17/05/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


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17/05/2017

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Hello. It's Wednesday.

:00:08.:00:09.

It's 9am. I'm Joanna Gosling.

:00:10.:00:10.

America's former FBI chief claims he was urged

:00:11.:00:20.

to drop his inquiry into links between the President's ex-national

:00:21.:00:22.

The Liberal Democrats will launch their manifesto today,

:00:23.:00:29.

promising a new referendum on Brexit.

:00:30.:00:31.

There's also more money for housing and education and a promise to lower

:00:32.:00:34.

Today we're offering huge opportunities for young people where

:00:35.:00:41.

they can get on the renting ladder for the first time because we'll

:00:42.:00:46.

give them help with their deposits or they can rent-to-own with a

:00:47.:00:47.

radical new scheme. We'll have all the details and we'll

:00:48.:00:52.

be asking if the party has done enough to woo back voters

:00:53.:00:55.

who abandoned them in 2015. One of Labour's biggest union

:00:56.:00:58.

backers - Len McCluskey from Unite - says he cannot see Labour

:00:59.:01:00.

winning the election. Also today, our panel of black

:01:01.:01:02.

and Asian voters tell us Education, the economy and better

:01:03.:01:11.

representation in Parliament are all on the list. We will speak to them

:01:12.:01:13.

in just a moment. The former American

:01:14.:01:19.

soldier, Chelsea Manning, who passed thousands of confidential

:01:20.:01:21.

documents to Wikileaks, will be released from

:01:22.:01:24.

a military prison today. We'll speak to someone

:01:25.:01:25.

who campaigned for her release. Hello and welcome to the programme.

:01:26.:01:36.

We're live until 11am. The bad news is there

:01:37.:01:44.

may be no such thing. Some doctors now reckon it's

:01:45.:01:47.

impossible to be overweight without increasing your risk

:01:48.:01:49.

of future health problems. Do get in touch on all the stories

:01:50.:01:53.

we're talking about this morning. Use the hashtag Victoria Live

:01:54.:01:56.

and if you text, you will be charged In a moment we'll get the latest

:01:57.:01:59.

on election campaign here. First, though to the US,

:02:00.:02:06.

where the White House is denying reports that Donald Trump asked

:02:07.:02:11.

former FBI director James Comey to stop an investigation into alleged

:02:12.:02:15.

links between an advisor and Russia. Mr Comey, who was sacked last week,

:02:16.:02:18.

is said to have made the claims in notes taken after a meeting

:02:19.:02:22.

with the president in February. Following a meeting of his security

:02:23.:02:24.

advisers back in February, President Trump waited for other

:02:25.:02:30.

officials to leave the room before taking then FBI director

:02:31.:02:35.

James Comey to one side. The previous day, his

:02:36.:02:37.

National Security Advisor, Michael Flynn, had been forced

:02:38.:02:42.

to resign amid allegations that he misled the vice-president

:02:43.:02:45.

about conversations According to the New York Times,

:02:46.:02:47.

the president then asked Mr Comey to shut down an FBI investigation

:02:48.:02:55.

into General Flynn. But the FBI investigation

:02:56.:03:00.

into Michael Flynn is still under way, along with one into possible

:03:01.:03:02.

collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government

:03:03.:03:07.

to influence the outcome Last week, James Comey was removed

:03:08.:03:09.

from his post by President Trump. The White House has denied

:03:10.:03:16.

the New York Times allegations, saying the president never asked

:03:17.:03:19.

for an end to any investigation, but the suggestion that

:03:20.:03:23.

James Comey kept detailed notes of his conversations

:03:24.:03:26.

with President Trump has left some Last week, President Trump

:03:27.:03:27.

suggested he might have tapes of his conversations with James

:03:28.:03:35.

Comey. If they exist, those, too,

:03:36.:03:38.

could be called for, in order to establish whose account

:03:39.:03:44.

of the discussions is correct. Some Democrats are already saying

:03:45.:03:46.

this could amount to obstruction of justice on the part

:03:47.:03:49.

of the president, an unproven allegation, certainly,

:03:50.:03:52.

but the most serious yet to confront Donald Trump's beleaguered

:03:53.:03:54.

administration. The Liberal Democrats

:03:55.:04:04.

will focus on younger voters when they launch their general

:04:05.:04:07.

election manifesto later. A promise to hold a second EU

:04:08.:04:09.

referendum will be at the heart of the document but it will also

:04:10.:04:12.

include pledges to restore housing benefit for younger people

:04:13.:04:15.

and to make it easier to get Our political guru Norman Smith

:04:16.:04:18.

is across everything It's a big day for the Lib Dems?

:04:19.:04:35.

Yesterday, we had the Labour manifesto and today we get the

:04:36.:04:37.

Liberal Democrats manifesto. Maybe it is a side bar because the Lib

:04:38.:04:42.

Dems have made pretty clear they're one, big message for this election

:04:43.:04:46.

is vote Lib Dem and we will have a referendum on the deal that Mrs May

:04:47.:04:51.

negotiates. In other words, Brexit is their big pitch and they're

:04:52.:04:55.

appealing to those people who voted Remain. The manifesto becomes not so

:04:56.:05:00.

important, although, it will contain measures for more money for schools,

:05:01.:05:05.

hospitals, social care, reversing some benefits, they will be looking

:05:06.:05:08.

to see where that cash is going to come from. They'll also be a pitch

:05:09.:05:13.

for younger voters, so they're suggesting there ought to be a

:05:14.:05:18.

rent-to-own scheme to try and help first-time buyers, they're going to

:05:19.:05:21.

bring back student grants, but Brexit remains their big theme as

:05:22.:05:23.

Vicki Young now reports. The Liberal Democrats see this

:05:24.:05:28.

general election as a chance to change Britain's future

:05:29.:05:31.

and their message is clearly aimed at those who voted Remain

:05:32.:05:33.

in last year's referendum. They want voters to have another say

:05:34.:05:35.

on Brexit once any deal with the European Union has been

:05:36.:05:38.

finalised and if people don't like it, they should be able

:05:39.:05:41.

to reject it and keep the UK The Lib Dems hope their pro-EU

:05:42.:05:44.

argument will encourage Remain voters to swing behind them,

:05:45.:05:50.

especially in seats But in some of the other former

:05:51.:05:52.

heartlands in the south-west of England, Brexit is much more

:05:53.:05:59.

popular, so the party is trying to broaden the appeal

:06:00.:06:02.

with new policy ideas. The Lib Dems have already

:06:03.:06:12.

called for extra health and education spending,

:06:13.:06:14.

paid for by higher income On housing, they want to introduce

:06:15.:06:16.

a rent to own scheme for tenants and they've pledged to legalise

:06:17.:06:20.

and regulate cannabis. The Lib Dem leader, Tim Farren,

:06:21.:06:24.

has admitted his party isn't going to win the election

:06:25.:06:26.

and says his aim is to replace Labour and be an effective

:06:27.:06:29.

opposition to the Conservatives. Norman a development in the Labour

:06:30.:06:44.

campaign? Yes, strange words from Len McCluskey, the leader of the

:06:45.:06:50.

Unite union and Jeremy Corbyn's key right-hand man, a strong man in the

:06:51.:06:53.

Labour Party. Suggesting that Labour seem to be on course to lose the

:06:54.:06:58.

election, but also saying that if Jeremy Corbyn wins just 200 seats,

:06:59.:07:04.

that would be a success. Now, 200 seats would be Labour's worst result

:07:05.:07:09.

since the Second World War. Worse even than Michael Foot and yet Len

:07:10.:07:13.

McCluskey is saying all things considered that would be OK. What is

:07:14.:07:19.

going on here? Well, I think the truth is, Mr McCluskey, like many of

:07:20.:07:24.

Mr Corbyn's key allies, is just trying to protect him if in the

:07:25.:07:28.

aftermath of an election defeat there is a move to oust Mr Corbyn.

:07:29.:07:32.

So he can turn around and say, "Well, look it has been a very

:07:33.:07:35.

difficult election. The media were against me. The Parliamentary party

:07:36.:07:39.

were always attacking me. I've had to deal with two leadership

:07:40.:07:44.

elections. At least I won 200 seats. And thereby, ensure that Mr Corbyn

:07:45.:07:48.

carries on as leader even if Labour go down to a pretty dismal defeat.

:07:49.:07:52.

Thank you very much, Norman. Annita McVeigh is in the BBC

:07:53.:08:04.

Newsroom with a summary The idea that people can be fat

:08:05.:08:06.

but medically fit is a myth, according to a study of the medical

:08:07.:08:11.

records of more than Researchers say being obese

:08:12.:08:14.

increases the risk of suffering heart disease, stroke

:08:15.:08:17.

and heart failure. Our health correspondent

:08:18.:08:18.

Dominic Hughes reports. So just keep your

:08:19.:08:20.

hands on your hips. The idea that you can be obese,

:08:21.:08:21.

but still healthy has Previous studies have suggested that

:08:22.:08:24.

around a third of very They have normal blood pressure

:08:25.:08:27.

and cholesterol levels despite being classed as obese

:08:28.:08:32.

according to their Body Mass Index which is a measure of

:08:33.:08:37.

height versus weight. But a new analysis of the medical

:08:38.:08:39.

records of 3.5 million UK residents suggests the idea of healthy obesity

:08:40.:08:42.

is a myth. Compared to those of a normal

:08:43.:08:47.

weight, it suggests even outwardly, healthy obese people have a 49%

:08:48.:08:52.

greater risk of developing coronary heart disease,

:08:53.:08:57.

the risk of heart failure is increased by 96%

:08:58.:08:59.

and stroke by 7%. What was new for me from this study

:09:00.:09:04.

was that it showed that people who are overweight or obese

:09:05.:09:09.

are at an increased risk of heart disease even though they may be

:09:10.:09:15.

healthy in every other respect. Previously I rather thought that

:09:16.:09:18.

obesity increased blood pressure and your cholesterol

:09:19.:09:24.

and it was those factors which increased your risk

:09:25.:09:26.

of cardiovascular disease. Just being overweight or obese puts

:09:27.:09:28.

you at increased risk Rugby players are often used

:09:29.:09:30.

as examples of people who might be classed as obese,

:09:31.:09:34.

but are healthy. Their Body Mass Index would mean

:09:35.:09:38.

they are technically overweight, but for the vast majority,

:09:39.:09:42.

this research suggests being obese Lloyds Bank says the taxpayer has

:09:43.:09:44.

made a profit of nearly ?900 million after the Government sold the last

:09:45.:09:54.

of its shares in the banking group. It is almost nine years

:09:55.:09:57.

since the bank was bailed out at In a statement, Lloyds confirmed

:09:58.:10:00.

the group has been fully returned The former US soldier,

:10:01.:10:04.

Chelsea Manning, who passed hundreds of thousands of confidential

:10:05.:10:15.

diplomatic documents to the website Wikileaks,

:10:16.:10:17.

will be released later today Born Bradley Manning, she announced

:10:18.:10:19.

she would be living as a woman, She was expected to remain in jail

:10:20.:10:24.

until 2045, but Barack Obama commuted her sentence before he left

:10:25.:10:30.

the White House in January. A police drone has captured

:10:31.:10:35.

the moment a controlled detonation was carried out

:10:36.:10:38.

on a Second World War bomb discovered at a building

:10:39.:10:40.

site in Birmingham. Around 180 people had to be

:10:41.:10:44.

evacuated from their homes near Aston following its discovery

:10:45.:10:55.

yesterday morning. The British Army said it was one

:10:56.:10:58.

of the biggest unexploded devices A pair of diamond earrings have been

:10:59.:11:01.

sold at auction in Geneva for a record-breaking price of more

:11:02.:11:14.

than ?44 million. The pear-shaped jewels,

:11:15.:11:18.

nicknamed Apollo and Artemis, The flawless stones mined

:11:19.:11:19.

in South Africa are perfectly matched except for their colour -

:11:20.:11:25.

Artemis is pink and Apollo is blue. That's a summary of

:11:26.:11:32.

the latest BBC News. Thank you very much indeed. Let us

:11:33.:11:41.

know this morning what you think about whether it is possible to be

:11:42.:11:43.

fat and fit because experts are saying it is not. Get in touch with

:11:44.:11:49.

us. All the usual ways, hashtag Victoria Live and remember texts

:11:50.:11:52.

will be charged at the standard network rate.

:11:53.:11:56.

We will be joined by our audience shortly to talk more about the

:11:57.:11:58.

election and about what matters to them.

:11:59.:12:03.

Groundbreaking news in horseracing with a first-ever

:12:04.:12:08.

Yes, good morning, Joanna well, with many sportswomen are under

:12:09.:12:17.

represented and it is the same in British horse racing. Almost 400

:12:18.:12:20.

people were interviewed for this report, from all levels, and the BBC

:12:21.:12:25.

had exclusive access to it. What did we find? A growing number of women

:12:26.:12:30.

entering horse racing from clebleg courses and that's outnumbering men

:12:31.:12:35.

by nearly 70-30, but the problem is that women are facing career

:12:36.:12:39.

stagnation as the report puts it, once they try to progress. It also

:12:40.:12:43.

found that because of how male dominated some areas of the sport

:12:44.:12:47.

are, women are being denied certain opportunities and several of the

:12:48.:12:51.

participants in the study have to deal with inappropriate behaviour

:12:52.:12:54.

and banter culture. Now the report was commissioned by women in racing

:12:55.:12:58.

which seeks to develop the profile of women in the sport. Here is their

:12:59.:13:03.

committee member Suzanna Gill. Young women are coming into the sport, but

:13:04.:13:07.

then what we're seeing and certainly what came out in the report is that

:13:08.:13:11.

those women are not necessarily making it through to the middle and

:13:12.:13:15.

top ranks. So, taking it through the career, if you look at who is on the

:13:16.:13:19.

senior boards of organisations in race, the average is 16% and we have

:13:20.:13:23.

several boards in the sport that don't have any women a the top level

:13:24.:13:28.

at all. So we're seeing a stagnation of career progression and that's

:13:29.:13:30.

something that certainly has been recognised in other industries as

:13:31.:13:35.

well and I think we probably moan about it in racing, but it is the

:13:36.:13:38.

first time we have seen it and talked about and hopefully can now

:13:39.:13:41.

act upon it. I know you'll have more on this later in the programme with

:13:42.:13:45.

our sports correspondent, Joe Wilson. Yes, we will be talking

:13:46.:13:50.

about that later. If people watching at home have got any thoughts on it,

:13:51.:13:54.

get in touch and let us know your thoughts.

:13:55.:14:00.

Maria Sharapova is back in the headlines

:14:01.:14:01.

after her doping ban, she's not having a smooth ride

:14:02.:14:03.

No, she continues to be a divisive figure. Different tournament

:14:04.:14:11.

organisers have shown different attitudes. She was given wildcards

:14:12.:14:15.

to events in Stuttgart, Madrid and Rome, but for the next tournament,

:14:16.:14:19.

which is the French Open, she will not be given the same privilege. She

:14:20.:14:24.

is a two-time champion there, but the organisers said their

:14:25.:14:27.

responsibility to protect the high standards of the game's played

:14:28.:14:31.

without any doubt on the results, on the other hand, this morning, the

:14:32.:14:34.

Chief Executive of the women's tennis federation has said that the

:14:35.:14:40.

French Open had no grounds to penalise Maria Sharapova by denying

:14:41.:14:46.

her a wildcard. Steve Simon said she already served her sanction. The

:14:47.:14:50.

next tournament is Wimbledon. Sharapova will need to go through

:14:51.:14:55.

qualifying because of her low ranking. Alternatively she could

:14:56.:15:00.

receive a wildcard, but Pat Cash hopes the organisers will send out a

:15:01.:15:04.

strong message. I would hope that they would stand strong and said no,

:15:05.:15:08.

you've got to go through play and qualify. Look, Maria at qualifying,

:15:09.:15:13.

she'll breeze through it on the grass. She is very experienced and

:15:14.:15:17.

she will probably need some extra matches and she might welcome those

:15:18.:15:23.

matches. Clearly, she's not physically ready 100% for hard

:15:24.:15:26.

tennis. She hurt herself this week. I think it will be in the long run,

:15:27.:15:31.

it might not be a bad thing for her, but I thinkle scat autopsy England

:15:32.:15:34.

need to stand up and make a stand about this and say we're not

:15:35.:15:38.

rewarding drug cheats. Well, it will be interesting to see which way the

:15:39.:15:43.

All England Club go. It is a contentious issue with the fans and

:15:44.:15:48.

broadcasters wanting the most high-profile names play k, but will

:15:49.:15:52.

the All England Club want to stand up and be counted in the decision

:15:53.:15:55.

against doping. An interesting decision to be made.

:15:56.:15:59.

As politicians start to outline their policies in more

:16:00.:16:00.

detail ahead of general election, we want to hear what issues

:16:01.:16:03.

Over the course of the campaign, we're talking to voters

:16:04.:16:08.

from all over the UK and hearing what different groups

:16:09.:16:11.

Today, a group of black and Asian voters are here to tell us

:16:12.:16:15.

what issues are most important to them.

:16:16.:16:20.

Only about 6% of the politicians in Westminster, in the House

:16:21.:16:23.

of Commons and the House of Lords are from a minority

:16:24.:16:26.

That compares to 13% of the general population.

:16:27.:16:29.

We have an audience of seven voters from different ethnic minority

:16:30.:16:31.

backgrounds to talk about the issues that are important to

:16:32.:16:34.

William, I know you feel quite wrongly about representation, we

:16:35.:16:42.

start with you and tell us what your thoughts are. Yeah, of course. I

:16:43.:16:48.

think representation is really, really important, especially because

:16:49.:16:51.

issues pertaining to a certain demographic are never going to be

:16:52.:16:54.

highlighted or pushed forward if people from that demographic are not

:16:55.:16:56.

represented within politics at large. I also feel like it

:16:57.:17:03.

highlights a wider issue around elitism, the fact that people from

:17:04.:17:07.

certain demographics aren't presented as well so I think it is

:17:08.:17:16.

very important. I am the chairman of the Asian business council. I am

:17:17.:17:20.

here to talk about representation to the UK Parliament of the BAA me

:17:21.:17:25.

community first I have looked at other parliaments, -- representative

:17:26.:17:33.

of the BAME. The US or Australian parliaments is about two to 3%,

:17:34.:17:38.

whereas at the UK at 6%, we are still better off. At least we have

:17:39.:17:42.

those 41 MPs from ethnic minority backgrounds who are representing us,

:17:43.:17:46.

who are voices in Parliament. More of the MPs from our backgrounds

:17:47.:17:51.

would be much better. I would say we have people who are standing up and

:17:52.:17:56.

down the country from the BAME community and we should go out and

:17:57.:17:59.

vote for them and make sure we see them in Parliament in the coming few

:18:00.:18:03.

days all week or two. Do any of you feel there should be a mechanism by

:18:04.:18:09.

which the number of MPs from ethnic minority backgrounds is forcibly

:18:10.:18:15.

increased? I don't think there needs to be a mechanism or a methodical,

:18:16.:18:21.

mechanical method, but certainly there is an emerging trend, that

:18:22.:18:28.

simply planting an ethnic minority face as a candidate is inadequate.

:18:29.:18:32.

That person needs to be competent, needs to have credibility, needs to

:18:33.:18:38.

have a track record. We have got up and down the country certain

:18:39.:18:41.

constituencies where you have an ethnic minority face. Three

:18:42.:18:48.

elections, still there now, safe seats, the local population gets fed

:18:49.:18:52.

up with them. They don't reflect the real life, the young life of the

:18:53.:18:56.

community that they tried to or seek to represent. Therefore, this sort

:18:57.:19:03.

of somewhat oversimplistic connection that from the seek

:19:04.:19:08.

community, if you put forward a steak

:19:09.:19:12.

-- from the Sikh constituency. I am from Coventry. I am an active

:19:13.:19:25.

campaigner in the Sikh community. There are no Sikh MPs at the moment

:19:26.:19:31.

in the UK Parliament. That is a big topic in the Sikh community. We need

:19:32.:19:38.

to have not just ethnic minority representation, which is

:19:39.:19:40.

fundamentally important, but we need to have the right people, the right

:19:41.:19:45.

quality of person, representing us. The rest of you, do you feel like

:19:46.:19:49.

you're MPs are currently representing the issues that matter

:19:50.:19:54.

to you? Personally, I feel my MP does represent me, however speaking

:19:55.:19:57.

on the matter of having ethnic minorities in Parliament and

:19:58.:20:02.

politics, I come from the point of view of educating people from the

:20:03.:20:06.

ethnic minority backgrounds about ways to get involved in politics,

:20:07.:20:12.

because in my opinion this is the most tolerant country in the world.

:20:13.:20:16.

And I think people just need to know what to do, where to go, in order to

:20:17.:20:23.

access those places. So you say it doesn't matter if the MP is from an

:20:24.:20:27.

ethnic minority, as long as they are tuned with what is going on? Well, I

:20:28.:20:33.

think it would be a good thing to have the good representation, so 6%

:20:34.:20:42.

where there is 13% of the population is not that good. It should be

:20:43.:20:47.

organic, but in doing that let's provide information from members of

:20:48.:20:50.

that community to enable them to have access. I am a leadership

:20:51.:20:59.

development coach. It really does come from education, I think it is a

:21:00.:21:04.

wider community in society. If all young people were getting the right

:21:05.:21:09.

education, good teaching, good schools, good opportunities,

:21:10.:21:11.

naturally those doors would open and you would find a lot more black and

:21:12.:21:15.

Asian politicians in place, and that is where the issue is. If you wait

:21:16.:21:19.

until after you have graduated, it's too late. You need to go back when

:21:20.:21:23.

you are in the school years, three or four years old, and giving them

:21:24.:21:27.

the support they need. There has been I have found over previous

:21:28.:21:32.

decades a cultural and political tokenism, in terms of black faces

:21:33.:21:39.

for that constituency, Sikh faces for that constituency, Muslim faces

:21:40.:21:42.

her that constituency. That has been purely superficial exercises. The

:21:43.:21:47.

migrant communities in this country now include fourth and fifth

:21:48.:21:52.

generation. They have gone through that first oversimplistic,

:21:53.:21:55.

ineffective process. We are demanding more now. We are demanding

:21:56.:21:58.

quality, we are demanding authentic representation. We want people from

:21:59.:22:04.

amongst us to be coming forward to Parliament. So let's broaden it out,

:22:05.:22:09.

the key issues you are thinking, the forefront of your mind to miss

:22:10.:22:12.

election, what is of particular concern to you? There are quite a

:22:13.:22:19.

few, to be honest. We couldn't go overall the things, but for me,

:22:20.:22:23.

being a regular black woman, British woman, who is a professional, as

:22:24.:22:29.

much as I know a little bit about politics, I don't really believe

:22:30.:22:34.

that all the information I need to make really good informed choices

:22:35.:22:41.

are readily available. And I don't think that is helpful for us to make

:22:42.:22:45.

the best decision. Who's fault do you think that is? The media's, the

:22:46.:22:51.

government's, I don't know. I am a regular woman, the person that gets

:22:52.:22:54.

up in the morning and goes to work, has a family, has to do everyday

:22:55.:22:59.

things, I represent the everyday British black woman, and I am fairly

:23:00.:23:03.

intelligent, as I said, I am a professional, and I enjoy

:23:04.:23:05.

information and I try to get as much information as I can, but the man

:23:06.:23:10.

next door isn't necessarily the same as me. He isn't able to make certain

:23:11.:23:15.

choices because the information you need to make from great choice is

:23:16.:23:19.

just isn't there. The manifestos are coming out this week, would you take

:23:20.:23:24.

a good look at those? Absolutely, but I am making a concerted effort

:23:25.:23:28.

to do that. Does the regular man on the street do that, I don't think

:23:29.:23:33.

so. Let's look at Brexit, people say that word and they don't know what

:23:34.:23:37.

the actual term means. I think it means Britain's exit, but does it? I

:23:38.:23:44.

do know, nobody has told me. I am somebody that works all over Europe,

:23:45.:23:49.

and sometimes internationally, not just throughout Europe, I actually

:23:50.:23:53.

don't know if Brexit is going to affect my work. I have been working

:23:54.:23:58.

in Europe to 20 years, and I have been able to move freely and work in

:23:59.:24:03.

whichever countries have needed to without any concerns. I actually

:24:04.:24:09.

don't know if, when Brexit becomes our reality, if that will affect

:24:10.:24:16.

that. It has been a recurring theme, always a recurring theme, voters

:24:17.:24:19.

saying they don't feel they are necessarily hearing a clear,

:24:20.:24:23.

factually -based picture, whether it is because of the media coverage or

:24:24.:24:27.

coming from the politicians. How do the rest of you feel? Brexit is

:24:28.:24:32.

quite plainly and simply a very grey area, there is no exact action plan.

:24:33.:24:40.

I am just thinking more generally, we have the NHS, education, every

:24:41.:24:44.

single issue we are facing, are you clear on which party is

:24:45.:24:51.

representing? We need to look at who owns the media. That may be a wider

:24:52.:24:56.

issue. A lot of the media is owned by the elite, by people that want to

:24:57.:25:01.

perpetuate a certain argument. And I feel they are given the liberty to

:25:02.:25:05.

push forward certain parties and represent them a bit unfairly. And a

:25:06.:25:10.

lot of people in general, as she was saying, actually don't read into

:25:11.:25:13.

policies and they themselves do the research so they just eat up

:25:14.:25:17.

whatever the media give them that is a major issue. So let's focus on the

:25:18.:25:22.

specific issues at the forefront of your minds. What is your key, going

:25:23.:25:28.

into the selection? As you can see, I am a young person, unemployed at

:25:29.:25:32.

the moment but I have a youth platform in Croydon that encourages

:25:33.:25:36.

immunity engagement and empowers the voices of young people. For me, the

:25:37.:25:39.

key thing is what is being done for young people, what is being done to

:25:40.:25:44.

make them feel they can go out there until they are valued but what in

:25:45.:25:49.

terms of things specifically? Things like education, dropping statistics,

:25:50.:25:54.

and tuition fees, but what about things like PSA Chi education,

:25:55.:26:01.

things that will take them into life skills going forward in life.

:26:02.:26:06.

Talking about mental health. Talking about knife crime. Building a

:26:07.:26:11.

respect for each other and that communication. The key thing about

:26:12.:26:15.

knife crime is people don't always respect each other or respect their

:26:16.:26:19.

lives, are able to communicate healthily, and just to find a way to

:26:20.:26:22.

get to the root issues of that. There was a lot of talk about stop

:26:23.:26:25.

and search, but what about getting to the root of it, working with

:26:26.:26:29.

people on the ground, the community of organisations, helping them to

:26:30.:26:33.

help those young people. Interesting you have gone into that, rather than

:26:34.:26:37.

the bigger picture of the NHS, does that chime with the rest of you? It

:26:38.:26:45.

is a really big thing. In 2008 I was part of a programme set up by the

:26:46.:26:48.

Labour government, what they found was that young black men, young

:26:49.:26:52.

black boys, were overrepresented in the prison system, they weren't

:26:53.:26:54.

doing well in school, so they thought of what we could do to help

:26:55.:26:58.

them. They found 20 different young black people in different issues you

:26:59.:27:01.

were doing well and I was one of those 20. We got to speak to

:27:02.:27:06.

students in schools, prisons, young offenders institutions, to help

:27:07.:27:11.

raise their aspirations. When the Conservative government came into

:27:12.:27:14.

power, that was scrapped, along with other community events and things.

:27:15.:27:19.

Those are the type of things we need, we need to connect more, build

:27:20.:27:23.

relationships, communities. It is all very well and good, because

:27:24.:27:26.

obviously I don't want to pay lots of taxes, I want to do well and have

:27:27.:27:30.

houses and all that stuff but if your basic community is struggling,

:27:31.:27:33.

if people are not connected and don't see opportunities, it doesn't

:27:34.:27:37.

matter if the 5% are doing well if the rest of the country are

:27:38.:27:41.

struggling. So it is really important we start to

:27:42.:27:53.

look at really need help, really need support. That should really be

:27:54.:27:57.

a focus. You are only as good as your lowest common to nominate. If

:27:58.:28:00.

the people at the bottom are struggling as a country, you are not

:28:01.:28:02.

a successful country, and we need to look as a whole where do you want to

:28:03.:28:06.

go to. Do you feel the politicians are talking about the issues that

:28:07.:28:08.

matter to you? Yes, personally, they are to me. Education is a big one

:28:09.:28:11.

for me. I have two children. My daughter is 15 and my son is nine.

:28:12.:28:18.

It is important to me that I know that they have access to a

:28:19.:28:22.

first-class education, without necessarily having to be rich to

:28:23.:28:26.

provide that for them. But, beyond that, it is also how my children, as

:28:27.:28:33.

black children, are treated in school. My daughter is in an

:28:34.:28:37.

excellent school, so there are no problems there and I appreciate

:28:38.:28:42.

that, but sometimes I kind of worry about how they place black children,

:28:43.:28:47.

especially black boys, in a box. When you save a commune in the

:28:48.:28:53.

schools. The education system, and the schools. They are not allowed to

:28:54.:28:57.

flourish. That is a concern for me. Why do you think that is the case?

:28:58.:29:03.

Four example with behavioural issues, a lot of times, they may not

:29:04.:29:10.

understand the cultural behaviour of young black people. There are quite

:29:11.:29:16.

a few studies on that. That is that everyone to see. And then they

:29:17.:29:19.

labelled them immediately from a young age without helping to develop

:29:20.:29:23.

them in their own truth, if you like. And it may be because there is

:29:24.:29:32.

not a huge representation of ethnic minority educators who understand

:29:33.:29:37.

why the children behave the way they do. But it is important to me that a

:29:38.:29:43.

child is not held back simply because they are poor or they are

:29:44.:29:52.

black, or their parents are not necessarily into their education. I

:29:53.:29:55.

think the education system should cater for all. I am a Conservative

:29:56.:30:04.

voter. Listening to what Mrs May is saying, I believe in her Britain,

:30:05.:30:09.

that is a Britain that works everyone, regardless of where you

:30:10.:30:13.

have come from. I don't think any of you have said the economy yet. Who

:30:14.:30:20.

do you trust on that? What I wanted to say, our local mosque, it has a

:30:21.:30:23.

volunteer group where we have teachers who come in to teach

:30:24.:30:29.

children who cannot afford to go to maybe private schools or do not get

:30:30.:30:32.

the right education. So they are making the housewives busy. That is

:30:33.:30:41.

a local initiative. So are the politicians doing what you would

:30:42.:30:45.

want on this? The politicians should encourage this to be rolled out in

:30:46.:30:50.

other religious places. It could be in the temples. Coming back to the

:30:51.:30:55.

economy, we need a very strong person to negotiate for Brexit. We

:30:56.:31:00.

need Mrs May, a person like Mrs May, who will not crumble under the

:31:01.:31:04.

pressure of 27 leaders of the European macro nations to get us

:31:05.:31:07.

that good deal with the single market. We need those free trade

:31:08.:31:11.

agreements with the world. The Commonwelfies able to us. I voted

:31:12.:31:15.

remain. That bus has departed, we the thing about how we will progress

:31:16.:31:18.

our economy now. I don't believe that this woman has

:31:19.:31:28.

any interest in securing the lives, the economical lives, the financial

:31:29.:31:31.

lives of anybody else in this country apart from those like her

:31:32.:31:37.

that come from her world, from her financial background, from her

:31:38.:31:41.

societal background. She does not have the interests of the regular

:31:42.:31:46.

people like myself and my next door neighbours at heart. Absolutely not.

:31:47.:31:52.

It shocks me that, I understand that everybody has different thoughts and

:31:53.:31:55.

everybody has a right to think what they want and choose who they want

:31:56.:32:02.

who best represents them. But I simply cannot fathom how anybody

:32:03.:32:07.

could think that Theresa May has the best interests at heart of

:32:08.:32:14.

everybody. The issue will be deciding your vote

:32:15.:32:17.

when gu into the ballot box. So let's just in a word, please, we'll

:32:18.:32:23.

start with you? NHS and economy. Education, those are the key things

:32:24.:32:28.

for me. Economy and education. Education and investing in the

:32:29.:32:32.

younger generation. Economy and enterprise and education. For me, UK

:32:33.:32:37.

foreign policy, specifically in regards to Punjab and Kashmir.

:32:38.:32:43.

Equality and access for all. Young people and hopefully something about

:32:44.:32:45.

knife crime and mental health. Thank you very much. Let us know your

:32:46.:32:50.

thoughts as well. Watching at home. We're going to be in Dunstable in

:32:51.:32:57.

Bedfordshire on Monday, 29th May. If you've made up your mind who you're

:32:58.:33:02.

going to vote for or still deciding or don't think you'll bother and

:33:03.:33:05.

would like the chance to share your views and grill senior politicians,

:33:06.:33:09.

get in touch to apply for a place at: There are more details on our

:33:10.:33:11.

Facebook and Twitter pages. We'll speak to someone

:33:12.:33:15.

who campaigned for the release of Chelsea Manning, the former

:33:16.:33:19.

American soldier who passed thousands of confidential

:33:20.:33:22.

documents to Wikileaks. She will be released

:33:23.:33:23.

from a military prison today. Researchers have cast doubt

:33:24.:33:26.

on the theory that some people can be healthy,

:33:27.:33:30.

despite being overweight. We'll be talking to the scientist

:33:31.:33:32.

behind the research. Here's Annita in the BBC Newsroom

:33:33.:33:40.

with a summary of today's news. The White House is denying reports

:33:41.:33:46.

that Donald Trump asked former FBI director James Comey to stop

:33:47.:33:50.

an investigation into alleged links Mr Comey, who was sacked last week,

:33:51.:33:52.

is said to have made the claims in notes taken after a meeting

:33:53.:33:59.

with the president in February. The White House say the notes are

:34:00.:34:07.

untrue. The Liberal Democrats are putting

:34:08.:34:12.

a second EU referendum at the heart of their general election manifesto,

:34:13.:34:15.

which is formally launched later. The party says it would

:34:16.:34:17.

"let the people decide" whether Brexit happens once

:34:18.:34:19.

negotiations have finished. It is also offering pledges to young

:34:20.:34:21.

people, promising to restore housing benefit for 18 to 21-year-olds

:34:22.:34:24.

and help people get The head of one of Labour's biggest

:34:25.:34:26.

union backers has said the party is on course to lose

:34:27.:34:31.

the general election. Len McCluskey of Unite claimed it

:34:32.:34:34.

would be a successful campaign A spokesman for leader Jeremy Corbyn

:34:35.:34:36.

said he was determined to lead Lloyds Bank says the taxpayer has

:34:37.:34:41.

made a profit of nearly ?900 million after the Government sold the last

:34:42.:34:50.

of its shares in the banking group. It's almost nine years

:34:51.:34:54.

since the bank was bailed out at In a statement, Lloyds confirmed

:34:55.:34:56.

the group has been fully returned That's a summary of

:34:57.:35:00.

the latest BBC News. You Thank you very much. The

:35:01.:35:12.

unemployment figures. Unemployment fell by 53,000 to 1.54 million in

:35:13.:35:17.

the three months to March. Latest official figures just out.

:35:18.:35:20.

With Manchester, Liverpool and Arsenal all battling

:35:21.:35:28.

for the final two Champions League spots, the Gunners have

:35:29.:35:31.

They beat Sunderland 2-0 to keep themselves in the battle for a top

:35:32.:35:35.

four Premier League finish and qualification for

:35:36.:35:38.

the Champions League which would be the 21st season

:35:39.:35:41.

City need just a point from their final match to secure

:35:42.:35:46.

third place to guarantee their spot after beating West

:35:47.:35:48.

City are now unbeaten in their last 12 Premier League home games.

:35:49.:35:56.

Andy Murray's difficult clay court season takes another

:35:57.:35:58.

turn for the worse - beaten in his first match

:35:59.:36:01.

at the Italian Open by Italy's Fabio Fognini.

:36:02.:36:04.

It's likely to be the world number one's last match

:36:05.:36:06.

before the French Open, which starts at

:36:07.:36:08.

And Geraint Thomas showed few ill-effects from Sunday's crash

:36:09.:36:14.

by finishing second in the Stage 10 time trial at the Giro D'Italia.

:36:15.:36:17.

Holland's Tom Dumoulin now leads the race by over two minutes.

:36:18.:36:26.

That's all the sport for now. I will have a full update for you at about

:36:27.:36:34.

10am. Thank you very much, Jess. See you later.

:36:35.:36:37.

Some time after dawn today at a barracks in Kansas the security

:36:38.:36:40.

gates will open and Chelsea Manning will be released.

:36:41.:36:44.

Earlier this week, her lawyer Nancy Hollander told our reporter

:36:45.:37:27.

She's obviously excited. Erm, she's nervous.

:37:28.:37:35.

Getting out of prison after a long incarceration is not as easy

:37:36.:37:38.

It's a transition, there's a period of adjustment.

:37:39.:37:42.

And it will take her some time to adjust.

:37:43.:37:52.

But she'll be fine, and she's got a lot of resilience and a lot

:37:53.:37:55.

that she wants to do, I'm sure.

:37:56.:37:58.

And she will start doing it, as soon as she has a little bit

:37:59.:38:02.

It was straight after she was sentenced, she announced

:38:03.:38:08.

Then she started the transition process.

:38:09.:38:15.

Ultimately, she was given the transition hormones,

:38:16.:38:22.

but they continued to fight about her hair length,

:38:23.:38:25.

which is a huge issue for her - she was not allowed

:38:26.:38:33.

So, we're very relieved that she's going to be out of the prison

:38:34.:38:39.

and can finish her transition without the anxiety

:38:40.:38:40.

of constantly fighting, fighting for what she's entitled to.

:38:41.:38:46.

What stage is that transition at now?

:38:47.:38:48.

She has received hormones, I don't know when they started,

:38:49.:38:51.

And I don't know exactly what happens next, but that will be

:38:52.:38:58.

Let's speak now to Naomi Colvin who helped campaign

:38:59.:39:06.

You have been campaigning for her release. So how are you feeling

:39:07.:39:17.

today knowing that she is actually coming out? It is a really momentous

:39:18.:39:22.

day. I'm thrilled for Chelsea and thrilled for my friends and

:39:23.:39:25.

colleagues over the world who campaigned so relentlessly over the

:39:26.:39:27.

past seven years. It is almost unbelievable. Do you think seven

:39:28.:39:30.

years is a fair sentence for what she did? No. It's incredibly unfair,

:39:31.:39:38.

. Serving almost seven years Chelsea will have served longer in prison

:39:39.:39:43.

than any whistle-blower in US historiment for part of the time she

:39:44.:39:49.

was treated incredibly poorly. The UN reported torture, it reported her

:39:50.:39:54.

treatment amounted to cruel and unusual treatment and as Nancy

:39:55.:39:59.

pointed out, she has not been able to live her life in the way she

:40:00.:40:05.

should and identify in the way, you know, that she is entitled to. It

:40:06.:40:09.

has been incredibly difficult for her and I think that, you know, I'm

:40:10.:40:14.

thrilled that she is being released. It was the right thing for President

:40:15.:40:19.

Obama to do commute her sentence, but she suffered so much and it is

:40:20.:40:26.

unjust. White House said that what she did was harmful to national

:40:27.:40:32.

security. She put out classified diplomatic information and military

:40:33.:40:36.

records, 750,000 military records which, you know, some say did put

:40:37.:40:40.

lives at risk? There is always a question of balance here and I think

:40:41.:40:45.

when you say, "Put lives at risk." It is worth remembering at Chelsea's

:40:46.:40:48.

trial nobody produced any evidence that was the case and they spent

:40:49.:40:54.

concerted time looking for it. If military records are put out there,

:40:55.:40:57.

it is identifying people in a public environment who perhaps should not

:40:58.:41:00.

be identified in that way? There is always a balance and I think with

:41:01.:41:05.

some of those military records some were kept back and there were

:41:06.:41:09.

redactions made, but if you look at the balance between public benefit

:41:10.:41:13.

and potential harm and Chelsea's release, the balance is very far in

:41:14.:41:16.

the direction of public benefit in my opinion. So what would you say

:41:17.:41:22.

has been the public benefit? When Chelsea, the words we have from

:41:23.:41:26.

Chelsea before she was arrested from chat logs talk about wanting to

:41:27.:41:29.

generate worldwide debates and reforms and if you look at the

:41:30.:41:34.

impact what she released I think it goes beyond what she could have

:41:35.:41:38.

imagined there. The release of the state department cables informed the

:41:39.:41:42.

revolution in Tunisia which went on to spark off the Arab Spring and the

:41:43.:41:46.

spate of democratic grass-roots movements which shook the world in

:41:47.:41:51.

2010, 2011. It is hard to imagine impact on a greater scale I think.

:41:52.:42:00.

One senator, military veteran, has said, she is a traitor and treated

:42:01.:42:05.

like a martyr? This, you always see this with whistle-blowers because

:42:06.:42:10.

the same thing came up with Snowdon as well, hero or traitor. I think

:42:11.:42:14.

actually outside of the United States very few people think that

:42:15.:42:17.

Chelsea is a traitor really. Within the United States, there are some

:42:18.:42:22.

senior figures within the Republican Party who do see it very

:42:23.:42:28.

differently. John McCain says it devalues the courage of real

:42:29.:42:32.

whistle-blowers who use proper channels to hold Government

:42:33.:42:36.

accountable and he also says that the actions endangered the lives of

:42:37.:42:40.

US troops, diplomats and intelligence sources. But... So,

:42:41.:42:49.

obviously people can disagree. As I say at Chelsea's trial nobody

:42:50.:42:53.

managed to produce any evidence that lives had been put at risk by

:42:54.:42:57.

Chelsea's disclosures and I think that history will judge her very

:42:58.:43:01.

kindly. Whatever individuals think, she had a tough time going through

:43:02.:43:08.

what she has been going through with gender dysphoria and being

:43:09.:43:11.

incarcerated? She is incredibly brave and when you think about it,

:43:12.:43:15.

she went through this incredible battle to maintain her intellectual

:43:16.:43:21.

integrity against odds. She joined the military believing it was the

:43:22.:43:25.

patriotic thing to do and believing what she was told about fighting

:43:26.:43:27.

terrorism and fighting for democracy in the Middle East. And sort of when

:43:28.:43:33.

she realised that wasn't quite what was going on, had the convictions to

:43:34.:43:37.

get the message out the that's one enormous battle and thereafter, she

:43:38.:43:42.

fought this very battle for transgender rights and for her

:43:43.:43:45.

gender identity to be respected and you know that's another enormous

:43:46.:43:51.

battle. Her bravery, I think, is astonishing and I think these a very

:43:52.:43:54.

modern kind of hero really. Thank you very much.

:43:55.:44:03.

It's one of the most serious allegations faced

:44:04.:44:05.

Did he ask FBI chief James Comey to drop an inquiry into links

:44:06.:44:09.

between his ex-national security adviser and Russia?

:44:10.:44:12.

In a moment we'll be talking more about the latest twist

:44:13.:44:21.

in the Trump-Comey tale - but first a reminder of why these

:44:22.:44:24.

Probably illegal - we'll have to find out

:44:25.:44:32.

what the FBI says about it - but certainly it was bad judgment.

:44:33.:44:35.

I just read the report. It's devastating, the report.

:44:36.:44:39.

Although we did not find clear evidence that Secretary Clinton

:44:40.:44:41.

or her colleagues intended to violate laws governing

:44:42.:44:45.

the handling of classified information, there is evidence

:44:46.:44:47.

that they were extremely careless in their handling of very sensitive,

:44:48.:44:50.

Based on what was being said, she was guilty.

:44:51.:44:56.

Today is the best evidence ever that we've seen that our system

:44:57.:45:08.

The question of whether that amounts to gross negligence, frankly,

:45:09.:45:23.

there's no way anyway the Department of Justice is bringing a case

:45:24.:45:26.

The FBI is reopening their investigation.

:45:27.:45:45.

That was so bad, what happened originally, and it took guts

:45:46.:45:53.

for Director Comey to make the move that he made in light of the kind

:45:54.:45:57.

What he did, he brought back his reputation.

:45:58.:46:03.

The FBI, as part of our counterintelligence mission,

:46:04.:46:28.

is investigating the Russian government's efforts to interfere

:46:29.:46:30.

with the 2016 presidential election, and that includes investigating

:46:31.:46:35.

the nature of any links between individuals associated

:46:36.:46:39.

with the Trump campaign and the Russian government.

:46:40.:46:43.

With respect to the President's tweets about alleged wiretapping

:46:44.:46:45.

directed at him by the prior administration, I have

:46:46.:46:48.

no information that supports those tweets.

:46:49.:47:15.

Scott Lucas is a professor of American politics at the University

:47:16.:47:20.

of Birmingham. We can talk to him now. How serious is this? Very

:47:21.:47:30.

serious. Even given the day-to-day controversies of the Trump

:47:31.:47:33.

administration, we have now crossed the line, that is because of

:47:34.:47:38.

obstruction of justice, claimed in the FBI director's memo, is both a

:47:39.:47:42.

legal defence, it could lead to criminal charges, and it is a

:47:43.:47:47.

political offence that could lead to impeachment. So Republicans now

:47:48.:47:50.

income west I think who have at least stayed back from pushing

:47:51.:47:53.

against Trump so far will probably be reconsidering their positions. If

:47:54.:48:01.

they don't, is there anyway that this could sort of the fatal for

:48:02.:48:07.

Donald Trump? What we are going to see, whether or not the Republicans

:48:08.:48:12.

shift immediately, is a steady diet of damaging memos, damaging

:48:13.:48:17.

documents, both in the context, the specific context of Trump, the

:48:18.:48:23.

investigation into Trump's associates's alleged links with

:48:24.:48:26.

Russia, and now the specific issue of whether Trump is trying to block

:48:27.:48:30.

that investigation. That will continue from the FBI, it will

:48:31.:48:34.

continue from the CIA, the national security agency because Trump is

:48:35.:48:38.

alienating those agencies. Now at some point, it is like you pull a

:48:39.:48:42.

brick, each brick from under the White House, at some point the White

:48:43.:48:46.

House collapses. Will it mean an impeachment immediately, no, but it

:48:47.:48:52.

means the White House is paralysed. It will not be able to pursue its

:48:53.:48:59.

domestic projects, such as repealing Obamacare. President Trump is tied

:49:00.:49:04.

down like a lover but unlike calibre I don't think he will be able to

:49:05.:49:08.

escape. You say that you are sure certain things emerge, but unless

:49:09.:49:14.

they do from the FBI investigation that is continuing, we don't

:49:15.:49:19.

actually know, do we? We have a body of circumstantial evidence, and

:49:20.:49:24.

let's review, we know that Trump associates met with Russian

:49:25.:49:28.

officials in 2016. The exact content of those and destinations is what

:49:29.:49:32.

the FBI is investigating. We know the times of those meetings that

:49:33.:49:36.

Russia was interfering at the time of the election through hacking and

:49:37.:49:43.

interference. We know that Michael Flynn the security adviser was

:49:44.:49:45.

dismissed because of his conversations with the Russian

:49:46.:49:49.

ambassador, and we now know that President Trump tried to block the

:49:50.:49:54.

investigation of flint by appealing to Director Comey to just stop. You

:49:55.:49:58.

add all of that together and it at least makes a case that this is

:49:59.:50:01.

serious, if indeed as you know it is not yet proven. And adding into this

:50:02.:50:08.

as well is the conversation that Donald Trump had at the White House

:50:09.:50:15.

with Russian representatives, where classified intelligence, it seems,

:50:16.:50:20.

was shared. He says he did share stuff, in the national interest, for

:50:21.:50:24.

the right reasons. What do you make of that row? To have one controversy

:50:25.:50:30.

is unfortunate, to have multiple is very careless, and when Trump gave

:50:31.:50:36.

that information to the Russians, Heerenveen Jude a sensitive

:50:37.:50:39.

relationship between the US and the Middle Eastern country, probably

:50:40.:50:42.

Israel, which may damage their intelligence sharing. He damaged US

:50:43.:50:48.

alliances with other countries, such as European countries, who are

:50:49.:50:52.

wondering whether they can trust the president, and he reinforced the

:50:53.:50:55.

perception that he is far closer to Russia than he is the sum of

:50:56.:50:58.

America's allies. Thank you very much.

:50:59.:51:02.

A new study appears to suggest the idea that you can be both fat and

:51:03.:51:08.

medically fit is a myth. Researchers from the University of Birmingham

:51:09.:51:12.

say obese people who had no initial signs of heart disease, diabetes or

:51:13.:51:16.

high cholesterol were not protected from ill health later in life. We

:51:17.:51:20.

can talk to the man behind the study.

:51:21.:51:22.

And joining me from Portugal is the man behind the study,

:51:23.:51:24.

He joins us from the European Congress on obesity. That is where

:51:25.:51:33.

the study is being unveiled. And Professor Tom Sanders from Kings

:51:34.:51:36.

College London, who is more sceptical of the study. We are

:51:37.:51:41.

joined in the studio by GPL E Cannon, who can offer us some

:51:42.:51:47.

insight into -- we are joined in the studio by

:51:48.:51:48.

Joining me in the studio is Dr Ellie Cannon, a GP.

:51:49.:51:50.

first you, Rishi. This was a study that looked at people who were

:51:51.:52:04.

obese, with no metabolic abnormalities, so without aid

:52:05.:52:11.

history of diabetes or high fat in their blood. We looked at whether

:52:12.:52:15.

they developed cardiovascular disease, specifically coronary heart

:52:16.:52:19.

disease, stroke, heart failure, and something called peripheral vascular

:52:20.:52:24.

disease first up we found that over an average follow-up of 50 years,

:52:25.:52:31.

that people who were obese and did not have any metabolic abnormalities

:52:32.:52:37.

were at increased risk of crony heart disease, heart failure and

:52:38.:52:46.

stroke. That is compared to normal weight individuals with no metabolic

:52:47.:52:51.

abnormalities. So in a nutshell you do not think it is possible to be

:52:52.:52:57.

fat and fit? I don't use the term fit. In terms of cardiovascular

:52:58.:53:04.

health, the study does suggest that it is not, according to the

:53:05.:53:10.

findings, there is a significant proportion of people, which are

:53:11.:53:15.

termed metabolically healthy obese that do go on to actually develop

:53:16.:53:20.

some form of cardiovascular disease. Professor Tom Sanders, what do you

:53:21.:53:24.

think of this? I think the bottom line is to maintain a healthy

:53:25.:53:29.

weight, what you are in early adult life, throughout life. I think

:53:30.:53:32.

people tend to put on weight through life. So if you measure them a long

:53:33.:53:36.

time ago and then look at follow-up, you are not taking into account

:53:37.:53:39.

people who are fat when they are young will be even fatter when they

:53:40.:53:45.

are older. We know that fatness itself is associated with raised

:53:46.:53:48.

blood pressure, raised blood fat, and diabetes. But the diabetes

:53:49.:53:52.

normally doesn't manifest itself until people are in their 50s. So

:53:53.:53:56.

measuring at outset doesn't really tell you that. So the key thing I

:53:57.:54:01.

think is to keep your weight down and don't think there is a magic

:54:02.:54:04.

cut-off point from when you can identify someone is having diabetes

:54:05.:54:08.

or hypertension. We talk about people having pre-hypertension,

:54:09.:54:13.

prediabetes, they are on that road to getting those disorders. They all

:54:14.:54:18.

increase the risk. It is important not to be complacent about your

:54:19.:54:21.

weight, get your weight down, even if you just lose a little bit of

:54:22.:54:26.

weight, that helps, and take regular exercise. Ellie, you are a GP, is it

:54:27.:54:32.

possible to think people to be overweight and ridden absolutely.

:54:33.:54:37.

These are very old-fashioned measurements, looking at BMI, as

:54:38.:54:42.

opposed to waste consultant -- waist circumference, which is much more

:54:43.:54:47.

important long-term health. We need look at holistically peoples health,

:54:48.:54:51.

you talk a lot about people's mental health and people being fit is not

:54:52.:54:55.

just governed by cardiovascular health and whether you get diabetes,

:54:56.:54:59.

whether you coronary artery disease. I don't want my overweight patients

:55:00.:55:02.

to be put off trying to exercise, trying to be healthy, which they

:55:03.:55:09.

really could be, even with a higher BMI. It is also really important to

:55:10.:55:13.

point out that this study has not actually been published. It has not

:55:14.:55:17.

been published in a peer-reviewed journal, so it means that it isn't

:55:18.:55:20.

the quality of evidence that we have in terms of other scientific

:55:21.:55:25.

studies. So, yes, we know that being fat is a risk factor, in terms of

:55:26.:55:28.

disease, along with smoking and other things. But it might actually

:55:29.:55:34.

still be fine for people to be slightly overweight, as long as they

:55:35.:55:39.

are exercising and that BP is normal. So, Rishi, how would you put

:55:40.:55:44.

it, in terms of clear guidance and advice to people, how overweight

:55:45.:55:50.

would you say somebody could be before health starts to become an

:55:51.:55:54.

issue, as a result specifically of the weight? I agree with some of the

:55:55.:56:07.

comments made by Dr Cannon. BMI is a risk of developing cardiovascular

:56:08.:56:12.

disease, depending on your weight, is along a continuum, that I agree

:56:13.:56:20.

with. However, in clinical practice, we do tend to use cut-offs, and the

:56:21.:56:27.

cut-offs we use from the WHO. And so I would be referring to the WHO

:56:28.:56:35.

cut-offs, if I was practising in a hospital, in a GP practice in order

:56:36.:56:39.

to give advice. Tell us what they are. The clear advice. For example,

:56:40.:56:48.

the cut-off for obesity, the BMI that being obese is 30 kilograms per

:56:49.:56:52.

metre squared, and that is according to the WHO. That is used across the

:56:53.:56:57.

world, it is used in clinical practice as well as in research

:56:58.:57:02.

studies, as well. So after that point you are OK, your weight isn't

:57:03.:57:05.

going to impact on your health? Not necessarily. But these are the

:57:06.:57:13.

cut-offs defined by the WHO. So there is a risk of developing for

:57:14.:57:16.

example cardiovascular disease at lower BMIs. That would make all of

:57:17.:57:27.

our rugby players classified as obese, so the entire rugby teams in

:57:28.:57:33.

this country would be obese and unhealthy, yet they are quite

:57:34.:57:36.

obviously very fit from a cardiovascular point of view. That

:57:37.:57:40.

is why doctors don't use BMI any more, it is an old-fashioned way of

:57:41.:57:45.

measuring. Thank you all very much. Let us know your thoughts at home on

:57:46.:57:50.

that as well. Just a reminder, we will be in Dunstable in Beds on

:57:51.:57:53.

Monday 29th made the big election audience debate. If you have made up

:57:54.:57:59.

your mind already you will vote for, still deciding ordered think you

:58:00.:58:03.

will bother, and want the chance to share your views, get in touch to

:58:04.:58:09.

apply for a place. There are more details on our Facebook and Twitter

:58:10.:58:10.

pages. Yesterday was a warm day. We saw the

:58:11.:58:23.

UK top temperature of 26 degrees in Gravesend in the south-east.

:58:24.:58:27.

Scotland also saw a woman's Day of the year, 22 in the Moray Firth.

:58:28.:58:31.

Things a little bit cooler today. Still plenty of sunshine in the

:58:32.:58:36.

north. I will show you this picture from our Weather Watchers. A fresher

:58:37.:58:42.

feel the things, even a touch of frost across the north-east of

:58:43.:58:45.

Scotland but compare that to the south-east, a very wet night. A lot

:58:46.:58:50.

of rain falling, even reports of some localised flooding, minor

:58:51.:58:53.

flooding across west London. You can see why, the bright colours

:58:54.:58:56.

indicating that heavy rain, which swept up from the south-west and

:58:57.:58:59.

more waiting in the wings, which will be driving its way northwards

:59:00.:59:01.

through the course of this afternoon. We could see some

:59:02.:59:05.

brightness developing through the south-east. Then temperatures will

:59:06.:59:10.

really shoot up because it is warm here. Across Scotland and Northern

:59:11.:59:13.

Ireland, a lovely day into the afternoon. The few heavy showers

:59:14.:59:18.

getting in May be heavy with some hail and thunder. Eastern Scotland

:59:19.:59:21.

tending to stay dry, feeling fresher but lovely in the sunshine. Maybe a

:59:22.:59:26.

bit of brightness getting in towards the north and west of Wales, some

:59:27.:59:29.

dry weather into the far south-west but the bulk of eastern Wales and

:59:30.:59:35.

for much of the Midlands, heavy bursts of rain, feeling quite cool

:59:36.:59:39.

too. Heat and humidity in the south-east means we could see some

:59:40.:59:43.

heavy, thundery downpours across the south-east, the London area, in the

:59:44.:59:46.

East Anglia as we head into this evening. Tom Prydie hazardous

:59:47.:59:50.

driving conditions, lots of standing water around for stock that

:59:51.:59:53.

continues to push off into the North Sea. It leaves a legacy of cloud and

:59:54.:00:00.

murkiness through the night. But the south-east where you have clear

:00:01.:00:03.

skies further north and west. The Thursday, once you lose the cloud

:00:04.:00:06.

from the south-east, a fresher feel across-the-board. But at least

:00:07.:00:10.

breakfast are plenty of sunshine around. A scattering of showers

:00:11.:00:13.

developing and some could be quite heavy with hail and thunder,

:00:14.:00:16.

potentially Northern Ireland, eastern Scotland, Wales.

:00:17.:00:21.

Temperatures were they should be, mid to upper teens. This is the

:00:22.:00:25.

pressure chart Friday, this area will be a player as we head into the

:00:26.:00:31.

weekend. This weather front in the south-east could graze East Anglia

:00:32.:00:33.

and the south-east, towards Kent, some patchy rain at times.

:00:34.:00:40.

Elsewhere, there will be a mixture of sunshine and showers,

:00:41.:00:43.

temperatures again in the mid-teen sells you. In the Saturday, a day of

:00:44.:00:48.

sunshine and showers, an area of low pressure firmly in control. Some

:00:49.:00:53.

showers fairly blustery and the north-west, but feeling pleasant in

:00:54.:00:56.

the sunshine. For the weekend it feels like it will be a mixture of

:00:57.:00:59.

sunny spells and showers, some of which will be heavy with hail and

:01:00.:01:03.

thunder. With light winds and clear skies at night we can expect to

:01:04.:01:04.

return to some chilly nights. Hello.

:01:05.:01:09.

It's Wednesday. It's 10am.

:01:10.:01:11.

and I'm Joanna Gosling. Our top story today -

:01:12.:01:12.

the Liberal Democrats will launch their manifesto today,

:01:13.:01:14.

promising a new referendum There's also more money for housing

:01:15.:01:17.

and education and a promise to lower Today we're offering huge

:01:18.:01:27.

opportunities for young people where they can get on the renting ladder

:01:28.:01:30.

for the first time because we're going to give them help with their

:01:31.:01:33.

deposits or they can rent-to-own with a radical new scheme.

:01:34.:01:37.

We'll get reaction from liberal democrat voters and Baroness Kramer

:01:38.:01:40.

from the Lib Dems will be here too to answer yours and their questions.

:01:41.:01:43.

America's former FBI chief claims he was urged to drop his inquiry

:01:44.:01:46.

into links between the Trump campaign and Russia

:01:47.:01:48.

Donald Trump denies the claims. We will have the details.

:01:49.:02:02.

The first survey into gender in horse racing shows that women are

:02:03.:02:06.

under represented in the most prominent areas of the sport.

:02:07.:02:15.

Here's Annita in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of today's news.

:02:16.:02:18.

The Liberal Democrats are putting a second EU referendum at the heart

:02:19.:02:26.

of their general election manifesto, which is formally launched later.

:02:27.:02:28.

The party says it would "let the people decide"

:02:29.:02:30.

whether Brexit happens once negotiations have finished.

:02:31.:02:32.

It's also offering pledges to young people, promising to restore housing

:02:33.:02:34.

benefit for 18 to 21-year-olds and help people get

:02:35.:02:37.

The head of one of Labour's biggest union backers has said the party

:02:38.:02:43.

is on course to lose the general election.

:02:44.:02:45.

Len McCluskey of Unite claimed it would be a successful campaign

:02:46.:02:47.

A spokesman for leader Jeremy Corbyn said he was determined to lead

:02:48.:02:52.

The head of one of Labour's biggest union backers has said the party

:02:53.:02:55.

is on course to lose the general election.

:02:56.:02:57.

The White House has denied reports that Donald Trump asked former FBI

:02:58.:03:03.

director James Comey to stop an investigation into alleged links

:03:04.:03:06.

Mr Comey, who was sacked last week, is said to have made the claims

:03:07.:03:11.

in notes taken after a meeting with the president in February.

:03:12.:03:13.

The White House says the notes are untrue.

:03:14.:03:19.

The UK's unemployment rate has fallen to a 32-year low,

:03:20.:03:22.

as a record number of people are in work, figures show.

:03:23.:03:25.

The jobless total fell by 53,000 to 1.54 million

:03:26.:03:29.

in the three months to March, a rate of 4.6%, the lowest

:03:30.:03:34.

Average weekly earnings ex-excluding, bonuses increased by

:03:35.:03:44.

2.1%. Lloyds Bank says the taxpayer has

:03:45.:03:48.

made a profit of nearly ?900 million after the

:03:49.:03:51.

Government sold the last It's almost nine years

:03:52.:03:52.

since the bank was bailed out at In a statement, Lloyds confirmed

:03:53.:03:57.

the group has been fully returned The former US soldier,

:03:58.:04:01.

Chelsea Manning, who passed hundreds of thousands of confidential

:04:02.:04:07.

diplomatic documents to the website WikiLeaks, will be released later

:04:08.:04:11.

today from a military Born Bradley Manning, she announced

:04:12.:04:13.

she would be living as a woman, She was expected to remain in jail

:04:14.:04:18.

until 2045, but Barack Obama commuted her sentence before leaving

:04:19.:04:24.

the White House in January. That's a summary of

:04:25.:04:32.

the latest BBC News. The Chief Executive

:04:33.:04:34.

of the Women's Tennis Association says that French Open organisers had

:04:35.:04:58.

"no grounds to penalise" Maria Sharapova by denying her

:04:59.:05:00.

a wildcard entry to the tournament, WTA chief Steve Simon says that

:05:01.:05:03.

Sharapova has complied Shortly after learning

:05:04.:05:05.

of her Roland Garros snub, Sharapova withdrew injured

:05:06.:05:07.

from her second-round Italian Open Sharapova could still be given

:05:08.:05:10.

a wild card to appear in the main draw at Wimbledon next month,

:05:11.:05:16.

but former champion Pat Cash thinks I would hope that they would

:05:17.:05:19.

stand strong and say no, you've got to go

:05:20.:05:29.

through play and qualify. Look, Maria at qualifying,

:05:30.:05:31.

she'll breeze through it on the She's very experienced and she will

:05:32.:05:34.

probably need some extra matches and she might

:05:35.:05:39.

welcome those matches. Clearly, she's not physically ready

:05:40.:05:42.

100% for hard tennis. I think it will be in the long run,

:05:43.:05:45.

it might not be a bad thing for her, but I think the All England Club

:05:46.:05:55.

need to stand up and make a stance about this and say we're not

:05:56.:05:58.

rewarding drug cheats. Andy Murray continues

:05:59.:06:00.

to have a tough time He's now lost his Italian Open

:06:01.:06:02.

title after being beaten It was a straight sets defeat

:06:03.:06:06.

to Italy's Fabio Fognini, made all the more worrying

:06:07.:06:09.

because the next major, And that is likely to be Murray's

:06:10.:06:12.

next competitive match. His Coach Ivan Lendl flies to Europe

:06:13.:06:17.

this weekend to join Murray's team. Clearly he still has

:06:18.:06:20.

a lot of work to do. The three-way battle for the top

:06:21.:06:26.

four in the Premier League will go down to the final day of the season

:06:27.:06:29.

after Arsenal and Manchester City Arsenal have qualified

:06:30.:06:32.

for the Champions League for the last 20 seasons and beat

:06:33.:06:35.

Sunderland 2-0 to keep Alexi Sanchez scored both goals

:06:36.:06:37.

in the second half to leave Arsene Wenger's side with an outside

:06:38.:06:42.

chance of overtaking And talking of City,

:06:43.:06:44.

they look the most likely to secure They had an straight forward 3-1 win

:06:45.:06:52.

over West Brom last night. Yaya Toure scored

:06:53.:06:59.

the pick of the goals. A point in their final match

:07:00.:07:02.

at Watford will guarantee third Geraint Thomas has

:07:03.:07:06.

moved up to eleventh in the Giro D'Italia

:07:07.:07:14.

after an impressive second place His chances of winning the race

:07:15.:07:16.

were ruined by a crash on Sunday, but he pulled some time back

:07:17.:07:20.

on his rivals yesterday. Holland's Tom Dumoulin now leads

:07:21.:07:22.

the race by over two minutes. That's all the sport for now,

:07:23.:07:33.

Joanna. See you at 10.30am. The Lib Dems will launch

:07:34.:07:41.

their manifesto later. It's their plan for the country

:07:42.:07:44.

which has a series of pledges designed to attract young voters

:07:45.:07:47.

and people who wanted They say if they win the election

:07:48.:07:49.

they'll restore housing benefit to young people,

:07:50.:07:52.

lower the voting age to 16, and hold a referendum

:07:53.:07:55.

on the final Brexit deal. The party is hoping these plans

:07:56.:07:57.

will help reverse the huge losses at the last election

:07:58.:08:00.

when they went from Some voters felt let down

:08:01.:08:02.

by the time they spent in coalition Here's a reminder

:08:03.:08:06.

of what went wrong. And just a warning, there is some

:08:07.:08:09.

flash photography in this report. Until pretty recently,

:08:10.:08:12.

the Liberal Democrats were the strong third force

:08:13.:08:13.

in British politics. In 2007, Nick Clegg, a young MP

:08:14.:08:15.

who used to work in the EU, His personal popularity soared ahead

:08:16.:08:20.

of the general election in 2010 So, don't let them tell

:08:21.:08:28.

you that the only choice is between two old parties who've

:08:29.:08:35.

been playing pass the parcel with your government for 65 years

:08:36.:08:37.

now, making the same promises, Making the same old mistakes

:08:38.:08:40.

over and over again. Despite losing a few seats,

:08:41.:08:48.

the Lib Dems held the balance of power after the election and went

:08:49.:08:50.

into joint government It all kicked off with

:08:51.:08:53.

a love-in out in the back On the steps of Downing Street

:08:54.:08:59.

yesterday evening, I said that Nick and I wanted to put aside party

:09:00.:09:05.

differences and work together Coalition government was not kind

:09:06.:09:09.

to Nick Clegg and his party. Forcing them to go back on some key

:09:10.:09:20.

policies like cutting tuition fees. And forcing this out

:09:21.:09:25.

of the party leader. We made a pledge.

:09:26.:09:32.

We didn't stick to it. Come election night in 2015,

:09:33.:09:34.

things were looking pretty bad. And so it turned out with the party

:09:35.:09:42.

dropping from 57 MPs to just eight. Key figures like former

:09:43.:09:47.

leader Charles Kennedy and Business Secretary Vince Cable

:09:48.:09:50.

were booted out overnight, He had little choice

:09:51.:09:53.

but to resign as leader. Clearly, the results

:09:54.:09:59.

have been immeasurably more crushing and unkind

:10:00.:10:02.

than I could ever have feared. For that, of course,

:10:03.:10:04.

I must take responsibility. Therefore, I announce

:10:05.:10:06.

I will be resigning as leader He eventually handed over to this

:10:07.:10:09.

man, Tim Farron, whose job it now is to give his party

:10:10.:10:16.

the Parliamentary boost it That was at rattle through the Lib

:10:17.:10:18.

Dems fortunes. Let's talk to Baroness Susan Kramer,

:10:19.:10:31.

a Liberal Democrat peer We're joined by two voters who say

:10:32.:10:33.

they felt "let down" by the Lib Dems the last time they

:10:34.:10:38.

were in government. Jess Bowyer voted for

:10:39.:10:40.

the Lib Dems in 2010 after their promise to abolish

:10:41.:10:42.

university tuition fees. Now, she says there's no point

:10:43.:10:44.

in the Lib Dems having good policies Kate Pearson voted for

:10:45.:10:47.

the Lib Dems in 2010. She says she was "seduced"

:10:48.:10:53.

by Nick Clegg's charm, but was horrified after

:10:54.:10:58.

the coalition government. Kate, you were seduced, but then

:10:59.:11:08.

horrified, what happened? I don't knowment like millions of voters

:11:09.:11:11.

across the country I watched Nick Clegg in the debates. He seemed to

:11:12.:11:15.

be the kind of person that I could trust. What were you basing that on?

:11:16.:11:23.

I live in leafy Kent. A vote for Labour seemed like a wasted vote and

:11:24.:11:29.

I didn't have a huge amount for Gordon Brown as the leader at that

:11:30.:11:34.

point. I had always been voting for the Labour Party until that point

:11:35.:11:37.

and Nick Clegg seemed to be saying nothing but things that I agreed.

:11:38.:11:43.

There was the hashtag trending, "I agree with Nick." So I gave him my

:11:44.:11:49.

vote and frankly, was sat in a mask of horror two days later when he

:11:50.:11:53.

stood in the Rose Garden next to David Cameron and they acted like

:11:54.:11:59.

best of friends. I spent five years feeling nauseous that my vote in

:12:00.:12:04.

some way had given value I hadation to the austerity cuts, and the work

:12:05.:12:08.

capability assessments and the tuition fees and all the other

:12:09.:12:13.

ghastly things, rising foodbanks and everything and I just felt as if my

:12:14.:12:20.

vote had given legitimacy to that. I also felt that the Conservative side

:12:21.:12:24.

of the coalition were doing it because they believed it was right

:12:25.:12:29.

and I might dishave disagreed, but they were doing it because they

:12:30.:12:33.

thought it was right and the Liberal Democrats knew that what they were

:12:34.:12:36.

doing was wrong and they were doing it anyway because they wanted to

:12:37.:12:41.

stay in power. Well, let's bring in Jess. You felt let down as well.

:12:42.:12:45.

Tell us why? I voted Lib Dem because I grew up in a Tory-Lib Dem marginal

:12:46.:12:51.

in Devon and it was very clear you voted Lib Dem to stop the Tories. I

:12:52.:12:55.

was attracted to the Lib Dems because you know I was 18. It was my

:12:56.:12:59.

first election. They billed themselves as the party of young

:13:00.:13:02.

voters, with pledges on tuition fees and that was really attractive to

:13:03.:13:09.

me. So, it was, it was a huge shock to find, you know, two days later

:13:10.:13:14.

them going into power with the Conservatives in capitulating on

:13:15.:13:19.

everything that they claimed to have stood for. The tuition fees for you,

:13:20.:13:23.

was what, that was the final straw, was it? It was one of the big things

:13:24.:13:29.

and I think tuition fees has become kind of emblematic with regards to

:13:30.:13:32.

perceived Lib Dem failures, but for me it is more about the austerity

:13:33.:13:37.

programme. We have had rises in child poverty, in homelessness and

:13:38.:13:40.

desmation of the Welfare State and the NHS, all of which have been

:13:41.:13:45.

facilitate bid the coalition Government and probably wouldn't

:13:46.:13:47.

have happened without the Lib Dems. So, Susan, how do you feel when you

:13:48.:13:51.

hear the Lib Dem voters talking like that? I suspect I will never win

:13:52.:13:57.

back Jess or Kate and I'm sad about that. They are representative of a

:13:58.:14:02.

lot of people. I'm sad about that. If we go back and look at the

:14:03.:14:06.

coalition, we need to look forward, but I wouldn't change going into

:14:07.:14:11.

coalition. I think people have forgotten the fragility of the

:14:12.:14:14.

economy and the crisis that we faced at that point in time and if we

:14:15.:14:19.

hadn't had a Government that had a majority to deliver in Parliament,

:14:20.:14:22.

we would, I mean, the damage that would have happened to people with

:14:23.:14:26.

their job losses, the collapse in communities, we have seen that in

:14:27.:14:29.

the past and to have decided, it's good for our party to stay out, but

:14:30.:14:34.

I'll let this happen to people, I couldn't have done that. So, I

:14:35.:14:39.

understand the anger. I would ask them not to forget the good things

:14:40.:14:42.

we did in Government, much of which have been claimed by the

:14:43.:14:46.

Conservatives, but there are 23 million people who used to pay

:14:47.:14:50.

income tax and don't. Pupil premium made a fantastic difference in

:14:51.:14:53.

schools, the der ter ration in the NHS, you can see comes after the

:14:54.:14:58.

coalition. We managed to hold the frontline services to a very

:14:59.:15:01.

significant degree during that period. We stemmed the Tories from

:15:02.:15:08.

savage cuts in welfare which you saw coming as soon as we were no longer

:15:09.:15:11.

there. There were a lot of things we did. Equal marriage. There were all

:15:12.:15:15.

kinds of things that were important in that period that I'm proud of,

:15:16.:15:20.

but not everything, we were the smaller party in a coalition and the

:15:21.:15:24.

reality, you do a programme for when you're in Government, but that means

:15:25.:15:27.

you think you're going to be the Government. We were part of a

:15:28.:15:34.

coalition. Let's see what Jess and Kate think. The bits that Susan is

:15:35.:15:39.

proud of. Does that mitigate the bits that you don't like? You

:15:40.:15:44.

mentioned the NHS. What about the massive top down reorganisation of

:15:45.:15:48.

the NHS that was unmentioned in anybody's manifesto and was opposed

:15:49.:15:52.

by every medical professional body in the country? That was on your

:15:53.:15:58.

watch. I have a very dear friend who was a sister in A and she would

:15:59.:16:04.

argue with you that cuts to National Health Service were going on long

:16:05.:16:06.

before. Things like waiting lists. The

:16:07.:16:23.

crunch seems to have come over the last couple of years. I think that

:16:24.:16:27.

is because the cutting process has continued. So let's look forward. We

:16:28.:16:38.

have the Lib Dem manifested today. Mental health finally on the agenda,

:16:39.:16:42.

finally finally, where it has never been before. Yes, it has come

:16:43.:16:47.

through. The manifesto launch today, trying to appeal to younger voters,

:16:48.:16:51.

exactly voters like these two. But you said right at the beginning you

:16:52.:16:54.

have no hope of winning people like back. What other policies that

:16:55.:17:03.

might? I talk to people on the doorstep. There are some that will

:17:04.:17:07.

always be disillusioned with us but I have found there are many that

:17:08.:17:11.

actually are very excited. Satele than the policies. What has been

:17:12.:17:17.

fascinating is our party membership, half of which under 35 and it is

:17:18.:17:21.

younger people who have come and said as we look at Lib Dem

:17:22.:17:23.

principles, we bond to join the party and shape the party, which I

:17:24.:17:28.

find absolutely fascinating and crucially important. For many of the

:17:29.:17:33.

young people I talk to, Brexit really is serious. They feel

:17:34.:17:37.

European, their identity is being taken from them, they planned to do

:17:38.:17:43.

internships in different places, engineering in Germany, fashion in

:17:44.:17:46.

France, they thought they were free to work abroad. So Lib Dems is

:17:47.:17:52.

giving a promise of a second referendum. Yes, that second

:17:53.:17:56.

referendum will be their chance to see what is the actual deal Theresa

:17:57.:18:00.

May has managed to negotiate and will you live with this or not. I

:18:01.:18:04.

hope young people will see that as a really important opportunity to talk

:18:05.:18:10.

about their feelings. Is that appealing? I would rather set myself

:18:11.:18:17.

on fire than live through another EU referendum. I don't think results

:18:18.:18:21.

would be any different. Don't give up, don't give up, we have to go to

:18:22.:18:25.

the barricades and keep fighting this. I do have Brexit and I think

:18:26.:18:30.

it can be avoided but I don't want another referendum. For me,

:18:31.:18:34.

fundamentally, the problem as it is fine to have all these great

:18:35.:18:37.

policies but why should voters trust you? I voted Lib Dem in 2010 on the

:18:38.:18:41.

basis of your policies, which never came into action, and you reversed a

:18:42.:18:47.

lot of things. We delivered a lot of that policy -based. The obvious one

:18:48.:18:51.

being taking 23 million people at the lower end of income out of tax.

:18:52.:18:56.

Instead of looking back it would be good on what is coming on the

:18:57.:18:59.

manifesto. A pledge to allow people to vote from the age of 16. That is

:19:00.:19:05.

something we really feel is so important because 16-year-olds

:19:06.:19:09.

should have a voice. My daughter just turned 16, I would love it if

:19:10.:19:13.

she had a voice, particularly with the European referendum last year. I

:19:14.:19:17.

think it was absolutely appalling that so many of the younger

:19:18.:19:19.

generation who would be the most affected by it, particularly people

:19:20.:19:24.

who might want to study and a couple of years, were not allowed a vote.

:19:25.:19:30.

Would it make you vote Lib Dem? Personally, I never ever thought I

:19:31.:19:34.

would vote Lib Dem again. 2015, I swore I would never vote Lib Dem

:19:35.:19:37.

again and two years later they have my vote. Delighted. They are the

:19:38.:19:49.

only people representing my views on Brexit. Unfortunately if Theresa May

:19:50.:19:52.

wants to say this is a Brexit election and this is her mandate to

:19:53.:19:56.

go in and deliver a hard, Conservative style Brexit, stripping

:19:57.:20:04.

away employee rights and equal protection under the law, if she

:20:05.:20:09.

wants it to be a mandate for her hard Brexit, the only party

:20:10.:20:14.

certainly south of the border whereby I can express my strong

:20:15.:20:19.

opinion that that is not my mandate is by going to the Liberal

:20:20.:20:24.

Democrats. What will success look like the Lib Dems in this election,

:20:25.:20:30.

because you are down to eight MPs? Never I spend my time looking at

:20:31.:20:34.

numbers. What I want us to do is to be that kind of voice that Kate

:20:35.:20:39.

talked about. Because I think Theresa May, I will be honest,

:20:40.:20:42.

Theresa May will get a substantial majority. She will see that as a

:20:43.:20:46.

mandate to do whatever she chooses, and not just on the Brexit issue. We

:20:47.:20:52.

have seen a lot of hard right policies being proposed. She is

:20:53.:20:55.

being careful to shore herself up by bringing in the Ukip vote. You are

:20:56.:20:59.

not going to give us a figure on what success would be for the Lib

:21:00.:21:04.

Dems? We are the voice of the election, we will keep that voice

:21:05.:21:07.

loud and clear, whatever our numbers. But the more people we

:21:08.:21:12.

have, the more we can push for the second referendum. We are going to

:21:13.:21:17.

listen to Theresa May right now, I will interrupt you because she is on

:21:18.:21:24.

the campaign trail and speaking. The UK economy has grown at one of the

:21:25.:21:27.

fastest rates in the developed world. Employment has increased by

:21:28.:21:35.

.9 million since Labour were in power, and we should never forget

:21:36.:21:39.

what those numbers mean for the Merhi working families. They mean a

:21:40.:21:43.

better future and more security. They mean a better standard of

:21:44.:21:46.

living for people and more tax revenue to spend on vital public

:21:47.:21:51.

services, like our NHS, schools and defence. And just today, we have

:21:52.:21:55.

seen that the work of fixing Labour's economic mess continues.

:21:56.:22:00.

The government has sold its remaining shares in Lloyds banking

:22:01.:22:04.

group, as we continue to repair the damage to our banking sector, and

:22:05.:22:11.

today's employment figures show that our credible policies are delivering

:22:12.:22:15.

greater security for families across the country. But none of this

:22:16.:22:22.

happened by accident. Our economic progress has been dearly won, and

:22:23.:22:26.

could easily be lost if the wrong policies were pursued in the years

:22:27.:22:33.

ahead. It is frankly all at risk. Any party which asks the British

:22:34.:22:39.

party to entrust to them the responsibilities of forming the next

:22:40.:22:43.

government through the crucial years of our Brexit negotiations and

:22:44.:22:48.

beyond must demonstrate that it has the credible economic plan and the

:22:49.:22:52.

capable team to safeguard our economic security. Now one could

:22:53.:22:58.

look at what Jeremy Corbyn and his Labour Party offered yesterday and

:22:59.:23:03.

concludes that it passed the test. The risk which a Jeremy Corbyn

:23:04.:23:07.

-based government would pose to our economy has been laid bare, that

:23:08.:23:11.

manifestos are also a test of something else. They are a test of

:23:12.:23:18.

leadership. Later this week, I will publish my party's manifesto for the

:23:19.:23:22.

next five years. Unlike Jeremy Corbyn's fantasy wish list of easy

:23:23.:23:27.

promises, paid for with imaginary money, I will set out in detail the

:23:28.:23:32.

five great challenges our country faces over the next five years. And

:23:33.:23:38.

lay out how we will tackle them. While Jeremy Corbyn and Labour

:23:39.:23:41.

retreat into an ideological comfort certain, ducking the difficult

:23:42.:23:46.

challenges which lie ahead, I will be straight with people. I won't shy

:23:47.:23:52.

away from facing the challenges of our time. Rather, I will set out how

:23:53.:23:59.

we will tackle them head-on. Because that is what leadership is about.

:24:00.:24:04.

And on this key test, Jeremy Corbyn has failed once again. If he can't

:24:05.:24:10.

show real leadership of his party now, how could he lead our country

:24:11.:24:14.

through Brexit? How could he sit down with the Prime Minister 's,

:24:15.:24:17.

president and chancellors of Europe and get a good deal for Britain? At

:24:18.:24:23.

this election, only the strong and stable leadership of me and my team

:24:24.:24:26.

can deliver the successful Brexit our country needs, face up to the

:24:27.:24:33.

challenges which lie ahead, and improve the lives of everyone in our

:24:34.:24:38.

country. It will be strong leadership and credible policies for

:24:39.:24:43.

a better future. That starts with getting the right Brexit deal for

:24:44.:24:48.

Britain, which locks in economic security for our country, the

:24:49.:24:51.

weakness of Jeremy Corbyn and the chaos of the coalition which would

:24:52.:24:55.

put him into Downing Street would put that at risk, and with it the

:24:56.:25:03.

future prosperity of families across our country, and the Chancellor will

:25:04.:25:07.

now say more about that. Thank you, Prime Minister. Yesterday, the

:25:08.:25:12.

Labour manifesto confirmed what we already suspected, that they do not

:25:13.:25:17.

have a credible plan for our country's future, and they cannot be

:25:18.:25:23.

trusted with our country's finances. What we saw yesterday is only the

:25:24.:25:27.

latest in a catalogue of chaos from Labour. Throughout this campaign,

:25:28.:25:31.

Labour have shown time and time again that they lack the basic

:25:32.:25:36.

competence and credibility the government this country. We have

:25:37.:25:41.

seen Jeremy Corbyn and his closest lieutenancy exposed as being simply

:25:42.:25:48.

not up to the job. The Shadow Chancellor, the self-confessed

:25:49.:25:50.

Marxist John McDonnell, doesn't know how big the deficit is. The shadow

:25:51.:25:58.

secretary Di Shadow Home Secretary at one stage was suggesting you

:25:59.:26:01.

could employ a police officer to ?30 a year. The Shadow Education

:26:02.:26:05.

Secretary Angela Rayner couldn't tell us how many children their

:26:06.:26:11.

class size policy would affect, and yesterday, the Shadow Foreign

:26:12.:26:14.

Secretary Emily Thornberry was unable to explain Labour's policy on

:26:15.:26:21.

benefits. Labour have simply become a shambles, and as yesterday's

:26:22.:26:24.

manifesto showed, their numbers simply do not add up. Now that

:26:25.:26:31.

Jeremy Corbyn has published his manifesto in full, we have been able

:26:32.:26:36.

to update the analysis, which David Davis and I published previously. We

:26:37.:26:41.

can now set out the full damage his nonsensical plans would do to the

:26:42.:26:48.

nation's finances by 2021-22. The new dossier of analysis we have

:26:49.:26:53.

published today shows that there is a ?58 billion black hole in Jeremy

:26:54.:26:57.

Corbyn's plans in just one year alone. Proposal after proposal in

:26:58.:27:04.

Labour's manifesto mean more borrowing and more debt, two

:27:05.:27:12.

unexplained threats to seize control of private companies stop these

:27:13.:27:17.

plans, many of them extremely questionable in themselves, simply

:27:18.:27:25.

do not add up. Any shred of economic credibility, which Labour had left,

:27:26.:27:28.

has now been buried by Jeremy Corbyn and his acolytes. And this matters

:27:29.:27:35.

to families across the United Kingdom. The economic chaos, which

:27:36.:27:39.

would hit our country if Labour were in a position to implement the

:27:40.:27:44.

shambolic package of policies they unveiled yesterday, would leave

:27:45.:27:48.

every household in Britain counting the cost. The price of Labour's

:27:49.:27:54.

chaos would be felt in higher taxes and steeper mortgage bills for

:27:55.:27:58.

working families. This economic chaos would mean higher

:27:59.:28:02.

unemployment, robbing families of the peace of mind and security,

:28:03.:28:06.

which comes with a job. It would mean more borrowing, throwing away

:28:07.:28:11.

all the hard earned progress of the last seven years, and take us right

:28:12.:28:17.

back to square one with a growing deficit, growing debt, and

:28:18.:28:20.

increasing financial uncertainty for the next generation. Labour's

:28:21.:28:28.

manifesto is a plan for an ideological fuel, which would mean

:28:29.:28:32.

economic chaos for the many. Only Theresa May and her Conservative

:28:33.:28:38.

team have a plan to lock in economic security and built a better future

:28:39.:28:44.

for our country. Dee Stakes at this election could not be higher. A vote

:28:45.:28:51.

for any other party is simply too big a risk to take. Thank you.

:28:52.:29:02.

Thank you, very much, Philip, we will now take some questions. Laura?

:29:03.:29:09.

Thank you very much Prime Minister and Chancellor. You have attacked

:29:10.:29:14.

the Labour plans, not surprisingly, but if increasing tax and increasing

:29:15.:29:20.

spending overall is such a bad idea, why has it continued to happen under

:29:21.:29:23.

a government that you have both been part of for seven years? You have

:29:24.:29:28.

repeatedly missed your deficit target the new even still have a

:29:29.:29:30.

black Colin Newell most recent budget, Chancellor. The Chancellor

:29:31.:29:36.

this morning rather candidly admitted swearing occasionally in

:29:37.:29:41.

rows with number ten. If after June you are re-elected, will you still

:29:42.:29:46.

be next neighbours? First of all, I will ask the Chancellor to respond

:29:47.:29:49.

as well, but first of all let's be clear about what we are saying about

:29:50.:29:52.

the Labour Party manifesto. It simply doesn't add up. What we see

:29:53.:29:58.

today is this ?58 billion black hole that we have identified in their

:29:59.:30:04.

figures. These are large numbers, but what matters is the impact it

:30:05.:30:08.

has on ordinarily working families, and it means that people will be

:30:09.:30:12.

paying the price of labour. They will pay the price in higher taxes,

:30:13.:30:18.

lower wages, higher prices, and an economy which will be in chaos. The

:30:19.:30:21.

key thing is that over the last seven years we have shown we have

:30:22.:30:24.

that credible economic plan and we have that credible economic plan for

:30:25.:30:29.

the future to take us forward, to ensure that we get the right deal

:30:30.:30:32.

from Brexit but also locked our economic security. And I think it is

:30:33.:30:36.

true to say that the Chancellor and I and every other member of our team

:30:37.:30:40.

are focused on the 8th of June. Our focus is on winning this general

:30:41.:30:43.

election because it matters for the future of our country. What I

:30:44.:30:49.

candidly admitted this morning, and my family will confirm this, is that

:30:50.:30:54.

I do occasionally swear. I wasn't referring to any particular, session

:30:55.:30:57.

but I do occasionally swear. The difference between us and Labour is

:30:58.:31:03.

that Labour doesn't believe in balancing the budget. The Prime

:31:04.:31:06.

Minister has said many times that as a country we have to get back to

:31:07.:31:09.

living within our means, we have to do that in a sensible way, we have

:31:10.:31:13.

to do that in a measured way that balances the needs of deficit

:31:14.:31:16.

reduction with the needs for investment in our economy, and the

:31:17.:31:19.

needs of our public services, but we do have to do it. Labour doesn't

:31:20.:31:25.

believe in reducing taxes. Labour believes in increasing taxes. We are

:31:26.:31:31.

a low tax party by instinct. Conservatives will always cost you

:31:32.:31:31.

less in tax. Well, let's leave Theresa May and

:31:32.:31:45.

Philip Hammond. Norman Smith is in Westminster.

:31:46.:31:53.

Today, they are focussing on bashing Labour's offering yesterday. Yes,

:31:54.:32:00.

this was just an attack press conference to gut and fillet

:32:01.:32:04.

Labour's manifesto yesterday. Theresa May, Philip Hammond,

:32:05.:32:07.

focussing on the issue of credibility, saying that Mr Corbyn's

:32:08.:32:12.

plans simply did not add up. It was described as a catalogue of chaos. A

:32:13.:32:17.

fantasy wish-list and at the heart of their argument is there is they

:32:18.:32:22.

say ?58 billion of unfunded commitments made by Mr Corbyn

:32:23.:32:26.

yesterday. Now, those mostly are the big nationalisations, he talked

:32:27.:32:29.

about, Team Corbyn are saying we didn't include that because it's

:32:30.:32:34.

capital spending so we can borrow. Mrs May, also again focus on the

:32:35.:32:37.

credibility of Jeremy Corbyn's leadership. She wants to make it a

:32:38.:32:41.

tussle about the strong and stable leadership of Theresa May as she

:32:42.:32:47.

sees it versus Jeremy Corbyn and she accused him of retreating into an

:32:48.:32:52.

edelogical comfort zone. So this was basically an attack press conference

:32:53.:32:56.

by the Tories to try and take apart Labour's big manifesto launch

:32:57.:32:59.

yesterday. And separately, Norman, today, one of Labour big backers is

:33:00.:33:03.

expressing his doubts about Labour's prospects at the election. Tell us

:33:04.:33:07.

more? Extraordinary really in a way because come election time normally

:33:08.:33:11.

all the big political beasts come out and say how wonderful their side

:33:12.:33:16.

is doing and it's all going very well. No so Len McCluskey who is

:33:17.:33:23.

Jeremy Corbyn's main man in the union movement and he is political

:33:24.:33:27.

muscle within the Labour Party. Len McCluskey said, it doesn't look like

:33:28.:33:31.

we're going to winment in fact, we'll be doing well to win just 200

:33:32.:33:35.

seats. That would be the worst result Labour have ever had since

:33:36.:33:39.

the Second World War. Worse than mike al Foot and Len McCluskey seems

:33:40.:33:45.

to be saying that would not be a bad result. This morning, a different

:33:46.:33:50.

tune from Mr McCluskey listen. Well, first of all the interview I did was

:33:51.:33:55.

a conversational piece and it was against the backdrop of if the

:33:56.:34:00.

opinion polls are to be believed that I made those comments. Of

:34:01.:34:03.

course, since then Labour have launched their manifesto. It's a

:34:04.:34:08.

fantastic manifesto. A manifesto for workers, for ordinary working

:34:09.:34:11.

people. A manifesto that will change Britain for the good. And the

:34:12.:34:17.

response that we've had from Unite members has been incredible. That's

:34:18.:34:24.

why I was checking our polls that we do constant polls and the response

:34:25.:34:27.

has been like something we've never seen before. So I'm full of optimism

:34:28.:34:32.

if I was having that interview today, I wouldn't be making those

:34:33.:34:36.

comments. I think also the Labour campaign has been brilliant. It has

:34:37.:34:39.

outshown the Tories. Jeremy Corbyn has come across as a real man of the

:34:40.:34:45.

people and a real leader. I'm now full of optimism as to what will

:34:46.:34:48.

happen in the next two to three weeks. I believe that the opinion

:34:49.:34:55.

polls will start to move, if our members in Unite are anything to go

:34:56.:34:59.

by, once people start looking at the policies that Labour have, in their

:35:00.:35:05.

manifesto, then anything is possible and we believe now that everything

:35:06.:35:08.

to fight for over the next three weeks and that's what we will be

:35:09.:35:12.

doing. So you have not had a change of tune? Yes, in many respects I

:35:13.:35:18.

have. Against the backdrop of the opinion polls, that was the

:35:19.:35:23.

conversational interview I was having, but Labour's manifesto has

:35:24.:35:30.

been received certainlily Unite members, very, very enthusiastically

:35:31.:35:33.

and I think positively and I think if that spreads throughout the rest

:35:34.:35:37.

of the nation then we could see something really dramatic happening

:35:38.:35:40.

in the next two to three weeks and that's what we will be fighting for.

:35:41.:35:45.

Every single vote, Unite, will be there, in every constituency

:35:46.:35:48.

fighting for Labour to win this election.

:35:49.:35:52.

You did say in the interview that 200 seats would be a successful

:35:53.:35:56.

campaign, but that's almost 30 fewer... Yes, against a backdrop of

:35:57.:36:03.

the current opinion polls and that's why it's always difficult in a

:36:04.:36:10.

long-ranging interview to pick out specific comments because it's

:36:11.:36:13.

always against the backdrop of what you were talking about and of

:36:14.:36:18.

course, I was talking about the opinion polls and how massive a task

:36:19.:36:24.

lies ahead for Labour. Now, what I'm saying now is, very evidencely, this

:36:25.:36:29.

manifesto -- efficiently, this manifesto that's come out, the

:36:30.:36:34.

Americans sometimes refer to it as a Christmas tree, there is a present

:36:35.:36:37.

for everybody hanging from it and that's true. John McDonnell has been

:36:38.:36:41.

brilliant in explaining where the cash will come from. And I think now

:36:42.:36:50.

that that should start to alter things fairly dramatically both in

:36:51.:36:53.

the polls and Labour's prospects so that's what I'm looking forward. But

:36:54.:36:57.

if the polls don't change and you're still... Well, let's just wait to

:36:58.:37:03.

see because I'm now convinced that the polls will change. I'm now

:37:04.:37:07.

convinced that Labour are in with a real chance and that's what we are

:37:08.:37:12.

hoping for the that's what the British people need if they could

:37:13.:37:17.

only examine those particular policies that Labour have put

:37:18.:37:20.

forward then I think things will begin to change and that's, I'm

:37:21.:37:24.

ready for the fight. I'm up for the fight. So, there we are. Len

:37:25.:37:30.

McCluskey had a conversion overnight. A shining light convinced

:37:31.:37:34.

him that Jeremy Corbyn is now in fact on course for victory. OK,

:37:35.:37:40.

Norman. Hold the thoughts. You may well know that every day until 8th

:37:41.:37:45.

June we are highlighting the best gaffe or amaoudsing moment from the

:37:46.:37:50.

election cal pawn with Norman. We need a general election and we

:37:51.:37:55.

need one now. To every city, every village, every town. We state a

:37:56.:37:59.

clear intention. About the future of this country. The big question here

:38:00.:38:05.

is simply this... At what point... Are voters... Getting tired of

:38:06.:38:10.

politicians. Let me finish if you don't mind. What have you got today,

:38:11.:38:20.

Norman? I bring you beards! What do we think of beards? Well, vote, are

:38:21.:38:24.

not terribly fond of politicians who have beards of the there is a survey

:38:25.:38:28.

out today saying two-thirds of voters don't like their leaders to

:38:29.:38:35.

have beards. They view them as unkept and looks as if you kind of

:38:36.:38:42.

let yourself go, which is not good news for Westminster's famous beard

:38:43.:38:49.

which belongs to Mr J Corbyn. He won the Beard Of The Year seven years on

:38:50.:38:54.

the trot. This was him being asked a couple of years ago, how long he had

:38:55.:38:58.

been growing a beard for? Well, the leader of the beard liberation front

:38:59.:39:05.

quoted me as saying I wear my beard as my opposition to New Labour, but

:39:06.:39:09.

that doesn't really work when John himself wears a beard! Look, there

:39:10.:39:15.

are contradictions in the movement. Now, history is not necessarily on

:39:16.:39:20.

Mr Corbyn's side, the last Prime Minister to have a beard was the

:39:21.:39:28.

Marcus of Salisbury in 1900s, 1902, something like that. He had a bushy,

:39:29.:39:36.

full beard, a bit like that character in Fools And Horses. He

:39:37.:39:42.

has an uncle Albert beard! Karl Marx, yes he had another very full

:39:43.:39:48.

beard! Other figures we can think of, well, of course, there was the

:39:49.:39:54.

US President, Abraham Lincoln. Very successful leader, of course, he had

:39:55.:39:59.

more of a goatee, I guess we'd call it now. Elsewhere on the range,

:40:00.:40:12.

Gengis Khan. Beards have a chequered relationship. However, on matters

:40:13.:40:19.

here, one Liberal Democrat is so enthused by his party, he has got

:40:20.:40:24.

the words, "Lib Dem" Cut into his hair! Have a look! This is what he

:40:25.:40:29.

has done on each side. That's how committed he is to the

:40:30.:40:32.

cause! Maybe I could get the words, "BBC"

:40:33.:40:37.

Cut into the sides of my hairment I don't think I've got enough hair.

:40:38.:40:42.

Scrap that idea. Forget it. I think you should do it, Norman.

:40:43.:40:44.

LAUGHTER So there is an election going on.

:40:45.:41:02.

We are calling it What's The Chatter? Today we are talking about

:41:03.:41:14.

echo chambers. What are they? Well, have a look at this.

:41:15.:42:47.

He's the stats guy at the think-tank, Demos.

:42:48.:42:51.

And his colleague Jamie Bartlett is here to tell us what the data means.

:42:52.:42:55.

Welcome. I know that you enjoyed Norman's chat on beards a moment

:42:56.:43:03.

ago! Let's talk more about the echo chamber because we heard the

:43:04.:43:08.

principle, Josh and I know you wanted to know if that principle is

:43:09.:43:12.

going on with the 200,000 supporters you followed. You generated a chart

:43:13.:43:16.

and explain what we're looking at here? What you're looking, we're

:43:17.:43:20.

interested in not only people were saying and who they were talking to

:43:21.:43:23.

and what the conversations were and each of the dots on this graph is a

:43:24.:43:28.

user on Twitter. And each line represents a conversation. So if I

:43:29.:43:33.

tweet to you, you will get a notification that I've, I'm talking

:43:34.:43:37.

to you, but you will be connected by a line on this graph. Now, the only

:43:38.:43:42.

thing that determines where the users are on this graph is who

:43:43.:43:47.

they're talking to and how much. We've coloured them by party, but

:43:48.:43:50.

that's what is determining their position. The really interesting

:43:51.:43:53.

thing that we have seen coming out here and this is 1.5 million tweets

:43:54.:43:58.

over the election period is that people are generally grouping by

:43:59.:44:04.

their parties. This affects kind of various, depending on the parties,

:44:05.:44:06.

Labour and Conservatives are grouped together, but they're more spread

:44:07.:44:09.

out than the three other parties that we have been looking at. So

:44:10.:44:14.

that's specifically then where you're identifying the echo chamber

:44:15.:44:17.

going on, the Lib Dems, the SNP and Ukip? That's where we have seen this

:44:18.:44:22.

effect strongest. So you can see and if we remove Labour and Conservative

:44:23.:44:25.

from the graph, you can see that while there are conversations going

:44:26.:44:31.

on between these clusters, they're much, much denser within themselves.

:44:32.:44:34.

So most of the chatter within each of the parties are to the party

:44:35.:44:38.

faithful, are to people who kind of share the same views. Jamie, tell me

:44:39.:44:42.

what you've identified about people in the three parties and what they

:44:43.:44:46.

are sharing? Well, so taking our sort of little clusters and taking

:44:47.:44:50.

our samples of 200 from each of the parties, we were looking at the

:44:51.:44:54.

tweets that were the most shared within them. So, I think the first

:44:55.:45:01.

one comes from the SNP here. So this was the most shared within the SNP

:45:02.:45:09.

group. And as you can see this is fairly inward looking. Essentially

:45:10.:45:12.

it is Nicola Sturgeon saying that Alex Salmond was right by saying

:45:13.:45:17.

that the Labour manifesto is essentially a rip off of some SNP

:45:18.:45:23.

policies. Very popular amongst SNP supporters. So that was

:45:24.:45:26.

reverberating around about that, but what about the Liberal Democrats? A

:45:27.:45:31.

sort of similar one. A self congratulatetry tweet from the

:45:32.:45:34.

Liberal Democrats. This was the most shared within that cluster and it's

:45:35.:45:40.

essentially again Tim Farron's vision to change Britain and

:45:41.:45:44.

apparently the voters were loving it. All Or Now message. What about

:45:45.:45:54.

Ukip? This was interesting because the Ukip one was not directly about

:45:55.:45:58.

the election. That was if you like a bit more on the core territory of

:45:59.:46:05.

Ukip, it was about a terrorism case in court. I don't know what you draw

:46:06.:46:11.

from that, may be that the focus is not solely on the election the Ukip,

:46:12.:46:16.

this was a bit of an outlier if you like, it was about a broader issue

:46:17.:46:27.

than this election. Won interesting. If we look of the tweets they are

:46:28.:46:30.

sending, the outlook is a bit different. They are engaging in

:46:31.:46:34.

debate with each other a bit more. And the shape here is interesting,

:46:35.:46:39.

these clusters are much closer together, much more connecting these

:46:40.:46:43.

two parties than we saw the other three parties earlier. They were

:46:44.:46:48.

focusing mainly on the same issues, in this last week, both parties

:46:49.:46:57.

talking about Eurovision. The Labour manifesto is a big topic of

:46:58.:47:01.

discussion. There are still groupings but there is more talk

:47:02.:47:07.

between them. So Jamie. Eurovision is a cross-party issue expat what

:47:08.:47:15.

else? The big story last week politically was ransomware, which as

:47:16.:47:19.

we saw was this piece of malware that was infecting computers and

:47:20.:47:23.

causing trouble particularly for the NHS because it was locking files

:47:24.:47:28.

that had to be decrypted. Ransomware was being talked about by all of the

:47:29.:47:35.

parties. One of the most popular tweets of all was this one from Paul

:47:36.:47:44.

Mason, about should we be upgrading trident Fumic uneven seemed to fix

:47:45.:47:53.

an exploit of Windows XP. That was the problem which resulted in some

:47:54.:47:58.

of the ransomware. And this was especially popular with SNP voters,

:47:59.:48:01.

probably because of the trident aspect. With the cyber attacks seen

:48:02.:48:12.

as Jeremy Corbyn things. Among Labour supporters it was this one

:48:13.:48:15.

that was most shared. This is the interesting thing. The received

:48:16.:48:20.

wisdom in electoral politics as if we are talking about the NHS, Labour

:48:21.:48:25.

is winning. That is what strategists have always thought. Labour

:48:26.:48:30.

supporters on Twitter were more likely to be talking about this

:48:31.:48:34.

ransomware than those from the Conservative Party. They especially

:48:35.:48:37.

focused on the fact that Jeremy Corbyn had been speaking about a tax

:48:38.:48:43.

that very morning on the NHS from things like -- speaking about

:48:44.:48:51.

attacks. The Tories did not engage in any way the same volume. The

:48:52.:48:55.

Labour Party wants to get the conversation onto the NHS of this

:48:56.:48:58.

was the way to do it. Where they did talk about this and I think it

:48:59.:49:03.

reflects the strengths of the different party as they perceive it

:49:04.:49:06.

themselves, Conservative supporters on twitter were just sharing

:49:07.:49:11.

information about it being an international cyber attack. It

:49:12.:49:16.

wasn't only the UK targeted. That kind of puts the conversation onto

:49:17.:49:21.

national security, where the Conservatives feel more confident.

:49:22.:49:28.

It is a good place for the Conservatives to take these issues

:49:29.:49:31.

of the day and spend them in a way that they think it works for them.

:49:32.:49:35.

What is the biggest tweet of the week? This was picked up by every

:49:36.:49:43.

party except the Conservative Party, everyone else loved it. Someone has

:49:44.:49:47.

noticed that the bus to Theresa May is currently touring the country in

:49:48.:49:52.

is exactly the same bus, if you look at the license plate, that was

:49:53.:49:57.

flagging up the boat Remain campaign just a few months ago. This is

:49:58.:50:01.

potentially a side of the campaign Theresa May would like to be

:50:02.:50:05.

forgotten, obviously she was on the Remain side back then. It is like a

:50:06.:50:11.

perfect tweet, it is funny and clever and simple. You can't get

:50:12.:50:16.

away with anything on twitter. One mistake and it will get picked up

:50:17.:50:24.

and shared widely. Thank you both. We will keep updating with them

:50:25.:50:25.

throughout the campaign. Horseracing is a sport worth over

:50:26.:50:30.

?3 billion to the British economy, watched live by six million people

:50:31.:50:33.

a year in Britain. But if women choose it as career,

:50:34.:50:36.

are they being held back? The first ever survey

:50:37.:50:39.

into gender in horse-racing Despite more women than ever before

:50:40.:50:40.

entering the sport, the research finds they are underrepresented

:50:41.:50:44.

in the most prominent It highlights examples

:50:45.:50:46.

of "entrenched prejudice Our sports correspondent,

:50:47.:50:50.

Joe Wilson, has seen the report. Most other sports have done their

:50:51.:50:58.

gender survey and come up with a gender survey. Researchers from

:50:59.:51:07.

Oxford Brookes, they were survey more, ask questions, interviewed. We

:51:08.:51:10.

should say this is all anonymous. It has enabled a lot of people in the

:51:11.:51:14.

industry and in the sport to speak more candidly than they have before.

:51:15.:51:19.

There was a range of views, some people would see racing as a

:51:20.:51:22.

meritocracy, whereby you get what you put in, hard work is rewarded,

:51:23.:51:27.

but a lot of people disagree. Most people responded, they were female,

:51:28.:51:32.

but not all. We have seen comments like I was told specifically not to

:51:33.:51:36.

ask for promotion, that there was talk of a bullying culture within

:51:37.:51:42.

yards. And the key bit of it is that women from across the industry

:51:43.:51:46.

reported being patronised, not taken seriously or being denied

:51:47.:51:48.

opportunities because of their gender. Those other key aspects of

:51:49.:51:54.

it. Why has it taken so long for horse racing to be looked at? That

:51:55.:52:09.

is a good question. A lot of sports that get funding from the lottery,

:52:10.:52:12.

they have to have this sort of study. Something I hear is that this

:52:13.:52:19.

is enabling people to say haps what they bottled up for a long time. If

:52:20.:52:25.

you look at horse racing as a sport, what is interesting is that the

:52:26.:52:28.

number of people going into it through colleges, trying to get

:52:29.:52:34.

their first job on it, are women. It is something like a 70-30 split. The

:52:35.:52:39.

interesting thing is how quickly do they face a ceiling, find a barrier

:52:40.:52:49.

to aggression within the sport? Tell us about the indications. Jockeys is

:52:50.:52:57.

one of a high-profile thing. Across-the-board, about 6%, just 6%

:52:58.:53:01.

of horses that are ridden and races that are ridden by women. If you

:53:02.:53:05.

look at trainers who have that responsible at E of looking after

:53:06.:53:13.

horses, turning them into, we went to Newmarket where there are over 70

:53:14.:53:17.

trainers in that town alone. You will find about of them are women.

:53:18.:53:22.

We spoke to Amy Murphy, the youngest trainer in the town. When I asked

:53:23.:53:26.

her specifically whether she felt it was more difficult for a woman to

:53:27.:53:31.

make progress than a man, she came up with an interesting answer which

:53:32.:53:34.

hopefully we can hear from now. You have to get the support

:53:35.:53:38.

I have to support get the support and sometimes I think,

:53:39.:53:43.

probably, as a woman, you're having to prove yourself

:53:44.:53:46.

before people want to support you, whereas if you were a man they might

:53:47.:53:49.

probably, as a woman, you're having to prove yourself

:53:50.:53:51.

before people want to support you, whereas if you were a man they might

:53:52.:53:54.

But, you know, we've had great support and great loyalty

:53:55.:53:58.

Whether I would have had that from day one had I not had

:53:59.:54:02.

the results we've had already, I'm not sure, but I'm

:54:03.:54:05.

so, Joe, how have the sport 's governing body respond to this? They

:54:06.:54:09.

say they welcome the report. They have given me a response. As you

:54:10.:54:15.

will see, he says it is a stark reminder that while they had been

:54:16.:54:19.

making progress, there is a lot to do over all areas of diversity. We

:54:20.:54:24.

are restating our commitment to improve diversity in our sport, they

:54:25.:54:27.

say. One other element which I think is interesting is if you look at the

:54:28.:54:32.

boards, the directors, there is a lot of them looking after various

:54:33.:54:38.

areas. The BH a restructured recently to bring more women in at

:54:39.:54:43.

director level. But that issue of the people in boardrooms rather than

:54:44.:54:48.

people in stables, and whether they are women rather than men, is

:54:49.:54:52.

another key issue. Thank you very much. Susanna Gill, what is your

:54:53.:55:01.

reaction to this? Good morning, great to be in the show. We are here

:55:02.:55:09.

to launch this research and it is a great step forward for the sport.

:55:10.:55:12.

The first time this piece of work has been done. As Joe said, people

:55:13.:55:16.

have been really honest in their feedback and it has led to a really

:55:17.:55:19.

great report from the team at Oxford Brookes who have looked at many

:55:20.:55:23.

other sectors before looking at horse racing. I hope today's report

:55:24.:55:26.

is just the start of what we want to do, that we now have a commitment

:55:27.:55:30.

from the BHA and others in the sport to look at diversity and women in

:55:31.:55:34.

racing can support that. Hopefully, year-on-year, we will see progress

:55:35.:55:39.

made. As Joe was saying, it is one thing the BHA doing a positive thing

:55:40.:55:43.

in terms of getting more women on the board but when it comes down to

:55:44.:55:46.

the individual stables and what is going on at grassroots, how

:55:47.:55:54.

difficult is it to connect the two? That is right, the BHA has to set an

:55:55.:55:59.

example from the top. But what we need is to have monitoring and to

:56:00.:56:02.

know what is going which happened until this report. The BHA are

:56:03.:56:06.

committed to doing that and setting an example from the top and it has

:56:07.:56:12.

to be a no tolerance approach to any inappropriate behaviour in the

:56:13.:56:14.

sport, especially yards, because that is where seven people are

:56:15.:56:18.

coming into the sport and experiencing it for the first time

:56:19.:56:22.

in a working environment. Can you give us some anecdotes of the worst

:56:23.:56:28.

things you have heard? Some of the things you hear is that men's tend

:56:29.:56:32.

to sometimes dominated, some of the language used, and we have seen it

:56:33.:56:35.

in other sports, where women have the sort of go along with it rather

:56:36.:56:39.

than stand up and say actually I am not happy with that. I have done

:56:40.:56:44.

that in my own environment. In the Oxford Brookes team that looked at

:56:45.:56:46.

this, you find that type of behaviour in any sector and it is

:56:47.:56:51.

well reported these days. It is about women having the confidence to

:56:52.:56:53.

say actually I am not comfortable with that, it is not appropriate and

:56:54.:56:57.

it went help us get on in our career. Everyone in positions of

:56:58.:57:06.

influence need to set an example. Why has it gone on so long in horse

:57:07.:57:13.

racing? Is it so bad in comparison to other sports? It hasn't been

:57:14.:57:17.

discussed in horse racing before because this research has not been

:57:18.:57:20.

done. There hasn't been anyone to make it happen. Until women in

:57:21.:57:26.

racing worked with the Oxford Brookes research team. I don't think

:57:27.:57:30.

racing is worse than other sports but this has cast a light on it and

:57:31.:57:36.

allowed us to address the key issues that the report raises. Thank you

:57:37.:57:37.

very much. Just a reminder, we're going to be

:57:38.:58:04.

in Dunstable in Bedfordshire on Monday, 29th May for a big

:58:05.:58:06.

election audience debate. If you've made up your mind already

:58:07.:58:09.

who you're going to vote for, still deciding or don't think you'll

:58:10.:58:12.

bother - and would like the chance to share your views and grill senior

:58:13.:58:15.

politicians on their policies - More details on our Facebook

:58:16.:58:18.

and Twitter pages. Thank you for your company, BBC

:58:19.:58:22.

Newsroom Live is coming up next. It's cold.

:58:23.:58:33.

Tastes a bit like avocado. And soon we're all

:58:34.:58:38.

going to be eating them. Four crickets have the same amount

:58:39.:58:42.

of calcium as a glass of milk, and a dung beetle,

:58:43.:58:45.

twice the protein of beef.

:58:46.:58:49.