10/07/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


10/07/2017

The programme has access to serving prison officers who say the service is at crisis point. Victoria speaks to the president of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 10/07/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

It's Monday, it's 9am, I'm Victoria Derbyshire -

:00:07.:00:11.

It's a matter of time before a serving prison officer

:00:12.:00:15.

is killed on duty - that's the warning

:00:16.:00:17.

from officers working in the Britain's jails right now.

:00:18.:00:19.

They've risked their jobs to speak anonymously to us.

:00:20.:00:23.

It's only a matter of time before something massive goes off.

:00:24.:00:26.

It will get to the stage where a prison

:00:27.:00:29.

Our exclusive report in a few minutes.

:00:30.:00:36.

The high court is to hear new evidence about Charlie Gard,

:00:37.:00:39.

the terminally-ill baby whose parents have taken on Great Ormond

:00:40.:00:43.

Street Hospital in an effort to secure experimental treatment

:00:44.:00:45.

Judges will examine claims that the proposed treatment

:00:46.:00:49.

Theresa May tries to hit the reboot button.

:00:50.:00:55.

One year on from moving into Number 10, the Prime Minister is attempting

:00:56.:00:58.

to regain political momentum by appealing to other parties

:00:59.:01:00.

We will be talking to Damian Green - the First Secretary of State,

:01:01.:01:06.

who is effectively her second-in-command.

:01:07.:01:23.

Hello, welcome to the programme - we're live until 11am this morning.

:01:24.:01:26.

Also, does the accent you have mean people think you are thick?

:01:27.:01:29.

This after Angela Rayner, the Shadow Education Secretary,

:01:30.:01:32.

was called thick after being on the Andrew Marr Show yesterday.

:01:33.:01:35.

Let me know what perceptions people have of you because of

:01:36.:01:38.

If you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.

:01:39.:01:46.

The case of the terminally ill 11-month-old boy, Charlie Gard,

:01:47.:01:52.

returns to the High Court today, as judges consider new evidence

:01:53.:01:54.

relating to potential treatment for his condition.

:01:55.:01:58.

An earlier ruling supported the view of his doctors that nothing can be

:01:59.:02:01.

done to improve his quality of life, and they should be allowed to switch

:02:02.:02:04.

"He's still fighting, so we're still fighting."

:02:05.:02:11.

A phrase that Chris and Connie Gard have used many times as they battle

:02:12.:02:15.

to keep their baby son Charlie alive.

:02:16.:02:21.

We are just two normal, everyday people.

:02:22.:02:24.

What is strong is the love we have for our boy.

:02:25.:02:28.

If he was lying there suffering, we wouldn't be here now.

:02:29.:02:34.

It's a story with another twist today.

:02:35.:02:37.

The High Court will look once more at whether or not the 11-month-old

:02:38.:02:46.

who was born with a serious genetic condition that doctors say

:02:47.:02:49.

mean he will never see, hear, move or speak,

:02:50.:02:51.

should be allowed to go to America for experimental treatment.

:02:52.:03:00.

So far, the courts have agreed with Great Ormond Street

:03:01.:03:02.

condition cannot be improved and he should instead

:03:03.:03:05.

But support has grown for the family from all over the world,

:03:06.:03:09.

including from President Trump and the Pope.

:03:10.:03:11.

And a glimmer of hope when seven specialists

:03:12.:03:13.

led by the Vatican Children's Hospital signed a letter saying that

:03:14.:03:16.

treatment should be reconsidered following success in conditions

:03:17.:03:18.

Chris and Connie handed a petition in to Great Ormond Street

:03:19.:03:23.

yesterday with over 350,000 signatures backing them.

:03:24.:03:25.

But the hospital has made clear that its position has not changed.

:03:26.:03:28.

It will be up to a judge to once again decide

:03:29.:03:38.

It will be up to a judge to once again decide if that is true.

:03:39.:03:42.

And we will hear from Charlie Gard's mum later in the programme.

:03:43.:03:50.

Joanna is in the BBC Newsroom with a summary

:03:51.:03:52.

Theresa May is to call on rival political parties to "contribute

:03:53.:03:56.

In her first major speech since the general election,

:03:57.:03:59.

the Prime Minister will say her commitment to change

:04:00.:04:02.

But with the Conservatives losing their overall majority,

:04:03.:04:05.

she'll say the reality she faces means she has to approach

:04:06.:04:07.

Labour said Mrs May's speech proved her party had

:04:08.:04:10.

The Iraqi prime minister has visited Mosul to congratulate his armed

:04:11.:04:14.

forces on their victory over the Islamic State group,

:04:15.:04:19.

nine months after they launched the offensive to liberate the city.

:04:20.:04:21.

In the capital, Baghdad, people sang and danced on the streets.

:04:22.:04:24.

Many areas of Mosul have been reduced to rubble in the fight,

:04:25.:04:27.

Iraq is celebrating the defeat of so-called Islamic State in Mosul.

:04:28.:04:40.

Homes, streets, shops reduced to ruins and dust.

:04:41.:04:54.

It's thought thousands have been killed.

:04:55.:04:57.

Some will have been part of IS, others were civilians.

:04:58.:05:00.

Search and rescue teams continue to pull bodies from the rubble.

:05:01.:05:02.

These families have survived three years under IS.

:05:03.:05:05.

Now they're able to leave, following nearly 1 million people

:05:06.:05:07.

who've already left their homes here.

:05:08.:05:09.

It may be a while until they can return.

:05:10.:05:16.

The fighting is ending, but the humanitarian crisis is not.

:05:17.:05:18.

It will take months, maybe even years, for the people

:05:19.:05:21.

who have fled from their homes, they have lost everything,

:05:22.:05:31.

it will take months for them to go back to the damaged neighbourhoos.

:05:32.:05:34.

The UN estimates it will cost at least ?770 million to restore

:05:35.:05:37.

the city's basic infrastructure, such as clean water and electricity.

:05:38.:05:40.

IS still hold territory to the west and south of Mosul,

:05:41.:05:42.

Some experts have warned that if gains are not secured properly,

:05:43.:05:47.

Although this city is liberated, for these families

:05:48.:05:52.

The BBC understands a Government inquiry into the so-called gig

:05:53.:06:02.

economy will call for flexible workers to be paid

:06:03.:06:04.

The Taylor review, which is due to be published tomorrow,

:06:05.:06:11.

will affect firms like Deliveroo and Uber.

:06:12.:06:13.

It's expected to argue that additional wages will help to offset

:06:14.:06:15.

President Trump says he didn't know his eldest son met a Russian

:06:16.:06:25.

lawyer who claimed to have damaging information about Hillary Clinton.

:06:26.:06:27.

The New York Times reports Donald Trump Junior met the lawyer -

:06:28.:06:30.

who said she had links to the Kremlin - two weeks

:06:31.:06:33.

after his father won the Republican nomination last year.

:06:34.:06:35.

But Trump junior says the lawyer's statements were vague and nothing

:06:36.:06:37.

The European Court of Human Rights is expected to rule on the case

:06:38.:06:44.

of a Scottish man fighting the UK's longest extradition case.

:06:45.:06:48.

Phillip Harkins, who is originally from Greenock, has been fighting

:06:49.:06:50.

extradition to the United States for 14 years.

:06:51.:06:53.

The 38-year-old denies murdering a man in a robbery

:06:54.:06:56.

If the case at the European Court of Human Rights goes against him,

:06:57.:07:02.

he could face trial in America for first degree murder.

:07:03.:07:06.

Counter-terror police have launched a film telling holiday-makers how

:07:07.:07:08.

to react in the event of a terrorist attack in their resort.

:07:09.:07:20.

The four-minute video shows families and hotel staff fleeing

:07:21.:07:23.

the sound of gunshots, barricading themselves into rooms

:07:24.:07:25.

and being treated as potential suspects by armed police.

:07:26.:07:29.

It repeats the advice to run, hide and tell.

:07:30.:07:34.

The mother of a British backpacker who was stabbed to death

:07:35.:07:37.

in Australia last year has made an emotional

:07:38.:07:39.

journey to the place where her daughter died.

:07:40.:07:41.

Mia Ayliffe-Chung was killed at a hostel in Queensland.

:07:42.:07:47.

Another British traveller, Tom Jackson, died trying to help her.

:07:48.:07:50.

Mia's mother Rosie wanted to retrace her daughter's steps,

:07:51.:07:52.

and learn more about the welfare of backpackers in Australia.

:07:53.:07:55.

Our correspondent Hywel Griffith reports.

:07:56.:08:00.

This isn't a journey any parent would want to make.

:08:01.:08:05.

10,000 miles from home, Rosie Ayliffe has come to learn

:08:06.:08:07.

20-year-old Mia was working in Queensland to gain a visa.

:08:08.:08:21.

30-year-old Tom Jackson from Cheshire tried to help her.

:08:22.:08:27.

A French national has been charged with their murders.

:08:28.:08:31.

The hostel is still open and, without the cameras following her,

:08:32.:08:34.

Rosie was allowed to enter and see Mia's room, and the place

:08:35.:08:37.

And I sat in a cubicle and I thought about Mia dying in that room.

:08:38.:08:43.

And she's gone, you know, and it's tough.

:08:44.:08:46.

I knew it would be, but I'm so glad I came,

:08:47.:08:51.

But this isn't only about commemoration.

:08:52.:08:56.

Rosie wants to meet other backpackers, and learn exactly

:08:57.:08:58.

what kind of a life her daughter had here.

:08:59.:09:04.

Every year, 200,000 people come to Australia for a working holiday.

:09:05.:09:09.

If they want to stay for a second year, then they have to come

:09:10.:09:12.

Many, like Mia, come to Queensland, where the farmers use

:09:13.:09:17.

the backpackers to pick their fruit and tend their fields.

:09:18.:09:20.

An investigation by Australia's fair work ombudsman has found many

:09:21.:09:23.

Two thirds say employers take advantage by underpaying them.

:09:24.:09:30.

Some have their passports taken away.

:09:31.:09:33.

Djuro, from Denmark, has just finished the 88 days

:09:34.:09:35.

of rural work needed to gain a second-year visa.

:09:36.:09:40.

It was almost like being in prison, rather than being in Australia.

:09:41.:09:45.

Treatment will be so bad, you're being pushed to your very limit.

:09:46.:09:50.

Now, we're speaking about people working in 40 degrees.

:09:51.:09:52.

And to the amount of capacity that you're working,

:09:53.:09:58.

one or two months, some people collapse, mentally.

:09:59.:10:00.

The Australian Government says it recognises migrant workers

:10:01.:10:04.

It has set up a task force, but while she is in the country,

:10:05.:10:12.

Rosie is anxious to push for more change.

:10:13.:10:14.

We are propping up their agricultural industry

:10:15.:10:16.

People are making huge amounts of money out of our backpackers.

:10:17.:10:24.

And it's got to stop, really, and, you know,

:10:25.:10:27.

But I can feel a fight coming on, I really can.

:10:28.:10:33.

It is one which may bring Rosie back to Australia several times,

:10:34.:10:36.

to lobby and campaign, and to give Tom and Mia a legacy.

:10:37.:10:46.

Firefighters have been tackling a blaze overnight

:10:47.:10:48.

at London's Camden Lock Market, which attracts 28 million

:10:49.:10:50.

70 firefighters were sent to the scene after the fire broke

:10:51.:10:54.

London Fire Brigade says the situation is now under control

:10:55.:10:58.

There are no reports of any casualties.

:10:59.:11:03.

A Coldplay fan who went to the band's recent concert

:11:04.:11:08.

at Croke Park in Dublin became more involved than he expected.

:11:09.:11:11.

Rob had been crowd-surfing in his wheelchair when he was

:11:12.:11:13.

spotted by lead singer, Chris Martin.

:11:14.:11:15.

He was then invited on stage and drew huge cheers from the crowd

:11:16.:11:19.

of more than 70,000 people when he brought out

:11:20.:11:22.

Rob described his experience as "amazing".

:11:23.:11:29.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 9.30am.

:11:30.:11:33.

Do get in touch with us throughout the morning -

:11:34.:11:38.

use the hashtag Victoria live and if you text, you will be charged

:11:39.:11:41.

Your accent - do people think you are more or less intelligent because

:11:42.:11:49.

of your accent? We ask because of the Shadow Education Secretary's

:11:50.:11:52.

appearance on the Andrew Marr Show yesterday. Somebody treated her and

:11:53.:11:56.

said she was thick. She responded and said, it's because of my accent.

:11:57.:12:01.

I am proud of it. I am not going to change it. Stop it.

:12:02.:12:04.

Let's get some sport now with Leah Boleto.

:12:05.:12:09.

It is manic Monday at Wimbledon, Andy Murray Johanna Konta attempting

:12:10.:12:19.

to give us a British man and woman in the quarterfinals since how long?

:12:20.:12:26.

to the last time Britain had a man and woman in the quarter-finals.

:12:27.:12:31.

But Andy Murray and Johanna Konta could make that a reality

:12:32.:12:34.

After a day's rest there was a bit of training

:12:35.:12:40.

But today, Murray is up against Frenchman Benoit Paire who -

:12:41.:12:53.

by the way - hasn't made a grand slam quarter-final, ever!

:12:54.:12:56.

Expectations are high for Murray but he is favourite

:12:57.:12:58.

All the action on Centre Court at around 3 o'clock today.

:12:59.:13:02.

But it's Johanna Konta who holds the first slot on Centre Court this

:13:03.:13:05.

afternoon, taking on Caroline Garcia of France - that's at 1 o'clock.

:13:06.:13:08.

They've both met four times before, each winning twice, with Garcia

:13:09.:13:10.

beating Jo in their most recent clash in March.

:13:11.:13:12.

But I'm sure crowds will try their hardest to inspire Jo.

:13:13.:13:15.

And given that Britain hasn't had a female quarter-finalist

:13:16.:13:17.

since 1984, we can expect quite a party this lunctime.

:13:18.:13:21.

Right, cricket. What a few days for Joe Root and England cricketing in

:13:22.:13:28.

this Test series. And he gets a victory in his first match as

:13:29.:13:30.

England captain, which is fantastic. Yes, a huge win for England

:13:31.:13:34.

under Joe Root and a lot The England Captain had

:13:35.:13:37.

lots of praise for Ali, who gave a fantastic performance -

:13:38.:13:41.

ripping through South Africa's Ali was man-of the-match

:13:42.:13:43.

after their 200 and 11 run win. The side won't be changed

:13:44.:13:47.

for Friday's Second Of course, this is England's first

:13:48.:13:49.

of seven tests with Root in charge for the first time, so a big relief

:13:50.:14:03.

for him that it started well. We know they will come back hard,

:14:04.:14:13.

but to be 1-0 up, it is the first time we have beaten them for a long

:14:14.:14:17.

time. Everything I have said to the lads this week, they have dived into

:14:18.:14:25.

and gone about in a brilliant way and made my life a lot easier.

:14:26.:14:30.

And of course, Victoria, the win came moments

:14:31.:14:31.

a crucial three-run win against Australia in the World Cup.

:14:32.:14:35.

The first time they've managed that in 24 years!

:14:36.:14:37.

The win puts England in a strong position to qualify

:14:38.:14:39.

for the semi-finals as they sit top of the points table.

:14:40.:14:51.

And before I go, Victoria, we know record goalscorer

:14:52.:14:53.

Wayne Rooney is leaving Manchester United after 13 years

:14:54.:14:56.

to return to Everton, where he played as a teenager.

:14:57.:14:58.

But he's just admitted that even though he's been wearing

:14:59.:15:00.

United's red shirt in the day, he's been slipping into his

:15:01.:15:03.

We don't have a picture of the PJs in question, but this

:15:04.:15:17.

We are sure sales of pyjamas will get a boost. You don't think they

:15:18.:15:25.

are going to bed with a pair of Everton pyjamas? We do have a

:15:26.:15:29.

mock-up. We don't know for sure, but we think it was going to bed wearing

:15:30.:15:35.

bees. Yes, Colleen is going to say come to bed in your Everton pyjamas!

:15:36.:15:42.

We are going to Doctor Sally at 9:30am, she is live at Wimbledon, we

:15:43.:15:51.

will be able to check their alarm systems if we are looking like we

:15:52.:15:53.

have every morning! First this morning, we're

:15:54.:15:55.

going to bring you rare interviews with serving prison officers

:15:56.:15:57.

who are speaking out about the reality of life

:15:58.:15:59.

inside British prisons. They're risking their jobs just

:16:00.:16:01.

by speaking out on this programme. Prisons in Britain

:16:02.:16:04.

are feeling the strain. Since 2010, the number of frontline

:16:05.:16:08.

prison officers has fallen by some 7000 to 18,000 and budgets

:16:09.:16:12.

have been cut severely. In recent months, jails have

:16:13.:16:14.

experienced some of the worst rioting in decades as the decline

:16:15.:16:16.

in standards has Back in December, riots

:16:17.:16:18.

in Birmingham Prison left four Just yesterday, it was announced

:16:19.:16:24.

that more than 200 kilos of drugs and 13,000 mobile

:16:25.:16:36.

phones had been found Dan Clark Neal's a former

:16:37.:16:38.

Metropolitan Police Officer - First of all it is tricky for

:16:39.:16:51.

serving prison officers to speak out? It is, I have spoken to a dozen

:16:52.:16:55.

in the last six months looking at the issue and we have only managed

:16:56.:17:00.

to get three of them to talk to us on camera, which is a massive

:17:01.:17:04.

achievement because it is rare for them to talk to us because they are

:17:05.:17:08.

concerned they may lose their jobs. The Ministry of Justice really don't

:17:09.:17:11.

like prison officers talking to the media. What kind of things were they

:17:12.:17:17.

saying? We were looking at four main areas, highlighted from speaking to

:17:18.:17:21.

three of them. We are looking at the issue of drugs, which we know was in

:17:22.:17:25.

the news again yesterday, we are looking at the issue of violence,

:17:26.:17:29.

and staffing and recruitment levels and stress. There are lots of issues

:17:30.:17:32.

alongside those ones that we have highlighted, but

:17:33.:17:49.

what is really interesting is the three prison officers that we have

:17:50.:17:51.

spoken to, they are not speaking to us for their moment of glory, they

:17:52.:17:54.

are talking because they want change, they want the prison service

:17:55.:17:56.

to change for the better and they are hoping that Ministry of Justice

:17:57.:17:59.

will sit up and take notice from what we have done with this film. As

:18:00.:18:02.

you would expect, we have protected the identities of the officers who

:18:03.:18:03.

have spoken exclusively to us. All the background footage you'll

:18:04.:18:04.

see in this film is from the BBC archive and was not shot

:18:05.:18:07.

in the prisons these He basically put excrement in a bag

:18:08.:18:09.

and ran up behind me and shoved it in my face -

:18:10.:18:20.

eyes, nose, mouth. When you join the Armed Forces

:18:21.:18:26.

and you're fighting in the battlefield, anything can

:18:27.:18:32.

happe - you can survive, you can get killed, you can

:18:33.:18:34.

get seriously injured. It's only a matter of time before

:18:35.:18:38.

something massive goes off. It will get to the stage

:18:39.:18:40.

where a prison officer We've gained incredibly rare

:18:41.:18:43.

access to prison officers. They want to speak out

:18:44.:18:56.

about the shocking reality We've protected their identities

:18:57.:18:58.

for their own safety. This is the life

:18:59.:19:07.

of a prison officer - Drugs is a massive,

:19:08.:19:10.

massive issue now compared When I first started this,

:19:11.:19:20.

what's known as spice, you'd have sort of an incident

:19:21.:19:27.

a week, maybe two. Just before I left, you'd have

:19:28.:19:30.

three or four a day. You can have somebody who's

:19:31.:19:39.

joking about one minute to fighting you in another,

:19:40.:19:48.

to having a fit in another. You could have all three

:19:49.:19:51.

of those in one episode. There's people within the prison,

:19:52.:19:54.

sort of prison life, they've actually lost their lives

:19:55.:19:58.

through this spice, regular, regular ambulances called to deal

:19:59.:20:02.

with what they call a spice attack. Prisoners are specifically now

:20:03.:20:05.

going out and doing a crime to be recalled because they can earn more

:20:06.:20:18.

money coming in with drugs, They spoke openly about friends,

:20:19.:20:21.

gang members, getting caught for petty crimes,

:20:22.:20:33.

receiving sort of two-year sentences because they know when they get

:20:34.:20:35.

in there there's quite There were talking about making

:20:36.:20:37.

several thousand pounds a month just through selling

:20:38.:20:41.

drugs in prison. Officers being assaulted, punched,

:20:42.:20:43.

boiling water thrown in their faces. It was just happening

:20:44.:20:51.

on a regular basis. Just before I left, we had

:20:52.:20:54.

a member of staff who ended up with a broken nose,

:20:55.:21:02.

potentional broken finger, I've been assaulted a couple

:21:03.:21:04.

of times, and also been injured stopping fights, and I was nearly

:21:05.:21:11.

taken hostage once. I've been on the end

:21:12.:21:13.

of a bad experience. We attended a cell with

:21:14.:21:15.

two prisoners in it. We were dealing with their issues

:21:16.:21:26.

when they assaulted us. They used the leg of a metal chair

:21:27.:21:29.

to assault myself and my colleagues, You don't know what or who was

:21:30.:21:32.

connected to who or what, and you try to do your best at that

:21:33.:21:47.

moment in time. I've done some internal damage

:21:48.:21:50.

to my shoulder and required He basically put excrement in a bag

:21:51.:21:52.

and he ran up behind me and shoved it in my face - eyes, nose,

:21:53.:22:06.

mouth. It was the worst

:22:07.:22:10.

feeling in the world. Like, we didn't know

:22:11.:22:13.

their medical records, I didn't know whether he had HIV,

:22:14.:22:15.

hepatitis, which is all carried So the next day I was in

:22:16.:22:18.

the hospital having all the tests When you join the Armed Forces

:22:19.:22:22.

and you're fighting on the battlefield, anything can

:22:23.:22:32.

happen - you can survive, you can get killed, you can

:22:33.:22:34.

get seriously injured. The assault rate against

:22:35.:22:36.

officers has crept up. But over the last 4-5 years has

:22:37.:22:38.

massively increased. So you're getting people

:22:39.:22:46.

with broken bones, and mental In my opinion you've

:22:47.:22:48.

seen nothing yet. It's literally, it's

:22:49.:22:54.

going to boil over very soon. It's only a matter of time before

:22:55.:22:56.

something massive goes off. And either a lot of prisoners

:22:57.:22:59.

will get hurt, or a lot of prison It will get to the stage

:23:00.:23:03.

where a prison officer I was joining a service that

:23:04.:23:06.

I was proud to join. So that I could change

:23:07.:23:12.

people's lives. As the service changed over

:23:13.:23:20.

the years, that has sort of been There's been a big issue

:23:21.:23:23.

with retention and recruitment You do recruit good people,

:23:24.:23:28.

but they tend to leave very quickly. After the training, it was,

:23:29.:23:36.

I think 8-9 weeks training in total, it was just, you're

:23:37.:23:50.

on the wings, and that is it. 20 years ago you had

:23:51.:23:53.

time with prisoners. Time to engage, time to understand,

:23:54.:23:55.

time to try and get them to see that their actions were wrong,

:23:56.:23:59.

whereas now we haven't got the staff, we haven't got the time,

:24:00.:24:02.

and we've got prisoners that don't really care about

:24:03.:24:05.

changing their lives. There was a massive sick rate

:24:06.:24:15.

and they 're struggling to cover There were times when,

:24:16.:24:18.

I was sure I wasn't the only one, you're left to lock 64

:24:19.:24:27.

prisoners behind doors. Prisoners issues are not dealt

:24:28.:24:29.

with as quickly as they used to be, that causes frustration among

:24:30.:24:32.

the prisoners and it builds up and sometimes

:24:33.:24:34.

this leads to assaults. Staff get injured,

:24:35.:24:36.

that leads to sickness, When I joined there used to be

:24:37.:24:37.

staff, from ex-army, ex-police, etc. They had the life experience to deal

:24:38.:24:50.

with these people, to talk to them. But young staff coming in don't have

:24:51.:24:54.

these kind of life skills and that's another big failure

:24:55.:24:57.

which causes problems. We're getting officers

:24:58.:25:00.

who are 20, 21 years of age. What experience have

:25:01.:25:06.

they got of life? And they are telling a 40,

:25:07.:25:12.

50-year-old to go behind the door who's probably done

:25:13.:25:15.

ten years already. There's no respect, no authority

:25:16.:25:16.

and there's no discipline. I saw it first hand,

:25:17.:25:18.

prisoners attacked another prisoner with a razor blade over

:25:19.:25:21.

a packet of tobacco. If you're on your own and you see

:25:22.:25:23.

something like that which we did, you could be trying to split

:25:24.:25:26.

15-20 blokes up. Staff have seen it gradually get

:25:27.:25:32.

worse over the period that I've worked there and they leave,

:25:33.:25:35.

they either retire or they leave on medical grounds,

:25:36.:25:39.

because in their eyes they're jumping off a sinking ship,

:25:40.:25:42.

and the new ones are coming on to try and replace the old ones

:25:43.:25:45.

leaving with vast experience. It's just a numbers game

:25:46.:25:48.

for the Government. Honestly, I used to wake

:25:49.:25:51.

up in the morning and And I just hope that at the end

:25:52.:25:53.

of the day I come away in one piece. And then I can go home,

:25:54.:26:05.

forget about it to the next day. When you've got a prisoner

:26:06.:26:09.

threatening to rip your head off, he's going to stab you,

:26:10.:26:15.

he's going to get your kids shot, get your missus shot,

:26:16.:26:18.

you don't know, you don't Up to the time of the incident

:26:19.:26:20.

I was a teetotaller, I didn't drink. When I'm not at work,

:26:21.:26:27.

when I'm on holiday, it's fine. How much are you drinking most days

:26:28.:26:45.

when you are at work? Then we get up the next morning

:26:46.:26:48.

and act as if nothing's wrong. Because you have to put a front on,

:26:49.:27:11.

because if prisoners find out you've got a weakness,

:27:12.:27:14.

they will use it. I don't think people

:27:15.:27:16.

would actually believe that a job If everyone who wanted to leave

:27:17.:27:18.

left, they wouldn't have And I said, you know,

:27:19.:27:31.

if ever I could help I will, and I was just fortunate I could get

:27:32.:27:44.

out, and I have got out. The reason why I took

:27:45.:27:48.

up your invitation to speak up was because I'm hoping that I can

:27:49.:27:50.

change the direction My intention was to expose

:27:51.:27:53.

the problems we're facing and to make it better for the people

:27:54.:27:56.

who want to join. It will be good if the disaster

:27:57.:27:59.

that is looming can be averted. We have this statement from the

:28:00.:28:02.

Ministry of Justice... "In November last year

:28:03.:28:09.

we announced a major overhaul of the prison system,

:28:10.:28:12.

including 2500 extra frontline officers and new measures to tackle

:28:13.:28:14.

violence, drugs and mobile phones. We are continuing to transform our

:28:15.:28:16.

prison estate to close old and dilapidated prisons,

:28:17.:28:19.

and create up to 10,000 new places The Iraqi army says

:28:20.:28:21.

Mosul has been liberated from the so-called Islamic State,

:28:22.:28:44.

but it has come at a price - thousands have been killed and more

:28:45.:28:47.

than 800,000 people And have you been judged for your

:28:48.:28:58.

accent? Angela Rayner was, we are asking you to let us know your

:28:59.:28:59.

experiences. Here's Joanna in the BBC Newsroom

:29:00.:29:00.

with a summary of today's news. The case of the terminally-ill baby

:29:01.:29:07.

Charlie Gard is due to return Great Ormond Street Hospital

:29:08.:29:10.

in London has asked judges to consider new evidence relating

:29:11.:29:13.

to potential treatment The courts have previously backed

:29:14.:29:15.

the view of his doctors that nothing can be done to improve his quality

:29:16.:29:19.

of life, and they should be allowed to switch

:29:20.:29:22.

off his life support systems. The Prime Minister is to signal a

:29:23.:29:27.

change in her style of Government, calling for a cross-party consensus

:29:28.:29:28.

on some policy ideas. In her first major speech

:29:29.:29:30.

since the general election, Theresa May will say her

:29:31.:29:36.

commitment to change But with the Conservatives

:29:37.:29:38.

losing their overall majority, she'll say the reality she faces

:29:39.:29:41.

means she has to approach She will call on other parties to

:29:42.:29:43.

contribute, not just criticise. The Iraqi prime minister Haider

:29:44.:29:47.

al-Abadi has congratulated his armed forces on their victory over

:29:48.:29:50.

Islamic State militants in Mosul. It's nine months since government

:29:51.:29:52.

forces launched an attack Much of it has been

:29:53.:29:54.

reduced to rubble. Counter-terror police have launched

:29:55.:30:05.

a film telling holiday-makers how to react in the event of a terrorist

:30:06.:30:07.

attack in their resort. The video shows an attack by gunmen

:30:08.:30:23.

on a hotel and repeat advice to run, hide and tell. Police say there is

:30:24.:30:27.

no evidence of an increased threat this summer.

:30:28.:30:28.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 10am.

:30:29.:30:32.

Let's head to Wimbledon now, and talk to Sally Nugent.

:30:33.:30:39.

We look forward to the emergency alarm going off. And it is manic

:30:40.:30:48.

Monday, so come on, Andy Murray and Johanna Konta! We love that moment

:30:49.:30:53.

when the alarm goes off, but who cares? Everybody plays today, that

:30:54.:31:07.

is why we call it manic Monday. Andy Murray will play Benoit Paire. Not

:31:08.:31:14.

everyone has heard of him, but this is potentially a really tough match

:31:15.:31:20.

for Andy Murray. Jo Konta, oh, my goodness, doesn't she look

:31:21.:31:23.

confident? Isn't it interesting how just a week in tennis can change

:31:24.:31:26.

things for her? She felt the love of the Wimbledon crowd last week. She's

:31:27.:31:36.

playing Carolina Garcia, also French, later today. So we have to

:31:37.:31:40.

make a really good hopes, and more than that, Victoria. Go on! You

:31:41.:31:49.

know. Marcus Willis. He is playing in the doubles. Our favourite

:31:50.:31:55.

player. He is such a hero. He is fantastic on social media. A new

:31:56.:32:00.

dad, posted lots of pictures with his cute baby. He has had rough time

:32:01.:32:03.

over the weekend. After that fantastic win other day, on social

:32:04.:32:09.

media people had the cheek to call him a bit overweight. But he

:32:10.:32:13.

responded to it very elegantly, pointing out that actually, he was

:32:14.:32:16.

doing really rather well and into the second week of one of the best

:32:17.:32:19.

tennis tournaments in the world. So we wish Marcus Willis and Jade

:32:20.:32:23.

Clarke well. Before I go, we might have missed the alarm. Lemina let

:32:24.:32:28.

you in on something we don't normally get to see. I don't know if

:32:29.:32:31.

my cameraman can go slightly to my right. This is a briefing going on.

:32:32.:32:42.

This time of day, we have all the Armed Forces, the servicemen and

:32:43.:32:45.

women who come and help at Wimbledon. They get told the order

:32:46.:32:48.

of the day and what is happening, who to look after, who to look out

:32:49.:32:52.

for, which will person is going to be here. So they are talking in

:32:53.:32:56.

hushed tones. We are not allowed to listen. Fair enough, have a good

:32:57.:33:00.

day. Charlie Gard's parents return

:33:01.:33:02.

to the High Court today with new evidence which they hope

:33:03.:33:05.

will save his life. The 11-month-old little

:33:06.:33:08.

boy is terminally ill, having been born with a rare genetic

:33:09.:33:10.

condition which means he can't move His parents have made a number

:33:11.:33:13.

of unsuccessful challenges to a decision to turn off his life

:33:14.:33:19.

support, but Great Ormond Street Hospital has now asked

:33:20.:33:23.

the High Court to look at new evidence about potential

:33:24.:33:25.

treatment for his condition abroad. Charlie's mum, Connie Yates,

:33:26.:33:27.

has been telling Radio 4's Today programme this morning

:33:28.:33:31.

about the treatment they hope There's 18 children

:33:32.:33:33.

currently on the medication. They all have mitochondrial

:33:34.:33:44.

depletion system as well as Charlie, but theirs is caused

:33:45.:33:47.

by a slightly different gene. You're bypassing the normal chemical

:33:48.:33:49.

reactions that happen in the cell. You're going right to the end, which

:33:50.:33:54.

is what the cell normally does, You're giving the body nucleosides

:33:55.:33:58.

and then you're increasing So Charlie should get his

:33:59.:34:01.

strength back, if it works. We've got around a 50% chance of it

:34:02.:34:10.

crossing the blood-brain barrier, so that means getting

:34:11.:34:12.

into his brain, because his He still has brainwaves, but they're

:34:13.:34:15.

slower than they should be. But, yeah, it has a good chance

:34:16.:34:21.

of crossing the blood-brain barrier and that's what the new research

:34:22.:34:25.

is about. We now have seven

:34:26.:34:27.

doctors supporting us. Two from America, two from Italy,

:34:28.:34:29.

one from England and two from Spain. They all specialise in mitochondrial

:34:30.:34:35.

depletion syndrome. At Great Ormond Street

:34:36.:34:40.

they have a lot of specialities under one roof, but they don't have

:34:41.:34:43.

anyone who specialises I know that structural

:34:44.:34:45.

damage is irreversible, although there have been cases

:34:46.:34:52.

where even that is reversible. We expect that the structural damage

:34:53.:34:57.

is irreversible, but I am yet to see something that tells me my son has

:34:58.:35:00.

got irreversible Do you have any sense

:35:01.:35:02.

throughout this process about whether or not

:35:03.:35:05.

he is suffering? I wouldn't be able to sit

:35:06.:35:11.

there and watch my son suffer or be in pain,

:35:12.:35:14.

I promise you that. A lot of people say,

:35:15.:35:16.

"I couldn't do it. He doesn't have the best life

:35:17.:35:18.

at the moment because If he was given a tracheostomy, then

:35:19.:35:26.

we could take him out to the park. We would probably be at home now,

:35:27.:35:33.

but for some reason they think it is in his best interest

:35:34.:35:36.

to keep him on the There are much more

:35:37.:35:39.

comfortable ways. He watches videos on the iPad

:35:40.:35:42.

and stuff like that. If he was suffering,

:35:43.:35:50.

I couldn't do it, I promise you. I think a lot of people

:35:51.:35:53.

think this is wrong. We've got one set of doctors

:35:54.:35:57.

blocking us from going We've now got two hospitals

:35:58.:35:59.

willing to take Charlie, so effectively two sets of doctors

:36:00.:36:04.

that we have been These guys are experts

:36:05.:36:06.

in this field. They've got medical

:36:07.:36:11.

licence to protect. They wouldn't do a treatment that

:36:12.:36:20.

didn't have a chance of working. It always had a chance, but now that

:36:21.:36:23.

chance is being put up to 10%. I think that's a good enough chance

:36:24.:36:27.

to take an oral medication Tomorrow is the 11th, which is three

:36:28.:36:30.

months since the judgment, and that's all we asked

:36:31.:36:36.

for, three months. In all that time, we

:36:37.:36:40.

could have tried it. We could have been having a trial

:36:41.:36:42.

today saying shall Charlie carry Or, you know, is it in his best

:36:43.:36:45.

interest to die now? But yet I am still fighting

:36:46.:36:49.

for the same thing that I have been We can cross to Mark Lobel, who's

:36:50.:36:52.

at Great Ormond Street Hospital. It is the hospital that feels the

:36:53.:37:08.

life-support machine should be switched off that is going back to

:37:09.:37:11.

the same judge at the High Court to look at this potential new evidence?

:37:12.:37:18.

That's right. Of course, it has come after pressure from the parent and

:37:19.:37:21.

from some members of the International medical community that

:37:22.:37:25.

in around four and a half hours' time, as you say, the High Court

:37:26.:37:29.

judges are again going to get a chance to decide what is in the best

:37:30.:37:35.

interests for 11-month-old Charlie, who is behind at the in Great Ormond

:37:36.:37:40.

Street Hospital. He has this rare syndrome, so he has to be helped to

:37:41.:37:46.

breathe. That is just one of the unfortunate characteristics that the

:37:47.:37:51.

parents desperately want to change. As you say, it is actually Great

:37:52.:37:55.

Ormond Street Hospital that have gone forward and found with this new

:37:56.:37:58.

evidence that they have been presented with another reason to ask

:37:59.:38:01.

judges to consider again whether Charlie should have this oral

:38:02.:38:07.

medication. It is only being used by 18 people, 18 children worldwide who

:38:08.:38:09.

have similar, but not the same condition as Charlie. And they are

:38:10.:38:18.

being asked to find out whether Charlie would probably benefit from

:38:19.:38:22.

this. Some people think he has a one in ten chance of benefiting from

:38:23.:38:25.

this treatment and it would make him feel better. If the judges decided

:38:26.:38:29.

that it would, he will be allowed to go to America. But, and there is a

:38:30.:38:36.

big but, there are strict criteria in the UK and the balance of

:38:37.:38:39.

decision-making is very thin. For example, if it was seen as

:38:40.:38:44.

unacceptably harsh, the treatment, or it wouldn't necessarily sustain a

:38:45.:38:48.

child's life for very long, they would not go ahead with it. So it is

:38:49.:38:52.

a tough decision and when they were presented with this decision before,

:38:53.:38:55.

the High Court didn't go through with it. That matters because if

:38:56.:38:58.

they don't go through with it, there is a chance that they would turn off

:38:59.:39:03.

the machines that are keeping the 11-month-old Charlie alive at the

:39:04.:39:10.

moment. Thank you, Mark. The hearing is two o'clock this afternoon but we

:39:11.:39:13.

are not expecting a final decision today. Next to Iraq.

:39:14.:39:17.

Thousands of people killed and injured and more than 800,000

:39:18.:39:20.

left without homes after a long and bloody battle to reclaim

:39:21.:39:22.

the Iraqi city of Mosul from the grips of so-called Islamic

:39:23.:39:25.

Yesterday, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi declared

:39:26.:39:31.

the country's second biggest city liberated from IS control

:39:32.:39:34.

after they occupied it nine months ago.

:39:35.:39:42.

Once known as an economic and cultural centre of north-western

:39:43.:39:47.

Iraq, Mosul had been home to nearly 2 million people.

:39:48.:39:49.

So what has been left and what does the future hold for the lives

:39:50.:39:52.

of those caught up in the conflict and the city's streets left

:39:53.:39:55.

The BBC's Jonathan Beale is in the heart of the war-torn

:39:56.:40:01.

city, and has witnessed rescue teams searching for survivors

:40:02.:40:03.

Ali says he spoke to his brother on this phone when he was trapped

:40:04.:40:18.

This territory just there is under IS control,

:40:19.:40:38.

just a small parcel of land.

:40:39.:40:43.

The families are making their way through any way they can.

:40:44.:40:47.

And as you can see, they are really desperate.

:40:48.:41:08.

These families said they had little food or water.

:41:09.:41:11.

They've left behind loved ones under rubble.

:41:12.:41:14.

Many will carry the scars of this battle for the rest of their lives.

:41:15.:41:22.

Let's talk now to Raffaello Pantucci, Director of

:41:23.:41:25.

International Security Studies at the foreign affairs think tank

:41:26.:41:27.

From Newcastle we have Dr Ahmed Sabaawi,

:41:28.:41:34.

who was born and raised in Mosul and his parents and brothers

:41:35.:41:37.

In Erbil, which is around two and a half hours' drive from Mosul,

:41:38.:41:43.

is Campbell MacDiarmid, a freelance journalist based in Iraq

:41:44.:41:46.

who has been covering the battle to retake Mosul since it began last

:41:47.:41:49.

from the International Committee of the Red Cross.

:41:50.:41:53.

She was in the city at the end of this week and will be returning

:41:54.:41:56.

And from Mosul we have Stephanie Remion, who is currently

:41:57.:42:00.

working as an emergency coordinator at a hospital in West Mosul

:42:01.:42:03.

Stefanie, tell us about the devastation of the city and about

:42:04.:42:18.

the lives of civilians who have survived this battle? We are located

:42:19.:42:28.

about three kilometres from the last active fighting area, so what I can

:42:29.:42:33.

tell you is not really what is happening on the front line or in

:42:34.:42:38.

the old city right now. But as you said about the civilian patients who

:42:39.:42:43.

arrived to us from the old city, they come with war trauma related

:42:44.:42:49.

injuries such as blast wounds, explosion wounds, Shell wounds,

:42:50.:42:57.

trauma wounds etc. They are in a desperate state. They tell us they

:42:58.:43:01.

have been waiting for days under the rubble until they were able to be

:43:02.:43:10.

brought to a hospital. So it is a world of devastation. Sarah from the

:43:11.:43:19.

Red Cross, Sarah Alzawqari, you were in Mosul last week. What help were

:43:20.:43:29.

you giving to people? I would like to also add that the humanitarian

:43:30.:43:39.

concern is extremely high. Right now, we have a surgical team which

:43:40.:43:43.

was just a kilometre away from the front line and although they have

:43:44.:43:48.

not received many blast injuries in the last couple of days, they have

:43:49.:43:51.

received a lot of people who were under the rubble all who had

:43:52.:43:59.

injuries from unexploded devices. The area is heavily contaminated.

:44:00.:44:03.

Everywhere inside Mosul, you will find bullets. There are families who

:44:04.:44:09.

tried to go back home and soon as they opened the door, there were

:44:10.:44:14.

booby traps. Kids stepped on landmines. And of course, the

:44:15.:44:19.

situation becomes more and more difficult. The help that we have

:44:20.:44:28.

been given, we also know it is important for those who are going

:44:29.:44:31.

back to have access to water. There was a lot of infrastructure that has

:44:32.:44:38.

been destroyed. Thousands of houses, bridges, roads, of course

:44:39.:44:44.

electricity, water plants. It is hard for people to go back with no

:44:45.:44:49.

homes, schools, hospitals or places like that. There is nothing to go

:44:50.:44:55.

back to, especially in areas that have witnessed heavy fighting. Let

:44:56.:45:02.

me bring in Dr Ahmed Sabaawi, because his family is still there.

:45:03.:45:14.

What are they telling you? My family are in a part of the city which has

:45:15.:45:19.

been liberated since January. I have some relatives and friends who have

:45:20.:45:25.

just fled the western part of the city. The situation now is better,

:45:26.:45:37.

but the western part is the old city of Mosul, with old housing, against

:45:38.:45:43.

area. There are more than 20,000 civilians trapped there as hostages

:45:44.:45:49.

and human shields. Our Iraqi army and security forces have done an

:45:50.:45:55.

extraordinary job and they have completed their mission with their

:45:56.:45:58.

heads held high. But the hard work is starting now. There are hundreds

:45:59.:46:05.

of thousands of families in refugee camps. They have lost their lives

:46:06.:46:09.

and their houses. In the city, we have too many children who have

:46:10.:46:17.

found themselves alone because their parents were dead in the war.

:46:18.:46:23.

Let me bring in Campbell MacDiarmid, a freelance journalist covering the

:46:24.:46:30.

battle to retake Mosul. You are in Irbil now, about five Hours Drive

:46:31.:46:34.

away, but in terms of the significance of this, this

:46:35.:46:37.

liberation of Mosul, how significant is it? It is certainly a major

:46:38.:46:42.

victory for the Government of Iraq, it strikes a real deathblow to the

:46:43.:46:49.

notion of Isis as a caliphate that can attract members from overseas,

:46:50.:46:53.

as we saw back in 2014 there were thousands coming to join. But what

:46:54.:46:58.

we've already started to see is that as they lose territory the group is

:46:59.:47:04.

able to revert to insurgent terrorist tactics that we have seen

:47:05.:47:09.

before in Iraq over the last decade. Already in Mosul and liberated areas

:47:10.:47:14.

we have seen suicide bombings, we have seen that further afield in

:47:15.:47:17.

Iraq and I think we can continue to see that overseas as well. Let me

:47:18.:47:21.

bring in Raffaello Pantucci, because you agree with the point Campbell

:47:22.:47:26.

was making, fighters change the way they look, shave their beards, and

:47:27.:47:29.

returned to cause more chaos? I think the point is we have to

:47:30.:47:34.

remember the group we look at now and call so-called Islamic State has

:47:35.:47:37.

been around since the late 90s in one shape or another and since that

:47:38.:47:39.

time it has moved into Iraq in 2002, 2003 and participated

:47:40.:47:54.

in this insurgency against American led forces fighting in the country,

:47:55.:47:57.

and it grew and shrank again in 2008, 2009, when it shrank to the

:47:58.:48:00.

hills and was pushed back. In the wake of the Civil War in Syria it

:48:01.:48:03.

managed to grow the game and grow and grow to the expansive engorged

:48:04.:48:07.

form that we have seen in terms of containing Mosul and Raqqa and now

:48:08.:48:11.

we see it shrinking again. What I think Campbell is pointing out, the

:48:12.:48:15.

group taking back to the hills, going back to the insurgent gorilla

:48:16.:48:20.

model is what we will see, rather than completely disappearing. Could

:48:21.:48:24.

they return to Mosul in a few months? And a lot will depend on

:48:25.:48:26.

what the Iraqi Government in Baghdad needs to

:48:27.:48:42.

reach out to the Sunni people in Mosul and say, we are here for you

:48:43.:48:48.

as well? As we have seen from the pictures there has been incredible

:48:49.:48:51.

devastation, making sure that get put together, making sure people

:48:52.:48:54.

feel that their Government really represents them and is eager for

:48:55.:49:01.

them to be part of Iraq is key to making sure the city is inoculated

:49:02.:49:05.

from so-called Islamic State. We have seen a direct correlation

:49:06.:49:08.

between IS losing some of its territory and terrorist attacks

:49:09.:49:13.

abroad in Manchester, London, Paris, Nice, various other cities, is that

:49:14.:49:19.

going to continue, do you think? I think the intent to launch attacks

:49:20.:49:23.

on the West remains and we have seen it has become incredibly diffuse,

:49:24.:49:27.

whereas previously we saw the model of the large-scale attacks like

:49:28.:49:30.

Paris and Brussels, there is still an aspiration in that direction but

:49:31.:49:34.

increasingly we are seeing this directive from a distance where

:49:35.:49:37.

people are talking to people at of Raqqa and Mosul who are telling

:49:38.:49:40.

them, take a car and mow down some people, do the sorts of things, and

:49:41.:49:45.

it becomes part of their message. I think we will see that continue but

:49:46.:49:51.

it will be interesting to see how it develops as a methodology as the

:49:52.:49:54.

group loses territory. Campbell, is it significant the Prime Minister

:49:55.:49:57.

there has not declared victory yet? We have seen the Government of Iraq

:49:58.:50:02.

is eager to claim victories, one of the things we have seen throughout

:50:03.:50:06.

this campaign is that officers have tended to get a bit premature with

:50:07.:50:10.

declarations of victory so I think it is a good thing that he hasn't

:50:11.:50:15.

made a formal declaration yet while there is still fighting on going

:50:16.:50:21.

because that undermines what is a very significant victory and I think

:50:22.:50:25.

we will see that declaration very soon, in the coming one or two days.

:50:26.:50:32.

Stephanie, tell our British audience about the conditions you are working

:50:33.:50:40.

game in the hospital where you are? The hospital is in very good shape,

:50:41.:50:46.

of course most of the hospitals have been destroyed during the conflict

:50:47.:50:50.

so the MSF team had to find a place that was correct in terms of

:50:51.:50:59.

structure so that we the could open in good conditions. Today the

:51:00.:51:08.

conditions inside the hospital are very good, of course coming everyday

:51:09.:51:12.

to the hospital from our base is where we cross the city with houses

:51:13.:51:19.

collapsed in rubble, etc. And Sarah, what kind of things do you need, and

:51:20.:51:24.

your workers, in order to be able to help people on the ground? Of course

:51:25.:51:31.

there are many things that are needed at the moment, it is going to

:51:32.:51:36.

be very difficult for the cities to stand up, it is going to be a very

:51:37.:51:40.

difficult road for the people. They have been traumatised, they left

:51:41.:51:44.

under very difficult situations and heavy bombardment with explosive

:51:45.:51:47.

weapons, being shot at, they have lost a lot of family members on the

:51:48.:51:51.

way, or they don't know what has happened to them. We are on the

:51:52.:51:55.

ground, we are giving everything that we could, whether it is

:51:56.:52:00.

emergency relief all food or medical supplies, even rehabilitation and

:52:01.:52:06.

building water units. It will take a lot of work from everyone. I think

:52:07.:52:09.

one of the biggest challenges as well right now which we and other

:52:10.:52:15.

organisations are going to step into even more is with the dead bodies

:52:16.:52:19.

that are currently, there are thousands of dead bodies in Mosul

:52:20.:52:26.

under the rubble, on the streets, a lot of hospitals are receiving them

:52:27.:52:31.

and it is becoming very hard to transport them, people don't have

:52:32.:52:35.

the correct means and facilities or training to be able to transport

:52:36.:52:39.

them in a dignified manner. And at the same time in a hygienic

:52:40.:52:46.

way. So this is a huge issue, we have been donating tracks for

:52:47.:52:52.

transportation and body bags but a lot more will be needed in the next

:52:53.:52:58.

weeks, especially as the fighting is over. Thank you all very much, we

:52:59.:53:03.

are grateful for your time. Thank you for your messages about

:53:04.:53:08.

the prison system. We brought you exclusive interviews with serving

:53:09.:53:11.

prison officers, which is really rare because they are worried about

:53:12.:53:16.

losing their job. Obviously we disguised their voices. This text

:53:17.:53:19.

from somebody who does not leave their name, as a former female

:53:20.:53:21.

prisoner serving just a short sentence, I stayed in three jails.

:53:22.:53:43.

In every prison mobile phones were on every wing and drugs were more

:53:44.:53:45.

available than outside. I have nothing but respect for all the

:53:46.:53:48.

prison officers who helped me on numerous occasions I encountered

:53:49.:53:50.

officers at the end of their ability to cope and in tears. I could only

:53:51.:53:53.

imagine men's prisons must be worse. We will talk more about the state of

:53:54.:53:55.

British jails after the news and sport, coming up at 10am.

:53:56.:53:59.

Before that, the Shadow Education Secretary Angela Rayner

:54:00.:54:01.

has come under attack, being described as sounding "thick"

:54:02.:54:03.

by some people on twitter after her appearance

:54:04.:54:10.

on the the Andrew Marr Show yesterday morning.

:54:11.:54:15.

Let's have a listen to a clip from the programme...

:54:16.:54:17.

I believe many working class and part-time and older mature

:54:18.:54:20.

There's three things that the coalition government helped

:54:21.:54:23.

the Conservatives with that have led to the disastrous

:54:24.:54:25.

Of course you mentioned the hiking of tuition fees,

:54:26.:54:28.

but there was the removal of the maintenance grants.

:54:29.:54:30.

There was the increase in the percentage of loans.

:54:31.:54:33.

They changed it so they couldn't use the base rate of the Bank of England

:54:34.:54:36.

and they upped the percentage that people paid.

:54:37.:54:38.

And of course the threshold of income, meaning more

:54:39.:54:41.

students would pay back more from the beginning as well.

:54:42.:54:44.

The Stockport-born MP, who has been the Member of Parliament

:54:45.:54:46.

for Ashton-under-Lyne since 2015, responded by saying

:54:47.:54:48.

she was proud of her accent and would not be changing.

:54:49.:54:50.

She tweeted, anonymous account attacking my accent again, saying I

:54:51.:54:56.

am sick etc? I will reiterate I am proud of my

:54:57.:54:59.

accent and will not change. In response she was trolled with a

:55:00.:55:02.

variety of tweets including means. We can speak now to Dr Rob Drummond,

:55:03.:55:08.

who is a senior lecturer in linguistics at Manchester

:55:09.:55:11.

Metropolitan University and has written about the abuse levelled

:55:12.:55:14.

at Angela Rayner and her accent. Hello to you, Doctor Rob Drummond.

:55:15.:55:24.

What do you think? I think it is really bad that in this day and age,

:55:25.:55:28.

2017, people are still getting abuse for the way they speak. I think it

:55:29.:55:32.

is great, the way she speaks, more than any other politician she speaks

:55:33.:55:36.

in the same accent as the people she represents, and I think when MPs are

:55:37.:55:40.

being accused of being out of touch with the people they represent, I

:55:41.:55:43.

think this should be celebrated, that she has such a genuine regional

:55:44.:55:49.

accent and she is proud of it. Linda says this, she mistook 11 billion

:55:50.:55:56.

and 100 billion, that is enough for me.

:55:57.:55:58.

Another says, it is nothing to do with her accent. One says, from

:55:59.:56:05.

Newcastle, I have met people who think I am friendly but

:56:06.:56:08.

unsophisticated, as if we still have an outside toilet! There is this

:56:09.:56:12.

prejudice and I think it is really quite bad. If you replace the idea

:56:13.:56:17.

of accent with any other thing to do with people, such as ethnicity,

:56:18.:56:21.

sexuality, gender, Iti replace those kinds of words you would soon

:56:22.:56:26.

realise that it is really not good, it is quite damaging. That is a

:56:27.:56:29.

really fair point. Angela Rayner has a very interesting background,

:56:30.:56:33.

mother of three, her eldest son was born when she was 16, in her first

:56:34.:56:37.

speech to the House of Commons she said a care worker becoming an MP,

:56:38.:56:44.

that is real aspiration for you. Perhaps as the only member of the

:56:45.:56:47.

house who was 16 and pregnant, she was told she would never amount to

:56:48.:56:51.

anything, if only they could see me now. Exactly, she has done really

:56:52.:56:54.

well and I think part of her appeal is that she is so genuine, she is

:56:55.:56:59.

authentic. The way we speak is so much a part of who we are, and she

:57:00.:57:03.

comes across as completely authentic. I think it is great. We

:57:04.:57:08.

also have reverse prejudice in this country, if you speed to posh you

:57:09.:57:19.

will also be criticised and cold online. You can, and to be fair

:57:20.:57:22.

there were politicians who have had that as well, think about Jacob Rees

:57:23.:57:25.

Mogg, who has probably one of the pot used -- poshest RP accent, I

:57:26.:57:28.

remember in his early days I think trying to get elected in Fife, he

:57:29.:57:33.

had no chance. He said as soon as he opened his mouth he realised he was

:57:34.:57:38.

losing votes. It is all to do with how people perceive different

:57:39.:57:43.

positions and different jobs to be, and a Conservative politician

:57:44.:57:46.

generally is seen as having that kind of accent, and that is what is

:57:47.:57:51.

expected, so if somebody is outside that, and similar for Angela Rayner,

:57:52.:57:56.

especially being involved in education, there is a perception of

:57:57.:58:00.

the kind of accent she should have, or traditionally that the

:58:01.:58:03.

post-holder has had, and when something is different from that

:58:04.:58:06.

people get a bit upset about it. Thank you very much, Doctor Rob

:58:07.:58:10.

Drummond from Manchester Metropolitan University.

:58:11.:58:13.

Jackie says, accents should not matter, ability to communicate

:58:14.:58:15.

matters and Angela Rayner communicates well.

:58:16.:58:25.

Stevie Smith says, the irony is that the BBC only ever use posh London,

:58:26.:58:30.

friendly northern Glaswegian accents, the BBC are close minded

:58:31.:58:34.

when it comes to accidents. Another says, your accent is no

:58:35.:58:37.

reflection on your ability to do a job well, there are lots of

:58:38.:58:42.

successful fix sounding people. News and sport on the way. First,

:58:43.:58:44.

let's get the latest weather. The weather on the change today and

:58:45.:58:53.

through the coming days, some suntan on offer but the risk of showers or

:58:54.:58:57.

longer spells the rain and it. To be fresher and more comfortable by

:58:58.:59:02.

night for sleeping and the risk of some breezy conditions as we head to

:59:03.:59:05.

the end of the week. We have low pressure in charge of our weather

:59:06.:59:09.

today, with that it is fairly unsettled, a weather front bringing

:59:10.:59:13.

more persistent rain through tonight but for the rest of today are

:59:14.:59:15.

essentially it is sunshine and showers, some of the showers happy

:59:16.:59:20.

and thundery especially across the south-east, potential for some

:59:21.:59:23.

surface water flooding, elsewhere a day of sunshine and showers. Parts

:59:24.:59:27.

of Northern Ireland and Scotland, an improvement compared with yesterday,

:59:28.:59:32.

still a bit of cloud around, sunny spells, the best of the sunshine

:59:33.:59:36.

across northern parts of Scotland, for much of England a day of

:59:37.:59:38.

sunshine and showers, the showers heavier in the east. Further west,

:59:39.:59:44.

for Wales a day of sunshine and showers, temperatures around 19

:59:45.:59:48.

Celsius, lots of dry weather for Devon and Cornwall and as we head

:59:49.:59:52.

into London we have had become downpours so if you are going to

:59:53.:59:55.

Wimbledon this afternoon the potential for a few showers, 30%

:59:56.:00:00.

chance we could see those showers but also there will be some sunshine

:00:01.:00:04.

to enjoy, temperatures around 24 Celsius. Through tonight the showers

:00:05.:00:08.

will ease and then all eyes to the west, we have another weather front

:00:09.:00:10.

making its way in from the West, heavy rain coming

:00:11.:00:28.

into parts of England and Wales and Northern Ireland, the further south

:00:29.:00:30.

and east you are it is drier and still relatively muddy but still

:00:31.:00:33.

fresh in the North, eight to 13 Celsius across Scotland. Tomorrow

:00:34.:00:35.

and north-south split, northern part enjoying sunny spells but also the

:00:36.:00:37.

risk of showers. Further south we have the rain gradually tracking its

:00:38.:00:39.

way eastwards, heavy pulses likely as well as we go through the day so

:00:40.:00:42.

there will be some rain for Wimbledon tomorrow. Temperatures

:00:43.:00:45.

between 13 to about 21 Celsius. As we head into Wednesday, an

:00:46.:00:49.

improvement, once this weather front clears south-east we can look

:00:50.:00:53.

forward to dry and bright weather, the link pleasant enough in the

:00:54.:00:57.

sunshine but certainly cooler than the last few days, temperatures

:00:58.:00:58.

ranging between 14 to about 22 Celsius. As

:00:59.:01:14.

we head to the end of the week, a mixture of sunshine and showers with

:01:15.:01:16.

the potential for breezy conditions through Thursday and Friday, so keep

:01:17.:01:18.

the sunscreen to hand and you will need your umbrella.

:01:19.:01:22.

We have exclusive access to serving prison officers

:01:23.:01:25.

who say the service is at crisis point and it's "only a matter

:01:26.:01:28.

of time before a prison officer is killed on duty".

:01:29.:01:31.

And I just hope that at the end of the day,

:01:32.:01:34.

Those prison officers have risked their jobs to talk to us.

:01:35.:01:46.

In the next hour, your experiences if you work within the prison

:01:47.:01:52.

service and we will speak to a representative of the Prison

:01:53.:01:55.

Officers Association and a former governor, plus an inmate.

:01:56.:01:56.

The parents of terminally ill baby Charlie Gard say interest

:01:57.:01:58.

in the case by the Pope and Donald Trump have

:01:59.:02:01.

They say they still have hope he will be allowed to travel

:02:02.:02:05.

Theresa May has spent one year as Prime Minister, while some say

:02:06.:02:15.

she is in a precarious position her second in command has

:02:16.:02:18.

this message for the Vonservative MPs trying to get rid of her...

:02:19.:02:21.

What do you say to Conservative MPs who are plotting to get rid of her?

:02:22.:02:25.

I think there is less of this than you would think.

:02:26.:02:27.

I have been around Westminster long enough to know that

:02:28.:02:32.

in July, there is lots of chatter, but I know absolutely that the

:02:33.:02:35.

overwhelming majority of my Conservative colleagues in

:02:36.:02:37.

Parliament are firmly behind the Prime Minister.

:02:38.:02:50.

Here's Joanna in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of today's news.

:02:51.:02:54.

The case of the terminally ill baby Charlie Gard is due to return

:02:55.:02:58.

Great Ormond Street Hospital in London has asked judges

:02:59.:03:04.

to consider new evidence relating to potential treatment

:03:05.:03:07.

The courts have previously backed the view of his doctors that nothing

:03:08.:03:11.

can be done to improve his quality of life, and they should

:03:12.:03:14.

be allowed to switch off his life support systems

:03:15.:03:19.

Charlie's mum Connie Yates has been telling Radio 4's Today programme

:03:20.:03:22.

about her son. His pulse is nice and settled. He

:03:23.:03:31.

wakes up, he enjoys his tickles. He watches videos on the iPad and stuff

:03:32.:03:36.

like that. If he was suffering, I couldn't do it, I promise you.

:03:37.:03:38.

Theresa May is to call on rival political parties to "contribute

:03:39.:03:41.

In her first major speech since the general election,

:03:42.:03:44.

the Prime Minister will say her commitment to change

:03:45.:03:46.

But with the Conservatives losing their overall majority,

:03:47.:03:49.

she'll say the reality she faces means she has to approach

:03:50.:03:52.

Labour said Mrs May's speech proves her party has

:03:53.:03:55.

"run out of ideas" - a claim rejected by one of her

:03:56.:03:58.

There are huge issues facing this country. Brexit is clearly the

:03:59.:04:11.

overwhelming one, but it is not just that. Theresa May is as ambitious as

:04:12.:04:15.

she ever was with her domestic agenda, which is why this week we

:04:16.:04:18.

will be talking about workers' rights. Later in the year, we will

:04:19.:04:22.

be setting out our new industrial strategy. There is a lot to be done

:04:23.:04:25.

and she is getting on with it and the government is getting on with

:04:26.:04:30.

it. You can hear Victoria's full interview with Damian Green in a few

:04:31.:04:32.

minutes' time. The European Court of Human Rights

:04:33.:04:36.

is expected to rule on the case of a Scottish man fighting the UK's

:04:37.:04:40.

longest extradition case. Phillip Harkins, who is originally

:04:41.:04:43.

from Greenock, has been fighting extradition to the United States

:04:44.:04:45.

for 14 years. The 38-year-old denies

:04:46.:04:47.

murdering a man in a robbery If the case at the European Court

:04:48.:04:49.

of Human Rights goes against him, he could face trial in America

:04:50.:04:54.

for first degree murder. The Iraqi prime minister Haider

:04:55.:04:56.

al-Abadi has congratulated his armed forces on their victory over

:04:57.:05:00.

Islamic State militants in Mosul. It's nine months since government

:05:01.:05:02.

forces launched an attack Much of it has been

:05:03.:05:04.

reduced to rubble. Counter-terror police have launched

:05:05.:05:11.

a film telling holiday-makers how to react in the event of a terrorist

:05:12.:05:13.

attack in their resort. The video shows an attack by gunmen

:05:14.:05:17.

on a hotel and repeat advice to run, The four-minute video shows families

:05:18.:05:30.

and hotel staff fleeing the sound of gunshots,

:05:31.:05:33.

barricading themselves into rooms and being treated as potential

:05:34.:05:35.

suspects by armed police. A Coldplay fan who went

:05:36.:05:37.

to the band's recent concert at Croke Park in Dublin became more

:05:38.:05:40.

involved than he expected. Rob had been crowd-surfing

:05:41.:05:43.

in his wheelchair when he was spotted by lead singer,

:05:44.:05:45.

Chris Martin. He was then invited on stage

:05:46.:05:46.

and drew huge cheers from the crowd of more than 70,000 people

:05:47.:05:49.

when he brought out Rob described his

:05:50.:05:52.

experience as "amazing". Carol from Inverness says, my accent

:05:53.:06:11.

is often taken as being aggressive as well as weigh less intelligent

:06:12.:06:16.

and not educated. Deborah e-mails to say, I got turned down for a job as

:06:17.:06:19.

I was told my voice was not conducive to telesales. So I rang up

:06:20.:06:24.

sales director using my telephone voice and complained about one of

:06:25.:06:28.

their products. At the end of the conversation, I came clean and got

:06:29.:06:32.

the job. I have often been judged on my London accent and I am convinced

:06:33.:06:36.

I have often been misjudged, but that only lasts fleetingly. Kevin

:06:37.:06:41.

says, people will always judge you. If it is not your accent, it is the

:06:42.:06:46.

way you dress or the way you look. I speak five languages and have an

:06:47.:06:50.

accent in each of them. I don't let it bother me. It is what I say that

:06:51.:06:55.

is important. If you're getting in touch, you are welcome.

:06:56.:06:57.

Here's some sport now with Leah Boleto.

:06:58.:07:00.

A big day at Wimbledon today as Andy Murray and Johanna Konta

:07:01.:07:03.

are both fighting for a spot in the quarter-finals.

:07:04.:07:05.

If they do both get through, it'll be the first time

:07:06.:07:12.

Britain's had a man and a woman in the last eight.

:07:13.:07:17.

After a day's rest, there was a bit of training

:07:18.:07:20.

Today Murray is up against Frenchman Benoit Paire,

:07:21.:07:26.

who hasn't made a grand slam quarter-final, ever!

:07:27.:07:28.

Expectations are high for Murray, but he's favourite

:07:29.:07:30.

All the action on Centre Court at around 3 o'clock today.

:07:31.:07:36.

But it's Johanna Konta who holds the first slot on Centre Court this

:07:37.:07:40.

afternoon, taking on Caroline Garcia of France - that's at 1 o'clock.

:07:41.:07:42.

They've both met four times before, each winning twice, with Garcia

:07:43.:07:45.

beating Jo in their most recent clash in March.

:07:46.:07:54.

And given that Britain hasn't had a female quarter-finalist

:07:55.:07:56.

since 1984, we can expect quite a party this lunchtime.

:07:57.:07:58.

Cricket now, because Joe Root's first test since taking over

:07:59.:08:01.

from Alastair Cook ended in a 211 run victory at Lords.

:08:02.:08:05.

Man of the match Moeen Ali gave a fantastic performance, ripping

:08:06.:08:08.

The side won't be changed for Friday's Second

:08:09.:08:11.

We know they are going to come back hard at Trent Bridge and we will

:08:12.:08:27.

have to play well. But to be 1-0 up, it is the first time we have beaten

:08:28.:08:30.

them here for a long time. Everything I have asked of the lads

:08:31.:08:34.

this week, they have dived straight into and have gone about in a

:08:35.:08:41.

brilliant way and made my life a lot easier.

:08:42.:08:42.

The win came moments after England's women got a crucial three-run win

:08:43.:08:45.

the first time they've managed that in 24 years!

:08:46.:08:52.

The win puts England in a strong position to qualify

:08:53.:08:54.

for the semi-finals as they sit top of the points table.

:08:55.:09:01.

And finally, Wayne Rooney is leaving Manchester United after 13 years

:09:02.:09:04.

to return to Everton, where he played as a teenager.

:09:05.:09:07.

The striker says that winning a trophy with Everton "would be

:09:08.:09:09.

And he's just admitted that even though he's been wearing

:09:10.:09:14.

United's red shirt in the day, he's been slipping into his Everton

:09:15.:09:17.

I actually have been wearing pyjamas at home with my kids. I have to keep

:09:18.:09:36.

that a bit quiet. But it's great. We don't have a picture of the PJs

:09:37.:09:44.

in question, but this is what we think

:09:45.:09:47.

they might look like. Victoria, you're not sure

:09:48.:09:50.

they'd get past Coleen, Assaulted by having excrement

:09:51.:09:52.

stuffed in your face, inmates out of control on drugs

:09:53.:10:09.

and a work life so stressful, you drink a bottle of spirits

:10:10.:10:12.

a day to escape. Just a few of the things serving

:10:13.:10:14.

prison officers have exclusively They're risking their jobs

:10:15.:10:17.

just by speaking to us. Since 2010, the number of frontline

:10:18.:10:22.

prison officers has fallen by some 7,000 to 18,000 and budgets have

:10:23.:10:25.

been cut severely. In recent months, jails have

:10:26.:10:27.

experienced some of the worst rioting in decades as the decline

:10:28.:10:32.

in standards has Around 240 prisoners were moved

:10:33.:10:34.

off the site after 12 And just yesterday, it was announced

:10:35.:10:40.

that more than 200 kilos of drugs and 13,000 mobile

:10:41.:10:50.

phones had been found It's very rare for serving prison

:10:51.:10:52.

officers to speak out - they spoke to Dan Clark Neal,

:10:53.:10:56.

who's a former We've protected the identities

:10:57.:10:58.

of the officers who've spoken We played you Dan's

:10:59.:11:01.

full film earlier - here's a short version

:11:02.:11:05.

before we speak to various All the background footage

:11:06.:11:08.

you'll see in this film is from the BBC archive

:11:09.:11:11.

and was not shot in the prisons Drugs is a massive,

:11:12.:11:14.

massive issue now compared They spoke openly about friends,

:11:15.:11:21.

gang members, getting receiving sort of two

:11:22.:11:30.

year sentences because they know when they get in there

:11:31.:11:41.

there's quite a strong drug feed. There were talking about making

:11:42.:11:44.

several thousand pounds a month just through selling

:11:45.:11:47.

drugs in prison. Prisoners are specifically

:11:48.:11:52.

now going out and doing a crime to be recalled

:11:53.:11:54.

because they can earn more money coming in with drugs,

:11:55.:11:59.

mobile phones and SIM cards. That never

:12:00.:12:01.

happened 20 years ago. Just before I left

:12:02.:12:03.

we had a member of staff who ended up with a broken

:12:04.:12:07.

nose, potentional broken finger, Excrement thrown in my face,

:12:08.:12:10.

he basically put excrement in a bag and he ran up behind me and shoved

:12:11.:12:23.

it in my face, eyes, nose, mouth, it was the worst feeling

:12:24.:12:26.

in the world, like, we didn't know their medical

:12:27.:12:30.

records, I didn't know whether he had HIV, hepatitis,

:12:31.:12:33.

which is all carried So the next day I was in

:12:34.:12:35.

the hospital having all the tests When you join the Armed Forces

:12:36.:12:43.

and you're fighting on the battlefield, anything can

:12:44.:12:51.

happen, you can survive, you can get killed, you can

:12:52.:12:54.

get seriously injured. After the training, it was, I think,

:12:55.:13:08.

eight to nine weeks' It was just, you're

:13:09.:13:10.

on the wing, and that is it. We are getting officers who are 20,

:13:11.:13:18.

21 years of age, what And they are telling a 40,

:13:19.:13:21.

50-year-old to go behind the door? Who's probably done

:13:22.:13:26.

ten years already. There's no respect, no authority

:13:27.:13:28.

and there's no discipline. There's been a big issue

:13:29.:13:30.

with retention and recruitment You do recruit good

:13:31.:13:32.

people, but they tend to Honestly, I used to wake up

:13:33.:13:36.

in the morning and feel And I just hope that

:13:37.:13:42.

at the end of the day When I'm not at work,

:13:43.:13:49.

when I'm on holiday, it's fine. How much are you drinking most days

:13:50.:14:07.

when you are at work? Then we get up the next morning

:14:08.:14:10.

and act as if nothing's wrong. Let's speak now to David Todd from

:14:11.:14:33.

the Prison Officers Association, Jonathan Robinson, who served 17

:14:34.:14:35.

weeks of a 15 month sentence in 2011 and John Attard, who spent seven

:14:36.:14:46.

years as governor at Holloway and is from the Prison

:14:47.:14:55.

Governors' Association. David, how do you react to this kind

:14:56.:15:03.

of insight? Unfortunately, it is nothing new. There has been a rise

:15:04.:15:07.

in assaults on prison staff and a rise in assaults on prisoners. Until

:15:08.:15:13.

last December, there were 344 deaths in custody. Prison officers have to

:15:14.:15:18.

deal with this. They have to deal with the violence. It takes its

:15:19.:15:22.

toll. There is a massive rise in post-traumatic stress disorder

:15:23.:15:27.

amongst my members. An officer on his own to close up more than 60

:15:28.:15:33.

prisoners. Is that the normal or is that unusual? In some of the inner

:15:34.:15:36.

London jails, you will have more than that. You will have two menace

:15:37.:15:41.

of staff looking up 160 prisoners and trying to control that many with

:15:42.:15:43.

two staff is asking the impossible. Is it asking the impossible, as a

:15:44.:15:55.

prison governor? I think it is, the crisis we are referring to right now

:15:56.:16:00.

is something the Prison Officers' Association was sensitive to a

:16:01.:16:05.

number of years ago and most people will be well be called for an

:16:06.:16:08.

independent public inquiry last year at our annual conference into the

:16:09.:16:12.

crisis prisons are in, and David refers to the statistics, but the

:16:13.:16:19.

statistics we are hearing are actually not completely relevant,

:16:20.:16:21.

the statistics we need to look at are those that go back five years

:16:22.:16:25.

when the austerity cuts first kicked in. If we look at serious assaults

:16:26.:16:32.

on staff, it is close to 200%, the increase. If we look at a

:16:33.:16:35.

self-inflicted deaths in custody, the increase is something like 117%.

:16:36.:16:40.

The figures are proud so simply going back 12 years is an irrelevant

:16:41.:16:44.

figure, it is just a Canada reference, not a real reference.

:16:45.:16:58.

So, when the Government says, amongst other things, they are

:16:59.:17:01.

spending a lot of money and employing an extra 2500 prison

:17:02.:17:03.

officer is, new measures to tackle violence, drugs and mobile phones,

:17:04.:17:06.

how is that going, in your eyes? Anything the Government do to

:17:07.:17:08.

improve things is welcome but the fact is over the last five years

:17:09.:17:11.

around 900 million, nearly ?1 billion was stripped out of prisons,

:17:12.:17:16.

we lost 7000 prison officers and 5000 prison governors. What we are

:17:17.:17:19.

looking at right now is the tip of the iceberg and if we are going to

:17:20.:17:23.

seek a different it is going to need a bigger push. We talked about

:17:24.:17:28.

public sector pay, who wants to be a prison officer or prison governor

:17:29.:17:32.

when we have had seven years of capped pay? It is not an attractive

:17:33.:17:36.

environment to work in. Jonathan, from your point of view, tell our

:17:37.:17:42.

audience about the number of mobile phones inside jails, the level of

:17:43.:17:51.

drugs inside jails. Well, Dan's film is the tip of the iceberg. I served

:17:52.:17:58.

a fully justified very short sentence in 2011, so that makes me

:17:59.:18:06.

an expert. I remember meeting a young man in his early 20s and he

:18:07.:18:09.

said to me, I have been put in here on purpose to make money, and I took

:18:10.:18:17.

that with a pinch of salt. But now I don't doubt him, because I've met so

:18:18.:18:22.

many people, I'd visit prisons a lot, get searched very rarely when I

:18:23.:18:27.

go into them, and young people are getting themselves deliberately

:18:28.:18:31.

recalled all put in custody deliberately to make money, and they

:18:32.:18:36.

enter prison with drugs about their person. When I arrived at HP Bedford

:18:37.:18:43.

in July 2011 we were about six people, we were searched, but not

:18:44.:18:49.

one of us were invited to sit in the chair, which was a machine in place

:18:50.:18:53.

that I now know if you sit in it it will detect whether you have

:18:54.:18:56.

something about your person. The prisons system, whilst I am

:18:57.:19:01.

extremely grateful to compassionate prison officer is, the prison

:19:02.:19:08.

system, you are parachuted in, quite justifiably, is a den of apathy and

:19:09.:19:12.

missed opportunity for sorting people out once we had got them in

:19:13.:19:16.

custody. Believe it or not, so many young people in jail want to turn

:19:17.:19:21.

their lives around, but we're doing hardly anything with them. When you

:19:22.:19:25.

meet a young person in his early 20s who tells you he is serving his

:19:26.:19:29.

ninth prison sentence, the pennies start to drop that we are not doing

:19:30.:19:35.

enough with folk once we have got them, and the standard

:19:36.:19:39.

administration responds off, we are employing 2500 more staff, is just a

:19:40.:19:45.

joke. It is not going to cut it? In terms of searches, are you going to

:19:46.:19:48.

tell me it is impossible to search everyone visiting the jail or sit

:19:49.:19:52.

them in the bass chair because they're not staff? Unfortunately

:19:53.:20:02.

that is the current situation. Sorry to interrupt, but if you don't serve

:20:03.:20:05.

everyone then for those officers it will create more problems inside the

:20:06.:20:15.

jail? It will, and unfortunately the public are only being made aware

:20:16.:20:19.

because prison officers and my union, the POA, had a protest which

:20:20.:20:23.

we stayed out on the streets and had it. I know they have never taken

:20:24.:20:33.

steps like that but we have highlighted things with the public

:20:34.:20:37.

through our actions. If we had enough prison offices in post we

:20:38.:20:40.

could search properly. Searching strategies at the minute are

:20:41.:20:45.

laughable. From your view from the inside, Jonathan, what would you

:20:46.:20:48.

change? Would you give prisoners mobile phones? No, I would start to

:20:49.:20:55.

utilise better the time in prison, at the moment purposeful activity

:20:56.:20:59.

has only risen 1% in five years. Being brave and giving mobile phones

:21:00.:21:02.

and tablets would be too much for the very right wing. I would like to

:21:03.:21:09.

see a full working day for inmates, including training. There is a

:21:10.:21:15.

wonderful example of how this works, a charity or prison restaurants, on

:21:16.:21:20.

Friday every single one of their restaurants around the country was

:21:21.:21:23.

number one on trip advisor. Prisoners who have been through the

:21:24.:21:28.

scheme, the reoffending rate is only 6%. Compared to two thirds of

:21:29.:21:33.

reoffending broadly? If that is not a template for using prison time

:21:34.:21:37.

purposefully, I don't know what is. And the food is yummy! First of all,

:21:38.:21:44.

can you imagine governors staging a protest by the prison officers did?

:21:45.:21:49.

It is not something that we would contemplate but bearing in mind it

:21:50.:21:53.

is against the law for us to take industrial action, but I do get a

:21:54.:21:58.

sense, and the PGA gets the sense that feeling at the moment is the

:21:59.:22:04.

lowest I have ever known it. What has happened is depressing, we talk

:22:05.:22:07.

about what should happen now to make things better, we need to take

:22:08.:22:12.

prisons say. It is important to not speak in generic terms, there are

:22:13.:22:15.

some prisons that are doing very well but it is large local prisons

:22:16.:22:19.

where we are struggling and if we want prison to be a better place, it

:22:20.:22:24.

has to be said for, and in order for that you need more staff to be able

:22:25.:22:28.

to do that, including prison governors. And would you back what

:22:29.:22:32.

Jonathan is suggesting, and meaningful, proper working day to

:22:33.:22:36.

try and cut the reoffending rates? You can only have a reasonable

:22:37.:22:40.

working day it you put enough staff... Oh, yes, absolutely. Having

:22:41.:22:45.

said that, most of my sentence was in an open prison where we had a

:22:46.:22:49.

tennis court, very few staff in an open prison. We talk about more

:22:50.:22:52.

money possibly being required, in my open prison we all sat about

:22:53.:22:57.

sunbathing. I had been trained by the system to teach if it would

:22:58.:23:00.

prisoners to read, a private education company that you are

:23:01.:23:06.

paying for banned the scheme, so is it that the justice system needs

:23:07.:23:11.

more money, or do they need to spend the money more wisely? Some

:23:12.:23:17.

contracts are in their millions. An e-mail, I have worked as a probation

:23:18.:23:21.

officer in prisons for some years, experienced older staff are

:23:22.:23:24.

essential to maintaining the necessary discipline and rapport

:23:25.:23:27.

with inmates. Martin on e-mail says, the biggest

:23:28.:23:31.

problem for prison officers is savage cuts since 2010 and it is a

:23:32.:23:35.

matter of time until we have a catastrophe.

:23:36.:23:38.

This text says, prison officers are very well paid in recognition of

:23:39.:23:41.

what they may have to do in the course of their work.

:23:42.:23:44.

Mohammed on e-mail says, I feel for these offices, I am ex-police and I

:23:45.:23:51.

know exactly what they are going through.

:23:52.:23:53.

Thank you very much all of you for coming on the programme.

:23:54.:23:54.

A year ago, Theresa May was taking over as Prime Minister in the wake

:23:55.:23:57.

She enjoyed positive personal poll ratings and opened up

:23:58.:24:01.

12 months later, and after a disastrous election

:24:02.:24:06.

she didn't need to hold but decided to anyway, how different it

:24:07.:24:09.

all looks, with many in her party asking when -

:24:10.:24:11.

Let's take a look back at her eventful year in charge.

:24:12.:24:16.

Brexit means Brexit, and we are going to make a success of it.

:24:17.:24:24.

I have just been to Buckingham Palace, where Her Majesty The Queen

:24:25.:24:31.

has asked me to form a new Government,

:24:32.:24:33.

If you're just managing, I want to address you directly.

:24:34.:24:37.

The Article 50 process is now under way.

:24:38.:24:42.

And, in accordance with the wishes of the British people,

:24:43.:24:44.

the United Kingdom is leaving the European Union.

:24:45.:24:46.

The only way to guarantee certainty and stability for the years ahead

:24:47.:24:49.

is to hold this election and seek your support

:24:50.:24:52.

Nothing has changed, nothing has changed.

:24:53.:25:02.

The Conservative Party has won the most seats

:25:03.:25:05.

and probably the most votes, then it will be incumbent on us

:25:06.:25:11.

to ensure that we have that period of stability, and that is exactly

:25:12.:25:14.

Damian Green is the first Secretary of State and what of Theresa May's

:25:15.:25:36.

closest allies. I spoke to him earlier and he began by defending

:25:37.:25:39.

Mrs May against claims she is a lame-duck Prime Minister.

:25:40.:25:41.

She's not a lame-duck Prime Minister.

:25:42.:25:46.

She is still full of ideas, full of determination.

:25:47.:25:48.

Well, she has a parliamentary majority.

:25:49.:25:51.

But even your own Conservative backbenchers and some former senior

:25:52.:25:56.

Cabinet ministers are apparently plotting to get rid

:25:57.:25:58.

The first duty of the Government is to make sure it passes

:25:59.:26:06.

the Queen's Speech legislation, which means we have got

:26:07.:26:08.

a legislative programme for the next two years.

:26:09.:26:10.

Absolutely, she and the Government have the authority to put that

:26:11.:26:18.

OK, what do you say to Conservative MPs who are plotting

:26:19.:26:22.

I think there is less of this than you would think.

:26:23.:26:29.

I've been around Westminster long enough to know that in July

:26:30.:26:34.

there's lots of chatter, but I know absolutely

:26:35.:26:36.

that the overwhelming majority of my Conservative

:26:37.:26:38.

colleagues in Parliament are firmly behind the Prime Minister.

:26:39.:26:41.

And for those who aren't, because you say an overwhelming

:26:42.:26:44.

majority of colleagues are behind her, meaning some aren't,

:26:45.:26:46.

for those who aren't, what do you say to those

:26:47.:26:48.

who are plotting how to get rid of her?

:26:49.:26:51.

I'd say that the Conservative Party won most seats and most votes

:26:52.:26:54.

at the general election and that everyone now should get

:26:55.:26:59.

on with the job that the country has given us, which is running this

:27:00.:27:03.

country in the way that meets our Conservative principles.

:27:04.:27:09.

There are a lot of issues that we face, not just Brexit

:27:10.:27:12.

What the people of this country want is a Government that

:27:13.:27:17.

Well, that's always a sensible view that we have.

:27:18.:27:24.

There is, I think, no public desire for another election.

:27:25.:27:32.

The Government is getting on with that job.

:27:33.:27:39.

There are serious issues facing this country,

:27:40.:27:44.

and it's time for all MPs to knuckle down to work

:27:45.:27:47.

to contribute what they can, to set their ideas,

:27:48.:27:49.

This Government is getting on with doing it and it deserves

:27:50.:27:58.

We will talk to two people about her first year in a moment, but let me

:27:59.:28:13.

bring you this news, British man Philip Parkins, wanted for murder in

:28:14.:28:18.

the United States, has lost his long-running battle against

:28:19.:28:21.

extradition, he had a final appeal to the European Court of Human

:28:22.:28:24.

Rights in Strasbourg, he has lost that which means he will be

:28:25.:28:27.

extradited to the United States to face trial for murder. We will bring

:28:28.:28:31.

you more reaction to that in the next half an hour of the programme.

:28:32.:28:33.

Let's talk to Joey Jones, who was Mrs May's spokesman

:28:34.:28:36.

when she was Home Secretary but didn't follow her

:28:37.:28:38.

And Kate Maltby, who helped set up Bright Blue, a Conservative

:28:39.:28:41.

think-tank that campaigns for a more modern, compassionate Tory Party.

:28:42.:28:50.

How is that going, Kate? We're getting there. Jerry Jones, how

:28:51.:28:59.

would you assess her first year as Prime Minister? It brought back some

:29:00.:29:02.

memories watching that montage, lots of things in that which one would

:29:03.:29:07.

not have expected to play out in the way that they did. I don't think any

:29:08.:29:12.

of us would imagine we would wake up to hear that Theresa May was

:29:13.:29:15.

reaching out to the hand of friendship, if you like, to a Labour

:29:16.:29:20.

Party led by Jeremy Corbyn, as seems to be the case at the moment,

:29:21.:29:24.

suggesting a new spirit of consensual and grown-up politics,

:29:25.:29:30.

Dominic Greene saying that there was space for dialogue between the two

:29:31.:29:35.

parties. That is only a few weeks after she opened and concluded a

:29:36.:29:40.

successful dialogue with the unions in Northern Ireland which are

:29:41.:29:42.

obviously a very different kettle of fish, so it is quite a lot that she

:29:43.:29:46.

seems to feel she can juggle and manage from a position that I think

:29:47.:29:50.

we all agree is not a strong one at the moment. What do you think of

:29:51.:29:54.

that, Kate, this appeal to her opponents to contribute. Just

:29:55.:30:01.

criticise? Any Prime Minister should be using Parliament as a place to

:30:02.:30:05.

really debate the ideas of the moment, that is why we send a wide

:30:06.:30:09.

range of representatives, but I'm afraid this all sounds rather hollow

:30:10.:30:12.

from a Prime Minister who just a few months ago, you showed it on the

:30:13.:30:16.

screen, was standing up talking about those who were trying to

:30:17.:30:19.

undermine Brexit, blocking the will of the people. You remember the big

:30:20.:30:23.

Daily Mail headline, crush the saboteurs. That is not quite what

:30:24.:30:27.

Theresa May said herself but you of all people will know Theresa May has

:30:28.:30:30.

very close links to the Daily Mail, or certainly had then. You cannot go

:30:31.:30:41.

from talking about crushing the saboteurs in Parliament to turning

:30:42.:30:43.

around and embracing your opponent in the spirit of constructive debate

:30:44.:30:45.

the next. There are so many reasons to be sceptical about this proposed

:30:46.:30:48.

course of action. Theresa May has a history of being able to work in a

:30:49.:30:51.

consensual way with people across the divide in Parliament, actually

:30:52.:30:55.

when I was in the Home Office there was a big effort to bring people on

:30:56.:31:00.

board for the IP bill that was going through, is very complicated bill

:31:01.:31:03.

described by some as the snooper's charter, and that was an issue where

:31:04.:31:08.

there was a lot of haggling, a lot of talk with people who you would

:31:09.:31:12.

not have expected her to be talking to, but this is different, this is

:31:13.:31:18.

on a different scale. Yes, because she had power as Home Secretary,

:31:19.:31:22.

potentially has she got less power as Prime Minister? Broadly speaking,

:31:23.:31:25.

for that proposal, although contentious, there was a

:31:26.:31:29.

Parliamentary majority for the taking. Here, if you look at it

:31:30.:31:32.

temperamentally and tonally, it is so bar out of the comfort zone for

:31:33.:31:36.

Theresa May that it feels like a different planet and in terms of the

:31:37.:31:39.

substance is there very much that she and Jeremy Corbyn's Labour Party

:31:40.:31:44.

agree on? Well, the interview was a bit longer with that and I went

:31:45.:31:48.

through some other things parties might contribute and nothing that

:31:49.:31:51.

the Conservative Party would agree with. But on that subject of whether

:31:52.:31:55.

she can reach across the aisle, she at least, by the very fact she has

:31:56.:32:00.

appointed Damian Green as first Secretary of State, he is going out

:32:01.:32:04.

on all of the TV programmes as her human shield, he is the minister

:32:05.:32:07.

always sent out to absorb bad press for Theresa May. That should remind

:32:08.:32:14.

us that Theresa May is at least capable of having close allies who

:32:15.:32:18.

actually come from very different ideological backgrounds. Damian

:32:19.:32:20.

Green is associated with the left of the party, he is privately very

:32:21.:32:26.

pro-Britain's relationship with the EU but they have forged a very close

:32:27.:32:30.

working relationship over years of mutual respect in the Home Office,

:32:31.:32:34.

where he was her junior, and what that should remind us is that there

:32:35.:32:37.

is not really a Theresa May doctrine, there is no such thing as

:32:38.:32:42.

Mayism. And there may not be time for it if, come the Conservative

:32:43.:32:46.

Party conference in September, a few Conservatives get together and

:32:47.:32:50.

decide to organise some kind of leadership contest? The end could be

:32:51.:32:55.

tomorrow, next week, next month, next year, nobody can predict, it is

:32:56.:32:58.

in the hands of the Conservative Party. One of the key thing is they

:32:59.:33:01.

will be thinking is, what does Theresa May still stand for? So much

:33:02.:33:05.

has had to be jettisoned and if you look at the areas where there is

:33:06.:33:10.

cross-party agreement, there was an article yesterday jointly signed by

:33:11.:33:14.

Ed Vaizey and Rachel Reeves in the TelegraphConservative and one

:33:15.:33:19.

Labour. And that was trying to pick an area where Theresa May has dug in

:33:20.:33:24.

her heels, the European Court of Justice, so there is potential

:33:25.:33:28.

agreement there but only chipping away still further from what the

:33:29.:33:31.

Prime Minister stood for. How long did you work for her? The blink of

:33:32.:33:36.

an eye, three months and then 12 hours in Downing Street.

:33:37.:33:44.

Could she show compassion? Definitely. Thank you both. Still to

:33:45.:33:52.

come: It's been the UK's longest ever

:33:53.:33:53.

extradition battle - but now Philip Harkins has

:33:54.:33:55.

lost his fight to avoid extradition to the US -

:33:56.:33:58.

we'll hear from the family of the man he is

:33:59.:34:00.

accused of killing... Another chance for the

:34:01.:34:02.

terminally-ill baby Charlie Gard. With a judge due to examine renewed

:34:03.:34:11.

claims the proposed treatment We speak to our Health

:34:12.:34:13.

Correspondent Fergus Walsh. Here's Joanna in the BBC Newsroom

:34:14.:34:16.

with a summary of today's news. A British man wanted for murder

:34:17.:34:19.

in the United States has lost his long-running legal

:34:20.:34:22.

battle against extradition Phillip Harkins, who is originally

:34:23.:34:25.

from Greenock, has been fighting extradition to the United States

:34:26.:34:28.

for 14 years. The 38-year-old denies

:34:29.:34:31.

murdering a man in a robbery this morning, the European Court of

:34:32.:34:48.

Human Rights said his rights would not be breached if he were jailed

:34:49.:34:49.

for life in Florida. The case of the terminally ill baby

:34:50.:34:50.

Charlie Gard is due to return Great Ormond Street Hospital

:34:51.:34:53.

in London has asked judges to consider new evidence relating

:34:54.:34:56.

to potential treatment The courts have previously backed

:34:57.:34:58.

the view of his doctors that nothing can be done to improve his quality

:34:59.:35:03.

of life, and they should be allowed to switch

:35:04.:35:05.

off his life support systems The Prime Minister is to signal a

:35:06.:35:14.

change in her style of government, calling for cross-party consensus on

:35:15.:35:19.

ideas. In her first speech since the general election, Theresa May will

:35:20.:35:23.

say her commitment to change Britain is undimmed, but she will say the

:35:24.:35:27.

reality she faces means she has to approach politics differently. She

:35:28.:35:30.

will also call on other parties to contribute, not just criticise.

:35:31.:35:34.

The government has said it's determined to tackle failings

:35:35.:35:36.

in the prison service, after it was revealed that

:35:37.:35:38.

since 2010, the number of frontline prison officers has fallen by some

:35:39.:35:41.

7,000 to 18,000 and budgets have been cut severely.

:35:42.:35:43.

Two prison officers have spoken to this programme

:35:44.:35:49.

about the reality of working inside prisons in England

:35:50.:35:51.

and Wales in order, they say, to expose the problems and violence

:35:52.:35:54.

I was punched and then had excrement thrown in my face. He basically put

:35:55.:36:09.

excrement in a bag, and he ran up behind me and shoved it in my face,

:36:10.:36:15.

eyes, nose, mouth. It was the worst feeling in the world. We don't know

:36:16.:36:18.

their medical records. I didn't know whether he had HIV, hepatitis, which

:36:19.:36:27.

is all carried in human waste. So the next day, I was in the hospital

:36:28.:36:31.

having all the tests to see if I had contacted anything.

:36:32.:36:32.

That's a summary of the latest news, join me for BBC

:36:33.:36:34.

Here's some sport now with Leah Boleto.

:36:35.:36:40.

Andy Murray and Johanna Konta are both fighting for a spot

:36:41.:36:48.

If they do both get through, it'll be the first time

:36:49.:36:56.

that Britain's had a man and a woman in the last

:36:57.:37:02.

Joe Root's first test since taking over from Alastair Cook ended

:37:03.:37:06.

in a 211 run victory over South Africa at Lords.

:37:07.:37:10.

Meanwhile, England's women have ended a 24 year wait

:37:11.:37:12.

for a World Cup win over Australia, thanks to a three

:37:13.:37:15.

It puts them in a strong position to reach the semis.

:37:16.:37:19.

And Wayne Rooney is leaving Manchester United after 13 years

:37:20.:37:21.

to return to Everton, where he played as a teenager.

:37:22.:37:25.

The striker says that winning a trophy with Everton "would be

:37:26.:37:28.

He's also just admitted that even though he's been

:37:29.:37:34.

wearing United's red shirt in the day, he's been slipping

:37:35.:37:36.

Next, we're talking tuition fees in England and mounting pressure

:37:37.:37:46.

on the government to rethink the student loans system

:37:47.:37:48.

which according to one report we brought you last week can leave

:37:49.:37:52.

students with a debt of more than ?50,000

:37:53.:37:53.

We're joined now by Lord Andrew Adonis, a former education

:37:54.:37:57.

minister for Labour, who came up with the tuition fee

:37:58.:38:00.

idea, and who now says they should be scrapped altogether.

:38:01.:38:07.

Paul Howden was a mature student who reckons he'll have

:38:08.:38:12.

about ?60,000 worth of debt, but still think tuition

:38:13.:38:14.

Rory Hughes is about to graduate in two weeks and thinks he'll have

:38:15.:38:19.

We're also joined by the head of the National Union

:38:20.:38:22.

of Student Shakira Martin - who wants an urgent review

:38:23.:38:25.

Let's begin with you, Lord Adonis. How have you had this incurable

:38:26.:38:32.

change of heart from the man who was the architect of these fees to

:38:33.:38:36.

saying they should be abolished? I haven't had a change of heart. We

:38:37.:38:40.

introduced fees at ?3000, with no real rate of interest. What happened

:38:41.:38:44.

in 2010 when the government changed was that David Cameron and Nick

:38:45.:38:51.

Clegg increased the fees from ?3000 to ?9,000. And from no real rate of

:38:52.:38:56.

interest, they have gone to a 6% real rate of interest. It is not

:38:57.:39:04.

sustainable. That is why people have debts of ?50,000. Even introducing

:39:05.:39:09.

?3000 with a very low interest rate, you know the way it is going to go.

:39:10.:39:14.

It is only going to go up. That is untrue. We gave a commitment that

:39:15.:39:18.

the fees would not increase beyond the rate of inflation. That is what

:39:19.:39:22.

we would have done if we had stayed in government in 2010. Of course, no

:39:23.:39:26.

government can be responsible for what its successor does. But

:39:27.:39:31.

students were not happy at the time with ?3000. But they accepted the

:39:32.:39:36.

system. They did not accept the principle. We did not have massive

:39:37.:39:42.

campaigns against. People thought it was fair. Is that right, Shakira?

:39:43.:39:50.

Did undergraduates accept the principle? I think students want

:39:51.:39:55.

free and accessible education, so anything that is a barrier to

:39:56.:40:00.

that... But the increase over the last few years has been a big issue

:40:01.:40:04.

and that has got students really angry. Let's bring in Rory. How much

:40:05.:40:15.

debt do you think you will have by the time you graduate? Roughly

:40:16.:40:21.

?35,000 without calculating interest, and interest will start

:40:22.:40:23.

accumulating while you are still studying and while you are still

:40:24.:40:27.

paying it off, so it will probably end up in excess of ?45,000. And do

:40:28.:40:33.

you think that is different from getting a loan to buy a house, or a

:40:34.:40:40.

loan to buy a car? Yes. The system is different. It doesn't function as

:40:41.:40:45.

a loan. It functions as a 9% income tax once you earn over ?21,000 a

:40:46.:40:51.

year. It comes out by PAYE. So it is different. It is a regressive way of

:40:52.:40:57.

funding further education. So instead of levying it on high

:40:58.:41:02.

earners or the top 5% of corporations, which would be the

:41:03.:41:04.

progressive thing to do, we are levying the cost of tuition fees on

:41:05.:41:09.

anyone who earns over ?21,000 a year with a 9% income tax which is

:41:10.:41:15.

treated as a loan. So the people who benefit from the university

:41:16.:41:20.

education pay for it. But we all benefit from university education in

:41:21.:41:25.

society. If you are trained as a nurse or doctor or teacher or a

:41:26.:41:29.

lawyer, you have some benefit to your career, of course, but society

:41:30.:41:34.

benefits from having those skilled graduates in society. University

:41:35.:41:37.

education is a public good, not a private good. If you earn a lot of

:41:38.:41:43.

money as a graduate, without these debts you would already be paying it

:41:44.:41:49.

back through progressive taxation. Lord Of The Rings, are you saying to

:41:50.:41:53.

scrap it all together or to take it back to the -- Lord Adonis, are you

:41:54.:42:01.

saying to scrap it or to take it back to ?3000? Education is a public

:42:02.:42:05.

good but higher education is also a private good. If everybody got

:42:06.:42:10.

higher education, then paying for it through the tax system would make

:42:11.:42:14.

sense. But that is not the case. There is a substantial benefit to

:42:15.:42:17.

the individual and only a minority get it. What would I do now? If the

:42:18.:42:22.

fees have not been increased beyond ?3000 and we did not have a real

:42:23.:42:27.

rate of interest and we had students and the government making a

:42:28.:42:30.

contribution, I would have kept the old system. The problem now is that

:42:31.:42:40.

?9,000 plus 6% is in my view... 6% is the interest rate that will be

:42:41.:42:43.

brought in from autumn. And you start paying it immediately when you

:42:44.:42:48.

take out the loans. So students are graduating with debts of ?50,000

:42:49.:42:53.

plus, accumulating interest every week. My view is that is not

:42:54.:42:57.

sustainable. When you have a baroque system that has big additions here,

:42:58.:43:03.

a flying buttress there, it is not sustainable. Sustainable for who?

:43:04.:43:08.

Sustainable politically. It will not last. So you are not saying

:43:09.:43:14.

sustainable financially. The question is what to do. My view is

:43:15.:43:20.

that we should do two things. We should encourage universities to

:43:21.:43:22.

recruit international students, who do pay fees and there is a vibrant

:43:23.:43:28.

international market. We have good universities and we are good at

:43:29.:43:32.

that. Where is the government has been dissuading universities from

:43:33.:43:35.

recruiting overseas students by counting them in the immigration

:43:36.:43:39.

figures, which is a stupid error. I am not sure that puts people off

:43:40.:43:44.

applying to Oxford and Cambridge. But there are 128 other universities

:43:45.:43:49.

and it is putting a lot though off. The second thing is, we should put

:43:50.:43:56.

up a top rate of tax by a few pence, and the 40p rate of tax is almost

:43:57.:44:00.

entirely paid by graduates. So when people said the alternative to the

:44:01.:44:03.

current system is that the poor pay, that is not true. If it is the top

:44:04.:44:07.

rate that goes up, that is paid for by graduates, so that acts as an

:44:08.:44:11.

effective graduate tax. Then you could sweep away the whole of the

:44:12.:44:14.

current system. Universities would be fairly funded. You would have

:44:15.:44:17.

more international students and students would not be saddled with

:44:18.:44:27.

debt. Shakira, what do you want? We want scrapped tuition fees. We want

:44:28.:44:33.

free education. And do you want the reintroduction of maintenance

:44:34.:44:37.

grants? We want the reintroduction of maintenance grants to give poorer

:44:38.:44:41.

students the opportunity to access university and to stay at

:44:42.:44:45.

university. It is one thing to say more people from marginalised

:44:46.:44:48.

backgrounds are accessing it, but one may look at the figures, the

:44:49.:44:53.

number who are staying in completing their studies is very low. How would

:44:54.:45:01.

university education be paid for, then? I don't agree with the

:45:02.:45:07.

argument of their not being enough money. It is evident when the Prime

:45:08.:45:10.

Minister needs to find ?1.5 billion to stay in government with the DUP

:45:11.:45:15.

that they can find it. When we pay one of the lowest corporation tax

:45:16.:45:20.

rates in the world as one of the biggest financial countries in the

:45:21.:45:27.

world, there is money to do it. It is evident since the general

:45:28.:45:29.

election that young people are coming out to vote. This is a policy

:45:30.:45:34.

they care about, and my students will no longer take lip service.

:45:35.:45:39.

Politicians and the parties need to take this seriously, because we want

:45:40.:45:44.

an education that is liberating for every body and as of right and not a

:45:45.:45:46.

privilege. I strongly agree with Shakira, there

:45:47.:45:55.

should be a review. I heard on the radio last week, they were

:45:56.:46:02.

emphatic... There is going to be reviewed... Of the interest rate?

:46:03.:46:08.

You have to start answering the question of how you raise the money

:46:09.:46:11.

if you cut the interest rate, will he stick to the ?9,250 tighter RPI,

:46:12.:46:18.

are the Conservatives going to go into the next election without? I

:46:19.:46:22.

don't believe it. In the Tory manifesto they did say there would

:46:23.:46:26.

be a review into the education system. Where is that with you? We

:46:27.:46:30.

want that right now and as the National Union of Students we should

:46:31.:46:35.

have a seat on that represent our members and be shaping the type of

:46:36.:46:38.

education system that we want. I think that is completely right.

:46:39.:46:43.

Thank you very much, Lord Andrew Dennis and Shakira Martin from the

:46:44.:46:47.

NUS, and thank you very much, Rory. Thank you very much,

:46:48.:46:54.

congratulations, you know you will graduate in a couple of weeks.

:46:55.:46:58.

We could not bring you Paul Hadden who reckons he will have around

:46:59.:47:01.

?60,000 worth of debt but still things to receive fees are a good

:47:02.:47:10.

idea. -- still things tuition fees are a good idea.

:47:11.:47:11.

Charlie Gard's parents return to the High Court today

:47:12.:47:14.

with new evidence which they hope will save his life.

:47:15.:47:16.

The 11-month-old little boy is terminally-ill,

:47:17.:47:17.

having been born with a rare genetic condition which means he can't move

:47:18.:47:21.

I'm joined by our health correspondent Fergus Walsh.

:47:22.:47:25.

Sorry, I was looking over there and you are here! So, first of all, what

:47:26.:47:35.

is happening this afternoon? On Friday, Great Ormond Street asked

:47:36.:47:41.

the original High Court judge, Robert Francis, to have a look at

:47:42.:47:46.

some new evidence that was sent in a letter on Friday morning, so it is

:47:47.:47:52.

all happening very quickly, from the Vatican's Children's Hospital,

:47:53.:47:58.

signed by seven doctors and researchers, saying there was

:47:59.:48:02.

unpublished data about this nucleoside therapy, this

:48:03.:48:04.

experimental treatment that the parents have raised ?1.3 million for

:48:05.:48:11.

in crowdfunding, that there was this unpublished data suggesting that in

:48:12.:48:14.

mice and patients with a similar but not the same genetic fault as

:48:15.:48:20.

Charlie of dramatic improvement. So, faced with that, faced with that

:48:21.:48:27.

letter they said, OK, even though they had the perfect right, legally,

:48:28.:48:33.

to end life support for Charlie, they decided the right thing to do

:48:34.:48:36.

was to go back to the High Court, said that is where we are at 2pm

:48:37.:48:39.

today. And this is back to the same judge

:48:40.:48:45.

who made the original decision that Charlie Gard's life support should

:48:46.:48:47.

be switched off and he should be allowed to die with dignity. What

:48:48.:48:53.

sort of improvement do Charlie Gard's parents believe might happen

:48:54.:48:57.

if he has access to this medicine? What Connie Yates and Chris Gard

:48:58.:49:01.

have said, and of course you have interviewed them yourself, what they

:49:02.:49:04.

were saying is that they have been told that there is up to a one in

:49:05.:49:11.

ten chance that it could work for Charlie, and Connie said that she

:49:12.:49:18.

was told about a girl in Spain who had been on a ventilator and then a

:49:19.:49:23.

year later was riding a bicycle. Now, the problem with that for the

:49:24.:49:29.

hospital, for Great Ormond Street, is that they have said, and they

:49:30.:49:34.

said on Friday, that Charlie has catastrophic and irreversible brain

:49:35.:49:40.

damage. So the hospital is absolutely adamant, their position

:49:41.:49:44.

has not changed at all, but the parents will not accept the scans

:49:45.:49:50.

and the evidence they have been given by the hospital that he has

:49:51.:49:54.

irreversible structural brain damage, and they say even though

:49:55.:49:58.

there is a very small chance, they want to go ahead with this. But it

:49:59.:50:08.

would be very surprising if this unpublished data suddenly showed

:50:09.:50:10.

incredible improvement that we haven't heard of already, because

:50:11.:50:14.

the people who are putting it forward from the Vatican and from

:50:15.:50:17.

the United States, certainly from the United States, are the same

:50:18.:50:20.

people who were suggesting it might be useful in the earlier court

:50:21.:50:25.

hearing, so they had a chance to put any of that unpublished data then

:50:26.:50:29.

and didn't do it. Thank you very much, Fergus Walsh,

:50:30.:50:30.

our medical editor. Professor Neena Modi is president

:50:31.:50:31.

of the Royal College She's said the considerable media

:50:32.:50:34.

attention and interventions made by individuals such as the pope

:50:35.:50:37.

and Donald Trump had In an open letter this morning,

:50:38.:50:40.

Professor Modi says she's been asked why doctors have not commented

:50:41.:50:47.

on the specifics of the case. She's travelling in

:50:48.:50:49.

Switzerland at the moment, Thank you for talking to us. What is

:50:50.:51:06.

your view today? Exactly as stated in our letter, this is a very

:51:07.:51:12.

distressing and tragic case, unhappily these cases of end of life

:51:13.:51:16.

care for children are not uncommon and it seems to me that what we

:51:17.:51:21.

should be doing as the wider public is allowing the doctors, the family

:51:22.:51:25.

and sadly in this case the court as well to reach a decision as is their

:51:26.:51:30.

duty to try and reach a decision that is in the best interests of the

:51:31.:51:36.

child, it is entirely unhelpful for any external organisation or

:51:37.:51:40.

individual is to attempt to put forward their own points of view in

:51:41.:51:47.

a very public and... Ill considered way. Who is ill considered? I think

:51:48.:52:00.

that, the reason I will not speak about the specifics of this case is

:52:01.:52:03.

that I am not privy to the details and nor should I be, they are

:52:04.:52:08.

confidential. The parents, the child's health care team and indeed

:52:09.:52:13.

now the courts. I don't know the details, I shouldn't know the

:52:14.:52:16.

details and therefore it is not for me to comment on the specifics of

:52:17.:52:20.

the case. But what I can say without any shadow of the doubt is that

:52:21.:52:23.

doctors have a duty to act in the best interests of the patient that

:52:24.:52:29.

they are caring for. Do you disagree with the decision? Sorry to

:52:30.:52:33.

interrupt, do you disagree with the decision by Great Ormond Street to

:52:34.:52:37.

go back to the court today to see the original judge, Mr Justice

:52:38.:52:41.

Francis, to ask him again to look at this unpublished evidence from seven

:52:42.:52:50.

doctors and researchers around the world? It is not for me to agree or

:52:51.:52:54.

disagree because as I said earlier I not privy to the details of the

:52:55.:52:58.

case. But what it is my responsibility to do is to reassure

:52:59.:53:01.

the public and explain to the public that in these sorts of

:53:02.:53:04.

circumstances, which sadly are not rare, it is absolutely the duty of

:53:05.:53:08.

every paediatrician to always have the best interests of the child at

:53:09.:53:13.

heart, and also doctors have to work and practice within the law, they

:53:14.:53:20.

also have to recognise the rights of the child. I think the public should

:53:21.:53:22.

be reassured that it is an absolutely bound to get --

:53:23.:53:26.

obligation of paediatricians to put the best interests of the child

:53:27.:53:29.

forward and that is absolutely what the doctor that Great Ormond Street

:53:30.:53:33.

will be doing. Thank you very much for your time, we appreciate it.

:53:34.:53:37.

Let me just bring to this breaking news from the High Court, they have

:53:38.:53:41.

rejected claims that the Government is acting unlawfully by failing to

:53:42.:53:46.

suspend the sale of British arms to Saudi Arabia. After seeing the good

:53:47.:53:50.

evidence, in fact, the High Court rejects claims the Government is

:53:51.:53:54.

acting unlawfully by failing to suspend the sale of UK arms to Saudi

:53:55.:54:00.

Arabia, so the sale of UK arms to Saudi Arabia will presumably

:54:01.:54:01.

continue. A British man wanted for murder

:54:02.:54:03.

in the US has lost his long-running legal battle against extradition

:54:04.:54:06.

after a final appeal to the European Court

:54:07.:54:08.

of Human Rights in Strasbourg. Philip Harkins had argued his

:54:09.:54:10.

extradition would violate his human rights relating to inhuman

:54:11.:54:12.

or degrading treatment Let's speak now to Dominic Casciani,

:54:13.:54:14.

our home affairs correspondent First of all, tell our audience what

:54:15.:54:27.

Philip Harkins is accused of in America?

:54:28.:54:29.

Philip Harkins was born in Scotland and when he was 14 he moved to

:54:30.:54:34.

Florida with his family and when he was 21, around 1999, he was accused

:54:35.:54:39.

of being involved in a drugs related armed robbery, and during that

:54:40.:54:42.

robbery and man called Joshua Hayes was shot in the head and

:54:43.:54:46.

subsequently died. That is effectively the murder charge. Mr

:54:47.:54:49.

Harkins said he was not even at the scene, he said he lent his car to

:54:50.:55:00.

someone else but there is disputed evidence about this. In 2002 whilst

:55:01.:55:03.

he was still under investigation as part of that, he left Florida and

:55:04.:55:05.

returned to Scotland. It was there that he was involved in a car crash

:55:06.:55:08.

which led to the death of a 62-year-old woman, he was jailed for

:55:09.:55:11.

that and while he was in jail for that the American authorities said,

:55:12.:55:14.

we want him back in Florida to face trial, triggering this unprecedented

:55:15.:55:18.

14 year extradition battle which has gone on until today.

:55:19.:55:22.

And now he has to go to America? Yes, he has been through the British

:55:23.:55:26.

courts not once but twice, to the European Court, and in essence he

:55:27.:55:29.

was saying there are two issues, the possibility of the death penalty.

:55:30.:55:34.

The Americans said, we will not seek the death penalty in this case if he

:55:35.:55:38.

is convicted, that is a standard procedure which they always offer in

:55:39.:55:43.

British extradition cases. But then Mr Harkins said, well, if I'm going

:55:44.:55:48.

to be jailed for life, life without parole is a breach of my human

:55:49.:55:52.

rights, it is cruel and degrading. This has been a long-running row

:55:53.:55:56.

between the European Court and British authorities about the nature

:55:57.:56:00.

of light sentences. A couple of years ago, even though he lost his

:56:01.:56:03.

case in Strasberg, you got a second chance because there was a bit of

:56:04.:56:07.

doubt in the European Court's mind, which is why he went back today, and

:56:08.:56:08.

this morning he lost. Let's speak now to Patricia Hayes,

:56:09.:56:13.

whose son Joshua Hayes was murdered, and her daughter Elizabeth,

:56:14.:56:15.

who was Joshua's only sister. Patricia, hello to you from us here

:56:16.:56:25.

in the UK. How do you react to the fact that Philip Harkins is now

:56:26.:56:28.

going to be extradited to the United States to face trial for the murder

:56:29.:56:33.

of your son? Well we are very happy to see today that he gets on the

:56:34.:56:40.

plane -- we're very happy to see that, the day he gets on the plane

:56:41.:56:44.

is the day we believe it. Sorry, I didn't hear that? It has been a long

:56:45.:56:49.

time and he has had appeal after appeal but the day he leaves

:56:50.:56:51.

Scotland is the day we will believe it is over from that. I understand.

:56:52.:56:56.

Elisabeth, what is your reaction? The same. Patricia, what has it been

:56:57.:57:06.

like waiting all these years? Honestly? It has been pure hell. It

:57:07.:57:11.

has been fighting battle. Why do you say that? Just waiting to get him

:57:12.:57:17.

back for justice Committee should have never been over there, he

:57:18.:57:21.

should have been here. What do you think about the appeal processes,

:57:22.:57:25.

the various processes that Philip Harkins has gone through? I really

:57:26.:57:31.

don't understand how he was ever allowed to file that many appeals. I

:57:32.:57:37.

mean, that is way too many. He says he is a victim, and he is not. Can I

:57:38.:57:45.

ask you, how is your grandson, Joshua's 's son? He has been brought

:57:46.:57:49.

up without a father. It has been rough on him. Very rough on him.

:57:50.:57:59.

Joshua has two grandchildren which will never get to know him. And what

:58:00.:58:08.

do you tell him about his father? I tell him all the good stuff, we keep

:58:09.:58:13.

Josh very much alive here, he will always be carried in our heart.

:58:14.:58:19.

Elizabeth, what has it been like for you and your family waiting for this

:58:20.:58:26.

news? Very hard to see my mum go through this. OK, thank you very

:58:27.:58:30.

much for your time this morning. When I think of the world

:58:31.:58:35.

we inhabit, everyone will think, Yeah. And it wasn't,

:58:36.:58:38.

it was done by hand over days and weeks

:58:39.:58:41.

and months and years.

:58:42.:58:45.

The programme has exclusive access to serving prison officers who say the service is at crisis point and it is 'only a matter of time before a prison officer is killed on duty'.

Victoria speaks to the president of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health who says interventions made by individuals such as the Pope and Donald Trump into the case of terminally ill baby Charlie Gard are 'unhelpful'.

Plus a talk with the prime minister's second in command, one year after Theresa May took office.