14/02/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


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14/02/2017

Joanna Gosling presents the BBC's daily news and current affairs programme with original stories, exclusive interviews, audience debate and breaking news.


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I'm Joanna Gosling, welcome to the programme.

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The Ministry of Defence wants to scrap its legal duty of care

:00:15.:00:17.

to servicemen and women in combat so it can assess cases of negligence

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The changes would mean that injured soldiers would no

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longer be able to sue the Government for negligence.

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We will be assessing the full impact of the proposals for our servicemen

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The Fire Brigade, police, Ambulance Service, they all have to have

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equipment that works, and the right equipment. That should be for the

:00:42.:00:43.

soldier. Just 24 days into the Trump

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Presidency, it has been hit by a high-profile resignation,

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that of national-security adviser Michael Flynn,

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who has been forced to quit after it was revealed that he misled

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White House officials But questions are being asked

:00:53.:00:54.

about who in the White House And, new research suggests over half

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of disabled people feel they're at risk of losing their jobs

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because of their impairments. We'll talk to some disabled workers

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about their experiences This Valentine's Day we're

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asking, are you single We will be talking to some

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of the singletons who say Or are you longing to find

:01:31.:01:36.

that special person? Do get in touch with your thoughts

:01:37.:01:43.

and experiences on that and any If you text, you will be charged

:01:44.:01:47.

at the standard network rate. In a severe blow to President

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Trump's new administration, his national-security adviser

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General Michael Flynn has Mr Flynn is accused of illegally

:02:00.:02:01.

discussing US sanctions with the Russian ambassador

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to the United States. But the conversation

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about sanctions happened before Under US law, private individuals

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cannot carry out official Barely three weeks into his

:02:10.:02:14.

presidency, Donald Trump has lost Retired army general Michael Flynn,

:02:15.:02:21.

a man renowned for his close ties to Russia, resigned amid allegations

:02:22.:02:28.

that he misled senior officials about conversations between him

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and the Russian ambassador a few weeks before the Trump

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administration took office. In his resignation letter,

:02:37.:02:40.

Mr Flynn said that as the incoming National Security Advisor he held

:02:41.:02:43.

numerous phone calls with foreign counterparts,

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ministers and ambassadors. "Unfortunately," he goes on,

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"because of the fast pace of events I inadvertently briefed

:02:51.:02:54.

the Vice President-elect and others with incomplete

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information regarding my calls Missing, it appears,

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from Mr Flynn's account was a discussion of sanctions

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imposed by the outgoing Obama administration in response

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to Russia's meddling Any offer to lift such sanctions

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by a member of the incoming administration would be a breach

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of American law. Meanwhile, it has emerged

:03:18.:03:20.

that the US Justice Department warned the Trump administration

:03:21.:03:22.

several weeks ago that Mr Flynn's account of the conversation differed

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from that of intelligence officials, The department also advised

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the President that Mr Flynn had potentially left himself open

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to blackmail by the Russians. All of which prompts

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the broader question, what did the President himself know

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about Michael Flynn's activities Ben Brown is in the BBC

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Newsroom with a summary A ten-year-old boy has died

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after suffering serious head injuries at a shopping

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centre in Reading. The boy was taken to hospital

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after what's being described by police as an "incident involving

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store furniture" at Topshop Police say the death

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is being treated as unexplained but not suspicious, and officers

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are continuing to make inquiries. Local authorities in England have

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paid out more than ?35 million in compensation and legal fees

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to tenants who are living Research by the BBC has discovered

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around 11,000 claims have been brought in the last five years,

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for issues such as damp, leaking drains and holes

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in front doors or walls. The Local Government Association

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said councils were doing a "great A new national centre designed

:04:41.:04:43.

to improve the UK's resilience to cyberattacks will be officially

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opened by the Queen this morning. The Government claims the new

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National Cyber Security Centre in central London will make the UK

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the safest place to Russian involvement in efforts

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to hack information... The worst case is that

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all of our customers' China's activities in cyberspace

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is a significant source of concern. Hacking that could

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hamper vote counting. Cyber attacks are,

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it seems, everywhere. Hackers targeting governments,

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businesses, ordinary people. Now, a new organisation

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is being formally launched. At its new headquarters,

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the head of the National Cyber Security Centre told me

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the threat is real. We've had significant

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losses of personal data, significant intrusions by hostile

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state actors, significant reconnaissance against critical

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national infrastructure. And our job is to make sure we deal

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with that in the most So what we've done here is create

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a room of the near future and we've got some devices that

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are all connected to the internet. The new centre is not just

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there to protect Government, Its technical director showed me how

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internet-connected items like lamps and coffee makers could be

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vulnerable, even a child's toy doll. More and more of our

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life is moving online. The UK's one of the most

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digitally-dependent A strength, but also

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a vulnerability. And protecting it online

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in the future will be vital for economic as well as national

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security. An Afghan interpreter who served

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with British forces says the Government has committed a great

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injustice by not Javed Hokta is applying for asylum

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for the second time after receiving death threats from the Taliban

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and fears for his life if the Home Office sends him

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back to Afghanistan. The former Liberal Democrat leader

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Lord Ashdown has described the treatment of armed-forces

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interpreters as a shame And we'll have more on this story

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later in the programme, where we'll be hearing

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from the Afghan interpreter. Rolls Royce has reported a record

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loss of ?4.6 billion in the last year, the worst in the history

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of the British engineering giant. The firm was forced to pay around

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?700 million in fines after being found guilty of bribery

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and corruption in 12 countries, in offences dating back

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more than 25 years. But the business has also suffered

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due to the weakening of the pound. Playboy magazine has announced

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it is bringing back nudity, The new chief creative officer

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Cooper Hefner said the magazine Playboy's circulation

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dropped from a peak of more than five million in the 1970s

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to below 700,000 last year. Disney has cut ties with YouTube

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star PewDiePie over The decision came after some of his

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videos contained Nazi references. PewDiePie, whose real

:08:08.:08:18.

name is Felix Kjellberg, accepted the material was offensive,

:08:19.:08:27.

but said he did not support "any He's reported to have

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made around ?12 million through the video-sharing website

:08:31.:08:33.

last year and has more Rail enthusiasts and commuters

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are getting the chance this morning to ride on the first timetabled

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mainline steam-engine service The Tornado will pull 12

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Northern Train services on the Settle-to-Carlisle line over

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three consecutive days. It's part of celebrations to mark

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the reopening of the line Passengers will pay the regular fare

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as it is a timetabled service. That's a summary of the latest BBC

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News, more at 9:30am. We will discuss the MoD plans to

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bring decisions on negligence cases in-house. They say it will lead to

:09:23.:09:28.

greater compensation but campaigners say it will deny access to justice

:09:29.:09:33.

and stifle debate. And, if you are disabled and in

:09:34.:09:37.

work, as he feared losing your job? More than half of disabled people do

:09:38.:09:41.

have that concern. Let us know your thoughts.

:09:42.:09:43.

If you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.

:09:44.:09:47.

Let's get some sport with Will Perry.

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We're going to focus on football, and it was a good night

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Happy Valentine's day as well! Same to you! Manchester City moving from

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fifth to second, it was a big jump. I am the only madman who thinks the

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title race is still on. There is an 8-point gap, 13 games to play, that

:10:14.:10:17.

is highly unlikely that they can do it. But they have done it before, in

:10:18.:10:23.

2012. Manchester United had the same gap, and they did it with six games

:10:24.:10:27.

to play. But Chelsea would have to lose at least three games and

:10:28.:10:31.

Manchester City win all of their games, and they have Champions

:10:32.:10:35.

League games to come. It was not ideal for them last night, they lost

:10:36.:10:40.

their main man Jesus to an injury, but Sergio Aguero came on. Raheem

:10:41.:10:45.

Sterling got the opener from close range. What a season he is having,

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what a contrast to last season. He set up their second. Tyrone Menkes

:10:51.:10:55.

getting the final touch to turn it past his own goalkeeper, slightly

:10:56.:11:00.

harsh on Sergio Aguero. Pep Guardiola playing down their title

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chances. They have to lose three games,

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because the goal average is in front of them. You have to win all of the

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games. You know how difficult it is to win all the games in the Premier

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League. Game by game, now the cup, and after we will see. We are happy

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to be second and to reduce the lead. But still, the gap is massive.

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So, Manchester City up to second, Will, and there was also a nice

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touch from Pep Guardiola at the end of the game?

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A really nice touch last night from the manager. Have a look at this,

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this is him at full time going over to Harry Arter. He had the

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devastating loss of a stillborn child in December. You might be up

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to work out what Pep Guardiola is saying, I wish you all the best, and

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Harry Arter said, he came over and wished us all the best, they are

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accepting -- expecting a new arrival. Showing their are more

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important things than football. The Ministry of Defence is proposing

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to change the law to scrap its legal duty of care to servicemen and women

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in the course of combat. Under the proposed scheme

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they will not be able to sue the MoD in the courts for negligence,

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and compensation will be taken in-house and be awarded

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by an MOD-appointed assessor. The MoD says the proposals

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are about better compensation and will save injured service

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personnel and families of those But the family of one soldier killed

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in a lightly-armoured Snatch Land Rover in Iraq has told

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the BBC the proposed How old was he when he first

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started playing the drums? In 2007 Colin Redpath's son,

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Lance Corporal Kirk Redpath, a keen drummer in the Irish Guards, died

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when a roadside bomb exploded next to his lightly-armoured

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Snatch Land Rover in Iraq. I deal with it because I want

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to be strong for his I mean, some people could literally

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pull the curtains and And people say to me, "We don't

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like to mention him," I say, "No, I'll talk about him,

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I'm proud of him. Kirk was one of some 37

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servicemen and women killed in the so-called Snatch Land Rovers

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in Afghanistan and Iraq. Colin fought a six-year

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legal battle against the Ministry of Defence, eventually

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winning the right at the Supreme Court to bring an action

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against the Government Three years later, that case is only

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now coming to a close. In July 2016, Sir John Chilcot's

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Iraq inquiry report identified numerous MoD failings

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in preparing for the Iraq campaign. The planning and

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preparations for Iraq The MoD's new proposals cover battle

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and the preparations for it. They include stopping legal claims

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for negligence, like those arising from the Snatch Land Rovers

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against the MoD in the courts. A no-fault compensation scheme

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for injured service personnel and families of those killed,

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meaning negligence does Assessors to value injuries

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and loss, based on expert And compensation to be at the same

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level, as if the MoD had been No one disputes that it is a really

:14:59.:15:03.

good idea for service personnel injured in the cause of combat

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and the families of those who have been killed to be spared long

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and frustrating legal battles through the courts, but there

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are real concerns about the Ministry of Defence scrapping the duty

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of care that it owes to soldiers and taking the system

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for compensating them in-house. At the end of the day

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they are an employer. You know, the fire brigade,

:15:38.:15:40.

the police, the ambulance service, they all have to go out

:15:41.:15:43.

with equipment that works. Well, that should be

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the same for a soldier. I mean, if not, what the MoD

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are saying is, we could send our boys and girls out with broomsticks,

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it wouldn't matter. Lawyers worried that by-passing

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the courts creates unfairness. You've suffered injury,

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you think that the employer, the organisation, the MoD

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is at fault, and yet you are asked to rely upon the MoD to assess

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the compensation that it should pay you for the damage

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that it has caused you. The proposed scheme assumes service

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personnel will not need and so will not receive any

:16:17.:16:23.

paid legal representation. Inevitably there will be trauma,

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grieving families involved, and the sort of client care that

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legal representatives provide is absolutely essential in ensuring

:16:33.:16:37.

that those victims are not further In a statement, the Ministry

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of Defence said: "This is about better compensation,

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and regardless of legal action, we already prioritise learning

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lessons from any incidents involving the safety of our personnel

:16:56.:17:08.

will stop where there have been serious injuries or fatalities

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we have robust systems and processes in place that allow us to record

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and investigate these accordingly. Obviously, the problem

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of what to do with his ashes, I didn't want to split them

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and I did not know where I would spread them, so I thought,

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well, he loved the drums, let's put them in his

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cabinet in a drum. So his ashes are with me in his

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cabinet with all his belongings. I couldn't think of

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anything better, really. The MOD's consultation

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on its proposals ends Colin Redpath hopes that

:17:36.:17:37.

for the injured and the families of the fallen the new system ensures

:17:38.:17:46.

maximum safety and fairness. Let's talk now to the President

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of the Law Society Robert Bourns, who doesn't support these proposed

:17:53.:17:56.

changes to compensation, the Labour MP Madeleine Moon,

:17:57.:17:59.

who is on the MPs Defence Select Conservative MP and former

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Army Officer, Iain-Duncan Smith Madeleine Moon you've said

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previously you believe the MoD is the most unaccountable Department of

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Government. How do you see these changes? I'm very worried about the

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changes. It's a very short report. It doesn't tell you very much which

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is the Government's way of doing things now. Tell you as little as

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possible and then legislate for as much as possible. So that you can't

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prepare your case in advance. I think it is very worrying that given

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the cuts that we've had in our armed force over the last few years, the

:18:41.:18:45.

quality of the equipment is deeply worrying and now they're going to

:18:46.:18:48.

give themselves immunity from failing to provide the quality of

:18:49.:18:52.

equipment and the quality of training that they should provide

:18:53.:18:56.

before people go into combat. I'm worried about that. Iain Duncan

:18:57.:19:02.

Smith for the immunity for failing is how Madeleine Moon sees it? There

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is a balance in these things, it is not all perfect by any means. I have

:19:07.:19:10.

historically been concerned about the growing nature of the use of

:19:11.:19:15.

courts when it comes to combat issues. It doesn't seem to me like

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the courts are the right place to be. Issues surrounding combat are

:19:19.:19:24.

often very difficult to judge against the standard common-law

:19:25.:19:26.

process so I think there is and there are grounds for changing the

:19:27.:19:30.

process to try and make the thing much simpler, less costly to those

:19:31.:19:35.

who are engaged in it and costly in human terms. But at the same time,

:19:36.:19:39.

also making sure that the right outcomes are derived and therefore,

:19:40.:19:43.

whilst I am in general supportive of the idea of making this simpler and

:19:44.:19:48.

better in many senses for those concerned, of course, I would want

:19:49.:19:51.

to see that this is open as possible, the assessor's role is

:19:52.:19:56.

therefore, very critical and the linkage with the Select Committee

:19:57.:19:59.

would be, I would like to see bound in on this. So in other words, I

:20:00.:20:03.

think it would be a very strong role for the MoD, for the Select

:20:04.:20:09.

Committee to be able to consent stant interrogate and be open to all

:20:10.:20:13.

the documents that are necessary to be able to figure whether or not the

:20:14.:20:17.

assessors judgements are balanced and fair and whether or not the MoD

:20:18.:20:21.

is hiding anything. But I think dragging things through the courts

:20:22.:20:25.

satisfies only lawyers. At the end of the day it makes things worse. I

:20:26.:20:29.

would like to see the MoD come clean much more often early on when

:20:30.:20:34.

they've made mistakes and got it wrong and if the assessors could

:20:35.:20:41.

then judge it. We will put the issue of lawyers being satisfied to the

:20:42.:20:47.

lawyer in the studio. Madeleine Moon, the point that Iain Duncan

:20:48.:20:51.

Smith was saying about the committee having powerful oversight? That's

:20:52.:20:55.

fine in practise, but what are we talking about? Are we talking about

:20:56.:20:58.

the Select Committee looking at individual cases? I don't think

:20:59.:21:02.

we're equipped for that. We don't have the capability to do that. But

:21:03.:21:08.

also, you know, a Select Committee should be there to challenge

:21:09.:21:12.

Government. And I have to tell you just in a recent case we challenged

:21:13.:21:19.

the Secretary of State to close down the IHAT inquiry and he told us it

:21:20.:21:22.

wasn't possible. He didn't have the right to do that. That the cases

:21:23.:21:25.

that were before them were the most complex and difficult that they had

:21:26.:21:29.

to deal with. And then the day before we were releasing our report,

:21:30.:21:34.

he announced he was closing the inquiry down. He had suddenly found

:21:35.:21:39.

powers. Now, you can't trust the Ministry of Defence I'm afraid to

:21:40.:21:43.

tell you the truth. If it's better for servicemen and women and their

:21:44.:21:47.

families in that it streamlines a process that when someone has been

:21:48.:21:51.

through a trauma and they have to fight through the courts, that's not

:21:52.:21:55.

good for anybody. It it makes that better and they get compensation at

:21:56.:22:02.

the level in a simpler process. Is that the right thing? In terms of

:22:03.:22:09.

the personal trauma, that's fine. Whether or not you're going to get

:22:10.:22:15.

the understanding and the lessons learnt and quite honestly, expose

:22:16.:22:20.

the failures of preparation and equipment, is another issue

:22:21.:22:24.

altogether. So, there is also and I think the father that you spoke to

:22:25.:22:30.

earlier said it absolutely wonderfully, there is also that

:22:31.:22:35.

feeling of justice. Now is the Ministry of Defence really going to

:22:36.:22:39.

use this as a way of buring its failures? They're very good at doing

:22:40.:22:45.

it and I just worry this is just another opportunity to do so.

:22:46.:22:49.

Robert, you're the president Law Society. Just picking up on what

:22:50.:22:52.

Iain Duncan Smith said, the only people that the court process

:22:53.:22:58.

satisfies in the inis lawyers? The situation here actually, we're

:22:59.:23:01.

concerned for the service personnel and clearly, there will be some

:23:02.:23:08.

cases where a compensation that operates quickly is fine, but what

:23:09.:23:11.

is really concerning is the proposal is it is in very vague terms within

:23:12.:23:16.

the consultation document that combat immunity should be extended.

:23:17.:23:20.

Nobody is suggesting that decisions taken in the heat of battle should

:23:21.:23:24.

be subject to scrutiny in court alelging negligence. What we are

:23:25.:23:28.

concerned about is the extension of combat immunity to include

:23:29.:23:31.

preparation and training and that would mean that people could not

:23:32.:23:34.

then allege negligence and this is more than just compensation. You

:23:35.:23:40.

heard from Mr Redpath in relation to his sonment he wasn't so much

:23:41.:23:44.

interested in come pen sags, what he wanted to know was that somebody,

:23:45.:23:48.

independent, was looking at this issue and making a decision and it

:23:49.:23:54.

is shutting people out of that justice process, forcing them into a

:23:55.:23:58.

compensation system and actually denying them the opportunity to say,

:23:59.:24:03.

"This was negligent." As I say, people want time and time again the

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cases that have come before the courts are about things other than

:24:07.:24:09.

what happened in combat. It's the preparation. It's the training. It's

:24:10.:24:16.

the equipment. And people should be entitled, shouldn't they, service

:24:17.:24:20.

personnel? Iain Duncan Smith why should it be extended to just not

:24:21.:24:24.

what happens on the battlefield, but the preparation? Well, in answer to

:24:25.:24:28.

Madeleine's point and I don't disagree with her. Historically the

:24:29.:24:33.

MoD has never had a great record of admitting its own failures and

:24:34.:24:37.

faults. I served in the Army. My father, told me about what happened

:24:38.:24:40.

in the aftermath of the Second World War. And yet with all of this

:24:41.:24:50.

process of kind of court cases going on, Madeleine is still complaining

:24:51.:24:54.

about their failure to open up. If anything, I think sometimes what

:24:55.:24:56.

happens with Government and having served in it, when you come under

:24:57.:25:01.

pressure about people taking legal action, governments shut up. They

:25:02.:25:04.

actually get worse about hiding stuff. So the key things to me are

:25:05.:25:09.

this. I do want to see when Government and when the military

:25:10.:25:12.

make a mistake, that is something they should not have made, in other

:25:13.:25:17.

words rectify a problem that they had arrived at through training or

:25:18.:25:21.

through bad decisions over equipment, I wot want to see that

:25:22.:25:24.

publicly come out and I think therefore the two roles here are

:25:25.:25:26.

really important. That's why I don't give this a blank cheque I say in

:25:27.:25:31.

principle, I am supportive of it. The two roles are an independent

:25:32.:25:35.

assessor... Sorry to interrupt. I hear what you're saying about your

:25:36.:25:39.

hope that without a fear of legal action and accepting liability and

:25:40.:25:43.

therefore, losing through the courts, the Government, the MoD may

:25:44.:25:47.

open up more, but that's a hope, isn't it? There is no guarantee on

:25:48.:25:53.

that and when you look at situations in the past like with the Snatch

:25:54.:25:57.

Land Rovers, if there wasn't transparency and openness on that

:25:58.:26:01.

forced through legal action, what might have happened? Well, there are

:26:02.:26:05.

lots of issues and you can debate about the use of those Land

:26:06.:26:10.

Roversment they were used in Northern Ireland when I served in

:26:11.:26:13.

Northern Ireland. The point I'm making the key element of this is

:26:14.:26:18.

the role and choice of the assessor, how public are? How accountable? And

:26:19.:26:24.

how independent? It is very, very important that the coroner's role in

:26:25.:26:28.

this is constantly upheld. In other words they don't override the idea

:26:29.:26:32.

so the coroner has full power still, that's what I want to see, to be

:26:33.:26:36.

able to point the finger during the course of that process and then that

:26:37.:26:43.

kicks the assessor into action. If you lose the coroner I would not

:26:44.:26:47.

support this. It is a good point. The coroner's courts are still

:26:48.:26:51.

there? The coroner's courts are still there and honestly have been

:26:52.:26:56.

pretty critical in exposing many of the failures of the Ministry of

:26:57.:26:59.

Defence in relation to equipment. But there are being asked to extend

:27:00.:27:05.

their role and responsibility outside of their technical

:27:06.:27:08.

competence. So why would you do this? I agree with the point of

:27:09.:27:16.

making it a simpler process. That you shouldn't always have to be

:27:17.:27:21.

getting yourself lawyered up to seek your rightful compensation. What

:27:22.:27:28.

worries me is that this is skewed towards the Ministry of Defence and

:27:29.:27:33.

I question the impartiality of the people who are going to be set-up to

:27:34.:27:39.

do the assessments. The Ministry of Defence is a very seductive place.

:27:40.:27:43.

You can get sucked into seeing everything from their prospective if

:27:44.:27:48.

you're not careful. They do dislike telling you even the most simple of

:27:49.:27:53.

information and they hide behind official secrets all the time. Might

:27:54.:27:57.

that evaporate if there is no fear of legal action as Iain Duncan Smith

:27:58.:28:03.

was saying potentially? A colleague asked twice why the Queen Elizabeth

:28:04.:28:07.

carrier was not going to go for sea trials in the spring and the date

:28:08.:28:11.

had been changed to the summer. Twice he was fobbed off. So I had

:28:12.:28:15.

the minister in front of me in the Select Committee and I asked her the

:28:16.:28:19.

same question. And she said, "It is a misunderstanding of when spring

:28:20.:28:24.

was. Spring could actually be in June." Now, I pushed and I pushed

:28:25.:28:30.

and I pushed and I was told eventually there is a technical

:28:31.:28:34.

problem. After the meeting, someone came to see me and said, "It's a bit

:28:35.:28:39.

of IT that's gone wrong. That's all it is." They won't tell you

:28:40.:28:43.

anything. They are the great hiders of problems.

:28:44.:28:51.

Robert, do you think that the fear of litigation does kind of lead to

:28:52.:28:58.

situations escalating potentially? It is unfortunate when people make

:28:59.:29:05.

the claimant fight every inch of the way. In 1987 the definition of

:29:06.:29:11.

combat immunity was limited to the battlefield post Falklands and one

:29:12.:29:13.

of the things that's said in one of the reports that leads to the

:29:14.:29:17.

consultation paper, a report from 2013 by one of Iain Duncan Smith's

:29:18.:29:21.

colleagues said at that time there were concerns that compensation was

:29:22.:29:25.

inadequate, that's without the threat of litigation, it was

:29:26.:29:29.

inadequate and there were concerns coming through to in the way service

:29:30.:29:34.

personnel had been put in harm's way in relation to nuclear testing in

:29:35.:29:37.

the 1950s and it was thought appropriate to give them the right

:29:38.:29:40.

to pursue claims for negligence and we don't want to see that right now

:29:41.:29:46.

restricted. And yes, we would like an open environment where people are

:29:47.:29:50.

prepared to admit their mistakes, absolutely. In certain

:29:51.:29:54.

circumstances, compensation schemes will work in favour of the service

:29:55.:29:59.

personnel, but if you think you have been injured or your family member

:30:00.:30:04.

has been lost, suffered, has been killed, as a consequence of some

:30:05.:30:08.

fallure back up the line, you will have a right to pursue that and you

:30:09.:30:11.

should have a right to pursue that. That's our point. Iain Duncan Smith,

:30:12.:30:13.

you wanted to come in. I am by no means at ease with

:30:14.:30:24.

everything here. As I said earlier, I understand the principles, and I

:30:25.:30:28.

think the whole idea of constantly going to court does not satisfy

:30:29.:30:33.

people who have to do it, because it forces the MoD and most other

:30:34.:30:39.

Government departments to become defensive. Two things are important,

:30:40.:30:46.

first, that this process is more swift and satisfactory in that

:30:47.:30:49.

people can get what they need done and the compensation is paid out

:30:50.:30:56.

quickly, and secondly, the checks and balances that exist through the

:30:57.:31:00.

coroner and the independent assessor mean this is what has to happen,

:31:01.:31:05.

therefore there is earlier acceptance of fault, and therefore

:31:06.:31:10.

that stops the heartache that goes on for soldiers sailors and NN and

:31:11.:31:16.

their families in the event of a problem. If that does not get

:31:17.:31:20.

satisfied, these processes should not continue, but I believe there is

:31:21.:31:24.

scope for that. These processes should not continue, you say it goes

:31:25.:31:31.

back to as it is? The checks that they talk about, the ability and

:31:32.:31:37.

willingness to admit early that there has been a mistake, that is

:31:38.:31:41.

critical if this consultation then is to work. If those are not there,

:31:42.:31:47.

it will not work, so that is the key test. Therefore, we will see how

:31:48.:31:52.

they intend to make the assessor's position all-powerful. It is open to

:31:53.:31:58.

the MoD to admit fault in a litigation at an early stage if they

:31:59.:32:01.

want to, rather than putting the personnel through years of

:32:02.:32:04.

litigation through an independent court. You said they would not do

:32:05.:32:11.

that? Wants legal cases begin, they shut up like everybody does, because

:32:12.:32:16.

they worry about the effect it has in different numbers of people, and

:32:17.:32:19.

therefore the ability to control the way in which that process works. It

:32:20.:32:25.

is an instinctive thing, you have seen it many times. If this process

:32:26.:32:29.

allows us to get to early identification of the problem, if

:32:30.:32:34.

there is fault, where default lies, and therefore what competition sport

:32:35.:32:38.

is there for the families, it has to be in the interests of families and

:32:39.:32:42.

service personnel. If it does not work like that, it should not go

:32:43.:32:47.

ahead. Coroners have been increasingly dragged into looking at

:32:48.:32:50.

issues of deaths in relation to the MoD. There are whole question is,

:32:51.:32:56.

and it'll be interesting to see what the chief coroner says, about the

:32:57.:32:59.

competence, the training and the understanding of military equipped

:33:00.:33:02.

and an personnel and the training they require to be able to protect

:33:03.:33:10.

the MoD from combating -- combat in unity. That is a different area of

:33:11.:33:13.

expertise that currently does not lie with coroners.

:33:14.:33:17.

Do let us know your thoughts. We will talk about it later a game, so

:33:18.:33:22.

it will be good to hear your thoughts, and with some of them into

:33:23.:33:26.

our conversation. Breaking news about inflation, the

:33:27.:33:31.

ONS putting out the latest statistics. The rate of consumer

:33:32.:33:37.

price index inflation rose to 1.8% in January, from 1.6% in December,

:33:38.:33:41.

so still below the Government target, but it is quite a jump.

:33:42.:33:49.

From 1.6% in December to 1.8% in January. We will talk to our

:33:50.:33:57.

business correspondent for more on that.

:33:58.:33:59.

We'll have more on the resignation of Donald Trump's top

:34:00.:34:03.

national security adviser, Michael Flynn over his

:34:04.:34:04.

contacts with Russia - and what did the President know

:34:05.:34:07.

And we find out what it's like to be a disabled worker -

:34:08.:34:11.

following research that suggests over half of workers

:34:12.:34:13.

with impairments feel like their job is at risk.

:34:14.:34:22.

Ben Brown is in the BBC Newsroom with a summary

:34:23.:34:24.

Donald Trump's national-security adviser Michael Flynn has resigned

:34:25.:34:28.

General Flynn discussed American sanctions with the Russian

:34:29.:34:33.

ambassador before Mr Trump took office, and is accused

:34:34.:34:37.

of misleading the Vice President about what happened.

:34:38.:34:40.

A senior Democrat politician has said General Flynn's departure

:34:41.:34:43.

would not end questions about any contacts between the Trump

:34:44.:34:46.

A ten-year-old boy has died after suffering serious head

:34:47.:34:53.

injuries at the high street store Topshop in Reading.

:34:54.:34:57.

The boy was taken to hospital after what's being described

:34:58.:34:59.

by police as an "incident involving store furniture" at Topshop

:35:00.:35:04.

Police say the death is being treated as unexplained

:35:05.:35:08.

but not suspicious, and officers are continuing to make inquiries.

:35:09.:35:15.

The chairman of the Japanese electronics conglomerate Toshiba has

:35:16.:35:18.

resigned following the news that the company suffered a net loss

:35:19.:35:20.

Shigenori Shiga announced he was stepping down shortly

:35:21.:35:27.

after the company delayed an announcement of its

:35:28.:35:29.

It had been widely expected to write off billions of dollars due

:35:30.:35:35.

to its problematic nuclear energy business, and to admit that

:35:36.:35:38.

Local authorities in England have paid out more than ?35 million

:35:39.:35:45.

in compensation and legal fees to tenants who are living

:35:46.:35:49.

Research by the BBC has discovered around 11,000 claims have been

:35:50.:35:54.

brought in the last five years, for issues such as damp,

:35:55.:35:57.

leaking drains and holes in front doors or walls.

:35:58.:36:01.

The Local Government Association said councils were doing a "great

:36:02.:36:04.

An Afghan interpreter who served with British forces says

:36:05.:36:10.

the Government has committed a great injustice by not

:36:11.:36:13.

Javed Hotak is applying for asylum for the second time after receiving

:36:14.:36:19.

death threats from the Taliban and fears for his life

:36:20.:36:22.

if the Home Office sends him back to Afghanistan.

:36:23.:36:25.

The former Liberal Democrat leader Lord Ashdown has described

:36:26.:36:28.

the treatment of armed-forces interpreters as a shame

:36:29.:36:31.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News, more at 10am.

:36:32.:36:38.

Here's the sport headlines now with Will Perry.

:36:39.:36:44.

Manchester City moved up to second in the Premier League with a 2-0

:36:45.:36:49.

victory at Bournemouth. This goal from 13 Stirling was their opener,

:36:50.:36:55.

the cross from Leroy Sunday. This was after half an hour. High roaming

:36:56.:37:00.

is then turned on Sergio Aguero's shot to make it two. They are now

:37:01.:37:06.

eight points behind Chelsea with 13 games to play.

:37:07.:37:09.

Anthony Watson is in the training squad for England's match against

:37:10.:37:13.

Italy next Sunday. He missed the victories over France and Wales with

:37:14.:37:17.

a hamstring injury. Lance Armstrong has lost his bid to

:37:18.:37:22.

block a ?79 million lawsuit by the US Government. It is alleged he

:37:23.:37:26.

defrauded the Government while doping, riding for the publicly

:37:27.:37:31.

funded team. He was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and

:37:32.:37:34.

banned for life in 2012. It clears for the way -- it clears the way for

:37:35.:37:38.

the case to go to trial. The price we pay for goods and

:37:39.:37:49.

services went up last month, inflation was 1.8% in January,

:37:50.:37:55.

compared to 1.6% in December. Is that a significant jump? It is more

:37:56.:38:00.

significant that we have seen for nearly three years. 1.8% for a long

:38:01.:38:12.

time -- 1.8%. For a long time it was around zero, so 1.8% is more

:38:13.:38:17.

substantial for quite a long time. It is driven partly because of the

:38:18.:38:22.

increases in the prices of petrol. That is driven partly because of the

:38:23.:38:26.

weakness of the pound. Oil is priced in dollars, so beget less oil for

:38:27.:38:31.

our pounds, so the cost is passed on to us at the pumps, which drives up

:38:32.:38:37.

the prices of other goods. How concerned should we be? It is still

:38:38.:38:40.

below the Government target. There is one reason to not be concerned.

:38:41.:38:45.

Our earnings are going up by more than inflation. At the last count,

:38:46.:38:49.

excluding bonuses, the average pay packet went up 2.7%. That is a lot

:38:50.:38:55.

more than the 1.8% inflation we have just seen. If that keeps up, it is

:38:56.:39:02.

fine. There is a view that says we need more inflation, we have had too

:39:03.:39:06.

little. We have a situation where we have huge debt. The thing with debt,

:39:07.:39:12.

the amount you owe is not grow with inflation, so if your earnings are

:39:13.:39:15.

growing with inflation and your debts are not, they are getting more

:39:16.:39:19.

affordable. 2.7% increase in earnings, does that show a change,

:39:20.:39:26.

our earnings starting to increase? It is better than people thought. We

:39:27.:39:30.

have the data last month, we get more tomorrow. If there is still a

:39:31.:39:35.

gap between earnings and inflation, not only are we not getting

:39:36.:39:40.

squeezed, we are getting better off, but within that, you have to break

:39:41.:39:46.

it down. If you look at food and non-alcoholic beverages, they still

:39:47.:39:50.

getting cheaper, but if you cut transport, up by 5.7%, that'll be

:39:51.:39:54.

the season tickets that kick in in January. Goods are going up by 1.1%,

:39:55.:40:02.

so not that much inflation. Services are way you have high Labour costs,

:40:03.:40:07.

he cuts to restaurant meals to broadcasting, they are costing more,

:40:08.:40:11.

because we have to pay people more to do them. In terms of policy

:40:12.:40:20.

levers, to try to adjust inflation, there's anything happen as a result

:40:21.:40:24.

of this? What will the policymakers be thinking when they look at these

:40:25.:40:28.

figures? The main instrument of policy is interest rates. I don't

:40:29.:40:32.

think this means that we are going to see any immediate rise in

:40:33.:40:39.

interest rates. Not least because the target for inflation is 2%. So

:40:40.:40:44.

long as it is within 1% of that, the Bank of England to stop have to

:40:45.:40:47.

write a letter to apologise for not doing its job. That is quite a room

:40:48.:40:52.

at prospect. Some people think it will get up above 3% later this

:40:53.:40:54.

year, but that is a minority view. The man appointed by Donald Trump

:40:55.:40:58.

to advise him on national security has resigned less than a month

:40:59.:41:00.

into the job. It's after it emerged

:41:01.:41:03.

that he misled officials at the White House about his

:41:04.:41:05.

contacts with the It's emerged Michael Flynn had

:41:06.:41:07.

discussed US sanctions with the Russian envoy before

:41:08.:41:10.

Mr Trump took office. In his resignation letter,

:41:11.:41:13.

he admitted giving incomplete With me now is Scott Lucas,

:41:14.:41:15.

a professor of American Politics from the University of Birmingham,

:41:16.:41:21.

and Dr Jacob Parakilas, assistant head of the US

:41:22.:41:25.

and Americas Programme at the international-affairs

:41:26.:41:28.

think tank Chatham House. 24 days into the presidency, a

:41:29.:41:48.

high-profile adviser has gone. This is big, both because of the specific

:41:49.:41:52.

issue, the extent of Russian interference in the US process,

:41:53.:41:57.

including during the troubled campaign, and how much this might

:41:58.:42:04.

have shaped,'s affinity for Russian leader not a Nir Bitton. Because

:42:05.:42:09.

Michael Frame was courted by Moscow, he was invited to a high-profile

:42:10.:42:17.

ceremony, said the idea that he was talking about lifting sanctions on

:42:18.:42:23.

Russia is significant. The wider issue, the Trump administration is

:42:24.:42:28.

being seen to have had a chaotic foreign policy, with division

:42:29.:42:31.

between fire breathers, hard right ideologues, and pragmatists. Will

:42:32.:42:39.

that continue, or will they learn how to steer a more cautious course?

:42:40.:42:48.

Tell us more about the man and the background, because there have been

:42:49.:42:53.

questions asked repeatedly since he got the job about his links with

:42:54.:42:59.

Russia. He had a very long and decorated career in the American

:43:00.:43:04.

military, culminating with a stint as the head of the defence

:43:05.:43:07.

intelligence agency, the organisation that collates and

:43:08.:43:13.

disseminate all of the intelligence gathered by the various military

:43:14.:43:18.

arms of the US Government. He left that position over a disagreement

:43:19.:43:22.

with the Barack Obama administration, and not too long

:43:23.:43:27.

afterwards became an adviser to the Trump campaign. He was vocal in his

:43:28.:43:33.

condemnation of Hillary Clinton, for her handling of classified

:43:34.:43:38.

information. From profiles of him, he is largely seen as a very

:43:39.:43:43.

intelligent man, but he often draws connections where other people do

:43:44.:43:46.

not see them, including in places where those connections are somewhat

:43:47.:43:53.

shady. He is linked to various conspiracy theories. His son, who

:43:54.:43:59.

has advised him, was released from the Trump transition team after

:44:00.:44:03.

talking about the Peter Pawlett that supposedly hosted a paedophilia ring

:44:04.:44:13.

-- the pizza parlour. He is linked to that establishment, but he has

:44:14.:44:17.

one foot in this conspiratorial world. He is gone because of having

:44:18.:44:24.

had conversations with the Russian ambassador before Donald Trump took

:44:25.:44:30.

office on American sanctions. The Big Questions now is, who else might

:44:31.:44:36.

have known what was going on, and when? Would the president have

:44:37.:44:41.

known? What would your thoughts be about whether somebody would have

:44:42.:44:45.

conversations like that without them being sanctioned at a higher level?

:44:46.:44:49.

It is highly unlikely that he spoke to the Russian ambassador on

:44:50.:44:56.

December the 29th, the day that Barack Obama imposed additional

:44:57.:44:59.

sanctions on Russia, without somebody else on the Trump team

:45:00.:45:03.

knowing, possibly Steve Bannon, possibly another official. The

:45:04.:45:07.

President claimed last Friday that this was the first he had heard of

:45:08.:45:11.

the affair. That is highly unlikely. Last month Michael Flynn was asked

:45:12.:45:18.

about the stories I M p, and he insisted he had not discussed

:45:19.:45:23.

sanctions. For Trump to not know that conversation would be

:45:24.:45:26.

extraordinary. I think there are others who are probably tied into

:45:27.:45:30.

this, and this may not be the end of this immediate story.

:45:31.:45:35.

Jacob, is it going to be the end of story? No, I don't think. The story

:45:36.:45:42.

about Russia and Trump has ebbed and flowed. There are a lot of other

:45:43.:45:46.

strands around the Trump administration going on right now.

:45:47.:45:50.

So inevitably, you know, the amount of attention paid to it hasn't been

:45:51.:45:54.

consistent, but this brings it right back up to the top of the headlines

:45:55.:45:57.

and while I think the Trump administration will be hoping that

:45:58.:46:03.

Flynn's resignation will tie the story off, I think the record of

:46:04.:46:09.

contacts or the record of sympathy for Trump, from Trump and for Putin

:46:10.:46:15.

and for his style of governance predates Flynn and it is outside of

:46:16.:46:18.

Flynn and so it will bring that story back to the top. There are

:46:19.:46:22.

calls from the Democrats for there to be an investigation into Mike

:46:23.:46:27.

Flynn's ties with Russia. Do you hold out much hope that that will

:46:28.:46:33.

happen, Jacob? I don't think that there will be an independent

:46:34.:46:37.

investigation. I think there will be a Congressional investigation. I

:46:38.:46:41.

don't know how aggressive that will be. It's possible that there will be

:46:42.:46:46.

an investigation which will sort of look at Flynn and keep the scope of

:46:47.:46:52.

the investigation somewhat limited. I think if there are additional

:46:53.:46:59.

revelations that might compel an independent investigation which

:47:00.:47:02.

would be absented from partisan concerns. Scott Lucas, come in. I

:47:03.:47:07.

was going to add to Jacob's statement. There are already two

:47:08.:47:10.

investigations going on. The first is there is an investigation of the

:47:11.:47:14.

Russian hacking that took place last year that assisted the Trump

:47:15.:47:18.

campaign and there is an investigation going on over an

:47:19.:47:21.

intelligence dossier which was gathered by a private intelligence

:47:22.:47:26.

firm, but it has been checked out by US intelligence agencies that Trump

:47:27.:47:31.

may have been compromised by Moscow because of sexual and financial

:47:32.:47:34.

affairs. Those investigations should not be forgotten as part of this

:47:35.:47:38.

wider context with this story going on and on. Thank you both very much,

:47:39.:47:40.

thank you. It can't have escaped

:47:41.:47:44.

you that it's Valentine's Day. We're asking are you single

:47:45.:47:49.

and proud out of choice? We'll be talking to some singletons

:47:50.:47:52.

who say they're happy Are you looking for love or are you

:47:53.:48:02.

happy to be single this Valentine's Day?

:48:03.:48:10.

More than half of disabled people in work feel at risk

:48:11.:48:14.

of losing their jobs and one in two have experienced

:48:15.:48:16.

bullying or harassment because of their impairments.

:48:17.:48:21.

That's according to new research by disability charity, Scope.

:48:22.:48:24.

Ahead of the closing of the Government consultation

:48:25.:48:26.

on work, health and disability, this survey highlights the issues

:48:27.:48:28.

Despite the Conservative Government promising in their manifesto

:48:29.:48:31.

to halve the disability employment deficit, the employment gap

:48:32.:48:33.

between disabled people and non-disabled has remained static

:48:34.:48:35.

So why has so little progress been made?

:48:36.:48:46.

Let's talk now to some disabled workers who say they have

:48:47.:48:49.

all experienced discrimination in the workplace -

:48:50.:48:50.

Storme Toolis, Samantha Renke, Madeleine Close and Paul Wilson.

:48:51.:48:58.

Thank you very much for coming in to join us. Storme, I know when you go

:48:59.:49:07.

for an interview don't actually reveal that you're in a wheelchair

:49:08.:49:11.

before you go, do you? Why is that? No, I don't disclose my disability

:49:12.:49:16.

on my CV or any application that I give for a job. I think partly it's

:49:17.:49:21.

because I feel like it's my prerogative to want to share that

:49:22.:49:24.

information, but also I think that it could have an impact on the kind

:49:25.:49:31.

of work that I'm offered. I work as an actor, but I'm a freelance

:49:32.:49:37.

education worker and I work in schools and various other short-term

:49:38.:49:44.

roles so finding short-term sort of, not long placement work is very

:49:45.:49:50.

difficult because I can't work in a bar or a restaurant, but I don't

:49:51.:49:54.

disclose I'm disabled because I feel like it might impede the view of me

:49:55.:49:59.

to a certain degree. Have you directly experienced it? Is it a

:50:00.:50:05.

fear? I have gone to an interview where it was never explained why I

:50:06.:50:10.

didn't get the job. You're entitled to get feedback from interviews and

:50:11.:50:14.

I went to a particular interview and I asked for feedback and I was never

:50:15.:50:17.

given it. No employer is going to tell you directly to your face,

:50:18.:50:24.

"We're not going to employ you because you're in a wheelchair." I

:50:25.:50:27.

have been refused feedback from interviews. I have been told I can't

:50:28.:50:31.

run off naughty children so therefore, I can't be a Teaching

:50:32.:50:36.

Assistant. I've been told that I don't have the capability to travel

:50:37.:50:40.

on the Tube so I can't do short-term work and various things like that.

:50:41.:50:44.

Madeleine, you're visually impaired and you try to keep that hidden,

:50:45.:50:48.

don't you. How do you try to keep that hidden? If I go to an

:50:49.:50:55.

interview, I won't take my guide dog. I've got enough resitual sight

:50:56.:51:02.

to make people think and I will only disclose towards the end of the

:51:03.:51:05.

interview that I have a disability. Why is it that you do that? Well, I

:51:06.:51:11.

feel that if you can get your foot in the door, demonstrate that you

:51:12.:51:16.

look normal, whatever, they don't pick up on your disability and then

:51:17.:51:21.

you're more likely to get the job. Have you been concerned that you

:51:22.:51:24.

have been directly discriminated against because of your visual

:51:25.:51:29.

impairment? Yes, I have had situations whereas soon as I've told

:51:30.:51:34.

them into I'm visually impaired the atmosphere changed completely and

:51:35.:51:37.

I'm sure I lost the job because of that. Samantha, what difficulties

:51:38.:51:42.

have you encountered because of your disability? I'm not surprised by the

:51:43.:51:51.

statistics brought out by Scope. I used to be a high school teacher and

:51:52.:51:56.

now I'm an actress. Now I'm working with a lot of people on a big set,

:51:57.:51:59.

tile is money, you can physically see my disability, I do not hide

:52:00.:52:04.

that. What I do hide is the fact that I have chronic pain on a daily

:52:05.:52:09.

basis and the last big TV appearance or what I was doing, I had chronic

:52:10.:52:15.

back ache and I thought I can't stop all these people. There were over

:52:16.:52:18.

100 people on set, you know, if I stop now, time is money. And I

:52:19.:52:23.

didn't want to disclose that, but I did because I had to and I asked for

:52:24.:52:28.

a pillow to be put at my back and I felt it's about communication.

:52:29.:52:36.

Nobody made me feel uncomfortable, the fact that I stopped the

:52:37.:52:39.

production, they were more concerned about my well-being. I'm not

:52:40.:52:42.

surprised that a lot of people want to hide their disability for fear

:52:43.:52:46.

because of possibly losing their job or being seen as a, I hate the word,

:52:47.:52:51.

but being seen as a burden. So yeah, I have experienced that. Even

:52:52.:52:56.

recently when I go for auditions. I ask is it 100% accessible? Yes, I'm

:52:57.:53:00.

told, it is accessible. I get there and there is a step. So, you know,

:53:01.:53:06.

it's about learning. It's about talking with people, it is about us

:53:07.:53:10.

coming on TV shows like this and educating. Madeleine, from what

:53:11.:53:13.

you're saying, it sounds like you're concerned there is always a

:53:14.:53:20.

prospective and from what you're saying as well Storme that people

:53:21.:53:25.

are looking at you and thinking what can't you do? They imagine barriers

:53:26.:53:29.

to be there. There is ways round them. You've got the solutions. For

:53:30.:53:36.

example, I travel as part of my job. You will get on application forms do

:53:37.:53:41.

you have a driving licence? Do you have use of your own car? You can

:53:42.:53:49.

use public transport and you can use taxis, you don't need to be able to

:53:50.:53:54.

drive to move around. Paul Wilson is joining us now from one of our

:53:55.:53:59.

outside studios. You have got rheumatoid arthritis Paul and you

:54:00.:54:03.

need a power wheelchair to get around. What difficulties does that

:54:04.:54:13.

bring? Good morning. Yes, so just for instance getting around so I use

:54:14.:54:20.

a wheelchair full-time and just getting here this morning was a real

:54:21.:54:27.

mission because my local area wasn't able to provide any wheelchair

:54:28.:54:32.

accessible taxis. So the company that picked me up had to come from

:54:33.:54:41.

at least 35 miles away. So that poses a problem straightaway. Sure.

:54:42.:54:47.

For anyone wanting to go to work. So I mean in a work context, have you

:54:48.:54:55.

ever felt that you've actually directly been discriminated against

:54:56.:55:01.

because of your disability? I think in terms of discrimination there has

:55:02.:55:06.

been instances throughout my working life where I've had to take time off

:55:07.:55:13.

for hospital appointments and when you're disabled you have a lot more

:55:14.:55:19.

general doctors appointments, consultants appointments than the

:55:20.:55:23.

average person and unfortunately, when you work for a business that's

:55:24.:55:31.

not always, it's not always the done thing to do. You feel under pressure

:55:32.:55:37.

not to go to a lot of doctors appointments or consultants or have

:55:38.:55:41.

time off with your disability. What about the rest of you on that? When

:55:42.:55:47.

you had to put your hand up and say, "I need extra appointments." Have

:55:48.:55:52.

you had experiences along these lines Even things like your

:55:53.:55:55.

wheelchair breaking. Sometimes parts break and I use a power wheelchair.

:55:56.:56:03.

So if I can't leave my house to go outside and travel independently on

:56:04.:56:08.

my own... You're stuck? I'm stuck and I can't go into work. There is

:56:09.:56:12.

not a lot I can do about that. Do you feel you can be open and say

:56:13.:56:16.

that or do you feel you have to make excuses? I feel like you can't

:56:17.:56:21.

apologise for it. I mean at the same time, there is, you don't feel good

:56:22.:56:24.

saying it, but at the same time you can't apologise for it. This is the

:56:25.:56:28.

situation. Because Samantha you said when you had that bad back and you

:56:29.:56:32.

actually spoke up, people wanted to help. Yes, most definitely. However

:56:33.:56:39.

I have got a bad experience, I have got brittle bones and I fracture

:56:40.:56:43.

easily. When I was a teacher, I didn't tell anyone, I went to work

:56:44.:56:47.

with a fracture because I didn't want to take too much time off work

:56:48.:56:50.

because when you're educating children you can't afford to do

:56:51.:56:55.

that. So I have hidden in the past when I've been quite severely

:56:56.:56:58.

injured and that's a shame. There should be more of a support network

:56:59.:57:03.

for people to be able to say, "Look, I might have to take two weeks off."

:57:04.:57:07.

I think you have a higher wall to climb if you want to be seen as

:57:08.:57:11.

professional and conduct yourself well and you want to be seen in a

:57:12.:57:16.

positive and an asset to a workforce. If you're disabled you

:57:17.:57:20.

have a higher wall to climb. You need to constantly prove it on an

:57:21.:57:24.

every day basis by turning up on time every day. Don't be late. Don't

:57:25.:57:29.

like make sure your chair is working fine. Don't do anything that will

:57:30.:57:33.

make you look like more of a burden than you should be. That's a good

:57:34.:57:37.

way to put it, a higher wall to climb. All of you facing challenges.

:57:38.:57:41.

We were hearing from Paul, just the challenge of getting somewhere. Do

:57:42.:57:45.

you feel that's recognised? You have got to sort of be better at your

:57:46.:57:51.

jobment you're constantly trying to make up or to sort of prove

:57:52.:57:54.

yourself. So you've got that pressure on all the time. Paul, have

:57:55.:57:58.

you ever felt that it is recognised by those around you that instead of

:57:59.:58:02.

being something that they might, they maybe should be feel concerned

:58:03.:58:07.

about in a workplace in terms of it having a negative impact, actually

:58:08.:58:12.

it underlines the strength and resilience in you that you have to

:58:13.:58:15.

encounter these things on a daily basis and you get on and you do it?

:58:16.:58:24.

I think depending on your line manager or supervisor and dependant

:58:25.:58:28.

on job as well. I think sometimes you get some very good managers,

:58:29.:58:34.

people managers, who are very good. They understand their staff and the

:58:35.:58:42.

problems and they'll manage everyone's problems to, you know,

:58:43.:58:47.

within the business. Whereas you'll get, unfortunately, you'll get other

:58:48.:58:50.

managers that don't necessarily have the background on employment or

:58:51.:58:57.

people management who will not be as caring or as understanding within a

:58:58.:59:01.

working environment. Thank you all very much. Thank you for coming in.

:59:02.:59:04.

Let us know your thoughts on that. Let's get the latest weather

:59:05.:59:09.

update with Jay Wynne. Of course, it's Valentine's Day day

:59:10.:59:18.

today. Some of us got the cold somehoweder this morning. A touch of

:59:19.:59:22.

frost there. One of our Weather Watchers made the most of it!

:59:23.:59:27.

A different story in the south and the west. We've got cloud and patchy

:59:28.:59:31.

rain drifting northwards and eastwards. But it will brighten in

:59:32.:59:38.

the far south-west. We will get 11 or 12 Celsius but for many places it

:59:39.:59:44.

is in single figures. Sixes and sevens typical. Overnight, we will

:59:45.:59:47.

see patchy rain working its way northwards and eastwards and another

:59:48.:59:50.

band of rain gets into the south-west by the end of the night.

:59:51.:59:53.

In between the two, a lot of cloud. It will be a mild night, frost-free

:59:54.:59:57.

across-the-board. Five to seven or eight Celsius. A lot of cloud to

:59:58.:00:01.

start the day on Wednesday. There will be some breaks here and there,

:00:02.:00:04.

particularly towards the north-east and later on in the south-west, but

:00:05.:00:07.

with showers, but generally a fairly cloudy day with rain moving ever

:00:08.:00:10.

northwards and eastwards, but notably through tomorrow,

:00:11.:00:13.

temperatures are up by a good few degrees. We're into double figures

:00:14.:00:15.

widely. He was an Afghan interpreter

:00:16.:00:20.

who fought alongside British troops, but now he's unable to live

:00:21.:00:23.

in the UK because his asylum Javed Hokta tells us why he'll be

:00:24.:00:26.

killed if he's deported They use us and leave us. We save

:00:27.:00:46.

your heroes, now I feel ashamed, and I regret my time being with them.

:00:47.:00:50.

Disney drops a huge ship store after several videos were found to find

:00:51.:00:59.

anti-Semitic imagery. We will talk to a social media expert about the

:01:00.:01:00.

potential fallout. And, love is in the air,

:01:01.:01:02.

for some of us, at least. It's Valentine's Day,

:01:03.:01:05.

and we're asking, are you single We'll be talking to some singletons

:01:06.:01:07.

who say they're happy Here's the BBC Newsroom

:01:08.:01:11.

with a summary of today's news. Donald Trump's national-security

:01:12.:01:21.

adviser Michael Flynn has resigned General Flynn discussed American

:01:22.:01:24.

sanctions with the Russian ambassador before Mr Trump took

:01:25.:01:29.

office, and is accused of misleading the Vice President

:01:30.:01:33.

about what happened. A senior Democrat politician has

:01:34.:01:36.

said General Flynn's departure would not end questions about any

:01:37.:01:38.

contacts between the Trump A ten-year-old boy has died

:01:39.:01:43.

after suffering serious head injuries at the high street store

:01:44.:01:49.

Topshop in Reading. The boy was taken to hospital

:01:50.:01:51.

after what's being described by police as an "incident involving

:01:52.:01:54.

store furniture" at Topshop Police say the death

:01:55.:01:59.

is being treated as unexplained but not suspicious, and officers

:02:00.:02:02.

are continuing to make inquiries. Lawyers have criticised a plan to

:02:03.:02:11.

scrap the legal duty of care the MoD owes to service personnel in the

:02:12.:02:15.

course of combat. Injured soldiers and the families of those who have

:02:16.:02:19.

died would no longer be able to sue the Government for negligence. The

:02:20.:02:22.

MoD says they will get more compensation.

:02:23.:02:25.

UK inflation has risen at its fastest pace in the past

:02:26.:02:27.

The Office for National Statistics said consumer prices rose

:02:28.:02:31.

1.8% in January compared with a year earlier.

:02:32.:02:40.

It was the event by higher fuel prices and a fall in the value of

:02:41.:02:43.

the pound. The engineering giant Rolls-Royce

:02:44.:02:45.

has reported the biggest loss in its history,

:02:46.:02:47.

of ?4.6 billion. It reflects almost ?700 million

:02:48.:02:49.

in fines it agreed to pay authorities after being found guilty

:02:50.:02:52.

of bribery and corruption in 12 countries, in offences dating

:02:53.:02:57.

back more than 25 years. The weakening of the pound has also

:02:58.:02:59.

hit the firm's profitability. The chairman of the Japanese

:03:00.:03:08.

electronics conglomerate Toshiba has resigned following the news

:03:09.:03:10.

that the company suffered a net loss Shigenori Shiga announced

:03:11.:03:12.

he was stepping down shortly after the company delayed

:03:13.:03:18.

an announcement of its It had been widely expected to write

:03:19.:03:20.

off billions of dollars due to its problematic nuclear-energy

:03:21.:03:25.

business, and to admit that That's a summary of

:03:26.:03:29.

the latest BBC News. Do get in touch with us

:03:30.:03:38.

throughout the morning. If you are disabled and in work and

:03:39.:03:52.

fear you are being disconnected against, let us know. Samuel says,

:03:53.:03:57.

people should be encouraged and supported. Christine says, I became

:03:58.:04:03.

disabled six years ago, on return to work they were supportive, my

:04:04.:04:07.

manager helped a lot, but when he left, the new manager was uncaring

:04:08.:04:10.

and gave me no support, she ignored the arrangement we had set up and

:04:11.:04:15.

would not reply to my e-mails. The stress made me worse and I took

:04:16.:04:20.

early retirement. Keep your thoughts coming in.

:04:21.:04:22.

If you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.

:04:23.:04:30.

It is Valentine's Day, we will talk about love, tell us if you are

:04:31.:04:34.

happily single, or not. Will Perry's here again now

:04:35.:04:36.

with a round-up of the sport. Manchester City moved up to second

:04:37.:04:44.

in the Premier League, beating Bournemouth 2-0. They lost Jesus to

:04:45.:04:50.

a foot injury early on. Raheem Sterling got the opener from close

:04:51.:04:53.

range with nearly half an hour played. In the second half, he set

:04:54.:05:02.

up the second. Eventually, Mings getting the final touch, to turn it

:05:03.:05:08.

past his own goalkeeper. They are now eight points behind Chelsea with

:05:09.:05:12.

13 games to play, but their manager is playing down their title chances.

:05:13.:05:15.

They have to lose three games, because the goal average

:05:16.:05:17.

You know how difficult it is to win all the games in the Premier League.

:05:18.:05:31.

Game by game, now the Cup, and after we will see.

:05:32.:05:35.

We are happy to be second and to reduce the lead.

:05:36.:05:43.

This game is all about winning and getting results. We changed the team

:05:44.:06:00.

and formations, we are always looking for new ways to get results.

:06:01.:06:05.

We are not judged by tonight, our season will be defined by what

:06:06.:06:08.

happened from this point. They have not won a game in 2017.

:06:09.:06:11.

Anthony Watson has been included in England's 25-man training squad

:06:12.:06:13.

for their Six Nations match against Italy next Sunday.

:06:14.:06:15.

The Bath wing missed the wins over France and Wales

:06:16.:06:18.

Eddie Jones is confident he will feature against Italy at Twickenham

:06:19.:06:26.

as they try to make it three victories out of three.

:06:27.:06:31.

The band cyclist Lance Armstrong has lost his bid to block a ?79 million

:06:32.:06:36.

lawsuit by the US Government. It is alleged he defrauded the Government

:06:37.:06:42.

while doping while riding for the publicly funded postal Service team.

:06:43.:06:46.

He was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life in

:06:47.:06:51.

2012. It clears the way for this case to go to a trial.

:06:52.:06:56.

Michael Vaughan has backed Joe Root to make a success of the test

:06:57.:06:59.

captaincy. He succeeds Alastair Cook, and Michael Vaughan believes

:07:00.:07:04.

the enormity of the job is unlikely to faze him.

:07:05.:07:09.

In terms of personality, mentality, he is ready, driven. You look at how

:07:10.:07:14.

he has improved his game, by being dedicated, he is trying to get

:07:15.:07:18.

better every day. That is what he will demand from the team. The team

:07:19.:07:23.

had better get ready for long, hard training sessions. He will prop them

:07:24.:07:27.

regularly to make sure they are improving every day.

:07:28.:07:29.

The headlines at 10:30am. The Ministry of Defence is proposing

:07:30.:07:31.

to change the law to scrap its legal duty of care to servicemen and women

:07:32.:07:35.

in the course of combat. Under the proposed scheme

:07:36.:07:38.

they will not be able to sue the MoD in the courts for negligence,

:07:39.:07:43.

and compensation will be taken in-house and be

:07:44.:07:44.

awarded by an assessor. The family of one soldier killed

:07:45.:07:46.

in a lightly-armoured Snatch Land Rover in Iraq has told

:07:47.:07:48.

the BBC the proposed The MoD says the proposals

:07:49.:07:52.

are about better compensation and will save injured service

:07:53.:07:56.

personnel and families of those How old was he when he first

:07:57.:07:59.

started playing the drums? In 2007 Colin Redpath's son,

:08:00.:08:10.

Lance Corporal Kirk Redpath, a keen drummer in the Irish Guards,

:08:11.:08:17.

died when a roadside bomb exploded next to his lightly armoured

:08:18.:08:22.

Snatch Land Rover in Iraq. I deal with it because I want to be

:08:23.:08:26.

strong for his memory. I mean, some people could literally

:08:27.:08:31.

pull the curtains and never go out And people say to me, "We don't

:08:32.:08:37.

like to mention him," I say, "No, I'll talk about him,

:08:38.:08:45.

I'm proud of him. Kirk was one of some 37

:08:46.:08:47.

servicemen and women killed in the so-called Snatch Land Rovers

:08:48.:08:51.

in Afghanistan and Iraq. Colin fought a six-year legal battle

:08:52.:08:57.

against the Ministry of Defence, eventually winning the right

:08:58.:09:00.

at the Supreme Court to bring an action against the Government

:09:01.:09:06.

under human-rights law. Three years later, that case is only

:09:07.:09:08.

now coming to a close. In July 2016, Sir John Chilcot's

:09:09.:09:11.

Iraq inquiry report identified numerous MoD failings,

:09:12.:09:17.

in preparing for the Iraq campaign. The planning and preparations

:09:18.:09:24.

for Iraq after Saddam Hussain The report found the military

:09:25.:09:27.

delayed replacing the The MoD's new proposals cover battle

:09:28.:09:34.

and the preparations for it. They include stopping legal claims

:09:35.:09:41.

for negligence, like those arising from the Snatch Land Rovers

:09:42.:09:44.

against the MOD in the courts. A no-fault compensation scheme

:09:45.:09:48.

for injured service personnel and families of those killed,

:09:49.:09:51.

meaning negligence does Assessors to value injuries

:09:52.:09:55.

and loss, based on expert And compensation to be at the same

:09:56.:10:00.

level, as if the MoD had been No one disputes that it is a really

:10:01.:10:06.

good idea for service personnel injured in the cause of combat

:10:07.:10:13.

and the families of those who have been killed to be spared long

:10:14.:10:17.

and frustrating legal battles through the courts, but there

:10:18.:10:22.

are real concerns about the Ministry of Defence scrapping the duty

:10:23.:10:24.

of care that it owes to soldiers and taking the system

:10:25.:10:30.

for compensating them in-house. At the end of the day,

:10:31.:10:33.

they are an employer. You know, the fire brigade,

:10:34.:10:42.

the police, the ambulance service, they all have to go out

:10:43.:10:45.

with equipment that works. Well, that should be

:10:46.:10:45.

the same for a soldier. I mean, if not, what the MoD

:10:46.:10:48.

are saying is, we could send our boys and girls out with broomsticks,

:10:49.:10:52.

it wouldn't matter. Lawyers worry that bypassing

:10:53.:10:55.

the courts creates unfairness. You've suffered injury,

:10:56.:11:04.

you think that the employer, the organisation, the MoD

:11:05.:11:06.

is at fault, and yet you are asked to rely upon the MoD to assess

:11:07.:11:09.

the compensation that it should pay you for the damage

:11:10.:11:13.

that it has caused you. The proposed scheme assumes service

:11:14.:11:16.

personnel will not need and so will not receive any

:11:17.:11:22.

paid legal representation. Inevitably, there will be trauma,

:11:23.:11:27.

grieving families involved, and the sort of client care that

:11:28.:11:31.

legal representatives provide is absolutely essential in ensuring

:11:32.:11:35.

that those victims are not further In a statement, the Ministry

:11:36.:11:41.

of Defence said this. Obviously, the problem

:11:42.:12:09.

of what to do with his ashes, I didn't want to split them

:12:10.:12:14.

and I did not know where I would spread them, so I thought,

:12:15.:12:19.

"Well, he loved the drums, let's put them in his

:12:20.:12:22.

cabinet in a drum." So his ashes are with me in his

:12:23.:12:26.

cabinet with all his belongings. I could not think of

:12:27.:12:32.

anything better, really. The MoD's consultation

:12:33.:12:35.

on its proposals ends Colin Redpath hopes that

:12:36.:12:36.

for the injuries and the families of the fallen, the new system

:12:37.:12:43.

ensures maximum safety and fairness. Let's get some reaction now

:12:44.:12:49.

to these proposed changes. Patrick Hennessey is a barrister

:12:50.:12:52.

and former army captain who thinks this will make

:12:53.:12:55.

the MoD less accountable. Hamish de Bretton-Gordon,

:12:56.:12:58.

who spent 23 years in the military, thinks this is good thing

:12:59.:13:01.

for veterans and the MoD. Her son Kris was killed in 2007,

:13:02.:13:04.

while serving in Iraq as part Also, Simon Harmer, who lost both

:13:05.:13:09.

legs in Afghanistan in 2009. Tell us what happened for your

:13:10.:13:29.

family after Chris was killed in terms of compensation. It was

:13:30.:13:39.

quickly dealt with, but not as well as it could be. I am more interested

:13:40.:13:46.

in the duty of care. He was killed in a warrior. In the Chilcott

:13:47.:13:55.

report, in 2003 it was condemned for not having protection. He was killed

:13:56.:14:03.

in 2007, and still it had no protection, even though in 2003 the

:14:04.:14:07.

MoD were putting protection underneath. Therefore,... We are

:14:08.:14:14.

struggling to hear a bit because of a bad line, so I will move away from

:14:15.:14:20.

you for a moment. Let me bring in Simon, you lost out of your legs in

:14:21.:14:27.

Afghanistan in 2009. What is your view on duty of care, compensation,

:14:28.:14:31.

and whether people should have the right to go through the courts to

:14:32.:14:38.

get redress? There needs to be an independent body that looks after

:14:39.:14:43.

us. When I was initially injured, I had to go through the process

:14:44.:14:48.

myself, I have the support of the veterans charity. Fit. For them, I

:14:49.:14:54.

would have struggled. I know that things were missed from my

:14:55.:14:58.

compensation. Did you feel you had to fight? The support that I had

:14:59.:15:07.

around me, from the charity, it had not been there, I would have

:15:08.:15:13.

struggled. If I had been on my own I would have struggled. Now these

:15:14.:15:16.

changes are being proposed, what did you think? Would it be better for

:15:17.:15:29.

soldiers or not? I am worried. I think that taking away outside

:15:30.:15:32.

influence, or an independent body, is not a positive move. I also think

:15:33.:15:39.

that if there is no appeal process, it could leave service men and women

:15:40.:15:42.

short-changed. Hamish you have lengthy experience

:15:43.:15:49.

in the military. You think it is a good idea. Why do you think that?

:15:50.:15:53.

Well, I think anything that improves the lot of the men and the women in

:15:54.:15:59.

the scoop forces who go to war is to be something that we should

:16:00.:16:05.

appreciate and go forward. I mean, not only did I do 23 years in the

:16:06.:16:10.

British military, forth last five years I have been in northern Iraq

:16:11.:16:15.

and worked in Syrian hospitals entirely of my own choice, but

:16:16.:16:19.

without that military backing. I think when a soldier, when he or she

:16:20.:16:23.

goes into combat and you really have to have been in combat to understand

:16:24.:16:28.

it properly. Number one, you want to have the best medical facilities

:16:29.:16:33.

available to sort you out if you get injured and I think we do probably

:16:34.:16:38.

have that British military. Number two, you want to make sure if you're

:16:39.:16:44.

killed, your family and friends are looked after properly and some of

:16:45.:16:47.

the store jis that people had to go through, about people having to go

:16:48.:16:51.

through a long and lengthy legal process to get money is disgraceful.

:16:52.:16:57.

If this gives money to the people that require it at the very highest

:16:58.:17:03.

levels, then I think it is to be encouraged and look, it is a

:17:04.:17:07.

consultation, but I think further the Chill chat inquiry that we've

:17:08.:17:14.

mentioned and also the IHAT, the Iraq historic abuse inquiry has

:17:15.:17:21.

broken in somewhat the covenant, the Army covenant that deal with

:17:22.:17:25.

civilians and politicians in this country have with the British

:17:26.:17:29.

military and that needs to be enhanced and I am concerned that MPs

:17:30.:17:36.

and I have met a lot recently with my activities in Syria are stymied

:17:37.:17:40.

by the desire to make sure that legally everything is right before

:17:41.:17:44.

they commit us to military action which at the end of the day is what

:17:45.:17:51.

our British Armed Forces are for. Patrick, if it stops somebody who

:17:52.:17:55.

has been through a trauma, whether they have been injured or the

:17:56.:17:58.

families of somebody that they have lost, if it stops them having to go

:17:59.:18:02.

through a lengthy legal process and they get compensation at the level

:18:03.:18:11.

they would have done? That can happen speedily now if the MoD isn't

:18:12.:18:16.

fighting the claim. I think it is a really important to acknowledge that

:18:17.:18:18.

there is a problem here. There is a problem here that needs to be

:18:19.:18:21.

addressed and it was said in one of your reports that the MoD is an

:18:22.:18:25.

employer like any other and the problem, it's not because ultimately

:18:26.:18:30.

when you go to war, there is an enemy and then me is trying to kill

:18:31.:18:36.

and injure you and that's what is different about soldiering to any

:18:37.:18:39.

other walk of life. I recognise there is a problem and this is the

:18:40.:18:42.

MoD trying to address it, but my concern is in the detail. So for

:18:43.:18:47.

example, it is said in the consultation there maybe an

:18:48.:18:49.

independent assessor for eligibility, but that might be done

:18:50.:18:53.

in house. So that could mean the MoD is entitled to look at the claim and

:18:54.:18:56.

say, "We don't think you have a claim at all." Where is the right of

:18:57.:19:01.

appeal to that? If the MoD allows your claim, it is said we imagine,

:19:02.:19:05.

the MoD will normally agree with an independent assessor on the value of

:19:06.:19:09.

your claim. Well, it's quite conceivable that the MoD won't agree

:19:10.:19:12.

and there is very little detail currently on what would happen if

:19:13.:19:17.

that circumstances. You might have a 19-year-old soldier who has been

:19:18.:19:20.

terribly injured and who maybe doesn't have the background,

:19:21.:19:23.

sophistication, family resources to challenge what the MoD is saying. He

:19:24.:19:28.

may have a right of appeal to an appeals tribunal, but you can see

:19:29.:19:32.

how these things will spiral into the same delay that is happening now

:19:33.:19:36.

without the independent scrutiny. Everybody mentioned the importance

:19:37.:19:38.

of independence because you can't be your own judge and jury. Val you

:19:39.:19:44.

were talking about the concerns with your situation with your son, the

:19:45.:19:50.

vehicle that he was travelling in and the importance of lessons being

:19:51.:19:54.

learnt. The Ministry of Defence says it is good at learning lessons from

:19:55.:19:58.

any incident involving safety of personnel. Does that reassure you?

:19:59.:20:06.

No, it doesn't because four years down the line and the Warrior

:20:07.:20:11.

vehicle was still the same as they were saying in 2003. How can that

:20:12.:20:17.

reassure you when four years later the vehicle is still in the same

:20:18.:20:21.

condition it was and is still as dangerous?

:20:22.:20:27.

What do you feel is the best way to hold the MoD o to account on things

:20:28.:20:31.

like that? Is it the courts? Is it something else? There is the

:20:32.:20:36.

coroners's court? There is the coroner's court and at Chris'

:20:37.:20:39.

inquest the coroner asked the question - why there was no

:20:40.:20:45.

protection on the under billiony? I've asked repeatedly of the MoD for

:20:46.:20:50.

proof that protection has been put underneath the Warrior vehicles, but

:20:51.:20:54.

they have never replied to me. So where was their duty of care then

:20:55.:21:00.

when it was recommended in 2003 that this be done and in 2007 it still

:21:01.:21:10.

hadn't been done. On the issue of lessons being learned, Patrick, you

:21:11.:21:14.

are a barrister and you have got a vested interest in legal claims

:21:15.:21:17.

being pursued, but do you believe that the courts process does mean

:21:18.:21:22.

accountability, there is greater accountability or is it possible

:21:23.:21:26.

that accountability is had through greater MPs scrut thee and the

:21:27.:21:30.

coroner's courts? This is really interesting because I don't

:21:31.:21:33.

necessarily either the court process or the proposed compensation process

:21:34.:21:37.

deal with the sorts of issues being raised there. There is a difference

:21:38.:21:39.

between the compensation that should be awarded to servicemen who are

:21:40.:21:45.

killed and injured and what I would characterise as kit issues and the

:21:46.:21:48.

duty of care to individual servicemen may not be the same thing

:21:49.:21:52.

as operational effectiveness and this is a great example of one of

:21:53.:21:57.

the really difficult decisions that militaries have to make sometimes

:21:58.:22:00.

the most important thing when looking at a vehicle for example

:22:01.:22:03.

might not be the level of protection it affords. It might be its

:22:04.:22:06.

mobility. It might be its fire power and it doesn't seem to me that

:22:07.:22:10.

either the courts process currently or this proposed scheme would deal

:22:11.:22:13.

with that aspect. That is something that's more properly dealt with by

:22:14.:22:18.

politicians. Thank you all very much for joining us, thank you.

:22:19.:22:24.

PewDiePie was the highest paid star on YouTube last year,

:22:25.:22:26.

His real name is Felix Kjellberg and he had a lucrative

:22:27.:22:30.

But Disney has just cut ties with the internet celebrity over

:22:31.:22:34.

The decision came after several videos he released over the past few

:22:35.:22:42.

months were found to contain Nazi references or anti-Semitic imagery.

:22:43.:22:44.

Let's talk now to someone who knows a thing or two about social media

:22:45.:22:47.

and how important these relationships can be for businesses.

:22:48.:22:50.

Steve Kuncewicz is a social media expert at the law

:22:51.:22:52.

Thank you very much indeed for joining us. So the relationship has

:22:53.:23:01.

now been severed. What is your prospective on the importance of

:23:02.:23:05.

that relationship? Well, I think it is an object lesson really in

:23:06.:23:09.

YouTube celebrities getting mainstream attention. PewDiePie for

:23:10.:23:13.

quite sometime was the most subscribed channel on YouTube. He

:23:14.:23:18.

beat out E MI Music to become one of the most viewed YouTube channels

:23:19.:23:21.

there was and he had a number of criticisms over the course of the

:23:22.:23:25.

past few years in relation to the content that he put up. Like a lot

:23:26.:23:30.

of YouTube influences PewDiePie has been forced to grow up in public.

:23:31.:23:36.

And that corporate master got in touch with him because they liked

:23:37.:23:40.

his reverence, they liked his humour, they liked the genuine

:23:41.:23:43.

nature, the authenticity of the way he communicated with the followers,

:23:44.:23:48.

however, it looks as if that sense of humour hasn't travelled well and

:23:49.:23:53.

if you're a corporate giant like Disney the last thing you want is

:23:54.:23:58.

anything to do with anti-semitism. The YouTube stars are really young.

:23:59.:24:02.

Earning that amount of money. The vast number of followers at the age

:24:03.:24:06.

of 27. In terms of fall-out and damage, how do you see it? Well,

:24:07.:24:12.

it's trillioning that the agreement that was part of Disney, noticed

:24:13.:24:20.

that PewDiePie was a gamer and vast majority of his content was about

:24:21.:24:26.

gaming, but it was non gaming content that got him into trouble.

:24:27.:24:30.

There will be some disrepute clause in there, but it will be a message

:24:31.:24:34.

to a lot of other YouTube influences to show them that they are going to

:24:35.:24:37.

be expected to be that bit more corporate if they do intend to turn

:24:38.:24:43.

this into a thriving career and having some old-fashioned input on

:24:44.:24:48.

how you present yourself, strategy, the journalistic training that some

:24:49.:24:51.

of the influences don't have might be a good idea if they want this to

:24:52.:24:55.

be a sustainable business. He made a good business out of it. No one is

:24:56.:25:00.

going to regulate are they in the way you're talking about having the

:25:01.:25:03.

journalistic or legal training or whatever? No, that's right. There is

:25:04.:25:08.

a lot of regulation around advertising law where we have seen

:25:09.:25:11.

YouTube influences fall foul along with brands at the same time. There

:25:12.:25:16.

is regulation the issue is a sense of humour doesn't trasm. Local laws

:25:17.:25:20.

don't travel across the internet and running their business, like a

:25:21.:25:22.

business and treating it in that way, thinking about the effects of

:25:23.:25:27.

what they say may have upon the various stakeholders will be

:25:28.:25:30.

essential for the YouTubers of the future. It was a mutual

:25:31.:25:34.

relationship. It has ended. Is that it? Any lasting damage? Well, I

:25:35.:25:40.

think PewDiePie has done a fair bit to damage himself over the past six

:25:41.:25:46.

months. He suggested when he hit 50 million subscribers on YouTube he

:25:47.:25:50.

may walk away from the platform. He had a rant about the fact that he

:25:51.:25:55.

lost followers. The mainstream media pounced on him and saw it as a

:25:56.:26:02.

temper tantrum. He retweeted a joke about Islamic State. He has done a

:26:03.:26:07.

fair bit to damage his own success before now, but certainly other big

:26:08.:26:11.

advertisers and other big brands will think twice about engaging with

:26:12.:26:15.

YouTube influences going forward. Thank you very much, indeed.

:26:16.:26:26.

One of the most powerful men in President Trump's

:26:27.:26:28.

Michael Flynn quit as National Security adviser after details

:26:29.:26:32.

emerged of his contact with Russian officials.

:26:33.:26:33.

He's admitted inadvertently giving misleading information by saying

:26:34.:26:35.

he didn't discuss US sanctions with the Russian

:26:36.:26:37.

The Kremlin has been giving its response. Let's get more from Steve

:26:38.:26:48.

Rosenberg. What is the reaction there, Steve?

:26:49.:26:54.

Yes, a few minutes ago the Kremlin made some comments about this which

:26:55.:26:59.

you could sum up in two words as no comment. The representative told

:27:00.:27:03.

journalists on a telephone conference call this was the

:27:04.:27:06.

internal affair of the Americans. He said it was the internal affair of

:27:07.:27:10.

the Trump administration and had nothing to do with Moscow. He zwant

:27:11.:27:14.

to make anymore comment about it. At which point I said to him on the

:27:15.:27:18.

call well, he was happy to comment yesterday about this and yesterday

:27:19.:27:24.

he had said once again there would be no conversations between US and

:27:25.:27:28.

Russian officials before Donald Trump became president. No

:27:29.:27:33.

conversations about sanctions. And when you said to him today, he said,

:27:34.:27:38.

"I have said it before, I'm not going to make anymore comment about

:27:39.:27:43.

this." The Kremlin not saying very much, but some other Russian

:27:44.:27:46.

politicians with angry responses this morning. We have heard from two

:27:47.:27:53.

senators, from the upper house of the Russian Parliament. One has

:27:54.:27:57.

tweeted that this this is about paranoia and a witch-hunt and

:27:58.:28:02.

another who heads the upper House of Parliament's Foreign Affairs

:28:03.:28:05.

Committee said that this resignation either meant that Donald Trump had

:28:06.:28:14.

been driven into a corner or that Russiaphobia had permeated the new

:28:15.:28:17.

administration from top to bottom. Strong words there. I saw another

:28:18.:28:24.

Russian lawmaker saying it is another signal for Russian-US

:28:25.:28:28.

relationsment how would you describe rush-US relations right now? Well,

:28:29.:28:32.

Russian-US relations have been bad, very bad and the Russians have big

:28:33.:28:38.

hopes for Donald Trump and they believe that with Donald Trump they

:28:39.:28:45.

can turn things around and get sanctions removed and allow Russia

:28:46.:28:48.

to come in from the cold. But certainly this is a blow to that and

:28:49.:28:52.

from the comments we have seen from Russian politicians this morning I

:28:53.:28:56.

think it is clear now how Moscow is going to portray Michael Flynn's

:28:57.:28:59.

resignation, they will try and portray it as an attempt by Donald

:29:00.:29:05.

Trump's opponents and his enemies in the United States to derail attempts

:29:06.:29:10.

for a new relationship between the United States and Russia. I have

:29:11.:29:15.

been following the state media a lot, the TV and the newspapers and

:29:16.:29:21.

you see it almost every day. The pro-Kremlin media talking about how

:29:22.:29:25.

Donald Trump has enemies in the Democratic Party and in the Republic

:29:26.:29:28.

Party and in the intelligence services and in the American media,

:29:29.:29:33.

not blaming him for anything that's happening, the United States right

:29:34.:29:38.

now, but blaming those around him and I'm pretty sure that's how the

:29:39.:29:42.

state media here will play this. Steve, thank you very much.

:29:43.:29:51.

The British Army interpreter who says he will be killed if he returns

:29:52.:29:56.

to Afghanistan. We'll talk to some singletons

:29:57.:30:03.

about how they don't need a significant other this Valentine's

:30:04.:30:08.

Day. John says, happily single, never

:30:09.:30:17.

been happier, able to do what I want with my life. Let us know your

:30:18.:30:20.

thoughts on being single. Ben Brown is in the BBC

:30:21.:30:22.

Newsroom with a summary Donald Trump's national-security

:30:23.:30:24.

adviser Michael Flynn has resigned General Flynn discussed American

:30:25.:30:28.

sanctions with the Russian ambassador before Mr Trump took

:30:29.:30:31.

office, and is accused of misleading the Vice President

:30:32.:30:35.

about what happened. A senior Democrat politician has

:30:36.:30:38.

said General Flynn's departure would not end questions about any

:30:39.:30:41.

contacts between the Trump A ten-year-old boy has died

:30:42.:30:44.

after suffering serious head injuries at the high-street store

:30:45.:30:50.

Topshop in Reading. The boy was taken to hospital

:30:51.:30:53.

after what's being described by police as an "incident involving

:30:54.:30:56.

store furniture" at Topshop Police say the death

:30:57.:31:00.

is being treated as unexplained but not suspicious, and officers

:31:01.:31:04.

are continuing to make inquiries. Duncan Kennedy is in Reading,

:31:05.:31:06.

where the incident happened. I have just been inside the building

:31:07.:31:20.

behind me to the third floor, top shop is currently shuttered up,

:31:21.:31:24.

although the lights are on. A couple of security men standing outside,

:31:25.:31:29.

plus members of the public. I suspect the shop will not be opened,

:31:30.:31:34.

at least for a few hours, whilst this investigation continues. It

:31:35.:31:38.

follows this incident at 4pm yesterday, when this boy was in the

:31:39.:31:43.

shop, we don't know who with. He was somehow involved in an incident with

:31:44.:31:46.

what the police called shop furniture. He sustained head

:31:47.:31:51.

injuries, three ambulances were called, plus other medical services.

:31:52.:31:57.

He was looked at in the shop and was taken to hospital, where he later

:31:58.:32:01.

died of those injuries. The police tell as his next of kin had been

:32:02.:32:05.

informed. We have no other details about what this involved, what kind

:32:06.:32:10.

of shop furniture. We are expect think a statement of the owners of

:32:11.:32:14.

the shop later, they say they are preparing a statement. The local

:32:15.:32:19.

council so they are working with the police on this, although the Health

:32:20.:32:23.

and Safety Executive tell us they are not currently involved with this

:32:24.:32:25.

investigation. UK inflation has risen

:32:26.:32:29.

at its highest rate The Office for National Statistics

:32:30.:32:31.

said consumer prices rose 1.8% last month,

:32:32.:32:38.

up from 1.6% in December. The increase was driven by higher

:32:39.:32:44.

fuel prices and the fall Join me for BBC

:32:45.:32:46.

Newsroom Live at 11am. Here's the sport headlines

:32:47.:32:56.

now with Will Perry. Manchester City moved up to second

:32:57.:33:05.

in the Premier League with a 2-0 victory at Bournemouth. This goal

:33:06.:33:09.

from Raheem Sterling gave them a 1-0 lead. That just before the half-hour

:33:10.:33:19.

mark. Mings got the final touch in the second half to make it 2-0, they

:33:20.:33:25.

are now eight points behind Chelsea, with 13 to play.

:33:26.:33:28.

Anthony Watson is in England's squad for their six Nations match against

:33:29.:33:32.

Italy. He missed the victories over France and Wales with a hamstring

:33:33.:33:35.

injury. Lance Armstrong has lost his bid to

:33:36.:33:40.

block a ?79 million lawsuit by the US Government. It is alleged he

:33:41.:33:44.

devoted the Government by doping while riding for the publicly funded

:33:45.:33:48.

US Postal Service team. He was stripped of his seven Tour de France

:33:49.:33:53.

titles. It clears the way for the case to go to trial.

:33:54.:33:57.

We have just heard that the Fed Cup team will be a way to Romania in

:33:58.:34:01.

their play-off tie in April. More on the BBC News channel through

:34:02.:34:02.

the day. An Afghan interpreter who fought

:34:03.:34:04.

alongside British troops says if the Government sends him home,

:34:05.:34:07.

it will be a death sentence. Javed Hokta is applying

:34:08.:34:10.

for asylum here in the UK. He says he was sent death

:34:11.:34:12.

threats by the Taliban He's currently living illegally

:34:13.:34:14.

in Birmingham while he makes He's already had one claim rejected

:34:15.:34:18.

because the threatening letters he received hadn't been signed

:34:19.:34:22.

or dated by the Taliban. Javed has been talking

:34:23.:34:26.

to BBC Midlands Today. Now I feel ashamed and I regret my

:34:27.:34:30.

time being with them. This wasn't the life that

:34:31.:34:46.

Javed Hokta imagined after spending two years fighting alongside

:34:47.:34:46.

British Armed Forces in Afghanistan. I was working as a soldier

:34:47.:34:50.

and interpreter as well, with the SPS and SAS,

:34:51.:34:53.

the British special forces. Our base was in our province,

:34:54.:34:58.

south of Afghanistan, but we had operations specially

:34:59.:35:03.

in dangerous parts of Afghanistan like Kandahar, Helmand,

:35:04.:35:06.

Farrar, Herat, these areas. So we were quick reaction force,

:35:07.:35:12.

we attacked attacked the Taliban compounds,

:35:13.:35:15.

daytime but the most operations Javed also worked for the Afghan

:35:16.:35:19.

special narcotics force, disrupting His reward, death threats

:35:20.:35:26.

from the Taliban. They say me to leave the job

:35:27.:35:31.

and join the Taliban, they asked me, "Come and join

:35:32.:35:36.

us, otherwise you are I didn't want to be

:35:37.:35:38.

a part of terrorists. So he fled to Britain in 2008,

:35:39.:35:42.

hoping to find asylum in return Javed handed in these death threats

:35:43.:35:46.

he received from the Taliban In this one for example it says,

:35:47.:35:51.

"You will be in hell very soon." Here, they accuse him of being a spy

:35:52.:36:02.

for the Crusaders and sentence him Now the Home Office refused

:36:03.:36:05.

to accept that these letters were genuine and they turned

:36:06.:36:09.

down his claim for asylum. Last week, the Commons Defence

:36:10.:36:13.

Select Committee heard The perception all over the country

:36:14.:36:15.

for them is that they have served with the infidel forces there,

:36:16.:36:21.

the eyes and ears of Something dreadful will happen

:36:22.:36:23.

and you will have no If he is sent back that will be

:36:24.:36:27.

an appalling act by our government and there will be one

:36:28.:36:32.

person to blame. The Ministers of the Crown

:36:33.:36:39.

and the Government. In what is, I think, an act

:36:40.:36:44.

as shameful as any I can remember We're going to refer to the fact

:36:45.:36:47.

that all these other foreign governments have

:36:48.:36:51.

changed their opinion, lifted the interpreters out

:36:52.:36:53.

of Afghanistan and given them Javed is making a renewed asylum

:36:54.:36:55.

application later this month. I think it's really unimaginable

:36:56.:36:58.

to put yourself in a position like him, and being really let down

:36:59.:37:02.

by a Government that is supported by working in the most

:37:03.:37:06.

dangerous circumstances. For now he finds himself living

:37:07.:37:09.

illegally in the West Midlands relying on friends for a roof

:37:10.:37:12.

over his head. But the people who work with the US

:37:13.:37:18.

and the European countries, they fully support those people

:37:19.:37:24.

who worked for them in Afghanistan and they welcome

:37:25.:37:27.

them to their countries If you can't take

:37:28.:37:29.

the responsibility, Maybe if we had worked for somebody

:37:30.:37:31.

else now we would be safe. Let's talk now to Colonel Simon

:37:32.:37:37.

Diggins, who was the British defence What does this country over him? I

:37:38.:37:56.

believe what we need to be able to do for him and all of the

:37:57.:38:00.

interpreters is to give them a safe and secure place to come to. They

:38:01.:38:04.

put themselves at extraordinary risk to work for us and for the

:38:05.:38:09.

Government of Afghanistan, and now that they are under threat, able to

:38:10.:38:13.

continue to work in Afghanistan, live there, we should have no

:38:14.:38:16.

hesitation in bringing them here. What is the threat to interpreters

:38:17.:38:24.

in Afghanistan? Exactly as your previous article said. The Taliban

:38:25.:38:30.

regard them as traitors, people who worked for the so-called crusaders,

:38:31.:38:34.

that is ours, and therefore they are the Summit targets in the eyes of

:38:35.:38:38.

the Taliban and also now you have got Islamic State in Afghanistan,

:38:39.:38:43.

and they regard them as targets. And not just them, but their families.

:38:44.:38:48.

If they cannot get the individual, they will try to get the families.

:38:49.:38:53.

Wendy where defence cachet in Kabul you had particular experience of

:38:54.:38:58.

dealing with the case of one Afghan interpreter who had three limbs

:38:59.:39:02.

blown off while he was on patrol, he wanted him brought to this country

:39:03.:39:05.

for medical treatment. Tell us what your experiences were of Government

:39:06.:39:09.

approach and the Home Office approach on it. Extraordinarily

:39:10.:39:16.

disappointing. This individual had been on patrol with British forces

:39:17.:39:21.

in Helmand, there had been an IED attack, he was evacuated to our

:39:22.:39:27.

medical base in Helmand, where he received first-class treatment by

:39:28.:39:31.

the brilliant medics we had working for us in Afghanistan, but there

:39:32.:39:34.

came a point where he needed to move on to further treatment, and if he

:39:35.:39:38.

had been a British soldier, he would have been evacuated back here, where

:39:39.:39:42.

he could have been looked after properly. When the subject was

:39:43.:39:46.

raised and I discussed it with an official from the Government, the

:39:47.:39:51.

only thing they were interested in was he should not come back here. He

:39:52.:39:57.

might claim asylum and that might set a precedent. That was appalling.

:39:58.:40:03.

In the end, for that individual, we evacuated him to India, where he

:40:04.:40:06.

received excellent treatment, but the attitude was wrong, it was that

:40:07.:40:12.

we were concerned for him not to be an asylum seeker. That has prevailed

:40:13.:40:15.

throughout the policies which have been in place since then to look

:40:16.:40:19.

after our Internet has. The Home Office has given us a statement. It

:40:20.:40:24.

says, while we cannot comment on this case, or claims are carefully

:40:25.:40:28.

considered on their merits and based on evidence provided by the

:40:29.:40:34.

applicant. We know that he has had one claim rejected because the

:40:35.:40:36.

threatening letters that he's admitted as evidence were not signed

:40:37.:40:41.

or dated by the Taliban. How do you respond? If it was not so awful and

:40:42.:40:50.

serious, it is almost laughable. The idea that the pilot and will sit

:40:51.:40:55.

down and write in a nice headed bit of notepaper, properly signed and

:40:56.:40:59.

dated, with a nice stamp on, saying we will kill this individual, and

:41:00.:41:03.

only then will be Home Office accepted, is beyond absurd. What

:41:04.:41:07.

would your fears be if he is forced to leave this country? That either

:41:08.:41:12.

he or his family will be killed. Worse than that, that behaviour will

:41:13.:41:20.

be completely shameful. I cannot believe there is a worse

:41:21.:41:25.

circumstance, we deport somebody, who has worked for us, and we find

:41:26.:41:29.

ourselves in a situation where he is killed. That would be shameful. He

:41:30.:41:35.

said he regrets his time spent with the British Army, because of the way

:41:36.:41:39.

he is being treated. What message do you think it sends to people in

:41:40.:41:43.

other countries who are relied on for services like being a

:41:44.:41:49.

translator? It sends a negative message. It is sadly inevitable we

:41:50.:41:55.

will be to work in countries where we do not have the language skills

:41:56.:41:59.

ourselves, so we will need interpreters in the future, but if

:42:00.:42:03.

the message we send to them is that we will use you and then we will

:42:04.:42:07.

dump you, that sends a very poor message indeed.

:42:08.:42:16.

Valentine's Day is renowned for being the most

:42:17.:42:17.

And many of us use it as an opportunity to show affection

:42:18.:42:21.

for our loved ones with cards, flowers or chocolates.

:42:22.:42:24.

In the UK an average of 25 million cards are given on Valentine's,

:42:25.:42:27.

Day but not everyone is looking for love.

:42:28.:42:29.

Many people are single and proud out of choice and are enjoying

:42:30.:42:33.

discovering themselves and what the world has to offer.

:42:34.:42:37.

Let's talk to some people who are all single and proud to be so.

:42:38.:42:40.

June Whittle, Stefan-Pierre Tomlin and Lauren Crouch.

:42:41.:42:48.

You have been single for 11 years. What happened? Why did you decide to

:42:49.:43:01.

be single? It was a choice, because of relationship issues in the past.

:43:02.:43:06.

I just wanted to find out who I was, because most of my life I jump from

:43:07.:43:13.

one relationship to another, and I went through abuse. I met somebody

:43:14.:43:18.

in 2005, it did not work out, and I thought, this is it. You could only

:43:19.:43:22.

be yourself not in a relationship? Yes. Do you ever have a twinge on

:43:23.:43:29.

Valentine's Day? I am happy being single, it is just another day to

:43:30.:43:40.

me. What is your view on being a singleton? There is nothing wrong

:43:41.:43:42.

with it. I would like to meet somebody one day. You have been

:43:43.:43:47.

single for four years? It is not a priority. There is pressure put on

:43:48.:43:51.

women, I am approaching 30, there is a thing where you see family and

:43:52.:43:55.

they say, when are you going to settle down? Actually, I prefer to

:43:56.:43:59.

prioritise my career and things like that. It is different now, one of

:44:00.:44:04.

the days when women need to be married and have kids by 25. It does

:44:05.:44:09.

not mean I don't want to meet someone, but I will not put myself

:44:10.:44:13.

under any pressure. You learn about yourself when you are single.

:44:14.:44:17.

Everybody knows those people who jump from one relationship to

:44:18.:44:21.

another. If you are always with other people, you don't get to find

:44:22.:44:25.

out who you are. You should be somebody who is so full of life and

:44:26.:44:29.

experience that when you do come to meet someone you want to spend the

:44:30.:44:34.

rest of your life with, you are an amazing, interesting person. You are

:44:35.:44:40.

here of the most swiped man on tender. That is put forward as you

:44:41.:44:49.

are all true eligible. It's a different perspective from what we

:44:50.:44:53.

are clearing about the pressures on women. You are very eligible. How do

:44:54.:45:00.

you see yourself as Mac I and a model, so I meet people in my

:45:01.:45:04.

day-to-day job. I have had girlfriends in the past. Last

:45:05.:45:09.

valentines I was on a date, on a TV show, I started seeing my date, but

:45:10.:45:15.

it did not work out. I find it hard to settle down with the right girl.

:45:16.:45:20.

You are on Tinder because you're looking for love. When I find the

:45:21.:45:26.

right girl I'm happy to settle down. I just haven't found her yet. What

:45:27.:45:32.

about what June and Lauren were saying about really understanding

:45:33.:45:35.

and knowing yourself when you're on your own. I spend half my life in

:45:36.:45:40.

hotel rooms by myself and it is quite lonely. I would say it is more

:45:41.:45:45.

a practical issue? Being in a relationship with my job is quite

:45:46.:45:48.

hard because I'm constantly travelling and there is trust issues

:45:49.:45:52.

with my job as well and I find being on Tinder it is quite easy to

:45:53.:45:56.

interact with people like me in my industry. Do you ever feel there is

:45:57.:46:02.

a stigma being a single male? No, I reckon if I really wanted to be in a

:46:03.:46:08.

relationship I could be. From what you were saying, there is maybe a

:46:09.:46:14.

stigma for being a single female? Some people are more traditionalist

:46:15.:46:17.

and would expect that a woman would prioritise meeting someone. I think

:46:18.:46:20.

over the past few years when I have been single, if I'd really wanted

:46:21.:46:25.

to, I could have had a boyfriend, but he wouldn't have astounded me

:46:26.:46:29.

and I don't really want to settle for anything less than incredible if

:46:30.:46:33.

it is someone that I'm going to be spending that much of my time

:46:34.:46:36.

with... Does the criteria get higher? It is not a criteria, it is

:46:37.:46:41.

not like he has to be or look like this, it is just the way someone

:46:42.:46:45.

makes you feel and unfortunately I'm incredibly romantic so I still

:46:46.:46:48.

believe in that spark and that's the only condition I have. So without

:46:49.:46:52.

that spark, you're not going to let anyone in? Yeah. What about you

:46:53.:46:58.

June? Is there a protectiveness as well when you're single? When you

:46:59.:47:01.

have been single for a long time, you know what you're dealing with.

:47:02.:47:09.

You're self-sufficient. I come from a different prospective because I'm

:47:10.:47:13.

a Christian. I used to jump from one relationship to another like I said,

:47:14.:47:16.

but my standards are quite high. Now my values are different. I could be

:47:17.:47:20.

in a relationship if I wanted to, but I haven't met the right man

:47:21.:47:26.

either. I'm happy being single. I've achieved quite a lot being single.

:47:27.:47:30.

Until I feel it's time for me to meet the right person then I'm just

:47:31.:47:34.

going to keep on being single. Valentine's Day is just another day,

:47:35.:47:39.

what about other key times of the year, Christmas, birthday? Christmas

:47:40.:47:44.

I spend with my family. Sometimes I get lonely. People say you have your

:47:45.:47:49.

friends and you have got people to do things with, but if you don't

:47:50.:47:54.

have a partner, you don't have anyone to do nothing with? There are

:47:55.:48:00.

times I wish I had somebody to cuddle up with and you know, go for

:48:01.:48:04.

a meal and stuff like that. I'm so used to being on my own, those are

:48:05.:48:09.

passing moments when I feel like that. You need a pet!

:48:10.:48:21.

Do you get pressure from family? My daughters used to say, "Come on mum,

:48:22.:48:26.

when are you going to meet him?" I would say, "I'm not ready. I do as

:48:27.:48:31.

well. My mum wants to be a grandma. OK, so you get that pressure? I get

:48:32.:48:35.

the pressure and when it happens, it happens. You can't rush these

:48:36.:48:41.

things. But my mum is keen on being a grandparent. Does it take

:48:42.:48:45.

confidence to be a happy singleton? It can be very difficult and dating

:48:46.:48:50.

has changed completely in the last five years even. And whereas you

:48:51.:48:55.

used to maybe seduce someone over the period of a few weeks or months,

:48:56.:49:00.

now if I'm on a date with a guy and he really likes me, there are

:49:01.:49:03.

thousands of other women on his phone so before it would be like oh,

:49:04.:49:10.

I was only competing with his super hot ex-girlfriend and now I'm

:49:11.:49:14.

competing with these millions of women who are readily available. You

:49:15.:49:18.

were saying about the spark. We watched the dating shows and there

:49:19.:49:22.

is that snap decision at the end of a date where it is like do you want

:49:23.:49:25.

to see them again? You get the sense of well, if there wasn't the spark,

:49:26.:49:33.

it's no. I have done proper dating shows. I thought there was a spark

:49:34.:49:38.

at the time, but it then wore off quickly. But do we put too much

:49:39.:49:44.

stall by the spark? Maybe. I think if you've had it in the past with

:49:45.:49:47.

someone. If you have had an amazing relationship with someone and you

:49:48.:49:50.

know that's there then I suppose you're not willing to settle in

:49:51.:49:55.

future and there is a lot to be said for letting something grow and

:49:56.:49:57.

seeing how something progresses over a period of time, but then I also

:49:58.:50:01.

think you can walk into a room and straightaway know if you want to

:50:02.:50:06.

speak to someone. I have got this thing in my head when I meet the

:50:07.:50:09.

right girl I will know straightaway and it will just happen really

:50:10.:50:17.

quickly. What about self protection? Yes, I think there is a lot of self

:50:18.:50:24.

preservation that you don't want to get involved with something unless

:50:25.:50:26.

it is going to mean something. If the relationship is right, then it's

:50:27.:50:30.

fine. You feel vulnerable and you put yourself out there, but they're

:50:31.:50:35.

doing the same. It is not a one-way thing where you're putting yourself

:50:36.:50:39.

out there and they can screw you over. Jeff e-mailed said, "It is

:50:40.:50:46.

great being single on Valentine's. I can't wait until tomorrow, cheap

:50:47.:50:50.

chocolate. And I bet better looking every day." Another viewer says, "I

:50:51.:50:58.

have been divorced for 32 years. It was the best thing that happened to

:50:59.:51:01.

me. I can do what I want, when I want, as often as I want. I don't

:51:02.:51:05.

want to have a partner barking out orders so I never wanted to remarry!

:51:06.:51:09.

" That's weird. If you're in the relationship with the right person

:51:10.:51:12.

you can still do whatever you want, when you want. We're all defined by

:51:13.:51:18.

past experiences. I suppose, I mean, I hope if I am ever in a

:51:19.:51:22.

relationship it is not the kind that stops me doing what I want and I

:51:23.:51:28.

would hope I'm not a girlfriend who stops my partner doing what they

:51:29.:51:34.

want. I had someone tell me I couldn't do stuff because of the

:51:35.:51:37.

trust. My next girlfriend is someone who is going to trust me and we are

:51:38.:51:42.

best friends and soul mates. I have been in controlling relationships as

:51:43.:51:45.

well. It is best to be friends first. Get to know the person and

:51:46.:51:49.

then take it from there. That's the best route. Could you imagine

:51:50.:51:53.

getting into another relationship? Yeah, I could, yeah, definitely. I'm

:51:54.:51:57.

not ruling it out. OK, well who knows who is watching!

:51:58.:52:02.

Good luck to all of you. Happy Valentine's Day!

:52:03.:52:08.

The American magazine, Playboy, has announced

:52:09.:52:10.

The magazine decided to remove naked pictures last year,

:52:11.:52:13.

but Playboy's new chief creative officer Cooper Hefner,

:52:14.:52:15.

son of founder Hugh, says that was a mistake.

:52:16.:52:17.

The latest edition of the magazine sees the playmate of the month

:52:18.:52:22.

reinstated with the hashtag #NakedIsNormal.

:52:23.:52:27.

Let's talk to Samir Husni, who is a journalism professor

:52:28.:52:29.

at the University of Mississippi and a leading expert on magazines

:52:30.:52:32.

and the journalist and author Juliette Wills who used to write

:52:33.:52:34.

Thank you very much indeed. Why do you think they have brought back

:52:35.:52:45.

nudity? Well, you know, it's part of the DNA of Playboy is nudity. When

:52:46.:52:51.

Hugh Hefner launched Playboy in 1953, there was a lot of magazines

:52:52.:52:56.

that had nudes in them, but his formula was to bring that to the

:52:57.:53:02.

first issue, the next door nude and the models and he combined that with

:53:03.:53:09.

what I call the first men's magazine because there was tonnes of advice

:53:10.:53:14.

for men and the only way he can get men to read the advice whether it is

:53:15.:53:18.

about music or movies or about sex was to have a nude picture here and

:53:19.:53:22.

there. For him to compete, part of that

:53:23.:53:27.

formula was to have those nudes that are not the celebrity nudes that

:53:28.:53:30.

were appearing everywhere like he did with his first issue with the

:53:31.:53:38.

poster from Marilyn Monroe. Julielet what's your view of that, the nudity

:53:39.:53:42.

in Playboy and whether men would read that sort of information

:53:43.:53:45.

without there being nudity alongside it? I think men can read without

:53:46.:53:50.

pictures. They do read cereal packets and things like that without

:53:51.:53:55.

pictures of nude women. But I kind of understand where they were coming

:53:56.:54:00.

from back then. It was a ground-breaking magazine. It had

:54:01.:54:07.

great articles. It still has great articles, but I do think men like a

:54:08.:54:11.

little light entertainment on the side, but they can also, you know,

:54:12.:54:25.

read a newspaper without being at this titilated. Was it an error and

:54:26.:54:34.

now it has come back? I often bought Playboy. In the last ten years or

:54:35.:54:42.

so, I'd buy the odd issue depending who was on the cover. I'm straight,

:54:43.:54:51.

but I like looking at women and I found that when the ban came in and

:54:52.:54:57.

they outright stopped showing nipples and etcetera, I thought

:54:58.:55:00.

really I can read these articles of this kind of stuff in GQ or He is

:55:01.:55:07.

quire or in a newspaper or Business Week. It lost the appeal that you

:55:08.:55:12.

could read something interesting and see some nice boobs! It went to

:55:13.:55:18.

bottoms which I found very odd. We will maybe some on the verbal

:55:19.:55:21.

descritions of the pictures at that point. Playboy without nudes and

:55:22.:55:30.

when you have got a brand and people associate something particular with

:55:31.:55:33.

it and you take that away, was it going to work? No. That's the reason

:55:34.:55:37.

why they are going back to the nudes because you cannot take the DNA of a

:55:38.:55:41.

publication and change it all of a sudden and then keep everything else

:55:42.:55:46.

the same. That's why even bringing, even if Scooper Hefner is going to

:55:47.:55:51.

bring back the nude, if that's the only things' going to do, it's not

:55:52.:55:56.

going to work. You have to remember when his dad created that magazine,

:55:57.:56:00.

it became one of the largest circulating magazines in the United

:56:01.:56:02.

States reaching almost seven million, but that was back in the

:56:03.:56:09.

mid-1970s, those days are gone. The circulation last year was 700,000.

:56:10.:56:14.

So you can imagine from seven million to almost three-quarters of

:56:15.:56:18.

a million. So if Cooper is only going to bring the nudes rather than

:56:19.:56:24.

reinvent the magazine now he has the opportunity, Hefner is no longer

:56:25.:56:31.

dictating what goes in Playboy or whatever selections of pictures or

:56:32.:56:33.

articles or you name it, so the magazine has to be desaound now, not

:56:34.:56:39.

for somebody who was born the same year that ploy boy was born in 1953,

:56:40.:56:45.

but rather for somebody like him. With everything available on the

:56:46.:56:49.

internet, are magazines just a dying format anyway? Are they just going

:56:50.:56:53.

to be inevitable limits to circulation? I beg to differ. I mean

:56:54.:56:59.

we are seeing more magazines coming to the market place in the UK, in

:57:00.:57:04.

the United States, but they are not the same magazines that used to be

:57:05.:57:09.

published in the 50s, 60s and 70s, anybody who publishes a magazine and

:57:10.:57:12.

gives me the same thing that I can Google and find the answers is

:57:13.:57:18.

doomed. I disagree on Playboy specifically with that because I

:57:19.:57:21.

think as you said the essence of Playboy has been what it was when it

:57:22.:57:25.

started. It's the, it's fairly innocent. It's inoffensive. It's not

:57:26.:57:32.

too much information as it were. So women have always had this area of

:57:33.:57:37.

slight mystery in Playboy. Thank you. Thank you both very much for

:57:38.:57:41.

your company this morning. I want to end with some more of your comments

:57:42.:57:46.

on Valentine's Day. "I'm single. I have a great little hope and a great

:57:47.:57:52.

little dog cord cam uponionship. It works for me. Happy days." Lots of

:57:53.:57:58.

you getting in touch on our conversation on disabled people in

:57:59.:58:00.

the workplace with statistics showing more than half fear losing

:58:01.:58:05.

their jobs because of disability. Terry says, "I feel like I have to

:58:06.:58:11.

work harder than non disabled." Catherine e-mailed, "I was a

:58:12.:58:15.

teacher. I was actively bullied out of my job over a period of two

:58:16.:58:18.

years. Over the two years I was told if I was a horse they would have me

:58:19.:58:21.

shot." Thank you for your comments. I hope

:58:22.:58:24.

you have a lovely afternoon. Happy Valentine's Day however you are

:58:25.:58:27.

spending it, I will see at the same time tomorrow. Bye-bye.

:58:28.:58:32.

I've searched the world to find these extraordinary people.

:58:33.:58:37.

I woke up and I could suddenly just play the piano.

:58:38.:58:45.

The human body is unique within nature.

:58:46.:58:49.