24:01.:24:03.

remember the religion share between Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher

:24:04.:24:10.

was not always sweetness and light. -- the relationship. On Grenada, she

:24:11.:24:19.

felt the need to intervene in the internal administrations debates to

:24:20.:24:22.

forcefully put the British view, the dorks with the Soviet Union at

:24:23.:24:25.

Reykjavik on nuclear disarmament were another example as to where she

:24:26.:24:32.

forcefully engaged to contradict the direction where she saw Ronald

:24:33.:24:37.

Reagan was taking Western policy. So that was a relationship where there

:24:38.:24:40.

was mutual respect, and that is what we have got to achieve. Some people

:24:41.:24:45.

might have blanched at some of your language, so apologies if you did,

:24:46.:24:49.

very sorry if any offence was called. That is my soldierly

:24:50.:24:59.

background! Betsy McCoy, you are a former adviser to Donald Trump on

:25:00.:25:02.

the economy, Crispin Blunt Saint Theresa May is a good listener, how

:25:03.:25:10.

would you characterise him? -- saying. What I would stress is that

:25:11.:25:15.

she was so warmly received yesterday by the Republican Party, and the

:25:16.:25:20.

Trump administration appears to have such deep respect for the history of

:25:21.:25:26.

this relationship with Great Britain, with the values of the

:25:27.:25:30.

nation, the work ethic of the people, and as you know, Donald

:25:31.:25:35.

Trump personally has strong ties to your country, his mother was

:25:36.:25:40.

Scottish, and so she is being welcomed with open arms to a party

:25:41.:25:48.

and a leader who wants to do a trade deal, and who wants to have a strong

:25:49.:25:54.

relationship of mutual respect and affection. And when she evoked the

:25:55.:26:00.

very special relationship between Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher

:26:01.:26:07.

yesterday, you could see that she was applauded so warmly, so

:26:08.:26:12.

enthusiastically by the President's party that I think this is going to

:26:13.:26:17.

be the beginning of a very strong relationship. Obviously, we hear all

:26:18.:26:22.

of those welcoming words, the fact that he feels this great affinity to

:26:23.:26:26.

the United Kingdom. When it comes down to brass tacks, though, he is a

:26:27.:26:31.

hard-nosed businessman, and the message is that he is sending out

:26:32.:26:37.

about America first, what sort of room for manoeuvre does that mean

:26:38.:26:42.

when it comes to a trade deal in our interests? Well, plenty, because as

:26:43.:26:47.

you say, your Prime Minister says exactly the same thing. The reason

:26:48.:26:52.

these two, I predict, will get along just fine, it is really going to be

:26:53.:26:56.

a love fest, is that both of them are committed to national

:26:57.:26:59.

sovereignty, to putting their national interest first. Unlike

:27:00.:27:05.

President Barack Obama, who was so critical of Brexit, Donald Trump

:27:06.:27:10.

applauded Brexit from the beginning. President Obama told the British

:27:11.:27:14.

they would have to go to, quote, the end of the queue if they voted for

:27:15.:27:18.

Brexit, whereas Donald Trump is welcoming your Prime Minister with

:27:19.:27:21.

open arms to negotiate a trade deal. So there is the difference, two

:27:22.:27:25.

countries can have strong commitments to their own people and

:27:26.:27:31.

still see many mutual interests. Let's bring in Roderick Abbott, you

:27:32.:27:34.

worked for the EU commission on trade for 30 years, obviously very

:27:35.:27:42.

appealing when the petition has gone from a president who said the UK

:27:43.:27:47.

would be at the back of the queue to a president saying the UK is right

:27:48.:27:50.

at the front of the queue, what you see has the potential for a trade

:27:51.:27:56.

deal? Yes, well, good morning. I think the first thing to say is

:27:57.:28:04.

that, between a special relationship type of getting together and a trade

:28:05.:28:09.

agreement, they are two very different sorts of things, and if

:28:10.:28:15.

you are fine on one, because you have got all the history, you are

:28:16.:28:18.

not necessarily fine on the trade agreement. It is also true that both

:28:19.:28:25.

sides would be looking for their own national interest, that is clear.

:28:26.:28:31.

How do I see this? I don't think there's going to be anything done

:28:32.:28:35.

very, very quickly in terms of concluding anything. I think they

:28:36.:28:41.

are in a preliminary stage where they are meeting each other, and

:28:42.:28:46.

they will be setting out a certain number of general principles and

:28:47.:28:49.

things, and that will lead onto informal discussions over the next

:28:50.:28:58.

months. Crispin Blunt, how do you see the timing? Obviously, there are

:28:59.:29:02.

rules that mean there cannot be any formal negotiations before the UK

:29:03.:29:06.

leaves the EU, but all the messages coming out of the United States are

:29:07.:29:08.

that there is no reason why they could not effectively sew something

:29:09.:29:16.

up quickly and quietly that could come into force then. You could have

:29:17.:29:21.

the discussions, and trade experts say you could have discussions but

:29:22.:29:26.

not formal negotiations, exactly as you said, but we won't know exactly

:29:27.:29:29.

the shape of the deal that the United Kingdom gets as we leave the

:29:30.:29:35.

European Union, and what freedom that then gives us to negotiate our

:29:36.:29:43.

own trade deals in terms until we have signed a deal and left the

:29:44.:29:46.

European Union. So these discussions will have to take place in principle

:29:47.:29:51.

between the parties, but what is different about these is the

:29:52.:29:55.

politics of this deal - you saw the warmth of the reaction that Theresa

:29:56.:29:59.

May got from the Republican members of Congress, and of course their

:30:00.:30:04.

trade ago shaders in a United States report to Congress, and usually they

:30:05.:30:07.

are really tough because they are looking after individual businesses.

:30:08.:30:12.

-- trade negotiators. This is an occasion where political pressure

:30:13.:30:16.

and the need for both countries to be able to do 80, there is a

:30:17.:30:19.

slightly different dynamic compared to other deals. -- to do a deal.

:30:20.:30:25.

They will be saying to their negotiators, get the deal done. The

:30:26.:30:29.

details may be less important than securing a deal, securing the

:30:30.:30:32.

argument for free trade in the United States, which is very

:30:33.:30:36.

important, as well as the UK showing that the world wants to do business

:30:37.:30:40.

with us as we leave the European Union. How will it be seen within

:30:41.:30:45.

the EU? Donald Trump's approach would look like classic divide and

:30:46.:30:49.

rule, he prefers to deal with individual countries in bilateral

:30:50.:30:52.

negotiations, rather than dealing with trade blocs. As other EU

:30:53.:30:57.

countries going to crucial election is this year, how does that dynamic

:30:58.:30:59.

play out? My first comment was that the

:31:00.:31:12.

politics which apply to the special relationship and the contacts with

:31:13.:31:16.

the Republican party and so on, don't necessarily spill over into

:31:17.:31:21.

trading because trade people in that community are very Mac and to list

:31:22.:31:37.

-- are very mercantilist. I imagine what Theresa May will look for is

:31:38.:31:41.

what she said, a bold and ambitious free trade agreement. And you can

:31:42.:31:46.

start to sketch out what that would mean. You might use as a model the

:31:47.:31:52.

TTIP, which is probably now in GDP freezer. It could be a good model,

:31:53.:31:57.

but I don't think you're going to get very far along the road until

:31:58.:32:05.

you see that the UK in relation to the United States is a much smaller

:32:06.:32:08.

target than the EU in relation to the United States. The dynamics in

:32:09.:32:15.

the bilateral relationship would be different to the dynamics with the

:32:16.:32:22.

EU. It means the European market I'm afraid is less attractive because

:32:23.:32:26.

it's a smaller population and you therefore have a smaller number of

:32:27.:32:32.

consumers and that kind of thing. Is it fair to say that Donald Trump

:32:33.:32:36.

prefers to have deals with individual countries rather than

:32:37.:32:39.

trading blocks because it's easier, because you have more clout and

:32:40.:32:46.

therefore, is it an appealing dynamic for Donald Trump to be

:32:47.:32:50.

warmly welcoming the United Kingdom when there are other EU countries

:32:51.:32:56.

who might be thinking, we might be all right out of the EU as well? I

:32:57.:33:01.

think it's a lesson the entire United States has learned, that in

:33:02.:33:09.

multilateral trade negotiations, often the interests of the United

:33:10.:33:12.

States are lost on the table in favour of the interests of the

:33:13.:33:17.

entire group. You can see how that would typically happen. Whereas in

:33:18.:33:23.

bilateral trade agreements the United States can secure its

:33:24.:33:27.

interest at the bargaining table and nobody is a better bargain than

:33:28.:33:30.

Donald Trump, that's why the Americans elected him president, to

:33:31.:33:36.

get this nation a good deal. I believe the Americans could they

:33:37.:33:42.

strongly trade relationship and strong overall relationship with

:33:43.:33:45.

Great Britain is a big winner. You can see that yesterday when the

:33:46.:33:48.

Republican majority in Philadelphia, and they will be the ones affirming

:33:49.:33:52.

any trade agreement, gave her such a warm welcome. A quick final

:33:53.:33:58.

thoughts, Crispin Blunt, are we weaker in these negotiations by

:33:59.:34:02.

being on our own? Relative to the European Union in conducting these

:34:03.:34:07.

negotiations, yes, in absolute terms. But the politics of the deal

:34:08.:34:13.

are actually rather different than a classic United States- EU deal,

:34:14.:34:16.

which has taken decades to negotiate and has run into what looks like

:34:17.:34:19.

terminal trouble. The bilateral politics and the need for both

:34:20.:34:26.

governments to secure, going into the electoral cycle for both

:34:27.:34:29.

governments in 2020, there's big political pressure on the

:34:30.:34:32.

negotiators to get a deal done and not behave in way trade negotiators

:34:33.:34:39.

usually do, which is very dry and mercantilist, as is described. The

:34:40.:34:42.

dynamic is different around this deal. So let's hope the politicians

:34:43.:34:48.

direct the trade negotiators to be sensible and get a deal done in the

:34:49.:34:52.

mutual interest of both countries to reinforce what's going to be a

:34:53.:35:00.

deeper special relationship. Thank you all very much. Still to come...

:35:01.:35:06.

And with the NHS in crisis, doctors are increasingly

:35:07.:35:08.

We hear from a group of GPs that had to shut down their surgery for good.

:35:09.:35:14.

They even had sell off equipment from their practice

:35:15.:35:16.

And more than a quarter of survivors of the Holocaust living in the UK

:35:17.:35:21.

still face anti-Semitic abuse or discrimination.

:35:22.:35:24.

We'll be talking to two British Jews about their experiences.

:35:25.:35:31.

Here's Annita in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of today's news.

:35:32.:35:40.

Theresa May will today become the first world leader to meet Donald

:35:41.:35:46.

Trump since he became US president. She told Republicans yesterday of

:35:47.:35:49.

the importance of the special relationship between the two

:35:50.:35:53.

countries at but says they cannot return to failed military

:35:54.:35:57.

interventions. It's expected a post Brexit trade deal will be high on

:35:58.:36:00.

the agenda at today's meeting in the Oval Office. Hundreds of millions of

:36:01.:36:06.

funding promised to schools in England last year has been taken

:36:07.:36:10.

back by the Treasury. The money had been announced to fund a plan to

:36:11.:36:14.

turn all schools into academies. The Department for Education says that

:36:15.:36:17.

it was appropriate to return funds of the project did not go ahead.

:36:18.:36:31.

A teenager has been charged with murder after a 15-year-old boy

:36:32.:36:34.

was stabbed near his school in north-west London.

:36:35.:36:36.

Quamari Serunkuma-Barnes was attacked in Doyle Gardens

:36:37.:36:37.

on Monday, just as other children made their way home from school.

:36:38.:36:40.

The suspect, who is also 15 and cannot be named for legal

:36:41.:36:43.

reasons, will appear before Willesden Youth Court later today.

:36:44.:36:45.

Plans to restrict some hip and knee operations in Worcestershire have

:36:46.:36:48.

been described as "alarming" by the Royal College of Surgeons.

:36:49.:36:50.

Three clinical commissioning groups in the county want to restrict

:36:51.:36:53.

They hope the move can save around ?2 million.

:36:54.:36:56.

But they insist they will continue to carry out more operations

:36:57.:36:59.

than many other parts of the country.

:37:00.:37:01.

A study in the United States suggests girls start to see

:37:02.:37:04.

themselves as less talented than boys do when they

:37:05.:37:06.

The researchers described the results as disheartening,

:37:07.:37:09.

and said such views were likely to shape girls' decisions about

:37:10.:37:12.

Bring in some comments on the research on six-year-old girls. John

:37:13.:37:21.

has e-mailed to wonder about the research. He says we now know there

:37:22.:37:27.

are more young women at University in the US than young men. What

:37:28.:37:31.

happens between six and 16 that changes these apparently

:37:32.:37:36.

contradicting sets of data? Another tweet, I think girls are more judged

:37:37.:37:39.

because of social media, which is sad. An anonymous text asks, why are

:37:40.:37:45.

six-year-old girls being asked this question? Thank you for your

:37:46.:37:48.

comments. Keep them coming in. We will talk more about it later. Now

:37:49.:37:54.

time to catch up with the sport. Rafa Nadal has just taken the first

:37:55.:37:59.

set against Grigor Dimitrov in the Australian open semifinal. The

:38:00.:38:02.

Spaniard has reached a major final since winning his 14th Grand Slam at

:38:03.:38:05.

the 2014 French Open. He got the break he needed to take the opening

:38:06.:38:10.

set 6-3. It's 1-1 in the second and the winner will face Roger Federer

:38:11.:38:13.

for the title on Sunday. Manchester United are through to EFL court cup

:38:14.:38:23.

quarterfinal. They lost 2-1 against Hull, the bringing an end to their

:38:24.:38:27.

17 match unbeaten record. They face Southampton at Wembley next month.

:38:28.:38:36.

Nottingham Forest have asked Bilton Albion -- Burton Albion to speak to

:38:37.:38:40.

manager Nigel Clough. There will be a post-war record crowd of 90,000 at

:38:41.:38:44.

the anti-would Joshua Wladimir Klitschko fight at Wembley next

:38:45.:38:46.

month. Three GPs that gave up running

:38:47.:38:55.

a surgery in a small village say they're now having

:38:56.:38:58.

to sell their equipment in order The Studley Health Centre

:38:59.:39:01.

in Warwickshire shut permanently on the 31st of December

:39:02.:39:05.

because the partners that ran it claim they were no longer

:39:06.:39:08.

able to make a living. Now the doctors are trying to raise

:39:09.:39:10.

around ?40,000 to cover The surgery had around 2000

:39:11.:39:13.

patients, and has been Let's talk to Dr Lars Grimstvedt,

:39:14.:39:19.

who was one of the partners at the Studley Health Centre,

:39:20.:39:26.

Dr Krishna Kasaraneni from the British Medical

:39:27.:39:29.

Association's GP Committee, and from Birmingham is Hazel Wright,

:39:30.:39:31.

who was a patient at For more than 40 years. Why was it

:39:32.:39:47.

that the practice was not viable? The main issue was being a small

:39:48.:39:55.

size. We were a small village so we focused on looking after patients

:39:56.:40:02.

and offering continuity of care. They could see the same doctor every

:40:03.:40:05.

time they came in and we could offer good appointments. They didn't have

:40:06.:40:09.

to wait long to see us. Talk is through the figures. Where was it

:40:10.:40:14.

not adding up? How did outgoings compare with income? To do this we

:40:15.:40:20.

had to put in quite a lot of time as doctors. We only get a set amount of

:40:21.:40:26.

money per patient per year. Is that ?80? Tail it's about 80 or ?85. That

:40:27.:40:36.

doesn't take into account the amount of appointments we have available.

:40:37.:40:39.

We could see a patient wants or ten times. There have been contractual

:40:40.:40:46.

changes meaning the amount we get paid will be decreased every year

:40:47.:40:49.

for the next five years. There is also an increase in demand. We are

:40:50.:40:53.

having to see more patients, and also more nonclinical work we have

:40:54.:41:00.

to comply with. Just cutting through, on whether a practice is

:41:01.:41:04.

viable or not, if you have 2000 patients and you get ?80 per

:41:05.:41:07.

patient, but each of those patients might come once a year, it's fine,

:41:08.:41:13.

but if you have maybe an ageing group in that 2000, they are coming

:41:14.:41:16.

lots of times a year and it becomes an issue. Was that the issue for

:41:17.:41:21.

you? It is. Also the fact that costs were going up. Wages were going up,

:41:22.:41:28.

and the income was going down. And the pressures worded so that we were

:41:29.:41:33.

spending more and more hours seeing patients, longer days, 12 hour days,

:41:34.:41:37.

and it's exhausting because you don't get on top of your workload.

:41:38.:41:40.

There is always more work coming in. You thought a merger might work. You

:41:41.:41:48.

are not the only practice in an area of 6000 people. Why didn't a merger

:41:49.:41:53.

work? We explored a merger and worked really hard to see if it

:41:54.:41:58.

could be a possibility but we were told that it wouldn't be an option

:41:59.:42:05.

for us. I'm still not... I haven't been given an official reason why it

:42:06.:42:08.

wasn't and I'm still trying to find out. From the BMA's GP committee,

:42:09.:42:18.

the Department of Health says it's always been a case that some GP

:42:19.:42:22.

practices open, close and merge over time. What's important is patients

:42:23.:42:25.

get access to the services they need in all parts of the country. In the

:42:26.:42:33.

end, if a practice isn't viable, this is the only outcome, isn't it?

:42:34.:42:38.

That's a short-sighted comment from the Department of Health. The reason

:42:39.:42:43.

being, of the last few years we have noticed that GPs up and down the

:42:44.:42:47.

country, workload has increased significantly. Part of that is

:42:48.:42:51.

because the NHS has been a victim of its own success. People live longer

:42:52.:42:55.

with more health conditions, so they need more care in the community.

:42:56.:42:58.

Unfortunately funding hasn't kept pace with that. We have been warning

:42:59.:43:02.

the government that if funding doesn't keep pace to provide a level

:43:03.:43:08.

of service nations need, GPs will leave. Numbers came out two days ago

:43:09.:43:13.

showing the numbers of GPs from 2009 to last year has dropped by 3500,

:43:14.:43:18.

including GPs in my own practice you have moved to Canada. We have now

:43:19.:43:22.

reached the point where the workload has increased so much and funding

:43:23.:43:26.

isn't enough to keep up the pace. The funding model of ?80 per patient

:43:27.:43:31.

per year being a fixed amount. How would you see it working better?

:43:32.:43:37.

Presumably it would be linked to the number of times somebody is

:43:38.:43:41.

visiting, and then the bill could potentially go up exponentially for

:43:42.:43:45.

the health service. The reality is that the funding isn't enough. We

:43:46.:43:48.

are asking the government to increase funding to keep up the pace

:43:49.:43:52.

with demands on the health service and general practice so we can

:43:53.:43:55.

provide the level of service patients have been used to. What

:43:56.:43:59.

would you see as a model that could work? One of the things NHS England

:44:00.:44:06.

has declared is an extra ?2.8 billion by the end of this

:44:07.:44:08.

Parliament. The problem with something like this, yes, it's an

:44:09.:44:13.

investment and a welcome opportunity for the government to invest in

:44:14.:44:16.

general practice, but if a patient rings for an ambulance with chest

:44:17.:44:22.

pain,, that money will not make a difference, the ambulance is needed

:44:23.:44:26.

now. Unfortunately Parliament continues to interfere with the

:44:27.:44:29.

health service too much political cycles rather than need. We need

:44:30.:44:34.

investment urgently available to GP practices now to maintain and

:44:35.:44:39.

improve services for patients. A number of GPs have been leaving the

:44:40.:44:44.

service. Are you aware of how many practices are closing? The numbers

:44:45.:44:50.

are difficult to pin down, but we know eight out of ten GPs are

:44:51.:44:53.

reporting that the level of service they are providing for patients has

:44:54.:44:57.

deteriorated in the last year and we know that one in three GP practices

:44:58.:45:02.

in the country have permanent vacancies where they cannot fill GP

:45:03.:45:05.

places. Depending on the situation, some will be looking to close

:45:06.:45:10.

practices and patients who are used to access in their local GP for a

:45:11.:45:13.

period of time will no longer be able to see their GP.

:45:14.:45:19.

Hazel, I mentioned you had been a patient at that surgery for more

:45:20.:45:24.

than 40 years, how do you feel about and closing? Quite angry, and so do

:45:25.:45:30.

a lot of residents, and it is an anger that really escalated, because

:45:31.:45:35.

Studley seems to be losing all these services. We have lost the Fire

:45:36.:45:40.

Service, the library, which is now manned by volunteers. We have at the

:45:41.:45:43.

banks close, you name it, we have lost it. And really, this was really

:45:44.:45:50.

angry, it made people really angry that this was happening now, that

:45:51.:45:55.

the doctors were going, especially those doctors, because they are well

:45:56.:45:58.

regarded, highly respected, because they knew, or as a patient you knew

:45:59.:46:04.

that you could rely on them, not only as a doctor, but somebody who

:46:05.:46:09.

cared about you. So what are the options now? What will you do? Well,

:46:10.:46:13.

in fact, there is another surgery in the village. I have registered with

:46:14.:46:21.

them. In all fairness, they are doctors of good quality, and I feel

:46:22.:46:29.

that I am confident with them. You have got to wonder, are they going

:46:30.:46:34.

to be able to cope if 2000 patients from this practice turn up at their

:46:35.:46:38.

door? At a public meeting arranged by the CCG, they made a pledge that

:46:39.:46:44.

they would accommodate as many patients as wanted to go to their

:46:45.:46:48.

surgery, because when we had a letter telling us that we would have

:46:49.:46:52.

to find a new doctor, we were provided with a list of doctors that

:46:53.:46:56.

are in Redditch, so people were given a choice. But as far as I am

:46:57.:47:02.

aware, most people have chosen to go to the other surgery. You are out of

:47:03.:47:11.

that environment now, working as a salaried GP somewhere else. How has

:47:12.:47:15.

this left you feeling? Presumably you went into medicine because you

:47:16.:47:20.

wanted to care for people, you got into a position where you were

:47:21.:47:25.

effectively a businessman. That is typical, really, I see myself as a

:47:26.:47:29.

an accidental businessperson, I wanted to look after people, and I

:47:30.:47:33.

am not very good with the financial side of things. It has been quite a

:47:34.:47:38.

stressful six months, six months two-year, really, when we have been

:47:39.:47:45.

looking at how to resolve this. I have, in recent times, my take-home

:47:46.:47:49.

pay has been less than a junior doctor's from the surgery, and

:47:50.:47:56.

therefore... And I knew I wanted the kind of work I wanted to do was in a

:47:57.:48:00.

small village surgery, and that comes at a price, but at some stage

:48:01.:48:07.

you have got to weigh up whether you are able to put bread on the table

:48:08.:48:10.

and pay the mortgage versus going to work. And there is work at there

:48:11.:48:16.

that pays a reasonable amount more with less responsibility, and it

:48:17.:48:22.

wasn't just that I couldn't see a way forward to carry this through,

:48:23.:48:25.

and that is why we had to make this really hard decision to say, well,

:48:26.:48:30.

we cannot carry this on much longer. How do you feel about patients who

:48:31.:48:35.

have been coming to the practice all this time? It has been overwhelming,

:48:36.:48:39.

the positive response that we have had, people saying how well they

:48:40.:48:43.

thought of us as a surgery. We haven't had anything but positive

:48:44.:48:47.

comment and sadness from patients and people we have been working

:48:48.:48:51.

with, that they have lost this surgery. And it is... It is almost

:48:52.:48:57.

heartbreaking to see, really, the effect that these decisions have

:48:58.:49:01.

made. But at the end of the day, we have got to think about what is

:49:02.:49:04.

best, and if we could not carry on much longer, we would have got into

:49:05.:49:09.

some kind of difficulty, and I wouldn't want to risk clinical

:49:10.:49:14.

safety or making a mistake or cutting services down to a level

:49:15.:49:18.

where I thought it was unsafe, which are the kind of choices I would have

:49:19.:49:23.

had to make if I carried on. Thank you all very much, thank you.

:49:24.:49:26.

A spokesman for the Department of Health says it has invested

:49:27.:49:29.

an extra ?2.4 billion into primary care

:49:30.:49:30.

and there will be an extra 5000 GPs by 2020.

:49:31.:49:33.

A spokesperson for NHS South Warwickshire Clinical

:49:34.:49:34.

Commissioning Group says it felt merging the Studely Health Centre

:49:35.:49:37.

with another practice was not viable and it was making sure

:49:38.:49:40.

patients still had an excellent GP service.

:49:41.:49:45.

Coming up, the vicar's daughter Theresa May

:49:46.:49:48.

meets the billionaire President Trump

:49:49.:49:51.

We're looking at what the special relationship

:49:52.:49:55.

between the US and the UK means and whether it has a future.

:49:56.:50:04.

One in four survivors of genocide

:50:05.:50:05.

have experienced discrimination or abuse in the UK

:50:06.:50:07.

because of their religion or ethnicity.

:50:08.:50:10.

The disturbing figures are released to mark Holocaust Memorial Day,

:50:11.:50:14.

which is dedicated to all those who were killed during

:50:15.:50:16.

the Holocaust, and in genocides since World War II.

:50:17.:50:20.

The research shows that most survivors can't talk

:50:21.:50:22.

about their experiences for at least 20 years.

:50:23.:50:30.

That is a brick that was thrown into the home

:50:31.:50:33.

And this is a poster for the film Denial,

:50:34.:50:43.

about a Holocaust denier, which was defaced

:50:44.:50:44.

after it was displayed at a London Underground station.

:50:45.:50:47.

Last summer, figures revealed that the number of anti-Semitic

:50:48.:50:49.

incidents in Britain increased by 11% between January and June.

:50:50.:50:54.

We have two guests in the studio with us.

:50:55.:50:56.

Holocaust survivor Susan Pollack MBE,

:50:57.:50:58.

And Binyomin Gilbert, who's a student and

:50:59.:51:03.

the president of the Jewish Society at Goldsmiths University,

:51:04.:51:05.

Thank you both very much for coming in. Susan, what do you think when

:51:06.:51:19.

you see the break, the reaction that there was to that poster, and also

:51:20.:51:25.

the statistics about anti-Semitic abuse? Well, it is very disturbing.

:51:26.:51:31.

It is frightening that after so many years, and many of us have devoted

:51:32.:51:37.

time and effort to remember, to try to inform people what that sort of

:51:38.:51:44.

hate propaganda, anti-Semitic various ways of talking, can lead

:51:45.:51:54.

to. And it is frightening, it is frightening. But we're hoping that,

:51:55.:52:00.

eventually, there's going to be some very strict laws. And not just

:52:01.:52:11.

talking but actually preventing that sort of thing. Have you experienced

:52:12.:52:19.

anything in your later years like anti-Semitic abuse? No, actually I

:52:20.:52:23.

haven't. Indirectly, yes, indirectly. Remember, talking about

:52:24.:52:29.

for instance the older Jewish woman down the road, forgetting that I

:52:30.:52:33.

have got a name, forgetting that I am part of the wider community. So

:52:34.:52:38.

that sort of discriminatory identification, I think, all these

:52:39.:52:46.

small streams of the others has got a certain danger attached to it. You

:52:47.:52:57.

were taken to Auschwitz at the age of 14. I was only 13 years old at

:52:58.:53:06.

the time. And some 435,000 of the Jewish people, and others, we must

:53:07.:53:10.

never forget the others, have been murdered. At the time. And it was

:53:11.:53:19.

the most horrific experience that I could think of, that could be

:53:20.:53:28.

orientated against innocent people. How could it happen? I think your

:53:29.:53:36.

mother disappeared almost immediately. Almost immediately,

:53:37.:53:40.

selection was taking place, and my mother was selected to be with older

:53:41.:53:51.

people and was gassed right on arrival. Ireland about this when I

:53:52.:53:58.

was in Auschwitz. -- I learned. I said that for many Holocaust

:53:59.:54:01.

survivors, it took 20 years to be able to talk about it. How did you

:54:02.:54:08.

sort of come through it? Well, the difficulty was, of course, how can

:54:09.:54:14.

life go on after? We were left on our own, the majority of us, we had

:54:15.:54:21.

no language, we were dehumanised, no skills and no education. The path to

:54:22.:54:29.

extermination had started long before Auschwitz, of course, so I

:54:30.:54:34.

lost my education very early. And I had to find some means of how to

:54:35.:54:40.

support myself. So that was one of the reasons why we couldn't speak

:54:41.:54:51.

about it. Also, the difficulty of finding an audience who were

:54:52.:55:00.

listening. At that time. How do you view discrimination after everything

:55:01.:55:04.

that you've experienced and been through? I am vigilant and cautious.

:55:05.:55:14.

I think that it needs constant education and very strong

:55:15.:55:19.

legislation. The two things that one needs in order to re-educate people

:55:20.:55:32.

and accept myself, the Jews, I am very involved in various other

:55:33.:55:38.

things as well. I mean, I became a Samaritan, just to rebuild my

:55:39.:55:42.

self-esteem and help others. The physical recovery wasn't all that

:55:43.:55:45.

difficult, though it took a couple of years. But the emotional, mental

:55:46.:55:50.

recovery took a lifetime, I'm still working on it. Of course. Binyomin,

:55:51.:55:57.

you are 22, obviously at the other end of the spectrum, but you have

:55:58.:56:03.

experienced anti-Semitic abuse, tell us about it. I have experienced a

:56:04.:56:09.

few physical incidents and a constant stream of small, everyday

:56:10.:56:14.

comments, online anti-Semitism and other forms. The worst experiences I

:56:15.:56:19.

have had involved physical assault. A few months ago in Coventry, I was

:56:20.:56:24.

assaulted by a... I think he was a neo-Nazi, it was difficult to tell,

:56:25.:56:30.

but he attacked me, hit me across the head. When I was younger... Were

:56:31.:56:35.

you literally just walking along? Walking along with a friend, up a

:56:36.:56:40.

side street in the middle of Coventry, and someone just came up

:56:41.:56:46.

to me, he saw that I was wearing a kippah, came up to me, said, you are

:56:47.:56:51.

Jewish, and told me to go back where I am from. What impact does that

:56:52.:57:01.

have on you? It is concerning. Thankfully, I am tough enough to

:57:02.:57:04.

take care of myself, but it does concern me that this is increasing,

:57:05.:57:09.

and it isn't something that I face of my own, it is something that my

:57:10.:57:13.

peers face, that we are seeing increased across Britain and Europe.

:57:14.:57:18.

And it makes me worried about the future. You say that you are tough

:57:19.:57:23.

enough to deal with it, has that been built over time? Yes. I think

:57:24.:57:29.

when I was nine years old and someone threw a bottle at me out of

:57:30.:57:32.

a car window when I was walking with my grandmother in the street,

:57:33.:57:36.

psychologically that god to me a lot more than recent incidents. Did you

:57:37.:57:41.

know when you were nine why that was done? I couldn't understand it. It

:57:42.:57:47.

took me years to understand, and it has been, over the last few years, I

:57:48.:57:53.

have come to terms with what anti-Semitism is, understood how it

:57:54.:57:57.

has developed since the war into a new form of anti-Semitism, new ways

:57:58.:58:02.

to attack people. And it has driven me to volunteer to fight against

:58:03.:58:06.

anti-Semitism. I started working for a campaign against anti-Semitism.

:58:07.:58:13.

And I feel like I am fighting back. Susan, I mean, how frustrating is it

:58:14.:58:17.

for you to hear that those sort of things are happening? Well, it is

:58:18.:58:23.

frightening. It is absolutely frightening. The Holocaust should

:58:24.:58:34.

always be a beacon of warning of what can take place, not just

:58:35.:58:40.

perhaps, yes, first of all against the Jews, but many others as well.

:58:41.:58:43.

We all need to stand up against that, and here strong voices. It is

:58:44.:58:52.

not good, because if we remain silent, if we made voiceless, who do

:58:53.:58:59.

we help? The perpetrators. That is one of the lessons we learned.

:59:00.:59:04.

Neither of you demonstrate any anger, do you feel anger?

:59:05.:59:11.

I feel disappointment. I do feel... Anger perhaps not in that sense,

:59:12.:59:22.

sort of angry. We never retaliated, for instance, after the Holocaust,

:59:23.:59:27.

we just went about and tried to rebuild our lives. But

:59:28.:59:34.

disappointment that we don't have any stronger kind of protection. You

:59:35.:59:42.

said that it has taken a lifetime to deal with the emotional scars of

:59:43.:59:46.

what you went through, you are still dealing with them. Absolutely,

:59:47.:59:50.

absolutely. We are still dealing with it. I mean, it is not something

:59:51.:59:56.

I shall ever forget, and I have come to accept it. But I have managed to

:59:57.:00:00.

build on it, and I have done quite a few things to do that. I have become

:00:01.:00:06.

a volunteer, as I mentioned, I became a Samaritan, which was

:00:07.:00:13.

helpful. Can I help you? And Ireland a lot about human conditions and

:00:14.:00:18.

various other things. I have been speaking to schools for almost 30

:00:19.:00:24.

years. -- and I learned. And yet such deep embedded eight, with some,

:00:25.:00:31.

I wouldn't say everyone, is still in existence. -- hate. Binyomin, how do

:00:32.:00:45.

you feel about the people who demonstrate its towards you? There

:00:46.:00:49.

is frustration, I wouldn't call it anger, but frustration for sure,

:00:50.:00:59.

that after all these examples, pogroms, it still has not been

:01:00.:01:03.

eradicated, and it makes me feel that it may be intrinsic and there

:01:04.:01:07.

may not be a way to completely remove it. But the only chance that

:01:08.:01:13.

we have is to educate, and that is one of the things that I do now in

:01:14.:01:17.

my life, I try and educate people about anti-Semitism. I have

:01:18.:01:21.

dedicated time to learning about anti-Semitism, and now I try to pass

:01:22.:01:25.

that information to on, going to other universities, going to speak

:01:26.:01:29.

to is Duden is and explain what it is that anti-Semitism is and why it

:01:30.:01:33.

is baseless and what it makes people feel like. -- speak to students.

:01:34.:01:39.

Thank you both very much for talking to us. We are a little bit late for

:01:40.:01:44.

the weather but we'll catch up with it right now.

:01:45.:01:50.

Still very cold outside. We have low pressure coming from the West with

:01:51.:01:56.

this weather fronts bringing rain. Not particularly heavy rain. And

:01:57.:02:01.

also some drizzle. We still have fog across parts of the East Midlands

:02:02.:02:05.

and Lincolnshire that will slowly lift, pretty dense through the

:02:06.:02:09.

morning. We have a 2-pronged attack, rain coming from the West and from

:02:10.:02:13.

the Channel Islands into southern areas and a lot of cloud building

:02:14.:02:19.

ahead of it across England and Wales and western fringes of Scotland and

:02:20.:02:23.

Northern Ireland. A cold day in prospect. Not as cold as yesterday.

:02:24.:02:27.

The rain tonight moves north and comes in from the West. The lot of

:02:28.:02:34.

it meets and travels east. Snow above 100 metres in Scotland and in

:02:35.:02:39.

the Pennines. Behind the cloud we have some icy conditions, bear that

:02:40.:02:43.

in mind first thing. The band of rain pushing over towards the east

:02:44.:02:47.

in the morning, cloud behind it, but it will brighten up with sunshine.

:02:48.:02:50.

We will have showers out towards the west and highs between five and

:02:51.:02:52.

nine. Hello, it's Friday, 27th January,

:02:53.:02:56.

it's 10am, I'm Joanna Gosling. The eyes of the world

:02:57.:02:59.

are on Theresa May and Donald Trump, who have their first face-to-face

:03:00.:03:02.

meeting since the billionaire Some tricky issues are

:03:03.:03:05.

on the agenda, but how The reason these two I predict will

:03:06.:03:21.

get along just fine, it's going to be a lovefest, is that both of them

:03:22.:03:25.

are committed to national sovereignty, putting their national

:03:26.:03:26.

interests first. Girls start to see themselves

:03:27.:03:29.

as less talented than boys Before then, both sexes think

:03:30.:03:32.

their own gender is "brilliant" - We're looking at gender stereotypes,

:03:33.:03:36.

and where children are picking up these influences from at such

:03:37.:03:40.

a young age. It's democracy in action tonight,

:03:41.:03:45.

as the UK decides which act will represent the UK at this year's

:03:46.:03:51.

Eurovision Song Contest. We'll be asking last year's entry,

:03:52.:03:54.

Joe and Jake, if they think the 2017 contender can hope

:03:55.:03:57.

to beat their 24th place. Here's Annita in the BBC Newsroom

:03:58.:04:07.

with a summary of today's news. Theresa May will today become

:04:08.:04:11.

the first world leader to meet Donald Trump since he became US

:04:12.:04:13.

President. She told senior Republicans last

:04:14.:04:16.

night of the importance of the special relationship

:04:17.:04:19.

between the two countries, but says they cannot return

:04:20.:04:22.

to failed military interventions. It's expected a post-Brexit trade

:04:23.:04:26.

deal will be high on the agenda at today's meeting in the Oval

:04:27.:04:29.

Office. The Conservative MP Crispin Blunt,

:04:30.:04:32.

who is chair of the Foreign Affairs Select Committee,

:04:33.:04:34.

says a good relationship And that Theresa May's reception

:04:35.:04:44.

from Republicans bodes well for a trade agreement.

:04:45.:04:47.

The reaction Theresa May got from Republican mems of Congress, and

:04:48.:04:52.

trade negotiators in the States report to Congress. They are

:04:53.:04:57.

normally really tough because the congressmen look after businesses in

:04:58.:05:00.

their individual district. This is a situation where political pressure

:05:01.:05:04.

and the need for both countries to do a deal, a slightly different

:05:05.:05:07.

dynamic in this trade deal than others. In both countries the

:05:08.:05:11.

politicians will say to the trade negotiators, get the deal done.

:05:12.:05:14.

Hundreds of millions of funding promised to schools in England last

:05:15.:05:16.

year has been taken back by the Treasury.

:05:17.:05:18.

The money had been announced to fund a plan to turn

:05:19.:05:21.

The Department for Education says that it was appropriate to return

:05:22.:05:24.

funds if a project did not go ahead.

:05:25.:05:27.

A teenager has been charged with murder after a 15-year-old boy

:05:28.:05:30.

was stabbed near his school in north-west London.

:05:31.:05:32.

Quamari Serunkuma-Barnes was attacked in Doyle Gardens

:05:33.:05:36.

on Monday just as other children made their way home from school.

:05:37.:05:39.

The suspect, who is also 15 and cannot be named for legal

:05:40.:05:42.

reasons, will appear before Willesden Youth Court later today.

:05:43.:05:45.

Jeremy Corbyn faces more dissent in the Labour Party

:05:46.:05:51.

today as the party whip, Jeff Smith, says he'll

:05:52.:05:53.

defy the leader and vote against the government Bill that

:05:54.:05:55.

The MP said he wasn't convinced the government had

:05:56.:05:59.

The Shadow Transport Minister, Daniel Zeichner, has also said he'll

:06:00.:06:03.

oppose the legislation, while Tulip Siddiq has

:06:04.:06:05.

resigned from the front bench over the issue.

:06:06.:06:08.

Plans to restrict some hip and knee operations in part of England have

:06:09.:06:12.

been described as alarming by the Royal College of Surgeons.

:06:13.:06:15.

Three clinical commissioning groups in Worcestershire hope the move

:06:16.:06:18.

would save around ?2 million, though they insist surgery

:06:19.:06:20.

would continue to be carried out elsewhere.

:06:21.:06:28.

A study in the United States suggests girls start to see

:06:29.:06:31.

themselves as less innately talented than boys do when they

:06:32.:06:34.

The researchers described the results as disheartening

:06:35.:06:36.

and said such views were likely to shape girls' decisions about

:06:37.:06:39.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News.

:06:40.:06:47.

Do get in touch with us throughout the morning -

:06:48.:06:52.

Why might it be that six-year-old girls don't think they are as good

:06:53.:07:05.

as boys according to new research? A couple of comments on the

:07:06.:07:07.

conversation we just had about the Holocaust. And anti-Semitism today.

:07:08.:07:15.

It's Holocaust Memorial Day. Stephen e-mailed to say he is horrified by

:07:16.:07:18.

continuing reports and he's interested to know which members of

:07:19.:07:22.

our communities are carrying out such offences. Kathleen has texted

:07:23.:07:28.

to say, watching your item on anti-Semitism with disgust. How can

:07:29.:07:32.

anybody treat another human this way?

:07:33.:07:35.

If you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.

:07:36.:07:39.

We've got a match on our hands in the Australian Open semi-final.

:07:40.:07:43.

Rafa Nadal is looking to reach his first Grand Slam final

:07:44.:07:46.

Grigor Dimitrov stands in his way but it was Nadal who took the first

:07:47.:07:51.

Dimitrov has never reached a Grand Slam final,

:07:52.:08:02.

but he reacted well, breaking Nadal in the second.

:08:03.:08:07.

Buttons Al has broken him twice. -- but Nadal has broken him twice.

:08:08.:08:15.

Currently 5-4 to Dimitrov. Roger Federer will play the winner

:08:16.:08:18.

for the title on Sunday after tomorrow's all Williams

:08:19.:08:21.

women's final. And congratulations

:08:22.:08:22.

to Britain's Gordon Reid, who's completed a career grand slam

:08:23.:08:24.

- he and partner Joachim Gerard have won the wheelchair doubles title

:08:25.:08:27.

in Melbounre this morning. Jose Mourinho celebrated his 54th

:08:28.:08:29.

birthday by taking Manchester United They lost 2-1 at Hull in the second

:08:30.:08:31.

leg of their semi-final but went through 3-2 on aggregate -

:08:32.:08:37.

although Mourinho insisted Here's the goal that Mourinho

:08:38.:08:39.

is refusing to recognise. Four players tangled

:08:40.:08:45.

in the penalty area, and Harry Maguire went to ground,

:08:46.:08:50.

possibly after Marcos Rojo Tom Huddlestone

:08:51.:08:52.

scored from the spot. Paul Pogba then struck what turned

:08:53.:09:01.

out to be the decisive goal. Before Oumar Niasse ended United's

:09:02.:09:04.

17-match unbeaten run - We didn't lose. It was 1-1. 1-1. I

:09:05.:09:22.

only saw two goals. I saw the Pogba goal, and their goal, fantastic

:09:23.:09:26.

goal. Great action, great cross. And the guy at the far post coming. 1-1.

:09:27.:09:35.

Why don't you count the first goal bastion yellow I didn't see. Deadly

:09:36.:09:37.

serious. --? Oh I didn't see. Could there be another Clough

:09:38.:09:45.

in charge of Nottingham Forest? They've made an approach

:09:46.:09:48.

to Burton Albion, to speak with Nigel Clough

:09:49.:09:50.

about their vacant manager's job. His father Brian Clough was Forest's

:09:51.:09:52.

most famous manager, leading them to numerous victories,

:09:53.:09:54.

including two Nigel has already followed

:09:55.:09:56.

in his father's footsteps once, And Anthony Joshua's world

:09:57.:09:59.

heavyweight title bout against Wladimir Klitshcko will be

:10:00.:10:02.

fought in front of a Over 80,000 tickets have already

:10:03.:10:04.

been sold for the Wembley bout on April the 29th -

:10:05.:10:08.

and the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, has granted permission for another

:10:09.:10:11.

10,000 to go on sale, after talking to rail

:10:12.:10:13.

companies to make sure fans We will have the headlines for you

:10:14.:10:27.

at 10:30am. Lots of you getting in touch on our conversation on

:10:28.:10:30.

anti-Semitism on world Holocaust Day. A tweak to say, disgusted there

:10:31.:10:38.

are still people in 2017 who abuse people of different races, religions

:10:39.:10:44.

and creeds. -- eight-week to say. -- at Tweet.

:10:45.:10:50.

Prime Minister Theresa May is in Washington today.

:10:51.:10:52.

She is the first foreign leader to be meeting

:10:53.:10:54.

The meeting comes as May has suggested that Britain

:10:55.:10:59.

could withdraw from some if its intelligence sharing

:11:00.:11:01.

with the United States if Trump presses ahead with his announced

:11:02.:11:05.

plans to reintroduce torture techniques like water-boarding

:11:06.:11:07.

during the interrogation of terror suspects.

:11:08.:11:14.

He has said it does work but he will bow to the wisdom of the CIA in

:11:15.:11:20.

anything on something like that. In an interview with ABC News

:11:21.:11:23.

yesterday, Trump said he believed that water-boarding works,

:11:24.:11:26.

but Downing Street says the UK's opposition to torture

:11:27.:11:28.

remains "unequivocal". That's not the only issue

:11:29.:11:29.

overshadowing the President's first The Mexican President has

:11:30.:11:32.

now cancelled his trip to the United States

:11:33.:11:35.

because of the row over the building of a border wall

:11:36.:11:37.

between the two countries. It's a meeting everyone would love

:11:38.:11:39.

to be a fly-on-the-wall for, but what exactly does the special

:11:40.:11:42.

relationship between the UK Let's talk now to Laura Schwartz,

:11:43.:11:45.

a political commentator who worked for the Clinton administration

:11:46.:11:52.

for eight years. Talking to us from Washington is

:11:53.:11:57.

Republican commentator Anneke Green, who was a speechwriter

:11:58.:12:00.

for George W Bush. Thank you both for joining us.

:12:01.:12:09.

Donald Trump is supposedly calling Theresa May, my Maggie. She says she

:12:10.:12:15.

won't be afraid to talk tough with him. How do you see the dynamic?

:12:16.:12:21.

She's already been fairly savvy in setting up a meeting with the

:12:22.:12:25.

Republican Congress. The Republicans have been on retreat in Philadelphia

:12:26.:12:28.

and she stopped by to talk to them ahead of her meeting with President

:12:29.:12:32.

Trump. She's been pretty savvy in communicating that she will work

:12:33.:12:36.

with congressional leaders as well as the president ahead of meeting

:12:37.:12:41.

him. Laura, how do you see things? I completely agree. I thought her

:12:42.:12:46.

speech yesterday was forceful. She mentioned a lot of the alliances and

:12:47.:12:50.

information from the Donald Trump campaign of which she's concerned

:12:51.:12:53.

about, and ways to make that the Iran to clear deal doesn't go away.

:12:54.:13:01.

Commitments to Nato. Some of the Allied agreements might be flawed

:13:02.:13:04.

but they can't be done away with that must be built upon. Everything

:13:05.:13:09.

from the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. She

:13:10.:13:13.

brought up some heady issues. Issues that are the same issues that many

:13:14.:13:19.

world leaders are concerned about within a Donald J Trump

:13:20.:13:24.

administration. I think it's very savvy to go to the Republican

:13:25.:13:27.

retreat. It gave her a day ahead of her meeting with Donald Trump to

:13:28.:13:30.

make that statement and I think that's what will make today's

:13:31.:13:35.

meeting with Donald, the press conference following, and the

:13:36.:13:38.

working lunch following that, productive, even perhaps more so

:13:39.:13:41.

behind the scenes with President Trump than we will see in front of

:13:42.:13:47.

the scenes. We have been able to build up a pretty good picture

:13:48.:13:50.

quickly. He has hit the ground running in terms of actions, as well

:13:51.:13:56.

as just words. The key phrase from him, America first, we have heard

:13:57.:14:02.

him say torture works. He introduced a potential clamp-down on visitors

:14:03.:14:06.

from seven countries with Muslim majorities. Making steps to see the

:14:07.:14:11.

border wall with Mexico come into force. At this stage, how do you

:14:12.:14:16.

assess him in terms of the rhetoric on the campaign trail, which some

:14:17.:14:19.

thought might be tempered once he came into office, with what we are

:14:20.:14:24.

seeing. He has not found down the way many anticipated. Myself

:14:25.:14:30.

included. -- he has not toned down. We did not think you'd be picking

:14:31.:14:33.

fights with the president of Mexico ahead of a meeting, which led to the

:14:34.:14:40.

meeting being cancelled. I think the debate around torture is a big

:14:41.:14:47.

distraction. Like you mentioned, leading the programme, he said he

:14:48.:14:51.

thinks it works but will rely on the CIA. The CIA has not used that

:14:52.:14:55.

enhanced interrogation techniques since 2003. They have no plans to

:14:56.:15:00.

begin doing so again. Originally it was only used on three high-value

:15:01.:15:05.

terrorism suspects. I don't think there is an appetite for that at

:15:06.:15:09.

this point among the American people, or interest in the CIA on

:15:10.:15:14.

resuming that. Laura, what should we make of that? Ultimately, we mustn't

:15:15.:15:18.

forget that he's a deal maker and plays hardball. He is sending out

:15:19.:15:23.

very hard core messages, but if the caveat is always, I will listen to

:15:24.:15:27.

the people around me, and the people around him don't necessarily agree

:15:28.:15:30.

directly with what he says, he gets to play to the people who want to

:15:31.:15:33.

hear those messages but maybe it will not happen in practice.

:15:34.:15:39.

It is a very good plan for Donald Trump, great for carrying forward

:15:40.:15:45.

the messages of the campaign, yet in this new governing mode that he is

:15:46.:15:51.

in today. He has said, I will let the CAA decide, and mike Pompeo has

:15:52.:16:00.

said that torture is illegal. We heard yesterday from the Leader of

:16:01.:16:04.

the House and the Senate, both said that torture is illegal, and they

:16:05.:16:09.

don't plan to overturn that any time soon, they don't plan to change

:16:10.:16:16.

that, because it has not been reliable. So he is able to talk to

:16:17.:16:22.

his base while still being able to give himself, Joanna, really and

:16:23.:16:26.

have to say, hey, I brought it up, I did it, I chose these great leaders

:16:27.:16:32.

to put around me, and we are going to try it their way first. On the

:16:33.:16:39.

wall, a key part of the campaign, he is now talking about it actually

:16:40.:16:43.

happening and a 20% import duty to pay for it, what do you think about

:16:44.:16:50.

the messaging on that one? That is going to hit people at home, isn't

:16:51.:16:56.

it? Prices will just go up. That has been the criticism of those plans. I

:16:57.:17:01.

don't know what I planned to do to counteract that, but the point that

:17:02.:17:09.

was just made by Laura still stands, which is that something needs

:17:10.:17:12.

discussing, is that what they are going to go with? We don't know at

:17:13.:17:17.

this point. I do wonder if there is a kind of good friend, bad friend

:17:18.:17:21.

scenario being set up with Mexico being debated as a bad friend,

:17:22.:17:25.

cancelling their meeting, and Great Britain being depicted as the good

:17:26.:17:29.

friend, the first one visiting, and they are the nation that the Trump

:17:30.:17:33.

administration has said they want to fast-track a trade deal with, do

:17:34.:17:38.

everything they can to make it work, even if the terms are not all

:17:39.:17:43.

favourable to the United States. So there is wiggle room there as an

:17:44.:17:47.

example internationally. This is what happens when you support us,

:17:48.:17:51.

this is what happens when you don't support as. He has gone into the

:17:52.:17:56.

White House with record low approval ratings, I mean, from what we see

:17:57.:18:01.

and hear about him, things like the number of people that turned out to

:18:02.:18:04.

the inauguration really mattered to him. It is quite interesting, isn't

:18:05.:18:11.

it, I suppose, whether he cares about those low approval ratings and

:18:12.:18:17.

what that says? It is something that he cared about all throughout the

:18:18.:18:20.

campaign, Joanna, where oftentimes he would come out with a sheet of

:18:21.:18:24.

paper, and on that paper were the names of polls and where he stood

:18:25.:18:29.

among them with relation to the Republican rivals. I think that is

:18:30.:18:35.

how he is driven, and you can see his fight turn more feisty or more

:18:36.:18:39.

cavalier depending on what those numbers are. I think he sees that

:18:40.:18:43.

these are very important numbers, some of the lowest ever, and he

:18:44.:18:47.

needs to make massive inroads to counteract that. Having Theresa May

:18:48.:18:54.

there today is outstanding, because the United States of America, the

:18:55.:19:00.

same people who are being polled on his approval rating, they have a

:19:01.:19:05.

very high regard for the UK, so we see a working relationship both

:19:06.:19:10.

among trade and among advisement. Very interesting, before Barack

:19:11.:19:14.

Obama left office, he spoke to a few leaders around the country that had

:19:15.:19:18.

been confirmed by their administration officials, as well as

:19:19.:19:20.

British officials in this case, with Theresa May. He asked Theresa May to

:19:21.:19:25.

stay in close contact with Donald Trump, because he felt the

:19:26.:19:28.

centre-right cleaning was much better than Nigel Farage's

:19:29.:19:35.

influence. So I really believe that your Prime Minister is taking up

:19:36.:19:43.

that baton, I really look forward to seeing the press conference this

:19:44.:19:47.

evening. Yeah, we will all be looking forward to that one! Thank

:19:48.:19:53.

you very much indeed for your time. Let's get the thoughts of a few

:19:54.:19:55.

other people. Should the UK re-evaluate

:19:56.:19:56.

its special relationship, We can talk now to four British

:19:57.:19:58.

expats living in the United States. John Turner is a Brit

:19:59.:20:03.

living in Vermont. He thinks our relationship

:20:04.:20:05.

means more to Britain Talking to us from Massachusetts

:20:06.:20:07.

is Samantha McGarry. Says she's proud the first

:20:08.:20:11.

foreign leader to meet Michaela and Matt Wilkinson

:20:12.:20:13.

in Florida are split but both think Theresa May will

:20:14.:20:18.

hold her own in the negotiations. Thank you all very much for joining

:20:19.:20:31.

us, John, why do you think the special relationship matters more to

:20:32.:20:35.

us than to the United States? I don't think that Donald J Trump

:20:36.:20:40.

really needs the UK that much. I think we have turned our back on

:20:41.:20:45.

Europe from a trade perspective, so we need to look west again. So I

:20:46.:20:49.

think, for that reason if nothing else, you know, she is looking to

:20:50.:20:56.

solidify her sort of authority there, move forward with the Brexit

:20:57.:21:01.

negotiations, and I think she sees an opportunity, and I agree it is a

:21:02.:21:04.

savvy move for her to be the first one to come over and do business

:21:05.:21:09.

with them. But I think he has a pretty long track record of using

:21:10.:21:13.

people, and I would be very circumspect with any sort of

:21:14.:21:18.

negotiations with him. Samantha, you are proud that Theresa May is the

:21:19.:21:21.

first foreign leader to be walking through the door of the White House

:21:22.:21:25.

with Donald Trump inside. Absolutely! You know, I can't

:21:26.:21:30.

imagine this relationship being anywhere near the Thatcher-Reagan

:21:31.:21:37.

love fest, but my hope is that Trump takes Theresa May seriously as a

:21:38.:21:45.

woman in power, and that she holds her own, and that she doesn't kowtow

:21:46.:21:49.

to him, and that she does what she thinks is right for the UK. Nick

:21:50.:21:54.

Taylor and Matt, I said you are split on your opinions of Donald

:21:55.:21:58.

Trump, but you think she will hold her own, tell us more about why you

:21:59.:22:07.

ask let them what is going on? Well, we're not having rows, but Matt and

:22:08.:22:11.

I are agreed on many issues, like women's rights, climate change, and

:22:12.:22:20.

I find that terrifying. I hope that Theresa May is strong in her

:22:21.:22:23.

opinions on that and holds firm on her values and can broach that with

:22:24.:22:29.

a diplomatic air. I think Matthew is more... He can see the business

:22:30.:22:35.

opportunities with Trump and those advantages. But I find him

:22:36.:22:43.

deplorable as a person! He has been elected, and we have to deal with

:22:44.:22:46.

him, he has got notoriously thin skin, and she would not be wise to

:22:47.:22:50.

go public with her opinions, whatever they might be, but she

:22:51.:22:55.

should aim to become a confidant and a good friend to him perhaps, talk

:22:56.:23:00.

straight in private, but don't humiliate him in public, because we

:23:01.:23:04.

know how he will react to that, and it will not be any good... How do

:23:05.:23:09.

you feel, as Brits living in a United States? Are you sort of

:23:10.:23:14.

conscious of their being a special relationship between the US and the

:23:15.:23:19.

UK, as is obviously talked about? Do you sense add affinity? Absolutely,

:23:20.:23:26.

yes, we have had a lot of history together, it suffered in the last

:23:27.:23:30.

administration, I think, I do not think Obama at the same feelings

:23:31.:23:33.

that previous presidents might have had towards the UK, but hopefully

:23:34.:23:38.

that can change now, Churchill's bust is back in his office, and May

:23:39.:23:43.

is seeing him before anyone else, so it is a good start. Both countries

:23:44.:23:47.

want to start trading and hopefully can work out a deal. Hopefully it is

:23:48.:23:52.

the dawn of a new era and it will be a good thing for both of us. Yeah, I

:23:53.:23:57.

personally think she probably would not want to have a special

:23:58.:24:00.

relationship with him! Because of the kind of man he is. But it is

:24:01.:24:07.

something that she has to do, and I just hope that she can, you know,

:24:08.:24:12.

steer him in the right they reckon, telling do maybe count to ten before

:24:13.:24:16.

he speaks. I am hoping that she can maybe be more of a calming influence

:24:17.:24:21.

on him, because we have to have a relationship with America, because

:24:22.:24:26.

they are incredibly important to Britain. So I just hope that she can

:24:27.:24:34.

be a good influence on him. Samantha, sorry, Samantha as a Brit

:24:35.:24:40.

living in the US, how do you see the special relationship? Obviously, it

:24:41.:24:43.

has had ups and downs, and the mood music now is that it could be

:24:44.:24:48.

potentially on and up. Well, you know, I don't envy Theresa May's

:24:49.:24:53.

role right now, she is like the piggy in the middle, or the monkey

:24:54.:24:56.

in the middle, as they say over here, she has got to do what is

:24:57.:25:01.

right for the UK, but she is stuck between the US and the EU as well,

:25:02.:25:04.

somewhere in the middle she has got to figure out what is right. I mean,

:25:05.:25:08.

these bestial relationship is important to us. -- the special

:25:09.:25:14.

relationship. I cannot imagine it is as bestial to Donald Trump, he has

:25:15.:25:18.

got a big agenda, and working out a trade deal with the UK is maybe not

:25:19.:25:24.

his top priority. -- it is as special to Donald Trump. I think

:25:25.:25:28.

this meeting is Bob Abi Morgan for setting a tone and showing that he

:25:29.:25:34.

is the boss. -- is probably more. I hope she does what is right. He has

:25:35.:25:40.

certainly spoken very warmly about his feelings towards the UK,

:25:41.:25:44.

particularly his links with Scotland, and I think that Theresa

:25:45.:25:50.

May is taking him something that is called a quaich, an old ceremonial

:25:51.:25:54.

whisky cup, but he is a teetotaller, he will only use it as a decorative

:25:55.:26:02.

thing. John, is the special relationship something that you are

:26:03.:26:06.

aware of, living in the United States? Do you feel there is an

:26:07.:26:09.

affinity between the countries that translates all the way through to,

:26:10.:26:16.

you know, ordinary people as well? Absolutely, I mean, I have lived in

:26:17.:26:22.

the US over 25 years, and there is a fondness, I think, for British

:26:23.:26:27.

people and British culture over here, people have always been very

:26:28.:26:33.

warm and friendly, wanting to open up and talk to us or talk to me, so

:26:34.:26:38.

there is definitely an affinity there. They love Downton Abbey, some

:26:39.:26:43.

of them think everyone drives around in a Rolls-Royce with a top hat

:26:44.:26:48.

still! But I think it only goes so far, in my opinion, and I think that

:26:49.:26:55.

she needs to be very candid with him and stay very strong with him and

:26:56.:26:58.

hold his feet to the fire, especially with things around, you

:26:59.:27:03.

know, torture and Nato. And I think being that sort of confidant, maybe

:27:04.:27:09.

from the Western world, that he seems to be able to lean on and rely

:27:10.:27:15.

on, that is a very important role that she can play, but I don't think

:27:16.:27:21.

she... She must not kowtow to him, I think he has shown himself, over the

:27:22.:27:28.

last 15 months, in the tortuous electoral campaign that we endure

:27:29.:27:33.

every four years, that he can say things and then changes mind, you

:27:34.:27:38.

know, the next day or a week later. So I would have liked to have seen a

:27:39.:27:44.

stick to her guns and not... Represent Britain's values and place

:27:45.:27:47.

in the world, and potentially open up some new areas of development for

:27:48.:27:54.

both countries. Within trade and so on and so forth. Thank you all. But

:27:55.:28:01.

do it carefully, I mean, I think he is a man where you have to earn his

:28:02.:28:09.

trust, and he is definitely very thin-skinned, so tread very

:28:10.:28:13.

carefully. Yeah, right, thank you very much for your time, I know it

:28:14.:28:17.

is horribly early, we appreciate you speaking to us, thank you. Just some

:28:18.:28:22.

news in that just hearing about a conversation between blood in the

:28:23.:28:26.

pudding and Donald Trump. -- between Lad Amir Putin. They will have a

:28:27.:28:34.

telephone conversation on Saturday evening Moscow time. The aim of the

:28:35.:28:39.

conversation was for Putin to congratulate President Trump and

:28:40.:28:42.

facilitate an exchange of opinions on the main aspects of bilateral

:28:43.:28:48.

relations, so they will be talking on the phone on Saturday.

:28:49.:28:50.

Here's a tale to restore your faith in humanity.

:28:51.:28:52.

It starts with a letter taped to an empty bike rack

:28:53.:28:55.

The letter was addressed to the thief who'd stolen a brand

:28:56.:28:59.

new bike, belonging to someone who'd saved-up for a year to buy it.

:29:00.:29:02.

A passer-by saw the note, and decided to do something about it.

:29:03.:29:05.

It can be really, really lovely. Coming up...

:29:06.:31:18.

Girls start to see themselves as less talented than boys do

:31:19.:31:20.

when they are only six years old, according to a group

:31:21.:31:23.

We'll be asking education experts why.

:31:24.:31:25.

Tonight the country decides who will represent the UK at this

:31:26.:31:28.

We'll be looking forward to that with last year's entry Joe and Jake

:31:29.:31:33.

And I would love to hear from you if you are a Eurovision super fan as

:31:34.:31:47.

well. Here's Annita in the BBC Newsroom

:31:48.:31:48.

with a summary of today's news. Theresa May will today become

:31:49.:31:51.

the first world leader to meet Donald Trump since he became US

:31:52.:31:54.

President. She told senior Republicans last

:31:55.:31:55.

night of the importance of the special relationship

:31:56.:31:58.

between the two countries, but says they cannot return

:31:59.:32:00.

to failed military interventions. It's expected a post-Brexit trade

:32:01.:32:03.

deal will be high on the agenda at today's meeting in the Oval

:32:04.:32:06.

Office. Hundreds of millions of funding

:32:07.:32:12.

promised to schools in England last year has been taken back

:32:13.:32:15.

by the Treasury. The money had been announced

:32:16.:32:16.

to fund a plan to turn The Department for Education says

:32:17.:32:19.

that it was appropriate to return funds if a project did not go

:32:20.:32:23.

ahead. A teenager has been charged

:32:24.:32:26.

with murder after a 15-year-old boy was stabbed near his school

:32:27.:32:29.

in north-west London. Quamari Serunkuma-Barnes

:32:30.:32:31.

was attacked in Doyle Gardens on Monday just as other children

:32:32.:32:34.

made their way home from school. The suspect, who is also 15

:32:35.:32:37.

and cannot be named for legal reasons, will appear before

:32:38.:32:40.

Willesden Youth Court later today. Plans to restrict some hip and knee

:32:41.:32:44.

operations in part of England have been described as alarming

:32:45.:32:47.

by the Royal College of Surgeons. Three clinical commissioning groups

:32:48.:32:51.

in Worcestershire hope the move would save around ?2 million,

:32:52.:32:54.

though they insist surgery would continue to be

:32:55.:32:56.

carried out elsewhere. The taxman's failure to get tough

:32:57.:33:02.

with the super-rich could undermine confidence in the whole system,

:33:03.:33:04.

according to MPs. The Public Accounts Committee says

:33:05.:33:07.

the amount raised each year from wealthy individuals has fallen

:33:08.:33:11.

by ?1 billion, and there needs HM Revenue and Customs has rejected

:33:12.:33:14.

any suggestion of special That's a summary of the latest news,

:33:15.:33:18.

join me for BBC Newsroom Grigor Dimitrov has just levelled

:33:19.:33:37.

his Australian open semifinal against Rafa Nadal at 1-1. In the

:33:38.:33:44.

last few minutes. Rafa Nadal took the first set 6-3, but Dimitrov took

:33:45.:33:49.

the second 7-5. The winner will face Roger Federer for the title on

:33:50.:33:50.

Sunday. Jose Mourinho celebrated his 54th

:33:51.:33:53.

birthday by taking Manchester United They lost 2-1 at Hull in the second

:33:54.:33:56.

leg of their semi-final but went through 3-2 on aggregate -

:33:57.:34:00.

although Mourinho insisted Could there be another Clough

:34:01.:34:07.

in charge of Nottingham Forest? They've made an approach

:34:08.:34:10.

to Burton Albion, to speak with Nigel Clough

:34:11.:34:12.

about their vacant manager's job. His father Brian Clough was Forest's

:34:13.:34:14.

most famous manager, And Anthony Joshua's world

:34:15.:34:16.

heavyweight title bout against Wladimir Klitshcko will be

:34:17.:34:18.

fought in front of a Over 80,000 tickets have already

:34:19.:34:20.

been sold for the Wembley bout on April the 29th -

:34:21.:34:24.

and the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, has granted permission for another

:34:25.:34:27.

10,000 to go on sale, after talking to rail

:34:28.:34:29.

companies to make sure fans Gender stereotypes start kicking in

:34:30.:34:40.

when children are as young as six. It appears from that age girls start

:34:41.:34:43.

to see themselves as less innately talented than boys. Before then both

:34:44.:34:49.

sexes think their own gender is brilliant according to US

:34:50.:34:53.

researchers. Where are they picking up these

:34:54.:34:58.

influences from at such a young age? I don't get any make-up in my hair.

:34:59.:35:10.

This was about a week ago. What do you think about me? That is the

:35:11.:35:16.

coolest thing. While the rest of the girls powder their noses, Alice has

:35:17.:35:21.

found something else to play with. These dinosaurs. Do you know a

:35:22.:35:28.

Tyrannosaurus rex, its teeth is as big as a banana. A clip from the

:35:29.:35:39.

Channel 4 observational series, The Secret Life Of Four, Five And

:35:40.:35:41.

Six-year-olds. Let's discuss this more

:35:42.:35:47.

with Professor Gemma Moss, Director of the UCL Institute

:35:48.:35:49.

of Education's International Literacy Centre, and

:35:50.:35:51.

Professor Paul Howard-Jones, an education neuroscientist

:35:52.:35:53.

from Bristol University who was part of the Channel 4 observational

:35:54.:35:55.

documentary series The Secret Life of 4, 5 and 6-year-olds,

:35:56.:35:57.

who joins me on webcam from Bristol. Professor Jones, you were part of

:35:58.:36:06.

those documentaries and you have seen kids close-up. What do you

:36:07.:36:11.

think of this latest research that indicates that six-year-old girls

:36:12.:36:15.

don't think they are as good as six-year-old boys? Until I was

:36:16.:36:21.

involved in the documentary series, I think I would have been quite

:36:22.:36:24.

surprised about this. But we have actually been filming this,

:36:25.:36:30.

children, looking at this specific issue. You will see on the screening

:36:31.:36:35.

of the special gender issue that's coming out on Thursday at 8pm, that

:36:36.:36:41.

in fact this is very common, even among younger children. Even four

:36:42.:36:45.

and five-year-olds seem to pick up these stereotypes. In a way it's

:36:46.:36:51.

really shocking. There are definite biological differences between boys

:36:52.:36:55.

and girls, but it's kind of ridiculous. At that age, the

:36:56.:36:59.

differences are almost all favouring the girls. Even at four and five

:37:00.:37:03.

years old you was seeing children, where the girls are very... They

:37:04.:37:12.

have fine motor skills, better motor skills, better social skills and

:37:13.:37:16.

theory of mind. They outperform the boys in so many respects, but at the

:37:17.:37:19.

same time you see gender stereotypes arising where the girls say, boys

:37:20.:37:24.

have bigger brains, boys are better. You wonder where it comes from. Part

:37:25.:37:29.

of it comes from the adult world, and part of it comes from the

:37:30.:37:32.

cultured the children make themselves. You see that recurring

:37:33.:37:37.

when you watch these children. Gemma, where do you think it comes

:37:38.:37:41.

from? I'm not sure where it comes from is really the key question. The

:37:42.:37:47.

study shows that children develop stereotyped views quite early on.

:37:48.:37:52.

It's very careful and precise in those respects. What it doesn't show

:37:53.:37:55.

is how that impacts on educational attainment and it doesn't show

:37:56.:37:59.

whether that has a longer lasting influence. Why do you think it's not

:38:00.:38:06.

to work out where coming from? It's not innate, is it? I think it's

:38:07.:38:12.

because of the fact that if children have a stereotypic view, what does

:38:13.:38:16.

it do to their performance in schools? The same study shows that

:38:17.:38:21.

girls aged six and seven think girls are more likely to succeed in school

:38:22.:38:26.

than boys. That's not been run in a way the report has been headlined,

:38:27.:38:31.

but it is in the report. There is something paradoxical here. They

:38:32.:38:34.

believe boys are more likely to be brilliant, but they think girls are

:38:35.:38:38.

more likely to succeed in school. Ultimately you are saying if it

:38:39.:38:41.

doesn't make difference in the long term in terms of attainment, it

:38:42.:38:43.

doesn't matter they are thinking these things. It raises another

:38:44.:38:48.

question. Does thinking that boys are brilliant help or hinder boys?

:38:49.:38:53.

Does thinking that girls have to try hard, help or hinder girls? That's a

:38:54.:38:57.

different set of questions that the report doesn't address. What do you

:38:58.:39:02.

think about that, Paul? It's a very interesting point. I'm not sure it

:39:03.:39:07.

is very good necessarily for boys to think they are brilliant. That's

:39:08.:39:12.

almost a defence. When you watched children in this age, and you'll see

:39:13.:39:15.

this on Thursday, the boys are really struggling in so many

:39:16.:39:20.

different areas and are surrounded by these super beings, which are the

:39:21.:39:25.

girls. When the girls enter you get overwhelmed by the sense of

:39:26.:39:29.

flourishing ability among them, which is common at this age, the

:39:30.:39:32.

gender difference. I feel like the boys feel like they have to fight

:39:33.:39:37.

back, and this is a way of boiling themselves up, if you like, feeling

:39:38.:39:45.

more assured and confident by promoting this idea that somehow the

:39:46.:39:48.

girls are inferior. -- boying themselves up. An e-mail from Mary,

:39:49.:39:59.

her two-year-old granddaughter loves looking at spiders in the garden.

:40:00.:40:03.

When she bought some Spiderman Wellington boots for her a couple of

:40:04.:40:06.

months ago, the shopkeeper said, initiate Tom Boyd? I think the most

:40:07.:40:09.

-- is she a Tom VoIP? -- Tom boy. They need to learn about all the

:40:10.:40:29.

different ranges of gender that exist. That's only going to really,

:40:30.:40:37.

about through having mixed groups. That's the most important thing. The

:40:38.:40:43.

is always going to be girls and girls groups who have interests that

:40:44.:40:48.

might in a stereotyped way be seen as more boyish. Some of them have

:40:49.:40:53.

biological causes. For example, it is possible to predict, based on the

:40:54.:40:57.

hormones a child has at one or two-month-old afterbirth, the sort

:40:58.:41:04.

of play behaviour they might show. So girls with high testosterone

:41:05.:41:07.

levels at one or two months old are more likely to pick of a truck or

:41:08.:41:11.

train set. There are biological issues here but there are massive

:41:12.:41:15.

social ones as well. The important thing is for boys and girls to have

:41:16.:41:20.

experience of each other so they can develop broad perceptions of what

:41:21.:41:24.

gender means. You are laughing at this. Cultural norms change over

:41:25.:41:28.

time was up expectations for women now are quite different for

:41:29.:41:32.

expectations for woman at the start of my lifetime. Only 12% of girls

:41:33.:41:39.

went to university in the 1970s. Now more girls than boys get into

:41:40.:41:43.

university. I think the key thing is not to gender stereotype ourselves.

:41:44.:41:48.

That doesn't help. The second thing is to keep on keeping our attention

:41:49.:41:51.

on the differences between boys and girls. Thinking that all boys are

:41:52.:41:58.

brilliant might disfavour boys who are actually struggling in the early

:41:59.:42:02.

stages of learning to read. It may be more difficult then to own up to

:42:03.:42:06.

the problems you've got and seek help. That could be crucial,

:42:07.:42:11.

equally, if girls think... Is that evidence, our boys less likely to

:42:12.:42:17.

ask for help? I've just completed a study for save the children looking

:42:18.:42:21.

at literacy and language development in the early years. One of the

:42:22.:42:26.

things we do see is that those boys and girls who start off school with

:42:27.:42:30.

the lowest attainment in relation to language and literacy, it has

:42:31.:42:34.

particularly strong impact on how boys interact with school so they

:42:35.:42:39.

are less likely to feel self-confident. One of the other

:42:40.:42:42.

important differences between the groups is that low attaining girls

:42:43.:42:46.

at age seven are much more likely to feel positive about reading despite

:42:47.:42:51.

the fact they attain at a low level. But boys are more likely to be

:42:52.:42:57.

disengaged. We have to challenge our stereotypes of boys and girls and

:42:58.:42:59.

get more specific about which girls and which boys and what are the

:43:00.:43:04.

issues. In a way it's an argument for individual attention from

:43:05.:43:09.

teachers to the range there is in their class and thinking about how

:43:10.:43:13.

they can do best by them. I'm not sure how to think now. It felt like

:43:14.:43:17.

it was all quite clear-cut. And Jerry is standard tarry -- and

:43:18.:43:23.

gender stereotyping was alive as well. Maybe it's not that clear cut,

:43:24.:43:27.

and it depends on the prism you look through. It's a very complex issue.

:43:28.:43:33.

There is biology involved and strong social and cultural issues as well.

:43:34.:43:38.

I agree with everything Gemma has said. These differences in terms of

:43:39.:43:43.

boys reaching out and asking for help, it carries on into adulthood

:43:44.:43:49.

where we see men less able to ask for help with mental health issues.

:43:50.:43:54.

Within a group of boys you are always going to have a greater range

:43:55.:43:58.

of differences than between boys on average and girls on average. You

:43:59.:44:04.

can never really leap to conclusions about how somebody is going to

:44:05.:44:09.

behave or what they need in order to succeed based on the fact that they

:44:10.:44:14.

are a boy or girl. A good message for parents of both genders, it's

:44:15.:44:17.

always good to ask for help if you need it. Absolutely, a key message

:44:18.:44:22.

to take away. Thank you both very much. Interesting to talk to you

:44:23.:44:28.

both. We are going to stay with this, sort of.

:44:29.:44:33.

Are gender-stereotyped toys putting off girls from choosing careers

:44:34.:44:35.

Before Christmas, the Institution of Engineering and Technology warned

:44:36.:44:38.

parents against buying pink presents for their daughters.

:44:39.:44:41.

But women who work in these industries got in touch with the BBC

:44:42.:44:45.

One of them, Jade Leonard, is a welding engineer

:44:46.:44:48.

I'm a welding engineer, and I grew up playing

:44:49.:44:57.

put off girls from doing science or engineering careers.

:44:58.:45:21.

Growing up, I played with Barbie dolls,

:45:22.:45:24.

just like the ones I've got here, and it didn't affect my choices.

:45:25.:45:44.

I think working here doesn't suppress my female side at all.

:45:45.:45:46.

I can be who I want to be, and actually being female helps

:45:47.:45:50.

with my success and how I interact with people, whether I've got this

:45:51.:45:53.

on or I'm dressed in these clothes, it doesn't change who I am,

:45:54.:45:56.

and I enjoy this job and I'm proud of being a female

:45:57.:45:59.

I believe what does discourage girls from going into these careers

:46:00.:46:07.

is when they get to secondary school, they lose self-confidence,

:46:08.:46:10.

a bit of self-doubt, not sure what careers

:46:11.:46:13.

My advice to girls getting into engineering,

:46:14.:46:18.

Even if you play with dolls, if you like being girly,

:46:19.:46:22.

getting your nails done, your eyelashes done,

:46:23.:46:24.

as long as you work for it and work hard.

:46:25.:46:29.

I will encourage my children to play with

:46:30.:46:31.

whatever they want to play with, be it pink, blue,

:46:32.:46:34.

on the BBC's Family and Education News Facebook Page.

:46:35.:46:41.

If you're interested in the development and learning

:46:42.:46:43.

you can join in the conversation there.

:46:44.:46:46.

Breaking news, police investigating historical allegations of abuse in

:46:47.:47:05.

Cambridge have arrested a man. Detectives arrested the man in

:47:06.:47:09.

Cambridge this morning. The man is in his 70s and from Cambridge. He

:47:10.:47:13.

has been arrested on suspicion of indecency with children and indecent

:47:14.:47:18.

assault, and he is currently in custody. Officers are working

:47:19.:47:22.

closely with partners including the Football Association, the local

:47:23.:47:26.

children's safeguarding board for Cambridge and Peterborough,

:47:27.:47:28.

Cambridge and Peter brake United, the clinical commissioning group and

:47:29.:47:36.

Peterborough City Council. They would encourage anyone with concerns

:47:37.:47:40.

about the allegations to call police on 101 or the NSPCC. So news just

:47:41.:47:49.

threw that a man in his 70s and from Cambridge has been arrested on

:47:50.:47:51.

suspicion of indecency with children and indecent assault. Elisa been

:47:52.:47:56.

investigating historical allegations of abuse relating to football in

:47:57.:47:58.

Cambridge. -- police have been. From the X Factor to

:47:59.:48:04.

the Eurovision Song Contest, tonight six hopefuls will be asking

:48:05.:48:06.

for your vote as they bid to represent the UK in Kiev

:48:07.:48:09.

this May. As you're "making your mind up"

:48:10.:48:11.

during the show, which is live on BBC Two,

:48:12.:48:13.

so will a jury of music professionals -

:48:14.:48:16.

including Sophie Ellis-Bextor and Strictly Come Dancing judge

:48:17.:48:18.

Bruno Tonioli. All the contestants have previously

:48:19.:48:20.

appeared on the X Factor, a rather dismal run of Eurovision

:48:21.:48:23.

results for UK entries. Last year we put forward Joe and

:48:24.:48:27.

Jake, who finished 24th out of 26. We'll speak to them

:48:28.:48:32.

in just a minute. But first, let's have a listen

:48:33.:48:36.

to tonight's shortlisted songs. What do you think? Any of those grab

:48:37.:48:42.

you? Let's speak now to British duo

:48:43.:51:30.

Joe Woolford and Jake Shakeshaft, who represented the UK

:51:31.:51:32.

in the Eurovision Song Contest Nicki French, who represented

:51:33.:51:34.

the UK in Eurovision 2000. and head of the International

:51:35.:51:38.

Eurovision Fan Club group. He has been to every

:51:39.:51:42.

Eurovision since 1999. Thank you all very much for joining

:51:43.:51:55.

us, I feel dreadful to have said that you came 24th out of 26 - it is

:51:56.:52:02.

a fact, though. We have dealt with it now! Good, before you speak,

:52:03.:52:05.

let's have a look at that performance.

:52:06.:52:07.

# When you're not around, it's fading, slow.

:52:08.:52:11.

# And it's something that I've never known.

:52:12.:52:15.

# I'll be, I'll be the answer you've been waiting for.

:52:16.:52:25.

# I'll be the truth that you've been looking for.

:52:26.:52:30.

I think it was great, you should have done better than 24th, you were

:52:31.:52:46.

robbed! Thank you very much. What has lifelike been since taking part?

:52:47.:52:52.

It's been good, we've been busy, we just released our latest song, we

:52:53.:52:56.

are in the studio recording lots of stuff. Definitely, it has been good,

:52:57.:53:02.

positive. As we look tonight to all of the hopefuls, when you were in

:53:03.:53:06.

that position, how did you feel? How big a deal is it when you are hoping

:53:07.:53:10.

to represent the country at Eurovision? We were so nervous about

:53:11.:53:14.

it, we thought, you know, if we make it to your vision, we know it will

:53:15.:53:20.

be amazing, but if we don't make it through tonight, we thought, no, we

:53:21.:53:24.

are going to miss out in front of everybody. We put so much work and

:53:25.:53:36.

before, singing that song, we really grateful we won that show. What is

:53:37.:53:42.

that? That is not mine, sadly! It is Simon's. Because you have taken part

:53:43.:53:49.

in Eurovision as well, you have been actively involved ever since as

:53:50.:53:53.

well. Tonight it is being done slightly differently from how it was

:53:54.:53:57.

done last year, in that the public at the final say. They won't get the

:53:58.:54:03.

final say tonight. Oh, I didn't know that! 50-50, the television vote

:54:04.:54:10.

will be half of it, and the professional jury will be the other

:54:11.:54:14.

half. They don't trust the public, you see? Why has it changed? I just

:54:15.:54:21.

want to say they did us proud lest you, they deserve so much higher

:54:22.:54:25.

than 24th, and they were great ambassadors for the UK, all year.

:54:26.:54:31.

And I was so proud to introduce them at the London party that we do every

:54:32.:54:34.

year, they were great. And they have been great ever since, and

:54:35.:54:39.

thankfully they are another one of the artists who does not want to

:54:40.:54:43.

hide it from their CV, they are proud. Very much so. You have every

:54:44.:54:49.

reason to be proud, representing the country. Do you feel the

:54:50.:54:53.

ambassadorial part is as important as everything else? Definitely. As

:54:54.:54:59.

important as it is to put on a great performance, it is important for

:55:00.:55:01.

everyone to feel proud of you, because one thing we have learned is

:55:02.:55:06.

that the community really wants to love you, so it is not hard to just

:55:07.:55:11.

hold yourself in a good manner for that. And the venue there was

:55:12.:55:15.

amazing, it was the first time it was held in the same venue where I

:55:16.:55:21.

did mine, in Stockholm. So I mean, it really is an amazing place to be

:55:22.:55:30.

form. So yeah, tonight, the artists will be getting ready, and it is

:55:31.:55:35.

such an exciting day, and then to be chosen as the UK's representative,

:55:36.:55:39.

it is like no other feeling. You love Eurovision, don't you? Why

:55:40.:55:46.

you love it so much? Oh god people always ask me, I have loved it since

:55:47.:55:51.

I was a kid, and in the UK it has tried my patients are little bit.

:55:52.:55:58.

You know, it is a fun fest, it is a week-long festival of fun, and it is

:55:59.:56:01.

a bit like some people are passionate about sports, other

:56:02.:56:04.

people are passionate about Eurovision! You know, there is a

:56:05.:56:09.

whole community are people who go to the live shows, and we have a

:56:10.:56:14.

wonderful time. Why do you think we don't do better? British music does

:56:15.:56:18.

brilliantly internationally, doesn't it? There is a whole load of

:56:19.:56:22.

reasons, there is politics in it, and certainly last year there was

:56:23.:56:27.

more politics than ever before. Spell it out! Last year, there is a

:56:28.:56:31.

jury and there is the public, and it was the jury is that seemed to swing

:56:32.:56:36.

the vote is lasted, and there was a stop Russia movement, they probably

:56:37.:56:40.

had one of the strongest songs in the competition. Ukraine, Russia, a

:56:41.:56:45.

bit of a situation there, and there was clearly some element of that

:56:46.:56:50.

political tension playing out in some of the votes of the jury is.

:56:51.:56:56.

Did you feel that? It is tough, isn't it? We tried not to focus much

:56:57.:57:01.

on that, because all we saw was our name is slowly going down and down.

:57:02.:57:09.

It started really well! We are doing well! No, we are not. In recent

:57:10.:57:13.

years, we said that you could literally send One Direction and

:57:14.:57:19.

Adele, and we would still get the same result. It is difficult,

:57:20.:57:24.

really, we were hoping to turn it around for the UK, but unfortunately

:57:25.:57:28.

it didn't go the way we wanted. The thing is, it is a national thing

:57:29.:57:34.

that people love. It is still one of the BBC's biggest shows every year,

:57:35.:57:39.

still one of the most watched BBC shows. Last year, around the world,

:57:40.:57:45.

204 million people. So there is something going right with it. You

:57:46.:57:49.

know, particularly in this country, people love to ridicule it, but

:57:50.:57:54.

actually, if you get on board with it and supported and enjoy it for

:57:55.:57:59.

what it is, it is an amazing experience, an amazing show to

:58:00.:58:06.

watch. And as I say, 204 million cannot be wrong, quite a few million

:58:07.:58:10.

in the UK cannot be wrong. So we are supporting a good thing here! A bit

:58:11.:58:16.

of enjoyment for the audiences nowadays, when everything else in

:58:17.:58:19.

the world that is going on. I am afraid we are out of time, enjoy its

:58:20.:58:24.

tonight, it has been fabulous to meet you all, thank you for your

:58:25.:58:30.

company. BBC Newsroom Live is next, I will see you soon, bye-bye.

:58:31.:58:32.

A holocaust survivor tells the Victoria Derbyshire programme why society must remain vigilant against anti-Semitism.

How gender stereotypes start affecting children as young as six.

And why one GP surgery was forced to close because of financial pressures.